Issuu on Google+

TURNER CONTEMPORARY, MARGATE DAVID CHIPPERFIELD AT 3.1 CASE STUDY REPORT Matthew Pickersgill 33263670 Sam Stalker 77065051 Nino Takvarelia 33272572 Sarah Wardrope 77082097


TURNER CONTEMPORARY - DAVID CHIPPERFIELD Contemporary Margate is a town with serious economic difficulties, and unemployment rates are far higher than the national average. The new gallery, clearly intended to help revive its fortunes, is the flagship of a new ‘cultural quarter’. Like many towns, particularly down-at-heel seaside ones, Margate has pinned a lot of hope on culture as a tool of regeneration. This project is a technical study that will be analyised in the following sections; • • • • • • • • • •

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE MATERIALS, CONSTRUCTION & DETAILED DESIGN FIRE STRATEGY ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS - SITE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS - PROGRAMME ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - HEATING, COOLING & VENTILATION ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - LIGHTING SUSTAINABILITY - ENVIRONMENT CONCLUSION


STRUCTURAL SYSTEM


GROUND FLOOR Concrete walls are load bearing which carry the weight of the structure.

Window mullions are also structural to allow the large openings to occur on the elevations.


FIRST FLOOR Concrete walls are load bearing which carry the weight of the structure.

Window mullions are also structural to allow the large openings to occur on the elevations.


STEEL BEAMS AND METAL DECKING


IN-SITU CONCRETE ROOF AND RIBBED CONCRETE FLOOR


IN-SITU CONCRETE WALLS


STRUCTURAL GLAZING


PLINTH AND FOUNDATIONS

PILE


DEAD LOAD Weight of structure


DEAD LOAD Weight of structure


DEAD LOAD Weight of structure


DEAD LOAD Weight of structure


DEAD LOAD Transferred across to the load bearing concrete walls


DEAD LOAD Transferred down into the foundations


DEAD LOAD The load is absorbed by the ground


LIVE LOAD Activity on the floors distributed again to the load bearing concrete walls.


LIVE LOAD Tensile strength provided for with reinforcement bars set within the concrete, providing bracing strength against live loads such as wind.


METAL DECKING Roof structure held with a deep metal decking


STEEL BEAMS Decking rests on top of steel beams which carry loads to the concrete walls


CONCRETE WALL - TOP Steels rest on top of concrete structure


STRUCTURAL MULLIONS Mullions to the window openings carry the loads from the top of the wall to the bottom


CONCRETE STRUCTURE BOTTOM Load carried to the bottom of the concrete structure


CONCRETE FLOOR Floor structure loads and wall strucuture loads meet.


FOUNDATION WALL Loads from wall and floor structure carried to foundations


CONCRETE RING BEAM Loads carried through to ring beam foundation


CONCRETE PILES Foundations pinned to the ground with the pile foundations


GROUND Loads off building opposed with the ground and distributed.


CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE


Pile holes are sunk. A steel reneforcing structure is then lowered in to the hole these piles also include the ground source heat pump pipe network so these pipes are attached to the re bar cage and the whole assembly is lowered in to the ground the concrete is then poured leaving some of the reneforment exposed for attachment to the Ring beam.


The Piles are joined to form a perimiter that forms the supporting system for the buiding the ring beam then forms the base which spreads the load of the raft carrying the building. the ring beam is cast in the ground using wooden shuttering with a metal renfocement in the centre. the re enforing structures both from the pile and the ring beam are tied or welded together. concrete is then poured.


Re enforcing bar is again left exposed from the top of the ring beam from there the plinth Part of the raft that the building rests upon will attach too. At this point Insulation is added to the shallowest side of the raft and undernoeth where the pad will be cast to prevent thermal bridging.


Legs of raft are then cast with rebar connections bent to ninety degrees. the sides of this are lined with insulation to prevent cold bridging. as shown in detail Also here we see the casting in of duct work that will allow services in to the structure


A Rebar cage is then positioned over the insulation and a set of form work is used to cast the slab of concrete in to this service ducts are also cast thought the reenforcing


The ribbing seen on the underside of the first floor slab these act as extra joists to sprad the load across the room to the lower load bearing walls. the joists are re-enforced .


Once the slab cast Acro props are used to maintain the structure before the structural mullion windows are fitted.


The Process of Reneforcment and shuttering is continued to form the wall


The Mullion Window Frames are key to large windows that this building enjoys but to allow the building to feel somewhat more subtle and placed within its environment.


The Foam Insulation sits in front of the DPM as seen in detail however it is water resistant by itself, the specification is similar to that of Kingspan Kooltherm.


Structual mullions added


The Foam Insulation sits in front of the DPM as seen in detail however it is water resistant by itself, the specification is similar to that of Kingspan Kooltherm.


