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“Fa shio n sho uld be a form of e s capis m, an d n ot a f o r m of impris on me n t .” – Alexan de r McQu e e n

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Masthead 004 Contributors 006 Forward 008 010 Martin + Gabe ~ Inked Kenny Bubble Ball AfroPunk J.Bernardt Nordic Cooking Rick Owens Acne Studios A Celebration Of Man Norwegian Woods Arresting Face Marennrol's

026 028 030 032 034 036 038 044 050 056 062 Caylan ~ Wander Aguiar 078 Christian ~ Adam C. Freire

Books 094 096 Laurent ~ Geoffrey Guillin

photography WANDER AGUIAR model CAYLAN HYGHUS

photography ADAM C. FREIRE model CHRISTIAN MAZZILLI

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photography INKED KENNY model GABE LADUKE & MARTIN EDMUND


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Editor-In-Chief/Creative Director WILLIAM MONTALVO William@Satellite-Mag.com Managing Editor R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Art Director BOX808 MEDIA Info@Box808Media.com Photogaphy Consultant RACER MEDIA INC. RacerMedia.com Special Correspondent ADDISON DE WITT Addison@Satellite-Mag.com Copy Editor ANNEMARIE MAES AmmemarieMaes@mac.com President R.E. FISHER Richard@Satellite-Mag.com Interns LONDON SILVER PARIS STUDIO CABO SHERMAN intern@Satellite-Mag.com

SUBMISSIONS We are always looking for new work. We accept submissions. If you would like to be considered as a contributor please send writing samples or images to Info@Satellite-Mag.com SPONSORSHIPS & SPECIAL PROJECTS Please send your requests to Sponsorship@Satellite-Mag.com HEADQUARTERS 6731 3rd Avenue Los Angeles CA 90036 USA Satellite-Mag.com FOLLOW facebook.com/satellite.mag instagram.com/satellie_mag twitter.com/SATELLITEonline satellite-Mag.tumblr.com

Satellite® is a registered trademark of BOX808 Media, LLC and used in Partnership with BOX808 Media Companies. Copyright 2012 by Satellite ©. All rights reserved . No part of this publication my me reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from Satellite. Satellite makes every effort to ensure accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. Satellite is published bimonthly by BOX808 Media Los Angeles, CA.

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Brazilian-born Wander Aguiae has always been fascinated with people and the art of photography; he got his first camera on age 12 and started shooting his family members on vacations trips.

After more than 20 years of working in styling and creative direction for fashion and commercial clients, Toronto-based Kenneth Koon moved behind the camera in 2008. He has since established himself as an in-demand photographer with a distinctive vision—one that most often finds its expression through his ongoing exploration of the male body. Drawn from the communities of Canadian and American cities, the men that he shoots reflect a mixture of confidence and passion, strength and sensuality, captured in bold images whose technical assurance and dark beauty provide the foundation for their power.

It is commonly said that eyes are the mirror of the soul. Geoffrey Guillin's eyes reflect poetry. A shadow would be seen by some as a hidden mystery. For Geoffrey, it is meant to reveal the complexity of a personality.

Four years after that he was discovered as a model and since than has done many runways and appeared in many campaign. Graduated as a Civil Engineer with eight years of experience on that field he decided to quit and become a traveler. On visiting California in 1998 he immediately lost his heart; he now lives San Diego and dedicated his time on his old passion working on the another side of the camera a welcome change as you can see on his fine portfolio. Wander says: “ I try to use my experience as a former model to bring the best on each one I work with, be a model is beyond to have a beautiful face you have to perform and show a different personality/attitude no matter what you have on.”

His work has been seen in solo exhibitions in Ottawa and Montreal and group shows in New York City and Toronto. He is currently working on a solo exhibit in Chicago. His work and creative process is the subject of Through the Lens of inkedkenny, a 2012 documentary short by German directors Denize Galiao and Marie Elisa Scheidt. Produced in partnership with the Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film München and Canada’s L’institut national de l’image et du son, the film has been widely showcased on the European festival circuit.

