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“Create y o ur o wn vis u al s t yle … Le t it be u n iqu e for y o ur self a n d ye t ide n t ifiable for ot h e rs .” – Ors on We lle s

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S A T E L L I T E Masthead 004 Contributors 006 Forward 008 010 Elia ~ Phil Limprasertwong Belcampo Chrisrttian Wiles Mister Marvelous DSTLD Starck Beer Inventery Thom Browne Shark! Ivan Dorn Elbow Bard Food EXSL Zwart Winter 17/18 Tom's Workd Paper Taxidermy California Architect

024 026 028 030 032 034 036 038 040 042 044 046 050 054 058 062 066 Steven ~ Wander Aguiar 080 Aaron ~ Diana Diederich 094 Gian ~ Antonio Guzzardo

Books 108 110 Valdis ~ Geoffrey Guillin

photography WANDER AGUIAR model STEVEN DEHLER

photography PHIL LIMPRASERTWONG model ELIA FONGARO

photography DIANA DIEDERICH model AARON MICHEL

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photography ANTONIO GUZZARDO model GIAN MARIA GIULIATTINI


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Editor-In-Chief/Creative Director WILLIAM MONTALVO William@Satellite-Mag.com Managing Editor R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Art Director BOX808 MEDIA Info@Box808Media.com Photogaphy Consultant RACER MEDIA INC. RacerMedia.com Special Correspondent ADDISON DE WITT Addison@Satellite-Mag.com Copy Editor ANNEMARIE MAES AmmemarieMaes@mac.com President R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Interns LONDON SILVER PARIS STUDIO CABO SHERMAN intern@Satellite-Mag.com

SUBMISSIONS We are always looking for new work. We accept submissions. If you would like to be considered as a contributor please send writing samples or images to Info@Satellite-Mag.com SPONSORSHIPS & SPECIAL PROJECTS Please send your requests to Sponsorship@Satellite-Mag.com HEADQUARTERS 6731 3rd Avenue Los Angeles CA 90036 USA Satellite-Mag.com FOLLOW facebook.com/satellite.mag instagram.com/satellie_mag twitter.com/SATELLITEonline satellite-mag.tumblr.com

Satellite® is a registered trademark of BOX808 Media, LLC and used in Partnership with BOX808 Media Companies. Copyright 2012 by Satellite ©. All rights reserved . No part of this publication my me reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from Satellite. Satellite makes every effort to ensure accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. Satellite is published bimonthly by BOX808 Media Los Angeles, CA.

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WANDER AGUIAR

PHIL LIMPRASERTWONG

ANTONIO GUZZARDO

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Brazilian-born WANDER AGUIAR has always been fascinated with people and the art of photography; he got his first camera on age 12 and started shooting his family members on vacations trips.

Phil Limprasertwong is a Los Angeles based fashion photographer specializing in men's fashion, editorial, portrait, commercial & lifestyle photography.

Antonio lives in Rome for the past 12 years, but he is Sicilian. As a young boy Antonio loved to do in my country report, the gettogethers with friends, on vacation, at rehearsal with my old amateur company. As soon as he started the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome decided to attend the course in Photography’s theory and his teacher said that this was his way.

Four years after that he was discovered as a model and since than has done many runways and appeared in many campaign. Graduated as a Civil Engineer with eight years of experience on that field he decided to quit and become a traveler. On visiting California in 1998 he immediately lost his heart; he now lives San Diego and dedicated his time on his old passion working on the another side of the camera a welcome change as you can see on his fine portfolio. Wander says: “ I try to use my experience as a former model to bring the best on each one I work with, be a model is beyond to have a beautiful face you have to perform and show a different personality/attitude no matter what you have on.”

His passion began with drawing at an early age but later transitioned to photography when he took his first course in college. He graduated from California State University, Northridge in 2015 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art with an emphasis in Photography. Shortly after he was blessed with the opportunity to intern for celebrity fashion photographer, Irvin Rivera aka Graphicsmetropolis, who he is currently working for as First Assistant. Fashion has always been a big influence in his life since he was young so it was only convenient that he fell in love with photography later on. Fashion photography is something that he has always enjoyed because of the endless possibilities of creativity it presents.

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Antonio had to photograph! So it was. However, he had neglected my passion for painting and drawing that was useful for what he does now. He is self-taught, but he wants to improve. The fashion for him is creative, colors, style, elegance! Antonio started with a job for his thesis for specialization in Visual arts on Advertising photography ironic and end up knowing the great photographers of fashion that have left an indelible mark, They had dared to go beyond the classical canons of aestheticism. Fashion has always influenced my life. Antonio thinks it is the one of the photographers’ name who have influenced and inspire are Pablo Roversi, Tim Walker and Giampalo Sgura. Antonio also speaks English.