Flat Roof Sections are cast and insulated


Roof I Beams


Insulation


Roof skin


MATERIALS, CONSTRUCTION & DETAILED DESIGN


SECTION LOCATION


EXISTING GROUND


TRENCH DUG


PILES DUG


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE PILES


SAND BINDING


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE RING BEAM


IN-SITU CONCRETE RING BEAM


FORMWORK


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


BLOCKWORK


SAND BINDING


PRE-CAST CONCRETE


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


GROUND BUILT UP


SAND BINDING


GROUND LEVELLED


HARDCORE


IN-SITU CONCRETE


SAND BINDING


PAVING SETTS


SAND BINDING


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE


FORMWORK


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


TEMPORARY SUPPORTS


FORMWORK


REINFORCEMENT BARS


IN-SITU CONCRETE


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


FORMWORK DECONSTRUCTED


DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE


BASE PLATE


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


UNDERFLOOR HEATING


IN-SITU CONCRETE


SCREED FINISH


SCREED FINISH


PVC RUN OFF


DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE


STEEL SUPPORT


BRACKET FIXING


CLADDING BRACKET


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


ACID ETCHED CLADDING PANELS


ACID ETCHED CLADDING PANELS


INSECT GRILL


INSECT GRILL


INSECT GRILL


DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE


STEEL ‘C’ BEAM


STEEL SUPPORTS -

WITH PROVISION

FOR MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL


ELECTRICAL WIRING


TRENCH HEATER CASEWORK


HEATING TUBING


STEEL ‘C’ SECTION


METAL STUD FRAMEWORK


OSB


PLASTERBOARD


PLASTERBOARD


PVC CAP


RECTANGULAR HOLLOW SECTION


PVC CAP


DAMP CONTINUED

PROOF

MEMBRANE

-


STEEL PLATE


VENTILATION GRILL


VENTILATION GRILL


STRUCTURAL STEEL MULLIONS


GLAZING SPACER


STEEL ENCLOSURE


GLAZING


EXTERNAL TRACKS


EXTERNAL TRACKS


HORIZONTAL MULLION


GLAZING SPACER


GLAZING


GLAZING


STEEL SECTIONS


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


KOOLTHERME INSULATION


BLINDS BRACKET


BLINDS


BLINDS


BLINDS


METAL STUD FRAMEWORK


PLASTERBOARD


PLASTERBOARD


STRUCTURAL STEEL ‘I’ BEAM


METAL DECK


SUSPENDED CEILING


TIMBER FRAMEWORK


INSULATION


TIMBER FRAMEWORK


INSULATION


OSB


DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE


ZINC SHEETING


STANDING SEAM ZINC FINISH


STANDING SEAM ZINC FINISH


PVC CAP TO PANELS


PVC CAP TO ROOF JUNCTION


COMPLETE SECTION


FIRE STRATEGY


GROUND FLOOR Compartment Zone 1


GROUND FLOOR Compartment Zone 2


GROUND FLOOR Escape Stair 1 & Fire Exit


GROUND FLOOR Compartment Zone 3


GROUND FLOOR Compartment Zone 4


GROUND FLOOR Escape Stair 2 & Fire Exit


GROUND FLOOR Fire Doors


GROUND FLOOR Escape Routes


GROUND FLOOR Emergency Lighting


GROUND FLOOR Call Points


GROUND FLOOR Smoke Detectors


GROUND FLOOR Alarm Sounders


FIRST FLOOR Compartment Zone 1


FIRST FLOOR Compartment Zone 2


FIRST FLOOR Escape Stair 1 & Fire Exit


FIRST FLOOR Compartment Zone 3


FIRST FLOOR Compartment Zone 4


FIRST FLOOR Escape Stair 2 & Fire Exit


FIRST FLOOR Fire Doors


FIRST FLOOR Escape Routes


FIRST FLOOR Emergency Lighting


FIRST FLOOR Call Points


FIRST FLOOR Smoke Detectors


FIRST FLOOR Alarm Sounders


ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS - SITE


ACCESS •

During construction work access to the sea was required by the RNLI at all times.

As the lifeboat station was inside the construction site special arrangements were made in order to accommodate this.

If the contractor needed to use the access route for construction works, then the lifeboat could be parked, with security, on the Harbour Arm to the West until the site was cleared for the boat to be moved back inside the RNLI building.


SOLAR There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, Designed to maximise both its dramatic setting and the area’s unique light conditions – those that inspired Turner himself over a century ago – the opaque white glass cladding, panoramic views and nautical appearance offer an inspiring new outlook for the seaside town.


8am

10am

12pm

2pm

4pm


8am

10am

12pm

2pm

4pm


SOLAR - NORTH LIGHT North light, commonly known as reflected light or indirect light, produces cool and controlled value shifts. With a north light window the artist does not have to dread the effects of sun moving through the studio at different angles during the day. North light basks the subject matter and painting in the same cool atmosphere. This helps the artist have far greater control over values, contrasts and subtle color changes within a painting.


WIND - MACRO SCALE South East England is one of the more sheltered parts of the UK The wind typically starts to blow from the south or south-west, but later comes from the west or north-west as the Atlantic depression moves away. The prevailing wind for the UK is from the south-west. Winds are strongest near westerly facing coasts.


WIND - MESO SCALE Coastal areas experience sea breezes from late spring through the summer, caused by the temperature differential between the sea and the warmer land. Predominately North-easterly wind. Average wind speed 9 knots.


WIND - AXO The brunt of the sea wind is hit head on by the north facing facade of the building, acting as a shield wall to the entrance around the opposite side.