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He plays on the range of "spleen" as a virtuoso while avoiding sadness. Details become a whole through the lens of his camera and his ability to capture a particular moment is an invitation to travel at the discretion of a wave of melancholia just when dawn enlightens us with a bluish glow.


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This new exciting and visually stunning edition of Satellite Magazine, Issue XLVIII, is filled with men's style and beautiful designs from around the world. We have 3 photographers who photographed some stunning men that are gracing our covers of this issue who are Wander Aguiar, Adam C. Freire and Inked Kenny. The handsome designer Lance McGregor and his beautiful Bubble Ball creation are featured. The exciting table Mareunrol’s has an amazing new architectural influenced collection out. An interview with the new craze AfroPunk creator Matthew Morgan takes his festival to London. Our music feature is J. Bernard release his new single Calm Down. This is just a little bit of what this packed issue that will delight the eye. We hope you enjoy the issue as much as we did putting it together.

William Montalvo Editor-In-Chief

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models MARTIN EDMUND Instagram @pfeifer63 GABE LADUKE instagram @nodigity666

hair SÉBASTIAN BARBER & SÉBASTIAN LEDUC SebastienBarbier.ca


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l l a B e l b b u B LANCE MCGREGOR

With a career spanning almost twenty years—as well as three continents—Lance McGregor had worked with design luminaries Tom Dixon, Matthew Hilton and Fabien Baron before setting up his own studio, McGregor & McGregor in 2009. Born in the seaside city of Tauranga, New Zealand and now based in the pretty suburban town of Montclair, New Jersey, nature has had a huge influence on McGregor’s work from day one. Combining materials like glass, metal, stone and marble, McGregor creates textural yet minimal pieces that are always imbued with a sense of whimsy. A self-described jack-of-all-trades, McGregor’s designs include everything from furniture to fragrance bottles. What inspires you? I find inspiration in everything, especially nature and natural materials like stone and marble. But it could be anything—a little detail in the street, a sketch that my kids have done or a passage in a book. I find that I’m kind of a sponge. I take it all in, and then it just comes out on the page when I’m sketching. How would you describe your aesthetic? My aesthetic changes constantly—I never really think about it; it just happens when the pen hits the paper. I’d describe it as sculptural, minimal, and abstract in a way. There always has to be an element of fun; something whimsical to set it apart from everything else that is out there. Can you tell us more about your studio and your work environment? My studio used to be in New York City but I’m now based in a suburb called Montclair in New Jersey, about thirty minutes away from Manhattan. Although it is very creative being in the city, there’s a lot of noise. Its nice to be able to go into New York two or three times a week and then come back here and have the solitude I need to really focus. I’m p .

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surrounded by trees and nature which really helps my design process. My studio is part of my home and there’s a lot of flow between the two spaces. My kids are always in there drawing and creating things. What did you design for OTHR? With OTHR there’s no brief, which is great but I was a little stuck at first! Then one day, I was at the beach with my kids and we were blowing bubbles. These bubble wands are usually just cheap plastic objects, but the activity of blowing bubbles is so cool and beautiful that I thought, “Why not make this into a luxe item for adults?” The bowl is ceramic and the wand is solid gold—it’s pretty wild! How do you think 3D printing is changing the design industry? Well OTHR’s philosophy is zero waste—everything is limited edition and 3D printing allows them to work that way. As far as people having 3D printers at home, I think that will make beautiful design available to the masses. There shouldn’t really be any bad design when there are so many great designers out there. With the bubble wand for example, I see home users downloading the model and then printing off thirty of them in plastic for a birthday party. How did you come to collaborate with OTHR? I was introduced to the team at OTHR through a friend and I told them I would love to design something for them. They are pioneering something in the industry and its really cool to be a part of that. It’s really humbling to be selected to design something amongst the other designers that OTHR work with and I think the OTHR aesthetic works well with my own. It’s simple, honest design. There’s no bells and whistles, there’s no noise and clutter. It’s just pure design. mcgregor-mcgregor.com othr.com XLVI I I

