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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

week of September 4


All 3 Generations on Display Pablita Velarde

Helen Hardin

“Mother and Child” - 17” X 11” casein watercolor c.1943

“Messenger From the Sun” copper plate etching

Margarete Bagshaw

“One Universe, Many Worlds” 24” X 36” oil on panel 2014


SPeciAl exhibitioN by

S tA r l i A N A y o r k

Wisdom Keepers Friday, September 5th

W

5:00 - 7:30 p.m.

Granma’s Gifts

125 W. Palace Ave. W Santa Fe, NM W 505.501.6555 W www.SorrelSky.com


FOODIES

Galisteo Bistro in conjunction with Santa Fe Wine and Chile

now |

–SEPT 10

2014

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

THE ONCOMING CHANGE OF SEASON has me feeling a little melancholy and a little nostalgic. Friends who’ve been in Santa Fe longer than I have speak fondly about certain incredible clubs and musical venues from the past, like the Senate Bar on Galisteo Street and Claude’s on Canyon Road. I distinctly remember many fun nights spent at Club West, Cargo Club, and, more recently, The Paramount and Paolo Soleri. Each of those spots holds memories related to great music, certain romances, and a few moments I’d rather forget. They’re part of Santa Fe’s nightclub history and part of my own personal history in this town. Hopefully they’re part of yours as well. The good news is that we get to make new memories today, so that 20 years from now we’ll have additional experiences to look back on. Let’s face it: clubs change. Places that are hot today most likely won’t be hot two decades down the road, except for probably Evangelo’s, El Farol, and La Fonda. Some things, in spite of everything, will never change. Here’s to making great new memories.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

September 24th Zenato Wine Dinner September 25th Chimney Rock/Sanford Wine Dinner Five course meals with exquisite pairings. Reservations Required 505-982-3700

On August 30, The Beatles’ Yoga: A Multi-Media Concert, which was part of the first annual Santa Fe Yoga Festival, featured a performance by Emmy-nominated musician Joey Lugassy and a seven-piece ensemble. For more images of recent goings-on around town, check out Seen Around on page 18.

Dinner Tuesday - Sunday 5PM - 9PM OpenTable.com or GalisteoBistro.com

DANIEL QUAT

227 Galisteo Street, Santa Fe, NM

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DAVID ROBIN

WANTED

SEPT 4


The Wiford Gallery Presents

Lands of Enchantment by Inger Jirby

September 5, 2014 - September 17, 2014

Full Moon  at  Sanctuario  de  Chimayo

Dazzling Peach  Orchard  in  Rinconada

Dancing Trees  at  Don  Fernando’s  Morada

Featuring the beautiful landscapes, orchards and architecture of Italy, France, the Carribean, Mexico and New Mexico

Opening Friday the 5th, 5PM to 8PM

ART AS  EMISSARY


now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

amy hegarty samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program porting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

b.y. cooper

ginny stewart-jaramillo

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

Our Local TeensProgram Dreams to Careers Program Supporting Our LocalSupporting Teens Dreams to Careers Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

steven horak, cristina olds, phil parker, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

Invites you to Reaching for the Stars FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, September 20th • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm TICKETS & INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table TICKETS $50 or purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION

Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 17, Week of September 4, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

Includes Tapas, wine and beverages FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT20th AUCTION Saturday, September • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, 20th • Governor’s 5:30pm AUCTION -Mansion TAPAS -•SILENT Call 505.216.6049 for• Information ay, September 20thSeptember • Governor’s Mansion 5:30pm TICKETS &FLAMENCO INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table - TAPAS -& SILENT AUCTION FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, September • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm purchase online:20th www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org FLAMENCO -or TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION TICKETS INFORMATION: & The Spanish Table “Red Archer” by artist John Nieto &NCO INFORMATION: Alphagraphics &Alphagraphics The Spanish Table Saturday, September 20th • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm ember 20th • or Governor’s Mansion •WILL 5:30pm purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org PLEASE KNOW TICKETS NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org TICKETS & Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table Saturday, September 20th •INFORMATION: Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm TICKETS & INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table or purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org RMATION: Alphagraphics The Spanish Table orATDAY purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org ASE KNOW NOT BE & SOLD THE DOOR. LAST DAY SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH WILL NOT TICKETS BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH TICKETS &WILL INFORMATION: Alphagraphics &FOR Thefor Spanish Table Call 505.216.6049 Information PLEASE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH e online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH or PLEASE purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org Call 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information T BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH SE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE Call DOOR. LAST DAY FOR for SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH 505.216.6049 Information l 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information TITUS CHILDERS PHOTOGRAPHY