North Easterly Sea wind STRONG

Wind dams up against the side of the building, creating areas of high pressure and increased wind speed

The wind then moves past the back of the obstacle and a huge low pressure area is created that causes the wind to curl in to fill the void.

Strong eddy winds are created downwind of the building

WIND ANALYSIS Despite the entrance, being located on the south side of the building, having shelter from the sea breeze, eddy winds are still created around the foyer.


FLOOD RISK Thanet has few areas of low lying land that are at risk of flooding from the sea, however the densely populated Old Town area of Margate falls within one of these areas. The existing flood defence (the sea wall) was constructed in the late 1950’s and is now in need of replacement. The long term effects of climate change on sea levels mean that a simple ‘like for like’ replacement of the defences would not be suitable. New flood defences must therefore be designed with the future in mind and must also have a long service life.


FLOOD RISK Work on a landmark scheme to protect Margate from flooding in the future has now started. The standard of flood defence is currently as low as 1:20, this means anything more severe than a 1 in 20 year storm would cause flooding in the town.  The new scheme will increase this defence standard to 1:200 for the next 50 years. 


STONE PIER November 2011-March 2012 • •

Strengthening of the Stone Pier Protection of the foundations using steel sheet piles, and cement grout to strengthen loose chalk core.

SLIPWAY AREA April 2012-August 2012

NORTH WALL April 2012-August 2012 • •

REVETMENT November 2011-December 2012

Sea wall reconstruction of • the North sea wall Including floodgates which • will be closed in the event of a flood warning.

SOUTH WALL January 2012-May 2012

New stepped structure 200m • long Absorbs wave energy during • storms preventing waves from spilling over onto the pavement and road.

Sea wall reconstruction of the South sea wall Including floodgates which will be closed in the event of a flood warning.


PROBABILITY OF FLOODING

FLOOD RISK

HIGHLY UNLIKELY

It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


PROBABILITY OF FLOODING

FLOOD RISK

UNLIKELY

It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


PROBABILITY OF FLOODING

FLOOD RISK

LIKELY

It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


TIDAL FLOOD ZONE 2 EXTENT FLOOD RISK IN IN IN IN

THE THE THE THE

YEAR YEAR YEAR YEAR

2005 2026 2080 2115

It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


TIDAL FLOOD ZONE 3 EXTENT FLOOD RISK IN IN IN IN

THE THE THE THE

YEAR YEAR YEAR YEAR

2005 2026 2080 2115

It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


200 YEAR TIDAL EXTENT UNDEFENDED IN THE YEAR 2005 IN THE YEAR 2115

FLOOD RISK It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


1000 YEAR TIDAL EXTENT UNDEFENDED IN THE YEAR 2005 IN THE YEAR 2115

FLOOD RISK It was built on the raised promenade following a flood risk analysis. “We are not really in the town and are not quite in the sea so it is quite a tough site,” he said. “We are sitting a reasonable way back from the harbour wall but this building still gets hit by overspill.” (David Chipperfield)


SEA WALL HEIGHT

FLOOD RISK the building has been raised onto a plinth which is in line with the current of the sea wall, meaning that the ground floor level has protection against the tide.


ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS - PROGRAMME


GROUND FLOOR - CAFE •

• • • •

South lighting and south facing view (large glazed opening) Artificial lighting when needed Natural ventilation – doors open onto outside seating Artificial ventilation when needed Under-floor heating


GROUND FLOOR - KITCHEN • •

Artificial lighting Artificial ventilation (especially needed for kitchen appliances such as oven)


GROUND FLOOR - MAIN RECEPTION, GROUND-FLOOR GALLERY & RECEPTION •

• • •

North lighting (large glazed opening) and artificial lighting (controlled for specific types of art) South lighting for the shop (large glazed opening) Artificial ventilation Under-floor heating for the shop


GROUND FLOOR - MULTI-FUNCTION / LECTURE SPACE • •

• • • •

North lighting and terrace with a view of the sea Artificial lighting and window blinds to gain more control of light for projection presentations Artificial ventilation Under-floor heating Sound – strips of speakers on the ceiling for presentations -Sound-proof curtain


GROUND FLOOR - STORAGE •

•

Artificial ventilation - Set ventilation/temperature for art to avoid deterioration Artificial lighting - set lighting for art to avoid deterioration


GROUND SPACE • •

FLOOR

-

WORKSHOP

North lighting, north facing view (large glazed opening) Artificial ventilation - Set temperature for people to work in Humidity – artificially controlled to avoid condensation


GROUND SPACES •

FLOOR

-

GALLERY

Artificial lighting – Set lighting for specific types of art. Light should be low enough to avoid object deterioration, but bright enough for viewing. Artificial ventilation - set temperature to avoid art deterioration Humidity – artificially controlled so that the art work isn’t damaged by condensation


GROUND FLOOR - ADMINISTRATION OFFICES • • •

Under-floor heating North and south lighting and facing views Artificial ventilation - Set temperature and ventilation when needed Natural ventilation through opening windows (by 10%)


ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - HEATING, COOLING & VENTIILATION