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AFROPUNK FESTIVAL COMES TO LONDON

As groundbreaking festival AFROPUNK makes its way across the Atlantic from NYC to London, we speak to some of the people involved with the event to find out wha AFROPUNK means to them. In case you haven’t heard, ground-breaking NYC festival AFROPUNK is making its way across the Atlantic to London for 2016. An explosive celebration of multiculturalism and diversity, AFROPUNK isn’t just a festival, it’s an ethos – an attitude to life which eschews any form of discrimination and initiates positive conversations. Taking place at London’s Alexandra Palace on September 24th, the (unsurprisingly) varied line-up includes the iconic Grace Jones, Skinny Girl Diet, Kwabs and more. To get an idea of what to expect from the festival – and get behind the concept of AFROPUNK itself – we spoke to those at the heart of the event.

To you – what is AFROPUNK? Afro: as in, born of African spirit and heritage; see also black (not always), see also rhythm and color, see also other, see also underdog. Punk: as in, rebel, opposing the simple route, imbued with a DIY ethic, looking forward with simplicity, rawness and open curiosity; see also other, see also underdog. AFROPUNK is defining culture by the collective creative actions of the individual and the group. It is a safe place, a blank space to freak out in, to construct a new reality, to live your life as you see  fit,  while making sense of the world around you. Do you think AFROPUNK has a specific style? The politics of style is really important to us, but the idea of any one style becomes more fashion which is much less important to us. Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival? p .

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I’m the most excited about seeing the people. I’m born and bred in London. I left 15 years ago and its changed since then, I’m excited to witness that. How would you describe your personal style? Simple and black, black being the colour. I keep it as simple as possible. Where do you look for style inspiration? I’m constantly  inspired, but I have a very strong sense of style mostly inspired by architecture and design. What would we be most likely to listening to on a standard day? Kendrick, Letlive, Sonyhoy Blues, Tinariwen, Amasa Hines What’s your favourite song right now? Protoje – Who Knows ft. Chronixx What’s your current obsession? Donald Trump’s racist ass, adidas Originals’ NMD sneakers, Crabby Shack on Franklin Ave, and Don Letts – a new film about reggae’s influence on punk. What makes London an ideal backdrop for AFROPUNK? London is my hometown – I grew up in the East End, so it seems pretty fitting. Where’s your favourite place to go in London? So when I get off the plane I drive directly to the Water Margin – a Chinese restaurant in Golders Green. AfroPunkFest.com

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Jinte Deprez is announcing his new side project under the nom de plume J.Bernardt, launching with the track Calm Down through Play It Again Sam.  Treading new musical ground, Deprez who co-fronts Belgian rock band Balthazar, has emerged from his home studio with an altogether different sound, a cornucopia of evocative synth beats drawn from a range of influences; be it his father’s love of Kraftwerk or the pop sensibilities of his own musical discoveries, Calm Down is the first fruit of that journey.

Shorn of band vaguaries, J.Bernardt is there to stand on its own merits, existing in an altogether different locale, and seductive grooves enveloped in warm soulful vocals permeate throughout. Written and recorded at home in Ghent, multi-instrumentalist Deprez has seen the entire project evolve from experimenting  with a synth, armed with  a DIY aesthetic to a collection of tracks that will provide the basis for J.Bernardt’s debut album, slated for release this year

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JBernardt.com.