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This latest offering of Satellite Magazine, Issue XLXI, is filled with men's style and sleek and stunning designs from around the world. We have 4 photographers who photographed some stunning men that are gracing our covers of this issue. Photographer Wander Aguiar shot the handsome Steven, Phil Limprasertwong shot the brooding Elia, Diana Diederich shot the striking Arron and Antonio Guzzard shot the interesting Gian. Not only are our models attractive, but also our featured musical artist like Ivan Dorn the anti-Pop star. Where and what to order when out at a few choice bars. The bear of a designer Walter Van Beirendonck showcasing his Zwart Winter 17/18 collection. Some incredible gadgets like the Elbow. This is just a little bit of what this packed issue that will delight the eye. We hope you enjoy the issue as much as we did putting it together.

William Montalvo Editor-In-Chief

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Elia Photography Phil Limprasertwong Philll.com Model

Elia Fongaro @eliafongaro atgency

Two Management @twomanagement Stylist

Anessa London

@stylezbylondonartistry Grooming

Keon Cruz @keeocruz

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Belcampo Restaurant and Butcher Shop

Tucked into the legendary Grand Central Market, Belcampo Restaurant & Butcher Shop Downtown Los Angeles serves up signature Belcampo dishes in a modern-meets-retro cool vibe. Grab a seat at our chic, counter-service diner for Breakfast or Lunch to indulge in our signature dishes while people watching and enjoying a glass of beer or wine. Or, stop by after work to pick up our changing rotation of Grab & Go foods, which are perfect lunch time snacks or convenient reheat & eat options to bring home for dinner.

YOU DESERVE BELCAMPO. Since 2012, we’ve led the way in reinventing how things are done to bring you the best meat possible. We raise our animals on our farm at the base of Mt. Shasta in California. Our farm, and our process, are crafted with compassion and sustainability at their core. This miraculously makes for more delicious meat that’s good for you and the planet too. Win-win. Here, we do everything for our fans. And since we’re big fans ourselves, we hold ourselves to high standards. This isn’t only the right way, it’s the only way. Belcampo.com p .

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photo courtesy of BELCAMPO

Are You Farm to Table? Yes. Belcampo controls every aspect of its supply chain. Unlike competitors, we raise our animals on our own farm, operate our own USDA-inspected and Animal Welfare Approved processing facility, and sell our meat in our own restaurants and butcher shops. Because we own our facility, we have implemented a strict coding system that allows full traceability. We track our animals from birth to butchery to your plate. And because we always know exactly which animal each cut of meat comes from, you can feel good about its quality, its integrity, and its safety.

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Christian Wiles Gentleman's Grooming

Over 20 years on the professional hairdressing circuit has seen Christian Wiles at our hair salon in Northampton demonstrate and educate other hairdressing professionals with his signature brand of Sassoon-inspired precision cutting and innovative hairdressing techniques. For the last several years, Christian has worked as an official Matrix guest artist, working with some of the biggest names in the industry, at professional hairdressing events and educational seminars. Matrix is an exciting hairdressing brand that directly fits with Christian’s own personal ethos of making hairdressing fun, exciting, engaging and one that challenges modern stereotypes and what is deemed as ‘the norm’.

Christian’s relaxed but professional fast flowing attitude has continued to help the Northampton salon remain a firm favorite with busy local clientele. The salon interior reflects the uniqueness of the Christian Wiles brand with a boudoir feel mixed with contemporary styling. At Christian Wiles Hairdressing you can expect a warm and friendly welcome, a high level of customer service and a head massage like no other! Christian’s dedicated team will always provide you with a detailed consultation prior to any hair cut or hair colour service and will guarantee you leave the salon feeling totally transformed. Christian Wiles and his team pride themselves on the high level of customer service and unparalleled expertise they offer at the salon. Their reputation for precision cutting and colour mastery have secured them an impressive reputation amongst their counterparts. With the most dynamic team of stylists waiting to create the look you’ve always dreamed of, Christian Wiles Hairdressing is the salon of choice. ChristianWilesHairdressing.co.uk p .

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photo courtesy of CHRISTIAN WILES

When it came to developing his own professional hairdressing salon in Northampton, Christian was determined to stick to his own personal values in creating his alternative boutique salon concept. Realising there was a needs for a hairdressers in Northampton that offered an alternative to some of the more ‘traditional’ salons, Christian created a successful unisex hairdressers in Northampton with an unpretentious, laid back vibe coupled with extra friendly staff.

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Mister Marvelous Byredo

For the launch of 'Mister Marvelous', Byredo founder Ben Gorham felt the world-renowned hair stylist Christiaan Houtenbos embodied the fragrance to a T. The dapper gent noted that "A marvelous thing must be strange in that it must be like nothing else," and with Mandarin Leaves, Bamboo, Black Amber and White Cedarwood in its composition, this scent certainly lives up to the challenge.

Ben Gorham is a native Swede, born to an Indian mother and a Canadian father, Ben grew up in Toronto, New York and Stockholm. He graduated from the Stockholm art school with a degree in fine arts, but a chance meeting with perfumer Pierre Wulff convinced him that he'd rather create fragrances than paintings. With no formal training in the field, Gorham, a 31-year old , sought out the services of world renowned perfumers Olivia Giacobetti and Jerome Epinette, explaining his olfactory desires and letting them create the compositions. As an outsider in the beauty industry, Ben is somewhat of an anomaly and has been recognized for his personal style and connection to fashion and art in several international magazines such as French Vogue, Vanity Fair, Elle, V Magazine and Fantastic Man to name a few. Byredo.com p .