HEATING STRATEGIES •

Boiler house and plant rooms

Under-floor heating

Trench Heating

Surface mounted steel panel radiators

Gas fired boilers and heat pump

Low Temperature Hot Water System (LTHW)


Boilers and Plant rooms Heat Pump Gas supply Gas and Water Meter

BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS • Gas supply to boiler house (for two boilers) through cavity in the retaining wall • •

A new natural gas supply has been provided to serve the Turner Contemporary Arts Gallery complete with a gas meter The gas main serves the new boilers The internal gas pipe-work is installed using heavy weight mild steel tube


BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS •

West Mezzanine Plant room provides services to block A


BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS •

Central Mezzanine Plant room


BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS • •

Central Mezzanine Plant room serves block B


BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS •

East Mezzanine Plant room


BOILERHOUSE AND PLANT ROOMS • •

East Mezzanine Plant room serves block C and D


Floor finish

Edge insulation

Floor screed

Insulated tacker panel Under-floor heating pipes UNDER-FLOOR HEATING • Concrete sub floor Tacker clips

Continuous coils of pipe, 12mm in diameter and approximately 60m long Maintains a very even temperature gradient and gives off about 50% of the heat by ratiation.


Ground-floor plan

UNDER-FLOOR HEATING Ground-floor axonometric diagram showing areas with under-floor heating with manifolds

Under-floor heating manifolds Under-floor heating areas


First-floor plan

UNDER-FLOOR HEATING First-floor axonometric diagram showing areas with under-floor heating with manifolds

Under-floor heating manifolds Under-floor heating areas


Glazing

TRENCH HEATING • Floor finish •

Finned element • TRENCH HEATING SHOWING AIR FLOW

A way of providing a heating system in front of full height glazing. When placed in front of glazing the trench heating will counteract down draughts and eliminate condensation. The finned element is placed towards the room so that the cold air from the glazing is heated and directed towards the room. Allows to maintain valuable wall space and required little to no maintenance


Ground-floor plan trench heating

indicating

TRENCH HEATING Ground-floor axonometric diagram showing trench heating


First-floor plan indicating trench heating

TRENCH HEATING First -floor axonometric diagram showing trench heating


Ground-floor plan indicating areas with panel radiators

SURFACE BOUND STEEL PANEL RADIATORS •

• GROUND-FLOOR AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM SHOWING AREAS WITH PANEL RADIATORS

Example of panel radiator

All radiators are fitted with a balancing lockshield valve and thermostatic radiator valve The radiators are the MHS LST steel panel radiators as manufactured by MHS Ltd.


Gas condensing boiler used in the building

GAS FIRED CONDENSING BOILERS AND GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP •

GROUND-FLOOR AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM SHOWING BOILERS AND HEAT PUMP

Boilers Heat pump

The boilers have been located within the ground-floor plant room The boilers are of the high efficiency condensing type model Vitocrossal 300 boilers with a Matrix burner as manufactured by Viessman Ltd The boilers have Riello Modulating Matrix Radiant gas fired burners.


GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP (GSHP) • •

• • • • •

• Elevation showing vertical pipes in the ground and water flow

Uses the earth as a heat source (in winter) or a heat sink (in the summer). Much more energy-efficient because underground temperatures are more stable and seasonal variations disappear below seven meters due to the thermal inertia. Reduces the costs of heating and cooling systems. Ground source heat pumps harvest heat absorbed at the Earth’s surface from solar energy. The temperature beneath the upper six meters of Earth’s surface maintains a constant temperature of 10 – 16 °C Heat pump is used to force the transfer of heat from the ground The core of the heat pump is a loop of refrigerant pumped through a vapour-compression refrigeration cycle that moves heat. Turner Contemporary has pipes running vertically in the ground. Pipe pairs in the hole are joined with a U shaped cross connector at the bottom of the hole.


LTHW flow and return

Thermal pipe insulation in the building.

LOW PRESSURE HOT WATER HEATING

Axonometric diagram showing Low Temperature Hot Water (LTHW) distribution on the groundfloor, to serve Under-floor heating, Trench heaters and surface mount steel panel radiators.

A low pressure hot water (Lphw) heating system has been set to work to serve the Turner Contemporary Arts Gallery.. The pipe work has been insulated for thermal resistance and reduction of the heat flow. Either glass wool or mineral wool insulation with a factory applied reinforced aluminium foil covering has been provided for thermal pipe insulation. This allows to provide effective vapour finish


LOW PRESSURE HOT WATER HEATING

Axonometric diagram showing Low Temperature Hot Water (LTHW) distribution on the first-floor, to serve Under-floor heating, Trench heaters and surface mount steel panel radiators.


COOLING STRATEGIES Chilled Water System


COOLING STRATEGIES New Packaged Air Cooled Water Chillers and associated equipment have been installed to serve the Turner Contemporary Arts Gallery There are three packaged air cooled water Chillers on the roof


COOLING STRATEGIES

The cooled water chillers serve the five Air Handling Units located in the three mezzanine plant rooms and the kitchen


COOLING STRATEGIES

They also serve ten Fan Coil Units located throughout the building including Admin office, lift motor rooms, and security office. Each indoor unit is provided with a condensate drain connecting to the condensate drain stack.