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375 MILES NORTH OF STOCKHOLM IS MAGNUS NILSSON, HEAD CHEF OF RESTAURANT FÄVIKEN MAGASINET Remote and, at times, unforgiving, the northern wilds of Sweden would not be every head chef’s preferred location for a restaurant. But this is where Magnus Nilsson has made a name for himself as one of the most innovative and resourceful chefs in the world, with Fäviken Magasinet, his Nordic-influenced  restaurant in a renovated 18th-century barn near the Norwegian border. If you want to eat Nilsson’s food, which, depending on what the Nordic gods have bestowed upon the surrounding land, might be anything from scallops cooked over juniper to lamb marrow, you will have to earn it in travel hours. It’s not uncommon for culinary tourists to journey far and wide  to sample the world’s best restaurants, but the logistics of getting to the remote province of Jämtland are not to everyone’s tastes. Not even the staff. After securing a sought-after place in the Fäviken kitchen (Nilsson receives about 200 CVs a week), some have been known to leave after realizing such isolation is not for them. Nonetheless, Fäviken is currently 41st on The World’s 50 Best Restaurants List  – reaching as high as 19th in 2014 (though such a concept, we suspect, seems arbitrary to Nilsson) – and is welcoming diners in droves. There are very few nationalities the restaurant hasn’t had pass through its doors, Nilsson tells Satellite after a morning spent gathering ingredients. We meet him early, as thick mist hovers over the nearby lake. It is a beautiful setting. But since Nilsson cooks with ingredients from his immediate surroundings (he also uses specialized local suppliers; one lady delivers just one bucket of gooseberries every year), it can be brutal. Temperatures get as low as -40°C in winter and not much grows for six months of the year. To build up one of the most revered restaurants in the world here is, well, a little bit special. This method of working means terms such as “foraging” and “seasonal” are often applied to Fäviken. Popularized by the better-known Copenhagen restaurant Noma, they are often appropriated by places that don’t deal in “hyperlocal” cooking. To Nilsson, who does not benefit from the sophisticated suppliers and spotlight that a city brings, the words do not really mean anything. He believes, whether in Manhattan or the Scandinavian countryside, a restaurant should be loyal to its surroundings so it can create something personal, something that makes sense. “It’s a very weird way of looking at food,” he says. “[Seasonal] is a word often used without any thought about what it means. We have to follow the rhythm of the year here, produce an excess in the summer and prepare it to be stored like people did in the old times.” As if to prove his point, in our film, above, Mr Nilsson cooks S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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some in-season grouse on an open fire by the lake. Shot in the surrounding heather-filled mountains, he flavours it with spruce needles and juniper. Simple, fresh and local really does taste best – we can personally attest to that. It’s just a shame that most of it goes to Krut, Mr Nilsson’s trusty English setter. If grouse isn’t your thing, try the classic Swedish meatballs recipe, below, selected from Nilsson’s The Nordic Cookbook. TORE WRETMAN’S MEATBALLS “The recipe for these mild and delicate meatballs comes from the grandfather of Swedish traditional cooking, Tore Wretman,” says Mr Nilsson. “I usually prepare them when I want meatballs to be part of the menu of a bigger meal, like Swedish Christmas dinner, rather than serving them as a dish on their own. For meatballs as a meal, I prefer my grandma’s coarser, leaner and more well-seasoned meatballs.” Ingredients: Butter, for frying 1 onion, finely chopped 30g (1/3 cup) fresh white breadcrumbs 200ml (7fl oz) cream 1 egg 200g (1 cup) minced (ground) beef 100g (1 cup) minced (ground) veal 100g (1 cup) minced (ground) pork Salt and white pepper, to taste Method: Melt a knob of butter in a pan over a medium heat. Add the onions and fry until soft and golden. Tip them out of the pan and leave them to cool. Combine the breadcrumbs with the cream in a large mixing bowl and leave for a little while to swell. Add the cooled onion and the egg, and mix everything together well. In a separate bowl, mix the beef, veal and pork so they are thoroughly combined. Add them to the bread and cream, season well, then mix everything together. Shape the mixture into balls the size of a small walnut. Melt a knob of butter in a large frying pan or skillet over a medium heat. Fry the meatballs until brown all over. Serves: 4 The Nordic Cookbook (Phaidon Press) by Magnus Nilsson is out now.