PLEASE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH

4

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On the cover: Local band Hot Honey can frequently be seen playing gigs up and down the Rio Grande Valley. For more on the group, see page 16.


the

green chile cheeseburger smackdown

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

buzz

La Sociedad Folklórica’s food and fashion celebration When Santa Fe resident and La Sociedad Folklórica de Santa Fe founder Cleofas Martinez de Jaramillo decided to hold a fashion show during the annual Fiesta de Santa Fe in 1935, she asked friends and community members to contribute historic clothing to the event. As a result, La Sociedad Folklórica—which aims to preserve Spanish Colonial customs and traditions—received dozens of outfits and began a tradition that’s still going strong 79 years later. On Saturday, September 6, the James A. Little Theater hosts Exhibición de Modas y Merienda, which will center on 128 years of fashion in Santa Fe and showcase 75 of the more than 200 outfits owned by La Sociedad Folklórica. The stars of the show are the four pieces of the wedding trousseau that belonged to Zulema Romero when she married Mariano Sena in 1886 in Los Lunas. Purchased in Kansas City, Missouri, and sent via railroad to New Mexico, the trousseau includes a royal blue afternoon dress with an elaborate black velvet design, a maroon and cream-colored two-piece dress with long fitted sleeves, a rose-colored horse-riding outfit, and a brown satin velvet skirt and top. “A lot of the women’s dresses are quite small because women married so young in those days,” says Ruth Ortega, who chose the clothing that will be on view. Among the other items worn by the fashion show’s 60 models are lawn dresses from the early 1900s, flapper dresses from the 1920s, 19th-century tuxedos, and World War II military uniforms. Three mannequins set up in the theater’s lobby will also be dressed in traditional outfits. Fiesta Queen Carmelita Roybal (who was awarded her crown in May) and her “court” will be the fashion show’s special guests. After the show, everyone is invited to enjoy biscochitos, hot chocolate, and live mariachi music outside the theater. —Emily Van Cleve La Sociedad Folklórica’s Exhibición de Modas y Merienda, $10, September 6, 3 pm, James A. Little Theater, 1060 Cerrillos, santafefiesta.org 6

santafeanNOW.com

The scent of grilled beef and seared chile peppers will fill the air at the Railyard when the second annual Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown kicks off on Friday, September 12, at 6 pm. Eight area restaurants will battle it out for the title of Reigning Chomp, determined by a panel of national food critics. Attendees will have their say, too—those who purchase tickets ($20, which includes a free beer or soda) will be able to sample each finalist’s take on this New Mexico classic and vote for their favorite. Cowgirl BBQ, last year’s winner of the People’s Choice Award, will square off against an expanded field, which includes newcomers like The Mine Shaft Tavern and Second Street Brewery. Building on the resounding success of the inaugural Smackdown, this year’s event will feature a beer garden, where you can pair your pint with some of the best food around. For tickets, visit ticketssantafe.org.—Steven Horak