The Admin office has Comfort Cooling via the chilled water fan coil units so that during the summer the windows can be closed to avoid the seaweed smells present during the summer months. Wall mounted controllers for each individual unit have been provided.


The IT server room is provided with two direct expansion Air Conditioning systems that connects to the refrigerant pipes going up to the heat rejecting condensers located externally on the roof. The refrigeration pipework is installed using refrigeration grade copper tubing and all joints have been brazed. Pipework has been thermally insulated with ‘Class O’ Armaflex.


VENTILATION STRATEGIES Mechanical ventilation Natural ventilation


MECHANICAL VENTILATION New fresh air supply and extract mechanical ventilation systems have been installed to serve the Turner Contemporary Arts Gallery. The system consists of five air handling units, with ductwork distribution systems to provide fresh air and to discharge stale air to atmosphere


MECHANICAL VENTILATION Air Handling unit No 4 is located in the west mezzanine plantroom. This unit serves the studio on the first floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the desired space.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

This Air Handling Unit serves the studio located on the first floor. The studio is one of the humidity controlled spaces and so humidifier equipment are located into the supply ducts.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling Unit No 5 is located in the ground-floor kitchen. Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the desired space.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

This Air Handling Unit serves the cafĂŠ and the dry store located on the ground-floor


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air from the dry store, studio and cafĂŠ is returned via ductwork to the air handling unit to be reused. Air from the WC is discharged to the atmosphere in the chilled compound located on the roof.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION Air Handing Unit No 5 also serves the kitchen. The extract system in kitchen consists of roof mounted extract fan with a fire rated ductwork. Air from the kitchen is discharged to atmosphere on the roof complete with bird mesh screen.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling Unit No 3 is located in the central mezzanine plantroom. This unit serves the gallery No 1, balcony and the reception.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the reception area.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the reception area.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the Gallery No 1 and balcony area..


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the Gallery No 1 and balcony area..


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air from the reception, gallery and balcony is returned through void to the roof where two air extract ducts are located complete with mesh.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling unit No 2 is located in the east mezzanine plantroom. This unit serves the multifunction rooms and multi-function corridor on the ground-floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the multifunction rooms and corridor


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the multifunction rooms and corridor


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the multifunction rooms and corridor


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

WC extract system consist of ceiling mounted grilles with ductwork


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air is extracted from the main WC’s located on the ground-floor and discharged to atmosphere. Air extracted from the multifunction room returns to the Air Handling Unit


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling unit No 1 is located in the east mezzanine plantroom. This unit serves the main galleries on the first-floor. It also serves the art store and workshop on the ground-floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the desired space. This Air Handling Unit serves the galleries located on the first floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

The located gallery is one of the humidity controlled spaces. therefore humidifier equipment has been installed into the supply ducts.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the desired space. This Air Handling Unit serves the galleries located on the first floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

The located gallery is one of the humidity controlled spaces. therefore humidifier equipment has been installed into the supply ducts.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the desired space. This Air Handling Unit serves the galleries located on the first floor.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

The located gallery is one of the humidity controlled spaces. therefore humidifier equipment has been installed into the supply ducts.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air is extracted from the first floor galleries and returned to the Air Handling Unit, where it is mixed with the fresh air and re-circulated.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling unit No 1 in the east mezzanine plantroom also serves the art store and the workshop located on the ground-floor. Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the art store and the workshop.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Handling unit No 1 in the east mezzanine plantroom also serves the art store and the workshop located on the ground-floor. Fresh air is provided to the Air handling unit, where it is chilled and then distributed to the art store and the workshop.


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air is extracted from the art store and workshop via ducts is discharged to the atmosphere at roof level


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Workshop and loading bay have a seperate air extract system


MECHANICAL VENTILATION

Air Extract system via ductwork is indicated on the diagram. It discharges air to atmosphere via ductwork that leaves the building through loading bay


NATURAL VENTILATION Natural ventilation is provided in the CafĂŠ area located on the ground-floor. This occurs during warm weather when outside seating can be used. Cold Air enters via the glazing


NATURAL VENTILATION

The glazing consists of three doors opening to outside where the outside seating is provided.


NATURAL VENTILATION

Cold air enters the café area.


NATURAL VENTILATION

As the air warms up it rises


NATURAL VENTILATION

Warm air leaves the area through the glazing openings and it is replaced by cooler air coming in from below


NATURAL VENTILATION Natural ventilation is provided in the Admin office located on the first-floor. This occurs when the staff ventilate the office naturally via north facing window openings.


NATURAL VENTILATION

Cold Air enters through the open windows.


NATURAL VENTILATION

Cold Air enters through the open windows.


NATURAL VENTILATION

Cold air starts to rise up as it gets warmer


NATURAL VENTILATION

Warm air leaves the office through the open window and is replaced by cooler incoming air from below.


ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS - LIGHTING


INTERNAL LIGHTING - GENERAL LIGHTING for Art Galleries has a unique set of priorities, those of conservation and effective display. In many ways these two requirements conflict as there is a necessity to restrain lighting levels to promote the former whilst the latter requires sufficient light of a high quality to provide optimum viewing conditions. • • •

Lighting levels should be maintained between 50 and 100 lux, depending on the light sensitivity of the exhibited work. Level of toleration is dependant upon the inks or pigments within the work, as well as the length of the exhibition. A maximum exhibition length should initially be determined for each exhibited item based on its light sensitivity, anticipated light level, and its cumulative past and projected exhibition exposure. Lights should be turned off, or lowered when no visitors are present within the exhibition.


8am

10am

12pm

2pm

4pm

DAYLIGHT • • •

Positive: Excellent in terms of colour rendering. Negative: Its intensity and high UV content can cause damage and degradation to exhibited work. Can be difficult and expensive to control. Solution: Control UV radiation through the use of blinds, shades, UV-filter films and UV-filtering panels in windows or cases.


SAFER OPTION •

Incandescent lamps are most suitable as they emit little to no UV radiation.

Fluorescent lamps are most common, however they can only be used when they emit a low UV output, with plastic sleeves.

Tungsten Halogen lamps are the current favourites for use as artificial lighting, however they still give off large amounts of UV radiation. They can only be used with UV filters and dimmers.


GROUND FLOOR - MAIN ENTRANCE ORIENTATION South Facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 200lux - areas that are continuously occupied areas. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Ceiling recessed, low voltage, linear downlights.


GROUND FLOOR - CAFE ORIENTATION South Facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 200lux - areas that are continuously occupied areas. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Ceiling recessed fluorescent downlights (T5 lamps) Adjustable spotlights.


GROUND FLOOR - CAFE ORIENTATION South Facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 200lux - areas that are continuously occupied areas. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Ceiling recessed fluorescent downlights (T5 lamps) Adjustable spotlights.


GROUND FLOOR - CAFE ORIENTATION South facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 500lux - essential due to working tasks A separate control zone is required for this area of the cafĂŠ to accommodate task lighting for staff. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Ceiling recessed fluorescent downlights (T5 lamps) Adjustable spotlights.


GROUND FLOOR - RECEPTION ORIENTATION North and South facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 200lux for an area continuously occupied by the public. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted low voltage linear fluorescent downlights, located between structural beams.


GROUND FLOOR - RECEPTION DAYLIGHT CONTROL There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, and a band of roof lights with diffusers at the centre, which are all provided with blackout facilities if required.


GROUND FLOOR - RECEPTION DAYLIGHT CONTROL There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, and a band of roof lights with diffusers at the centre, which are all provided with blackout facilities if required.


GROUND FLOOR - LOBBY LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 100lux – transition space, where only limited visibility is needed. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Integrated ‘light box’ within balustrade. Ceiling recessed, low voltage linear downlights within lift.


GROUND FLOOR - CORRIDOR ORIENTATION South facing, however limited natural daylightvavailable. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 100lux – transition space, where only limited visibility is needed. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Ceiling recessed, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights to corridors. Ceiling recessed, low voltage, compact fluorecent downlights to vestibule areas.


GROUND FLOOR - LECTURE 1 ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for lecture spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Surface mounted, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights, located within structural beams. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


GROUND FLOOR - LECTURE 1 ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for lecture spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Surface mounted, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights, located within structural beams. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


GROUND FLOOR - LECTURE 1 ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for lecture spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Surface mounted, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights, located within structural beams. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


GROUND FLOOR - LECTURE 2 ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for lecture spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Surface mounted, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights, located within structural beams. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


GROUND FLOOR - LECTURE 3 ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for lecture spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Surface mounted, low voltage, linear fluorescent downlights, located within structural beams. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - WORKSHOP ORIENTATION North facing windows- produces cool and controlled value shifts. South facing ‘light box’ providing diffused light. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for classrooms and workshop spaces. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - WORKSHOP DAYLIGHT CONTROL There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, and a band of roof lights with diffusers at the centre, which are all provided with blackout facilities if required.


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERY 1 ORIENTATION North facing windows - produces cool and controlled value shifts. South facing ‘light box’ providing diffused light. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 50-200lux – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERY 1 DAYLIGHT CONTROL There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, and a band of roof lights with diffusers at the centre, which are all provided with blackout facilities if required.


FIRST FLOOR - MEZZANINE ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 100lux – transition space, where only limited visibility is needed. Up to 200lux for Mezzanine – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Integrated ‘light balustrade.

box’

within

Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with adjustable low voltage spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield.


FIRST FLOOR - VOID SPACE ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 50-200lux – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level.


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERY 2 ORIENTATION North facing windows- produces cool and controlled value shifts. South facing ‘light box’ providing diffused light. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 50-200lux – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERY CORRIDOR ORIENTATION North facing windows - produces cool and controlled value shifts. South facing ‘light box’ providing diffused light. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 50-200lux – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERY 3 ORIENTATION North facing windows - produces cool and controlled value shifts. South facing ‘light box’ providing diffused light. SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 50-200lux – exhibition dependant. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTS Light box, with black-out option, located at high level. Surface mounted track, with spotlights, designed by David Chipperfield. Zumtobel: ARCOS 1 Innovative thermal design delivers COOL TOUCH function Spotlight rotates through 365° and pivots through 90° Mains voltage: 230–240 V / 50/60 Hz rated lamp voltage: 12 V


FIRST FLOOR - GALLERIES DAYLIGHT CONTROLS There is natural lighting in each gallery by a north light at high level, and a band of roof lights with diffusers at the centre, which are all provided with blackout facilities if required.