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photo courtesy of BYREDO

BYREDO was founded in 2006 by Ben Gorham. Ben began to be intrigued by scent and memory after travelling to his mother's hometown in India, where he was stirred by the aromas of spices and incense. Inspired by this trip, BYREDO's scented candles and perfumes have been developed with an understated approach, using simple composition of the highest quality raw materials.

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DSTLD Denim Jacket

A jet black denim jacket is a striking departure from the usual classic indigo offerings. Our heavy, durable 12.4 oz. black denim fabric has been thoughtfully washed to reflect light wear and to retain its ability to fade over time. This style is designed in a slim fit and featured classic details: side slit pockets and metal button closures at the chest pockets, cuffs, and side tabs. Pairs with all types of jeans to add a seasoned rock ’n roll vibe. Do stylish, high-quality garments require a luxury price tag? For DSTLD co-founders Corey Epstein and Mark Lynn, the answer is a resounding no. Epstein and Lynn have always valued a top-quality product and customer experience over the name on the label of their clothes. But for two guys living in Los Angeles, the denim capital of the world, they found it impossible to find well-made jeans and go-to essentials without the premium price tag, so they took matters into their own hands.

Their distinct vision and progressive platform made it easy to find a multi-talented crew of like-minded individuals. Modest yet agile, the DSTLD team comes from some of the top brands and companies in the world: GAP, John Varvatos, Adidas, Revolve, BCBG, Calvin Klein, Deloitte, and Caltech, to name a few. Most of us left corporate culture to endure the even more demanding startup culture, and we love every minute of it. "We come from all over the globe, but call Los Angeles home." DSTLD.com p .

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photo courtesy of DSTLD

Epstein, who’s diverse background includes photography, design, creative direction, and consulting, and Lynn, a luxury hospitality and e-commerce aficionado, knew they could build a brand that set them apart from traditional premium labels. A brand that was different, better, and had an edge. A brand for the modern consumer.

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Starck Beer Organic Fertile Surprise from Elswhere

At the origin of this collaboration, there is the encounter of two honest and generous creators. Philippe Starck, internationally renowned creator, and Sébastien Blaquière, founder of the Brasserie d’Olt, have invented a unique, diagonal creative process to translate Starck’s creativity into a unique beer with precise dosages and composition. They were inspired by Nature to create together a golden and certi ed organic beer in resonance with the exceptional terroir of the Aubrac plateau. "STARCK beer is an original creation offering a universal language whose avor comes from elsewhere, born from the honesty and the tradition of the Aubrac.” Ph.S.

This IPA (India Pale Ale) beer without additive, coloring or preservative, is neither ltered nor pasteurized giving rise to a 5.2% ABV beer, more alive, more natural which allows the culture medium to balance itself naturally, guaranteeing a good preservation over time. Also created by Starck, the bottle with it minimal design offers surprising optical games in order to place the product at the heart of the creation. The bottle is produced locally by a two-hundred-year- old working glass factory in Albi. BrasserieDolt.com Starck.com p .

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photo courtesy of PHILIPPE STARCK

The beer STARCK with Olt is produced artisanally, and the raw materials used in its composition have been carefully selected - malts from organic farming, hops and water from the Boraldes of the Aubrac as a strong sign of respect for the local environment and traditions. The unique work around this beer reaf rms the creativity of Starck and the Brasserie d’Olt, offering a surprising composition of a single variety of organic spring barley, three types of hops with fruity aromas - citrus, pineapple, exotic fruits - and subtle softwood notes. The STARCK lager beer, with its delicate and smooth foam, is characterized by a nice bitterness, balanced yet persistent.

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Inventery Refined Goods for Men

Designed by INVENTERY in Los Angeles, these stunning brass mechanical pens demonstrate the brand's uncompromising commitment to quality. Each pen is precision machined from a single brass rod to achieve a smooth, unibody finish. The sleek pen also features an all-brass click mechanism from Schmidt that guarantees a smooth and silent click in comparison to standard plastic parts. Each pen is handmade and unique, marked with its own serial number. Available in four distinct colors. Designed as a desk pen, not recommended for pocket carry without a pen sleeve Each Mechanical Pen is unique, marked with an individual serial number.

They obsess in quiet madness over the small details, and seek taste and sophistication in modern life. PRODUCTS FOR THE THINKER, JOURNEYMAN, AND EVERYDAY ESSENTIALISTS. Inventery.co p .

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photo courtesy of INVENTERY

Inventery is an independent design house specializing in the design and manufacturing of refined goods and stationery products.

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Thom Browne

Thom Browne serves up a healthy dose of his signature Americana this season, with his Varsity-style bombers, slim cropped trousers and tri-stripe sneakers all key players for AW17. If you’ve got a spare grand or two that you’ve been saving for a rainy day(!), now’s the time to invest in his premium calfskin leather backpack with its red, white and navy trim and gold embossed branding. For those of us with a little less cash to drop, his unique take on the classic baseball shoe finishes off casual tailoring in Browne’s inimitably off-kilter way. ThomBrowne.com p .