quirk for date night The characters of Ethan and Sophie feel real from the first scene of The One I Love. You probably know this couple. They’re not fun. He’s a grump who’s perpetually offended; she’s a doormat (practically a martyr). Their marriage is dissolving, so their marriage counselor suggests a retreat. Then things get weird. How weird? Twilight Zone weird. Science-fiction weird. Or at least extra-dimensional, existentially experimental weird. This is the great trick that makes The One I Love so interesting: It’s a marriage drama about a familiar couple, but it’s also a mind-bending mystery. By the end of the film, Ethan and Sophie aren’t unlikable anymore. They’ve changed in the way that great characters change in great movies. They understand themselves and each other much better. But the story doesn’t resolve the way you expect it to resolve. It’d be a sin to reveal the twist here. Suffice it to say it hits early and is confusing for about three minutes. That confusion could have dragged on for an hour, but instead Ethan and Sophie realize there’s strangeness brewing and team up to unravel it. Watching them work together—taking passive-aggressive jabs one minute and tenderly embracing each other the next—is thrilling because the performances by Mark Duplass as Ethan and Elisabeth Moss as Sophie are so strong. The mystery is compelling, certainly, but the characters are why The One I Love is so watchable. Duplass was in another strange film in 2012 called Safety Not Guaranteed, which had time travel, young journalists, romance, and a shy exchange student fearful of women. Safety Not Guaranteed has the same Woody-Allen-meets-Rod-Serling vibe that The One I Love does, but this new film is more interesting. The marriage dynamic is a more adult place to play. Ethan embodies everything an insecure spouse could hate about himself. He’s not having fun; he’s trying to understand what’s happening and kind of being a jerk about it. Sophie, on the other hand, can give in a little more. She embraces little pleasures. She’s not stressed out when she doesn’t need to be. The One I Love is short (91 minutes) and quirky in the best way. It’s the best date film out there, and it’s showing at CCA.—Phil Parker


AZIZANSARI.COM

Comedian Aziz Ansari performs at The Lensic on September 7. For details, see page 11.

this week

September 4–September 10 September 4, 2014 NOW

7


September 5–7: Fiesta de Santa Fe, an annual event that’s more than 300 years old, takes over downtown Santa Fe this weekend with music, food, arts and crafts, historical reenactments, and more. For a detailed list of events, go to santafefiesta.org.

Introduction to Weaving: Inkle Loom Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on the inkle loom, which is commonly used for narrow weaving of items like belts, trims, and straps. $69, 6–8 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Shop Walk Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Explore some of Santa Fe’s fun and tasty food shops with a guide from Santa Fe School of Cooking. $45, 2–4 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

C. S. Rockshow La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com. 8

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Drastic Andrew Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

142 E De Vargas

A performance of works by anonymous writers poking good fun at Sante Fe. Directed by Andy Pimm. $20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Progressive rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

September 5 friday

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Guided Hike Santa Fe Canyon Preserve Upper Canyon Rd and Cerro Gordo

Editor’s Pick

Learn about the history and natural environment of the Santa Fe Canyon Preserve on a guided hike led by Nature Conservancy stewardship ecologist Robert Martin. Free, 1–2:30 pm, nature.org.

Santa Fe Fiestas Fine Art & Crafts Market Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

A juried show of jewelry, pottery, clothing, paintings, and more. Free, 9 am–5 pm, through September 7, 505-913-1517, santafefiesta.org.

Cascarones Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

DNAWORKS and Teatro Paraguas present the world premiere of Irma Mayoraga’s Cascarones, directed by Daniel Banks. See profile on page 15. $5–$15, through September 14, Thursday–Saturday 7 pm, Sundays 5 pm, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org.

The Santa Fe Fiesta Melodrama Santa Fe Playhouse

September 4–7: The Santa Fe Fiesta Melodrama

: LYNN ROYLANCE

September 4 thursday

CHRIS CORRIE

this week


Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Cuisines of Mexico V Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class focused on Mexican cuisine. $80, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Tasty Thai Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta Thai cooking class. 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Tribute Luncheon La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa 330 E Palace

The New Mexico Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts presents a luncheon honoring dancer and mentor Nancy Zeckendorf, chair of the board of directors of the Lensic Performing Arts Center. $100, 11:30 am–2 pm, newmexicowomeninthearts.org.