FIRST FLOOR - LOBBY LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 100lux – transition space, where only limited visibility is needed.

ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


FIRST FLOOR - OFFICE ORIENTATION North and South facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited SOLAR SHADING Blinds LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 500lux – well lit office ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


FIRST FLOOR - PRINT ROOM LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – minimum for easy reading ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


FIRST FLOOR - PRIVATE OFFICE ORIENTATION North facing - produces cool and controlled value shifts. SOLAR SHADING Blinds LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 500lux – well lit office ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


FIRST FLOOR - KITCHEN LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – general room levels 500-750lux – worktop levels, where high visibility may be needed. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


FIRST FLOOR - MEETING ROOMS ORIENTATION South facing - Reduction in energy consumption by making use of natural daylight; Need for artificial lighting limited SOLAR SHADING Blinds. LUX LEVELS REQUIRED 300lux – required for work spaces where high visibility is only moderately required. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Surface mounted, low voltage downlightsAluminium body T16 1x28w G5 With electronic ballast 230v/ 50Hz IP20 rated


GROUND + FIRST FLOOR - STAFF + SERVICE AREAS ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING Zumtobel: LINARIA 1x1/24 T16-D Seamless diffuser


EXTERNAL LIGHTING BEGA Recessed wall and ceiling luminaires 路 Directed lightwith LED, for tungsten halogen or discharge lampsProtection class IP 65Die cast aluminium, aluminium and stainless steelSafety glassReflector of pure anodized aluminium 700 lumenColour 3000 K.

temperature


EXTERNAL LIGHTING BEGA LED bollards with rotationally symmetrical light output 360掳Protection class IP 65Die cast aluminium, aluminium and stainless steelBorosilicate glassReflector of pure anodized aluminium BEGA bollards are bolted with a mounting plate to afoundation supplied by the customer or an anchorageunit made of galvanized steel.with LED 路 with integral power supply unit 1800 lumenColour temperature 5000 K.


EXTERNAL LIGHTING BEGA LED wall luminaires with directed lightwith LED or for fluorescent lampsProtection class IP 64Die cast aluminium, aluminium and stainless steelSafety glass mattLuminaires with LED 路 with integral power supply unitColour temperature 3000 K.


EXTERNAL LIGHTING BEGA Recessed wall and ceiling luminaires 路 Directed lightwith LED, for tungsten halogen or discharge lampsProtection class IP 65Die cast aluminium, aluminium and stainless steelSafety glassReflector of pure anodized aluminium 700 lumenColour 3000 K.

temperature


SUSTAINABILITY - ENVIRONMENT


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The de-dualling - hence reduction of the width of Fort Hill to allow for additional planting areas to the south of the building with trees and shrubs


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The design of a low rise development - with mono-pitched roofs sloping towards the town


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Design of a landscaping scheme allows public access for walkers and cyclists through the site, and the maintenance of the Viking Coastal Trail for the benefit of the Margate community


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Green roof/roof garden - to the boiler house


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Relocation of the Margate Yacht Club - to a new compound to the East of the site to facilitate continued sailing activities for members


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Responsive lighting with zoning to allow separate controls and thereby control energy consumption.


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Local thermal zoning - within the building to allow control of thermal comfort to meet occupancy levels in individual spaces


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Sub-metering of substantial energy uses in the building and of the main occupancy areas in the building facilitating knowledge of and management of energy use of the building


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The use of energy efficient white goods - in the staff areas of the building


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Monitoring of C02 levels - for the building in use and the facility to regulate to adjust the building occupancy patterns


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The use of sanitary facilities and fittings - which minimize the use of potable water i.e. Dual flush WC cistern and sensor operated spray taps to all basins


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The provision of renewable energy - through a ground source heat pump to supplement gas boilers by providing up to 7% of the total building energy for both heating and cooling


DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION - DISADVANTAGES •

Pre-cast concrete – CO2 emissions for transportation of materials to the site. Large amounts of pre-cast concrete needed to be transported – large vehicles needed – more 02 emissions The cement industry (cement used in reinforced concrete for structural purposes, also for the flooring) – one of the primary producers of CO2 creating up to 5% of worldwide man-made emissions. - 50% of which is from the chemical process when calcium is thermally decomposed, producing lime and CO2, and 40% from the use of energy, particularly from burning fuel.