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photo courtesy of THOM BROWNE

Tri-Stripe Grained Leather Sneaker

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Shark! Michael Muller Michael Muller was ten when his father bought him a Minolta Weathermatic, a gaudy, yellow hunk of plastic that was state of the art in underwater photography at the time. His imagination quickly outpaced his access to subjects, and among the first photos he took was a snapshot of an image of a shark from the pages of National Geographic. He told his awed classmates he’d shot the photo himself. The ruse didn’t last long, and he soon admitted that he had not. “That was the first time that I really saw the power of photography,”. In the decades since, Muller has built a career as one of the foremost wielders of that power, a top-shelf editorial and advertising photographer and Hollywood’s go-to lensman for ubiquitous movie posters and celebrity portraits. But it is sharks we are here to discuss, a subject Muller has come back to with his forthcoming book Sharks: Face to Face With the Ocean’s Endangered Predator, from Taschen. The culmination of a decade-long obsession with these apex predators, it contains hundreds of photos, shot in a beautiful, haunting style that takes its cues from Muller’s studio work rather than National Geographic. It’s also a project with a higher purpose: to change people’s perceptions of sharks and draw attention to their plight—an estimated one hundred million sharks are killed each year, primarily to supply the demand for their fins and other body parts. Getting and holding a viewer’s attention, Muller was convinced he could use his artistry to make people take a second look at an animal they already think they know. “It was like, what can I do?” Muller says. “I can use my skills to change people’s perceptions and to raise awareness about the number of sharks being killed.” “You can’t bring the shark to the studio, so I thought, ‘We’ll bring the studio to the sharks.’” He had been researching underwater lighting for a Speedo campaign he was shooting, and was taken with the idea of using studio-style lighting underwater to illuminate the animals. But the main commercially available lights were 400-watt strobes, which were insufficient for the task of lighting what he calls a 15-foot-long “SUV with teeth.” So he began trying to figure out how to bring more powerful 1,200-watt strobes underwater.

The resulting book unites Muller’s shockingly original images of sharks with essays from conservationist Philippe Cousteau Jr. and marine biologist Dr. Alison Kock, as well as pages of species notes, shark-related statistics, and lists of resources for further information and shark conservation organizations for readers to support. There are also some incredibly disturbing shots of the blood-soaked “finning” of captured sharks, which Muller shot in the Persian Gulf. Muller Photo.com p .

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photo courtesy of MICHAEL MULLER

He became more comfortable swimming with the animals, mostly without a cage or metal suit. The project grew in scope from great whites to all sharks as Muller began thinking more about a book that would unite his images with a strong conservation message. He began bringing celebrity friends like Ben Stiller on shark dives to draw attention to the plight of the animals, and eventually he found the perfect partner for the project in Taschen.

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Ivan Dorn Avant-pop star

Ukraine avant-pop star Ivan Dorn unveils the video for his summer banger, "Beverly". The song has all the classic elements of a bonafide radio hit with it's early 90s swagger meets European indie-pop in the vain of Air, M83 and Sebastian Tellier. Dorn's first step into the English language pop genre takes a bold step with a song that already sounds like it's topped the Pop charts. Dorn details the video: "'Beverly’ is a music thriller, which keeps you in suspense for the whole song. It displays varied moods to the listener. One of the best guitar solos I’ve ever heard is in this track (don’t get me wrong, not just because it’s mine haha),” Dorn says. “Also as an author I could say that the best track is that one which is written without any pressure, so that’s exactly about 'Beverly!' As for video - it’s one of the most pink themed music videos I’ve ever done!" Its difficult to imagine the post-soviet pop scene without the controversial story of Ivan Dorn. In 2011 the tall blond Ukrainian became an overnight sensation with his debut album ‘Co’n’Dorn’. His unique blend of 90s house, pop, nu-disco, funk and free jazz, came as a breath of fresh air to the suffocated Eastern Europe pop scene. The well-crafted compilation of catchy pop tunes brought the 23 year old into the spotlight. His fashion-forward style, controversial public appearances, fancy footwork and contagious personality caught on like wild fire. Within months Ivan Dorn and his band filled sports arenas around the country and he quickly earned a spot as a judge on The Voice Ukraine.

In 2016, Ivan started Masterskaya, an independent music label focused on bringing the exciting sound of Ukrainian underground to the main stage. Out of the blue, the 28 year old artist moved to Los Angeles to start recording his first English-language album, and quickly found himself inspired by the ocean breeze and palm trees. His US debut album is now on its way, and with feature a tight selection of tracks that, like Ivan, don’t follow the rules. If there is one thing we’ve learned about Ivan over the years, is that if you think you have him all figured out, you are probably already one step behind. IvanDorn.com soundcloud.com/masterskayalab/ivan-dorn-beverly p .

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photo courtesy of IVAN DORN

In 2014, just when it seemed like Ivan would follow the footsteps of most modern pop stars with radio-friendly hits and overproduced music videos, he dropped, “Randorn”, an album that would redefine him as an artist and bridge the gap between the underground and the mainstream. The masterpiece featured an odd selection of unique tracks sounding anywhere from Aphex Twins to Kavinski passing through Pharrell Williams. Although it was initially received with mixed feelings, the record quickly topped the charts and had audiences dancing from the VIP areas of the high society to the basements of the underground.