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The designer whose creativity extends past the realms of fashion.   It’s to be expected that The Dark Lord of High Fashion would eschew traditional design and materials in favor of something a little more avant-garde with his collection of interior pieces – this is the man who once stated he ‘would lay a black glittering turd on the white landscape of conformity’ after all. Including a naked wax effigy of himself urinating on the floor and the life-sized models holding up the tables and chairs of his Hong Kong flagship store (an irreverent nod to Allen Jones’ 1969 Hatstand, Table & Chair), his esoteric sculptures are but one aspect of the multidisciplinary designer’s extra-curricular pursuits. Describing his inspirations as ‘Biblical, Brutalist, Bauhaus and Bakersfield’, Owens’ furniture marries the minimalist with the ostentatious – much in the same way as his eponymous clothing line does. In a signature minimalist palette, pieces are crafted from 500,000 year old petrified wood, stark white ox bone and Basalt; a dark lava stone that makes up ocean floors and surfaces the moon. “I would love to say I will be using Lunar Basalt, but I have had to accept that I’ll have to settle for Indonesian material” says Rick. Though ultimately functional – his antler-bearing Tomb Stag Bench and Curial chairs don’t necessarily facilitate casual lounging on a Sunday evening (“sentimental cosiness is not my thing”) – they will inspire the envy of dinner guests regardless. The piece de resistance is an alabaster and marble bed first presented in 2010 – yours if you have a spare $216,000 that you’ve been saving for a rainy day. RickOwens.eu S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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s i n Agrrey e g n a l e m Acne Studios Arnis grey melange are felt slippers with applicated knots. It comes with a leather sole in sacchetto construction., Knot details, Leather soles, Soft comfort, AcneStudios.com S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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A Celebration of Man is a visual art project. Dedicated to the love of  photography and to the pure aesthetics of men. A project by photographer Reno Mezger and curator Uta von Fintel. All men presented are models from prestigious model agencies and are photographed exclusively for the project. In their everyday jobs, models are part of a sales pitch. Their bodies are vehicles of commercially fueled dreams. A Celebration of Man gives each and every man time and space to show who they really are. The visual art project, incorporating photography and filmmaking and spanning over 2 years, and is an ongoing collaboration between Uta von Fintel, who is curating all the imagery and pulling the strings behind the scenes, between Leica Fotografie International (LFI) and me, as the photographer and director. All men pose nude.Nudity is the key to self-being. Each picture captures a moment between moments – an intimate encounter. A journey so to speak. There is no preset path, apart from intimacy, honesty and authenticity. A Celebration of Man will be published this year in 2017. ACelebrationOfMan.com


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Norwegian Woods ANDREAS LIE

Andreas Lie is an engineering student from Haugesund, now living in Bergen, Norway. He's 25 and has found an international audience with his work, most notably with the series "Norwegian Wood" that merges portraits of Norwegian animals with the landscapes in which they live. The use of digital double exposure – a process which involves merging two unique photographs to create one piece of art - provides a unique and wonderful expression, and by using a simple idea in a new way he's quickly become a recognizable artist. Lie’s images reflect a deep appreciation for nature and the wildlife that inhabits the wilderness near his home. He is fortunate to live in a place surrounded by majestic mountains and wild spaces, which are undoubtedly an inexhaustible source of inspiration for him in his work. His unique images typically feature a single animal, set in sharp contrast to the negative space that surrounds it, and filled with images of their natural habitats. Contained within the stark shape of the animal you’ll find forest scenes, mountains, water, and other scenic vistas that are then blended seamlessly with the texture of the animal’s fur or feathers, as the case may be. Where does your inspiration come from? What made you start this animal series? I decided to start making prints for sale in late may 2014, in the beginning my first prints was of black silhouette animals with some mountain layered over it. I would rather call it texture work than double exposure. Gradually after I started experimenting with the double exposure style with people. The transition to do the same thing with animals was a natural one. I get a lot of inspiration by admiring other artists work, there are many great artists out there. But the ideas come to me while I'm in the shower, on a mountain hike or something like this. When I'm not working with it. 