CONCLUSION


IMPORTANCE OF LIGHT One of the main driving forces of the Design and orientation of the Turner Gallery was to capture the infamous light qualities of the site promoted by the artist JMW Turner. Chipperfield achieved this by orientating the entire building towards the sea, basking the majority of interior spaces in North Light (Galleries included). Traditionally the lighting in Gallery spaces is required to be fully controlled in order to protect and present the exhibited work at its best, however, in this occasion Chipperfield has in theory allowed for the subtle manipulations of the North light to penetrate and effect the spaces throughout the day. The result, so we were told, is that the gallery spaces benefit from an understated luminosity that allows the exhibits to be displayed without any artificial light


IMPORTANCE OF LIGHT Unfortunately we were unable to experience this during our visit, as the current exhibition required high levels of light control and blackout blinds were in place to achieve this. It was difficult to not feel a sense of disappointment at being unable to experience the spaces as Chipperfield intended, however, it also called into question the practicality of his design. The reality may result in the spaces having black out blinds for prolonged periods of time, exhibit dependant; resulting in large numbers of visitors being deprived of the intended experience.


MATERIAL COMPOSITION The essence of what the building seems to represent is a purity and a balance of form, whereby seamless joins meet with a degree of effortlessness. The focus is orientated to the sea and to the north, the source of the views and inspiration of J. W Turner whom the gallery is named after. The intake of this focal point is what called for the subtle approach of the detail build up of the structure, whereby the joins and pieces that construct the walls are hidden from view and what we are left with is the intentional clear focus of the natural light.


MATERIAL COMPOSITION To achieve this balance several elements had to be scaled against each other to acheive a certain harmony with their placement. The area in this project report that was studied in great detail was the window sill to the large window in the entrance area. Particular interest came form the way the structural steel is able to sit onto the sill level and the necessary supports to uphold the weight sit between the maintence and electrical runs. Along with the the steel carries the load down to the concrete which also hold the cladding tracks and connects back down to the foundations.


MATERIAL COMPOSITION However despite this great care that was taken into the composition of the pure formed lines which had and underlayer of technology and infrastructure, a signifcant anchor to the detail, the concrete, was hidden from view, and as a result the true formation of the structure was hidden. I personally feel the natural material and aesthetic on the concrete should of obtained a greater presense in the finishing of the walls, further establishing this connection to natural light and beauty within simplisty and slight variance.


CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS

PLANT ROOM

NORTH LIGHT

The main Structural frame is a series of simple blocks , which are divided in to functional spaces . The gallery itself houses four major functional spaces these are the gallery’s of which there are four plus a learning studio these are roughly similar in volume and reside with the pointed roof space on the first floor with large north facing windows. The Material allows for these large windows to be positioned to collect and funnel down in to the gallery. Due to the Re enforced concrete the Architect is able to Specify large self supporting walls in this case they act as the boundary’s between the functional blocks. You enter the Gallery in to the second volume of the building taking you in to a large open room which develops into a double height space. The space is able to perform both functions without columns or supports which interrupt the flow of the space one via the strength of concrete but this alone is not always enough instead the First floor concrete slab is ribbed this effective distributes the loads from the upper story’s to the Precast concrete walls on the ground and floor. to that end this building has no visible columns the only two are located between gallery 3 & 4 and are located inside of the wall of a corridor and can act as anchoring points from which to secure doors at different points allowing for flexible spaces so simple plaster board walls can be altered or removed without effecting the structure.


CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS

GALLERY 3

A

B GALLERY 4

The Building’s use of space whilst having some interesting features allowing large spans etc. however these do not appear to be used in the most efficient way. a large proportion of space is devoted to plant space rather than to gallery or public space and perhaps the architect could have looked at where the plant was placed in relation to the buildings programme for example the eastern most block of the building is entirely private and while the language of the building suggests its removal with the of set we see that as in the other constituent blocks galleries are situated with in the north facing glazed pointed gable where as in the private area the wall is closed and the roof space filled with plant (A) whist you might get advantages to having plant at a hight point within a building for functions such as gravity water feed, there is a disregard for the space and its potential in my opinion based on my argument layout. Further to this i would suggest that the Architect has already successfully integrated plant in a non obtrusive way with the high roof space shown on plan (B)


CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS The building combines both technology and structure together to take advantage of the material properties within the structure while designing technology which integrates within the building such as the Micro energy piles which integrates the pile foundation system with the ground source heat pump.

This minimises the drilling of many holes adding cost whilst also reducing the amount of land taken up more land by having to have a pile cap from the found which would require housing or landscaping Flow and Return -Cold in Warm in some way this not only adds to the cost but will also lead to out 12 - 14 degrees designing to cover something up which should t not be encouraged, Items of plant should be designed into a built system not designed around. A similar theme is used within another of Chipperfield’s works, the Hepworth gallery in Wakefield where the site is located next to the river Calder the building uses the waster as a heat sink in order to maintain a constant temperature although this system is more likely to freeze than those seen at the margate gallery.


BIBLIOGRAPHY Burberry, P 1997: Mitchell’s Environment and Services. Harlow: Longman. Stephen Emmitt and Christopher Gorse, 2006. Barry’s Advanced Construction of Buildings. Oxford:Blackwell Publishing LTD Bell, V 2006. Materials for Architectural Design. Princeton Architectural Press, New York www.turnercontemporary.org http://www.kent.gov.uk www.davidchipperfield.co.uk www.zumtobel.com www.bega.de http://www.thanet.gov.uk www.arca53.dsl.pipex.com www.planningportal.gov.uk


David Chipperfield - Technology Casy Study