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Elbow Cassette Player

Elbow is a portable cassette player reduced to the core. In XXI century, the rise of cheap and convenient digital media has made all physical formats „outdated“. Still, the tactile intimacy of physical formats is dearly missed. That’s the reason behind the resurgence of vinyl, and also motivation behind Elbow. The audio cassette is not just a medium – it’s a cultural icon. Therefore we feel it should not be obscured inside a device, but brought to the forefront of user’s attention. By exposing the cassette to the elements, Elbow offers a fresh user experience, allowing the listener to directly appreciate the mechanical motion, or even forcibly interrupt playback.

How it works? A typical cassette player uses a capstan and a pinch roller to drag the tape along the magnetic head at a constant speed. Additionally, separate pulleys rotate the take-up and supply reels to manage the tape. As tape relocates from one reel to another, mechanical clutches, belts and springs adjust the speed of both pulleys. Alternatively, capstan and reel pulleys can have seperate motors. All of this result in a quite completx device and takes up a lot of space. In Elbow, a single pulley is used to drive the tape. To maintain constant playback rate, tape speed must be tracked and used as a contrl parameter for motor adjustment. Tape speed tracking can be achieved in severaldifferent ways such ad digital, optical and mechanical. BrainMonk.BandCamp.com p .

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photo courtesy of ELBOW

Elbow’s most prominent feature is the biaxial arm. It rotates in two directions – upward motion enables the insertion of a cassette, while sideways motion allows to manually switch playing direction. Playback is controlled by a single wheel – turning left from the initial position activates the motor and increases volume, turning in the opposite direction fast-forwards the cassette. The device has two connections: a standard 3.5mm audio plug, and a mini-USB port for charging and transferring audio to a computer. Also, an additional pin can be used to attach player to clothes and other objects, turning your cassette into a unique accessory.

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Bar Food Some of the best you can eat.

Wogies - New York

You can barely move in New York without bars touting theirs as “the best in the city” with variations of spice, size and, indeed, sophistication. Wogie’s may have its roots in Philadelphia, but it’s renowned as serving some of the best wings in West Village since opening its NYC site a decade ago. The wings are named after Krazy Kate (her cooking p .

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exceeds her spelling), mother of the bar’s owner, Mr Aaron Hoffman. They come in mild, medium, hot or “Krazy”. Medium are delicious, and best paired with a fine craft IPA from the globetrotting selection. Make ours a Sly Fox IPA, please. Wogies.com XL XI

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Untitled - London

Tony Conigliaro has been at the forefront of the London bar scene for more than a decade. His latest bar in Dalston pays as much heed to its bar snacks as it does its back bar. In fact, “bar snacks” does them an injustice: these are carefully selected blends of salt, sweetness and umami that pair perfectly with curiously named cocktails that read

like haiku. “Violin”, for example, contains dark oak, pine, beeswax, benzoin and black pepper vodka infusion and is

designed to be eaten with the seaweed tempura,. This is very much a drinking snack for modern times. Untitled-Bar.com

Bar Do Luiz Fernandes Sao Paulo

Brazil , the Latin American country gave birth to citrus-noted, highly effervescent lagers that are best served so close to freezing you can almost feel the ice crystals melting in your mouth. At Bar do Luiz Fernandes, do like the locals and order an icy Serramalte with a salty snack to match. Much of Brazil’s food culture harks back to its Portuguese heritage – S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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another nation that knows its bar snacks – so it’s hard to go wrong. Tuck into one of owner Ms Doña Idalina’s speciality “bolinhos” – crispy croquettes packed with slow-cooked beef and doused with vinaigrette and a punchy malagueta pepper sauce – then chase it down with (another) beer. BarDoLuizFernandes.com.br XL XI

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EXSL Exterface & Stiaan Louw

Five years ago South African designer Stiaan Louw and French photographic duo Exterface started their singular collaboration. Enriching their artistry, pushing the boundaries of male iconography, they come up with iconic looks and stories that inspire an ever-growing community. The overwhelming response and their successful artistic partnership has naturally led them to build the EXSL project. “By exploring ideas of cultural belonging, social and sexual subcultures and male archetypes, we bring fantasy to reality.”

You’ve always been about photography. What inspired you to get into the world of clothing? Clothing is a strong aspect of our Exterface body of work as an extension of our aesthetic and as a way to tell our stories. We are our own stylists. Creating a world of fantasies we felt it was interesting and exciting to bring it into reality. That’s why this partnership with our designer friend Stiaan Louw was an evidence. Since our very first collaboration 5 years ago, he has been giving us what we’ve always been needing, and more, in terms of expression and design. With EXSL it’s a continuation of this wonderful thing, we are telling stories between design and photography, complimenting each other and making it available for everyone. EX-SL.com p .