In the Light Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

Editor’s Pick

Two- and three-dimensional pieces by Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007). See page 23. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Lands of Enchantment Wiford Gallery 403 Canyon

Landscape paintings of scenes from France, Italy, Mexico, the Caribbean, and New Mexico by Inger Jirby. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-982-2403, wifordgallery.com.

Landscapes New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

Expressionist works by Cecilia Kirby Binkley. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Logos in the Next Dimension Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Graphic art/sculpture by Wilfried Haest. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

The Spirit of the Horse Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace

New oil paintings by Ethelinda. See preview on page 21. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 505-986-0440, manitougalleries.com.

Cosmology for the Embodied Human: The Body’s Way StudioNia Santa Fe 851 W San Mateo

Rachael Resch hosts an introductory talk on The Body’s Way, a weekend workshop based on the Nia technique. (Nia combines dance and martial arts and is set to music.) $15, 7:30–9 pm, 505-989-1299, studioniasantafe.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Boom Roots Collective El Farol 808 Canyon

Reggae music. $5, 9–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

September 5: In the Light at Charlotte Jackson Fine Art

The Santa Fe Fiesta Melodrama Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

Live classical and other guitar music. Free, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

A performance of works by anonymous writers poking good fun at Sante Fe. Directed by Andy Pimm. $10–$20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 7:30 pm and 10 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Lumbre del Sol Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

September 6 saturday

Happy Hours with Tito Rios Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Chicano rock band. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Sierra La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Beginning Tinworking Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on the art of tinwork. $125, 10 am–3:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Resistance Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A screening of Resistance, a new film about the growSeptember 4, 2014 NOW 9


ing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Free, 4 pm, RSVP at 505-750-4919, ccasantafe.org.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Big Brothers Big Sisters Benefit Dinner Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Live performance by singer/songwriter and guitarist Jesus Bas. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Twenty percent of sales from dinner and drinks go to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico. Free, 5–10 pm, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Sabor Santa Fe Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

A cooking class using ingredients inspired by New Mexico. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Salsa I Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Sierra La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

A hands-on class focused on four different salsas. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 7 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Tour & Cooking Class Santa Fe Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta Food Tour New Mexico partners with the Santa Fe Culinary Academy for a day of adventure and cooking with Chef Rocky Durham. Meet a Food Tour New Mexico guide, tour the Santa Fe Farmers market, and gather fresh produce for a cooking demonstration. $120, 9 am–12:30 pm, 505-465-9474, foodtournewmexico.com.

Compassion, Generosity, and Grace: Stories from 9/11 op.cit Bookstore 500 Montezuma

Storyteller, actor, writer, and educator Regina Ress shares stories “of the best human impulses in response to the worst” regarding the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Free, 4:30–5:30 pm, 505-428-0321, opcit.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Controlled Burn El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock music. $5, 9–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water 10

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White Buffalo Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe September 6: Tea in the Author’s Garden

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

A blend of “the best of The Byrds, The Beatles, Tom Petty, and Northern New Mexico rhythms.” Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Amigos Barbeque Cerrillos Hills State Park Visitor Center 37 Main

A fundraising cookout sponsored by the Amigos de Cerrillos Hills State Park. Free (donations appreciated), 3–5 pm, 505-476-3200, cerrilloshills.org.

Hike to Placer Peak Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve Cerrillos

A guided, strenuous, four-mile hike to Placer Peak, 8,897 feet. $5 for non-members, 8:45 am meeting, 9 am hike, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Tea in the Author’s Garden Various locations

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

A tour of five of Santa Fe’s “secret gardens,” followed by tea with hostess Sallie Bingham. Part of Kitchen Angels’ Adventures à la Carte series. $75, 3–5:30 pm, 505-471-7780, kitchenangels.org.