photo courtesy of ANDREAS LIE

AndreasLie.com


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MARK MICHAELSON

g n i t s Arre Faces The faces are "right out of central casting," says Mark Michaelson. For a decade, the graphic designer collected old mug shots—he got them from a retired cop in Scranton, Pennsylvania, from a file cabinet bought at a Georgia auction and stuffed with pictures, and from eBay—until he had tens of thousands. All of them might have remained the personal collection of this self-described pack rat. But with the growing popularity of vernacular, or found, photographs, Michaelson's trove suddenly had wider appeal. This past fall, he exhibited the mug shots in a New York City gallery and published them in a book slicker than an L.A. loan shark.

on pink cards; and the racism, as in the description of a Missouri man (a "close mouthed Negro who is probably committing burglaries"), who was arrested in 1938 for stealing "several pairs of stockings."

Michaelson, who has worked at Newsweek, Radar and other magazines, got interested in underworld imagery after a friend gave him a Wanted poster of Patty Hearst. For his collection, however, he avoided famous people and notorious criminals in favor of what he calls "the smalltimers, the least wanted." His book is even called Least Wanted: A Century of American Mugshots. It is a sort of accidental tour of the crooked, down and out or unlucky. But because Michaelson, 51, knows little or nothing about most of the subjects, readers have to supply the backstory. "I don't have any more info than what the viewer gets," Michaelson says in a telephone interview from Berlin, where he now lives.

He has also posted a portion of his collection on the photo-sharing Web site Flickr.com, where people discuss and rate photographs. Responding to a shot of a thinfaced, exhausted-looking Minneapolis woman arrested in 1963, one commentator wrote, "She looks [like] a mean one, doesn't she?" Another said, "That's some serious Minnesotan crossbreeding." And another: "We can tell by her lack of make-up, oral hygiene and feminine charms that it most likely wasn't hooking." Reading the comments, one gets the feeling that Michaelson's mug shots encourage a kind of voyeurism, which doesn't always bring out the best in people. But we are drawn to the photographs by their undeniable authenticity. In this day of flickering instantaneous images and photo-manipulation software, the mugs stare back as rare artifacts. "In an increasingly digital world," Michaelson notes in the book, "the hard copy original is an endangered species." Yet there's something else. The Least Wanted images intrigue us in the way a collection of old passport photos might not. A mug shot captures people at their lowest or most vulnerable. We look hard at their faces, calculating guilt or innocence. And then look harder.

flickr.com/photos/leastwanted

photo courtesy of MARK MICHAELSON

Why, exactly, were the pair of Fresno cross-dressers—clad like modest housewives—arrested on successive Tuesdays in 1963? What sort of upbringing, if that's the word, befell a Pennsylvania boy known as Mouse, who was arrested in the 1940s at ages 13, 14 and 18? We can only wonder. If the pictures are short on detail, they still add up to a vivid, impressionistic archive of American metamorphosis: bowler hats and beehives; Depression-era vagrancy and a 1970s narcotics bust; the arrival of Irish, German and Italian immigrants; the first wave of anti-Communism, in the 1930s, with the accused Communists' mugs mounted

The New York Times called the pictures "a catalog of the human face and the things that can happen to it." But Michaelson is interested in the photographs as pop artworks, too, à la Andy Warhol. To that end, he has blown some of them up to poster size, stamped them with a number and signed his name. A gallery in Rome was scheduled to exhibit those works this past month.