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photo courtesy of EXSL

EXSL is a contemporary and adventurous fashion project uniting the Stiaan Louw and Exterface creative forces. An ongoing thrilling dialogue from Cape Town to Paris, halfway between photography and fashion design. With an unapologetic expression and a tasteful eye, together they redefine underthings and shape a whole new intimate lifestyle for men.

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Zwart Winter 17/18 Walter Van Beirendonck

Walter Van Beirendonck called his fall collection “Zwart” — Dutch for black or dark. Perhaps it was chosen to reflect today’s somber times. Or maybe it referred simply to the line’s prevalence of camouflage prints, masked models’ faces and leather details contributing to its fighting feel.

“It’s a very positive ritual,” he said. “They look all scary, but they get away the previous season, they get in the new spring. It’s healing the world and bringing back the good spirits, and getting rid of the bad spirits.” The mix of military and naïveté were perfectly on-trend for fall. Plus adding to this collection’s strength was Van Beirendonck’s sharp tailoring — apparent especially in blazers and coats, which come both finely constructed and deconstructed (he’s a master of both). These included a wide variety of fabrics and colors, such as orange velour, gray tweed, green leather and camo prints. WalterVanBeirendonck.com p .

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photo courtesy of WALTER VAN BEIRENDONK

There has been plenty of glumness this men’s fashion, held at a perilously uncertain moment for the world, and much hand-wringing in the stands about what, politically and otherwise, is to come. Designers have responded in their own separate ways: Many have simplified and practicalized their designs; others have sailed blithely on. Only Walter Van Beirendonck, the bearish Belgian designer and head of the fashion department at the Royal Academy in Antwerp, has taken matters into his own hands and set out to banish the dark spirits that have taken up residence on our doorsteps.

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Tom's World Eric Lanuit

Born in Paris in 1965, Eric Lanuit has always been interested in image, fashion, and photography. His bedroom was full of vintage vogue and harper’s bazaar magazines and his first photo shoot was at the age of 13. Working with the famous Parisian cabaret the lido. At the lido the spectacle of what happens onstage and backstage revived his original interest in photography.

Eric Lanuit discovered Tom Of Finland’s drawings at the age of thirteen and immediately became a huge admirer of his art and what it represents: he’s not only the first to have prominently depicted a unique sexuality but also a masterful artist. Tom Of Finland’s art has been a constant inspiration for Eric Lanuit, and his photographs pay him a warm tribute, taking up all the significant codes of his art to offer a respectful and sensitive perspective. EricLanit.fr p .

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photo courtesy of ERIC LANUIT

Tom’s world is a book of photography by photographer Eric Lanuit as a tribute to the wonderful artwork of Touko Laaksonen, aka Tom Of Finland (1920-1991).

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Paper Taxidermy Deer and Bear

Papertrophy, suppliers of animal trophies from paper, was established in 2015 by Dr. Holger Hoffmann in Berlin. At Papertrophy, customers assemble their trophies themselves: True to the motto of the company "Do not shoot them - glue them�, they are delivered pre-cut into individual pieces, pre-creased and assembled by hand using a special glue stick. With an extensive range, the most unusual animals, including dinosaurs, unicorns, dobermans and gorillas beckon alongside classics such as deer, moose, rhinos and elephants. The wall trophies and standing figures are available in different sizes, so they fit into any room, whether new or old buildings or lofts.

The product design is inspired by the well-known animal trophies, but translated into a timeless form. The minimalist polygon structure of the stylized trophies creates an interesting and fine surface structure. Customers can choose between different color themes. Because the option of two colored trophies is also possible, the range includes more than 100 color combinations. PaperTrophy.com p .

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photo courtesy of PAPER TROPHY

The Papertrophy products are easy to assemble: The pre-cut and pre-creased individual pieces are numbered and are glued together with a special glue which the company also offers for sale. After some time, the result is a three-dimensional work of art, without long instructions. To ensure that everything works, Papertrophy places a training sheet in each package so that forgotten gluing arts can be reactivated before the correct Papertrophy is started.

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California Architect Stephen Jones

A uniquely talented architect and designer of such a space must showcase their ability to evolve existing structures and designs, thoughtfully and seamlessly marrying the fresh with the familiar. That’s the profile of Stephen Francis Jones, who has been designing restaurants, hotels and spas all around the world, from Wolfgang Puck’s Spago in Beverly Hills, to the retro chain Lucky Strike Lanes, to the wildly successful MB Post in Manhattan Beach, to Java House franchises in Kenya. But experience has taught Jones that challenges do not emerge only in new projects, where blank canvases, new developments, and empty tenant spaces can mean the freedom of endless possibilities for a designer. In fact, the most significant challenges demand that his approach towards design itself evolve and adapt to the ever-changing ways in which public and work environments come together in conceptualizing new dining and entertainment facilities.

When the business and tech leaders, HCP Life, behind the project were considering ways in which to lure top corporations to their new facility, they envisioned something that resembled what Google and other companies have done in creating workspaces that cater to workers’ out-of-office interests, lifestyle choices, and tastes. In fact, they were bowling at a Lucky Strike bowling alley, saying that this was the kind of space they needed – some place that was fun, casual, and impeccably designed – so they decided to find the guy who had designed Lucky Strike – Stephen Francis Jones. “Typically with a new client or restaurant concept, I create a story that goes with the project,” p .