Gran Baile de la Fiesta Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

The Gran Baile (large dance) de la Fiesta has been a Santa Fe Fiesta tradition for more than a century. Attire is intricate, historical, and extremely colorful. $20, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

La Sociedad Folklórica’s Exhibición de Modas y Merienda James A. Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos

La Sociedad Folklórica, which is dedicated to preserving Spanish Colonial customs and traditions, hosts a fashion show honoring 128 years of Santa Fe


fashions. See profile on page 6. $10, 3–5:30 pm, facebook.com/SociedadFolklorica.

September 8: Tamales I at the Santa Fe School of Cooking

The Santa Fe Fiesta Melodrama Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

Tamales I Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A performance of works by anonymous writers poking good fun at Sante Fe. Directed by Andy Pimm. $10–$20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 7:30 pm and 10 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

A class focused on tamales. $98, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

September 7 sunday

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Silver, The Psychedelic Bus DeVargas Mall 564 N Guadalupe

March beside Silver, “the psychedelic bus” whose theme is “Peace, Love, and Compassion,” in the Historical/Hysterical Parade, part of the annual Fiesta de Santa Fe. The bus will have a band on top. Free, 9 am meeting, 12:45 pm parade, 505-690-5668, lisalaw@ cybermesa.com.

Ladyhawke Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Screenwriter Edward Khmara introduces a viewing of his Oscar-nominated film Ladyhawke (1985) and partakes in a Q&A. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and kids), 6:30 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

The Sturgeon Queens Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A film focused on the American Jewish immigrant experience, presented by the Santa Fe Jewish Film Festival. The event includes live music, complimentary coffee and rugelach, as well as an optional smoked fish brunch. $12–$15 (extra for brunch), 11 am, 505-216-0672, santafejff.org.

Guitar Games with Bruce Dunlap GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St

Two-day guitar workshop with Bruce Dunlap to support the all-volunteer GiG Performance Space. $100, 11 am–3 pm Saturday and Sunday, gigsantafe.com, brucedunlap.com.

ERIC SWANSON

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

September 8 monday

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez El Farol 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com

The Tom Rheam Trio Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Jazz, pop, rock, and and Latin music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Santa Fe Trail Bicycle Trek Begins in Santa Fe

Cyclists ride for at least four days and then they have the option to keep riding up to 1,096 miles of the Santa Fe Trail over 22 days, ending in Missouri. $45 per day includes breakfast, dinner, campsites, daily ride sheets, maps, and all gear carried by truck. 505-982-1282, santafetrailbicycletrek.com.

Live Nation Presents Aziz Ansari Live The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A stand-up comedy performance by Aziz Ansari, who stars on NBC’s Parks and Recreation. $35, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Santa Fe Fiesta Melodrama Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

A performance of works by anonymous writers poking good fun at Sante Fe. Directed by Andy Pimm. $20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 4 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol 808 Canyon Live music. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

September 9 tuesday Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Acoustic/Open Mic Night Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta Open songs night with Ben Wright. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-989-8585, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Bittersweet Highway Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Progressive folk duo. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon September 4, 2014 NOW

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Free (reservations required), 6:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Rewind Replay: 1950–2014 David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Paintings by Lilly Fenichel. Free, through September 6, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

David Geist Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Music from Broadway musicals. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Three separate but concurrent shows featuring works by documentary photographers. Free, through September 6, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Justin Furstenfeld Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Editor’s Pick

Justin Furstenfeld, lead vocalist of the platinumselling rock band Blue October, performs as part of his solo acoustic tour. $25, 7 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

September 10: Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts: An Intimate History at The Lensic

Live music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson

Latin world music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-989-1166, terracottawinebistro.com.

Seasonal Wildflower Identification Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards A class focused on the tools and skills needed to identify native plants. $65, 6–8 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

September 10 wednesday Botanical Drawing and Painting Autumn Specimens Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on botanical drawing and painting autumn specimens. $149, 9:30 am–12:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

New Mexico PBS in partnership with The Lensic presents The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, a screening of a new documentary by Ken Burns. 12

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William Albert Allard, Kevin Bubriski, and Greg MacGregor VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 E Marcy

Moondogs La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

The Littlest Birds Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Cello and banjo duo. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Power of Woman Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Comanche painter Nocona Burgess brings attention to the culture, identity, and influence of Native American women. Free, through September 7, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Visual Poetry Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200-B Canyon

An exhibit of works by abstract painter Charlotte Foust and sculptor Eric Boyer. Free, through September 7, 505-984-2111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

African Art Masquerade Intrigue Gallery 238 Delgado

Ongoing

Vintage African masquerade masks, art from Robert Fiedler’s collection, and gallery tribal art. Free, through September 8, 505-820-9265, intriguegallery.com.