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MARITE MASTINA–PETERKOPA ROLANDS PETERKOPS

s ’ l o r n u e r a M A multi-disciplinary superstar, Mareunrol’s is comprised of Marite Mastina–Peterkopa and Rolands Peterkops, both of whom work in set design as well as costume construction. Honing in on their Spring/ Summer 2017 collection shown in Paris a few weeks prior, the Latvian brand defines its creative vision with razor-sharp coherence. The chosen textiles are hyper-textural, a stunning marriage to the monochrome blue sobriety. Many of the fabrics appear, in one way or another, quilted or crumpled. But the absolute stand-out is the hand-plaited baseball jacket. Beautifully dimensional, it embraced both movement and tactility into its design concept. A pair of shorts was also done with the same woven technique, though flatter and with a tighter construction that emulated a basket weave. The second half of Mareunrol’s collection takes a turn, using a pale beige to execute a few silhouettes that are really anything but. Multi-layered shorts are effortlessly draped against a wide-sleeved poncho-cape hybrid, while the straight cut coat is all-encompassing in its heft. Mareunrol’s articulates its designs with a distinctly European modesty. Never clamoring for attention, the brand instead becomes an object of envy through its dedication to artistic craft and construction.

photo courtesy of MARENNROL'S

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photography

WANDER AGUIAR

WanderAguiar.com model

CAYLAN HUGHES photography assistant ANDREY BAHIA

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ADAM C. FREIRE

Adam-Freire-Photography.tumblr.com model

CHRISTIAN MAZZILLI

instagram @mazzimahn stylist & makeup PAUL LANGILL

PaulMatthewManagement.com hair

PAUL PEREIRA

PaulMatthewManagement.com

all clothing JOHN VARVATOS


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all clothing JOHN VARVATOS bracelet NERON by CAROLINE NERON


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Books With its brilliant writing, spot-on acting, faultless art direction, and impeccable costume design, Mad Men is a landmark for cable television. Never before has a period series offered such compelling plotlines alongside such painstaking attention to detail and accuracy. As the show’s personal and professional machinations evolve, so too are the minutiae and the milestones of history in motion, from the shifting height of hemlines to the struggles of the civil rights movement. This book is TASCHEN’s tribute to Mad Men’s television art. Volume 1 chronicles the show’s seven seasons with sequential stills alongside key script excerpts. From a sideways glance to a cavorting office Christmas party, each frame captivates in its masterful visual storytelling, its choreography of people, places, and situations down to the most discrete, dynamic detail. Volume 2 brings a wealth of behind-the-scenes insights with on-set photographs, production ephemera, costume designs, notes from the writers’ room, as well as extensive and candid interviews with the show’s creator. From the plot twists that took our breath away to the unforgettable outfits, from the shapes and textures of ’60s decor to the very real intricacies of relationships, discover the ideas, inspirations, and talents that brought human lives and human history together on the small screen. Taschen.com p .

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From Rio to London, Cusco to Seville, Mario Testino is renowned for his free-spirited chronicles of dress and demeanor. In SIR, his largest book to-date, the influential photographer presents over 300 photographs in his search to define the allure of men. Featuring an essay by Pierre Borhan, an interview with Patrick Kinmonth, and many previously unpublished works from Testino’s archive of thousands, this book traces the evolution of male identity over the past three decades. Costume, tradition, gender play, portraiture, photojournalism, and fashion collide as Testino observes masculinity in all its modern manifestations: through the dandy and the gentleman, the macho and the fey, the world-famous face to the unknown passerby. Every photograph represents a unique point of view, and a new visual connection between photographer and sitter. With Josh Hartnett for VMAN (2005), Testino evokes the fall of Helmut Berger in the abyss of Luchino Visconti’s The Damned. Studies of Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Jude Law and Colin Firth are as candid as they are curious. David Beckham, David Bowie, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards feature for the courage they have taken in redefining male identity. Through a kaleidoscope of guises, these portraits define a period in which men’s changing role, style and appearance has never escaped Testino’s eye and impeccable intuition. Taschen.com S AT E L L I T E - MAG. COM

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No XLVIII Martin Edmund & Gabe Laduke by Inked Kenny