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photo courtesy of STEPHEN JONES

That’s the core idea behind Jones’ evolving design strategy, called “Saturday,” the driving vision behind his latest project, Foundry & Lux, located at the new office complex Britannia Cove at Oyster Point, located in South San Francisco. A shared “campus”-like community of 880,000 square feet, designed to house some of the world’s most innovative and influential science and biotechnology firms in seven buildings, the Jones-designed common space, which occupies about 27,000 square feet, centrally located in the ground floor of one of the buildings, will be one of the main perks for the companies and individuals who will work there, filled with artisanal restaurants, recreational and fitness activities, and personal services. “Foundry & Lux, this central amenities facility,” Jones explains, “is to the rest of the complex what Saturday is to the other days of the week.”

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Jones remembers, “I often sell clients on that story, which might be about the history of the space, or the story of the concept.” But in this case, Jones was a bit stumped – the complex’ site was an otherwise unremarkable former port in an industrial portion of the Bay’s southern coastline, what was once farmland before being converted to a staging yard for the steel that made the Golden Gate Bridge a century ago. Instead, Jones hooked onto the Saturday concept, building on an instinct he had been harnessing about the future of architectural design in a world of shifting life-work dynamics. Reading the “Saturday” supplement of the Los Angeles Times one weekend morning as he waited for his daughter’s youth volleyball game to start, the light bulb went off – could there be a design equivalent? “I realized that I was really designing social spaces,” Jones explains and that the activities in social spaces could be those activities you do on a Saturday.” One of the hallmarks of Jones firm is its strong working relationships with fabricators, artisans, and other designers who share the same vision: of spaces that are functional, sustainable, and inspiring, suited to the demands the individual client, the users of the space, and the local community. “I just thought about all of those people I work with and my group of clients, and imagined them sharing a common social space. This guy’s into craft beer; this one does gourmet salads; this one likes the gym, this one goes to a yoga studio. Saturday is the stuff you do on Saturday – eat, play, live.” It became clear that this was more than just a new design concept: this was a full-fledged endeavor that needed to be managed and grown over time, not just “built” and left to use. “I wasn’t only thinking about being the architect,” Jones explains. “I wanted to work with my client to create a fun amenities program and design to that program, and then take it a step further, which is executing it. Eventually, we hope to put together a team of operators – like the concierge at a hotel – to take care of the people at the office park. We’ll be able to respond to the needs of the businesses as they evolve, whether that is Wednesday afternoon oil changes, a place to drop off your dry cleaning, places to eat, or a bowling alley.” Designing social spaces unites the numerous strategies and concepts of Jones’ two decades in the profession, a logical next step from designing restaurants which are, perhaps (besides houses of worship) the most singular public space where sharing, celebrating, relaxing, and connecting are fundamental. Foundry & Lux at Oyster Point and other recent projects have given Jones the opportunity to bring that same vision to the shared spaces of work communities. Another client is working with Jones to create a work-and-live amenities portion of a 50,000 square foot facility in El Segundo that will be made up of like-minded creatives, similar to “We Work.” Working on behalf of these entrepreneurial “colonies” has allowed

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Jones to evolve alongside his clients, more of whom are looking to streamline and diversify their appeal. “I’m doing the same thing with my office environment,” Jones says, discussing an ongoing expansion of his own office space. “There are a couple of firms who are going to share space in my office, creating a community of like-minded creatives. We aim to be the leaders in creating amenities facilities, and Oyster Point was really the catalyst for it.” A cursory recollection of Jones’ most noted projects provides ample evidence of his ability to think creatively while still retaining the value and quality of well-established brands. When the La Brea Bakery debuted in a new home, Jones’ design elements, from the 35-foot display case to the lowercase “b” logo, helped usher in a successful re-brand. He and his graphic designer created an updated brand identity and prototype building design to reinvigorate the brand of Japanese chain Mister Donut. He designed new locations for the Del Frisco Grille in Irvine, Santa Monica, and Pasadena. He’s currently at work on his 6th and 7th locations for Greenleaf restaurant (in Glendale and Calabasas), which each new location requiring fine tuning in order to connect with the brand and speak to the unique demands of each location. He’s also busy at work on creating a second location 360 Degrees Artisan Pizza in Africa, part of his continuing work for casual dining chains in Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda. While some challenges are practical—getting materials overseas and dealing with time zone differences and lengthy travel—others are more theoretical. Navigating through different perspectives on the importance of design can pose challenges, but the restaurant’s forward-thinking CEO understood the value of design and its ability to help set the chain apart from its competition. “I’m still applying the same basic elements that I developed for my clients here,” Jones explains. “It’s all about understanding the needs of the client and responding to them as they let you know what is and is not working.” Jones is well-prepared for a successful global career. After studying architecture at the University of Florida, Jones got his Architectural Master's degree at UCLA. He began his career in Boston, working with Jung/Brannen Associates designing high-rises. After his first year at UCLA, he studied in Italian hill towns in Tuscany. While living in Europe, he worked for a year in Barcelona during the exciting buildup to the 1992 Olympics. There, he worked with the internationally renowned firm, Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura, where he was the designer on the Cagnessur-Mer mixed-use complex in France, and the Institutio de Mediteraneo in Barcelona. He began working for the famed L.A. firm Grinstein/ Daniels while still at UCLA, and after completing his Master's degree, Jones spent a year in Miami rebuilding hurricane-damaged homes and then returned to Los Angeles to work on the design of a co-generation power