Ocean Treasures Photogenesis, A Gallery of Photography 100 E San Francisco

Touching Land Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon

New work by photographer Nicholas Trofimuk. Free, through September 5, 505-989-9540, photogenesisgallery.com.

Through Our Eyes Nedra Matteucci Galleries 1075 Paseo de Peralta

Realist oil paintings by Santa Fe–based couple John and Terri Kelly Moyers. Free, through September 6, 505-982-4631, matteucci.com.

Ongoing: Touching Land at Waxlander Art Gallery

New Mexico landscape painter Matthew Higginbotham’s ninth annual summer show at Waxlander. Free, through September 8, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

Apocalypse Reversed Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Work by glass artist Emma Varga. Free, through September 9, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.


Beckonings and Reckonings Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

New work by abstract expressionist painter Stephanie Shank. Free, through September 9, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Selections from a Santa Fe Collection and A New Series by Danielle Frankenthal Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

A group exhibition plus new works by painter Danielle Frankenthal. Free, through September 9, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Juxtaprose Series David Rothermel Contemporary Fine Art 142 Lincoln, Ste 102 Paintings by David Rothermel. Free, through September 10, 575-642-4981, drfa-sf.com.

Reverie photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe

Photographs by Tom Chambers. Free, through September 13, 505-988-5152, photoeye.com. Ongoing: A solo exhibition of works by ceramist Jun Kaneko at the Gerald Peters Gallery

jeancocteaucinema.com.

The Tradition of the Martinez Family of San Ildefonso Pueblo Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon

An exhibit of pottery and paintings by Maria Martinez, her husband, her son, and her grandson. Free, through September 15, 505-629-4051, adobegallery.com.

David Crane and José Sierra Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Ceramics by David Crane and porcelain stoneware by José Sierra. Free, through September 20, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

A Walk in the Clouds Evoke Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

Works by the late New Mexico painter Louisa McElwain. Free, through September 20, 505-995-9902, evokecontemporary.com.

Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca LewAllen Galleries 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca present meditative interpretations of tree branches. Free, through September 21, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com.

Once Upon a Time In America Monroe Gallery of Photography 112 Don Gaspar

Photographs by Steve Schapiro. Free, through September 21, 505-992-0810, monroegallery.com.

New Works Sculpture 619 619 Canyon

Dave Lambard’s newest series of paintings. Free, through September 22, 505-660-6166, sculpture619.com.

IMPACTS! Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, in collaboration with Mizuma Art Gallery (Tokyo), presents an exhibition of artworks by artists primarily from Japan. Free, through September 22, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Jun Kaneko Gerald Peters Gallery 1101 Paseo de Peralta

An exhibition of more than 20 past and present works by ceramist Jun Kaneko. Free, through September 14, 505-984-5700, gpgallery.com.

Jodi & Dean Balsamo Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Works by photographer and collage artist Jodi Balsamo and mixed-media artist Dean Balsamo. Free, through September 15, 505-466-5528,

Indian Market Show Pablo Milan Gallery 209 Galisteo

Ongoing: Women in Cultural Context at Tansey Contemporary

Here and Now, Now and Then Wheelhouse Art 418 Montezuma

An exhibition of mixed-media works by Margaret Denney that addresses consumer culture, mass production, and the illusion of choice generated by these topics. Free, through September 23, 505-919-9553, wheelhouseart.com.