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plant in Sacramento. Jones was given the opportunity to reinvigorate his passion for restaurant design when he was hired as the in-house architect at the Wolfgang Puck Food Company. In 1996, he left the Wolfgang Puck Food Company to start his own firm, SFJones Architects. Eager to continue his association with Jones, the famed chef and Barbara Lazaroff hired him to recreate Spago, Wolfgang Puck's most celebrated restaurant, in its new Beverly Hills location. Jones continued to work on Puck’s fine and casual dining restaurants all over the world. He then went on to create the original design for Lucky Strike Lanes in Hollywood, with locations to follow in Chicago, Toronto, Denver, St. Louis, Louisville, South Beach and Orange County. The fresh concept of a retro bowling alley/ lounge became fiercely popular nationwide: Jones was hired to design Big Al's, a bowling alley and sports bar in Vancouver, Washington, and Ashton Kutcher's Dolce Group hired Jones to design Ten Pin Alley in Atlanta. Jones’ client list now second to none when it comes to some of the most respected and successful eateries on the west coast and beyond. That list now includes Jones’ most recent gigs for clients like the Urth Caffe in the City of Orange; American Tea Room, which has opened in the arts district in Downtown Los Angeles; and three Simmzy’s restaurants in Burbank, Huntington Beach, and El Segundo. He is busy at work in the design phase of a new restaurant in Honolulu, HI called Merriman’s, featuring local star chef Peter Merriman. But how does a designer supply to client demand for fresh, new ideas that will breathe vitality (and profits) into a business? Jones says the key is diversity in lifestyle. “Lifestyle translates to one’s design sense. I think a designer is always thinking about design in their environment and the more diversity you have in your life, the more ideas that present themselves to you.” As a married father of two (his wife, Stephanie Eyestone Jones, is owner of Eyestone Environmental, an urban planning firm), Jones lives a carefully integrated life. His mornings begin very early at the UCLA Aquatic Center, near his office in Marina Del Rey. An hour or more of rowing in a single scull gives him time and tranquility to think through his day. “Relating it to my daily regiment lifestyle,” explains Jones, “it’s a meditation period of my day—when I have my best ideas.” In these types of projects—where an idea like “Saturday” might inspire a completely new design concept—what may appear to be limitations to novice designers are seen as opportunities by the more seasoned architect deeply refined and committed in his craft. The experience does not merely call for a challenge in design, but also calls for one in discovery. "My ambitions go beyond architecture,” Jones explains. "I like to live my life with the same passion that I bring to design. I want to do work that feeds the spirit, not the ego." SFJones.com

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Books

What makes Albert Watson one of the world’s most revered photographers, hailed by peers, critics, and collectors alike? Is it his unparalleled portfolio of celebrity portraits? Breathtaking landscapes? Sensual nudes, still lifes, illustrious fashion shoots? KAOS presents a kaleidoscopic overview of Watson’s career to date and the dazzling array of subjects, objects, people, and places he has encountered along the way. A skillfully curated survey of a uniquely diverse, dynamic portfolio, it spans nearly half a century of photography to encounter stars, statesmen, women, and strangers; bound through neon-blazing cities; find figures poised, gymnastic, or shimmering with nude eroticism; roam the bright lights and the backstreets; soak up extravagant sunsets; enter the controlled studio environment; and breathe in the elemental wilds of the photographer’s native Scotland. n is accompanied by an essay from the recently retired head of photographs at Christie’s, Philippe Garner, and extensive quotes from Watson, as well as dozens of previously unpublished Polaroids, culled from Watson’s personal archives. The result is a defining document of the “photographer’s photographer,” iridescent in its graphic, often cinematic allure, and irresistible in its eclectic glory. Taschen.com

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Items: Is Fashion Modern? presents 111 items of clothing and accessories that have had a profound impact on global culture in the twentieth and twentyfirst centuries. Among them are designs as well-known, transformative, and coveted as Levi’s 501 jeans and the sari and as ancient, charged, and historically rich as the pearl necklace and the keffiyeh. The catalogue accompanies the first fashion exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art since 1944. An essay by curator Paola Antonelli highlights the Museum’s unique perspective on fashion and explores fashion’s role in the changing landscape of design. The 111 texts that follow trace the history of each item in relation to labor, marketing, technology, religion, politics, aesthetics, and popular culture. Arranged alphabetically, these essays are richly illustrated with archival images, fashion photography, film stills, and documentary shots. Punctuating the book are newly commissioned photographic portfolios that bring a vibrant creative energy to the project. Hardcover. 288 pp; 500 color illustrations. store.moma.org

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No XLXI Elia by Phill Limprasertwong  

Transmitting distinctive culture

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