Women in Cultural Context: A Multi-Media Group Exhibition Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Gallery artists explore women’s responses to cultural roles and expectations. Free, through September 23, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Yazzie Johnson and Gail Bird Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Native American contemporary jewelry. Free, through September 26, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Indian Summer, 1835–1935 William R. Talbot Fine Art 129 W San Francisco (Second Floor)

Group exhibition of paintings and prints, as well as early maps of the Southwest and Indian Territory. Free, through September 30, 505-982-1559, williamtalbot.com.

Avian: Selected Works from the Affinity Series photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space 376-A Garcia An exhibition of photographs by Brad Wilson. Free, through October 11, 800-227-6941, photoeye.com.

Work by fifth-generation New Mexican Pablo Milan, wildlife sculptor Jess Davila, and Cheyenne River Sioux artist Don Brewer Wakpa. Free, through September 22, 505-820-1285, pablomilangallery.com.

Ben Wright Art Gone Wild Galleries 130-D Lincoln

Smoke on the Mirror Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery & School 315 Johnson

Historic San Ildefonso Polychrome Pottery Steve Elmore Indian Art 839 Paseo de Peralta

Smoke-fired and golf-leafed sculptures and platters by Heidi Loewen. Free, through September 22, 505-988-2225, heidiloewen.com.

Paintings by Ben Wright. Free, through October 15, 505-820-1004, artgonewildgalleries.com.

Pottery from San Ildefonso Pueblo, ca. 1875–1925. Free, through October 16, 505-995-9677, elmoreindianart.com. September 4, 2014 NOW 13


A slide and sound installation by Andrea Geyer held in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe as part of SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through January 11, 2015, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Messages from the Wounded Healers Center for Contemporary Arts/Spector Ripps Project Space 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of Sam Scott’s series of large paintings, The Wounded Healers. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

New Perspectives Center for Contemporary Arts/Muñoz Waxman Gallery 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of work by sculptor Chuck Ginnever. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Poems of Divine Colors Catenary Art Gallery 616 ½ Canyon

Watercolor paintings by Vassia Alaykova. Free, through November 19, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

Annual Indian Market Group Show Gallery 822 822 Canyon

An exhibition showcasing new work by all of the gallery’s artists. Free, ongoing, 505-989-1700, gallery822.com.

Group Exhibition Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Exhibition of works by artists like painters John Barker, Jody Le Cher, Sherry Ikeda, and John Schaeffer and jewelry designer Christine Norton at Canyon Road’s newest fine art gallery. Free, ongoing, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: The Hawaii Pictures Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson

The first exhibition to feature artwork created in Hawaii by American modernists and friends Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams. $6–$12 (kids free), through September 14, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Local Color: Judy Chicago in New Mexico New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

An exhibition of Judy Chicago’s large-scale projects and smaller-scale personal artworks opens to the public in honor of the artist’s 75th birthday. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through October 12, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

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Alcove Shows 1917–1927 New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ongoing: Delilah Montoya: Syncretism at the New Mexico Museum of Art

Cameraless New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

A group exhibition of photo-media works. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through December 7, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Courtney M. Leonard: LEVEL/LAND Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Works by Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock Nation) are featured in the MoCNA Store’s Lloyd “Kiva” New Gallery. Free, through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Da-ka-xeen Mehner: Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Alaskan artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between the Tlingit language and song. See profile on page 22. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Mario Martinez: The Desert Never Left “The City” Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Mario Martinez’s artwork pays reverence to nature through the influences derived from his deeply rooted Yaqui cultural background and commitment to Western Modernism. See profile on page 22. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Ric Gendron: Rattlebone Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Traveling exhibition of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, PVMIWA.org.

Spiral Lands, Chapter 2, 2008 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Works by 24 artists in the museum’s permanent collection. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 23, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Delilah Montoya: Syncretism New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Photographs by Delilah Montoya. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through March 15, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A 1960s ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal inspired mission churches throughout the Americas to undergo renovations and, all too often, cast off centuries-old art work. $6–$9, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A collection of nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras that show how a light-tight box with a tiny hole can help capture amazing photos. $6–$9, through March 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture presents its extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and educates on the geology, mining, and history of the stone. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies, including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


Cascarones Teatro Paraguas hosts the world premiere of a buzzed-about play by Emi ly Va n C le ve

PAULO T. PHOTOGRAPHY

THIS WEEK, DNAWORKS, in collaboration with Teatro Paraguas and seven associate producers, presents the world premiere of Irma Mayorga’s play Cascarones, a story about human fragility and resilience as seen through the eyes of a San Antonio teenager. Director Daniel Banks—an associate professor of theater and performing arts at IAIA and a cofounder of DNAWORKS, whose mission centers on “dialogue and healing through the arts”—became familiar with Cascarones in 2003, when he saw a workshop version of the play at the National Playwrights Conference. The play stayed with him over the years (he taught it to undergraduate drama students at NYU), and, having moved to Santa Fe from New York City in 2010, he thought it would be an ideal work to stage here.  “The play offers a deep understanding of Chicano culture, but it’s so much more than that,” Banks says. “People of any culture can relate to it. It’s also a story about a young person making sense of the world.”

Cascarones takes its title from the name of the festive yet hollowed-out chicken eggs filled with confetti or small toys that are popular throughout Latin America and are associated with both Carnival and Easter. The play centers on Mary Margaret Caceres, a teenager who works for the San Antonio transit authority, and her journey to understand her personal circumstances and the particular challenges she and her working-class family face. In what’s been referred to as a dreamlike state, she encounters a number of historical figures—like American explorer John Wesley Powell and Spanish conquistador Francisco Vázquez de Coronado—and comes to term with the effects their past actions have on her present. Cristina Vigil stars as Caceres, while six other actors—Nicholas Ballas, Nicole Gramlich, Jonathan Harrell, Marcos Kelly, Roger Montoya, and Bernadette Peña—assume various roles. “We held a staged reading of Cascarones at Teatro Paraguas in February,” Banks says. “A moving community dialogue followed the reading. One audience member remarked that this is just the kind of theater Santa Fe needs to bring people together.” Mayorga, an assistant professor of theater at Dartmouth College and a San Antonio native, has been in town as artist-in-residence at the Santa Fe Art Institute and has been working with the actors during rehearsals. She’ll be in attendance for her play’s gala performance on Saturday night. Cascarones, Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie, September 4–6 & 11–13, 7 pm, September 7 & 14, 5 pm, tickets $15 ($10 fixed income, $5 kids), $100 for September 6 gala performance with reception, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org

Cristina Vigil (left) and Nicole Gramlich in a scene from Irma Mayorga’s play Cascarones, which receives its world premiere at Teatro Paraguas on September 4.

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by Emi ly Va n Cle ve

TITUS CHILDERS PHOTOGRAPHY

Hot Honey

the genre-bending band is making its mark on Santa Fe’s music scene

From left: Lori Ottino, Lucy Barna, and Paige Barton of Hot Honey

FANS OF HOT HONEY have called the Santa Fe–based band’s musical style “Appalachian country” and “gothic bluegrass,” but members Lucy Barna, Lori Ottino, Paige Barton, and Willow Doug (aka Doug Meier) haven’t quite decided how to label themselves. “I’d say that sass undermines everything,” notes Barna, who plays guitar and banjo. “We write songs that project a strong-woman-kicking-out-your-door vibe.” Playing a combination of original tunes written by the three female band members and covers of songs by artists like Loretta Lynn, Patsy Cline, and Dolly Parton, Hot Honey steadily books gigs up and down the Rio Grande Valley. Having just completed a series of shows every Sunday in August at the Second Street Brewery, the band is gearing up to play at the Santa Fe Ski Basin on September 6 and The Mine Shaft Tavern in Madrid on September 27. Hot Honey’s roots go back to August of 2012, when Barna was playing a solo gig at The Mine Shaft Tavern and invited Barton, an acquaintance at the time who also plays guitar and banjo, to join her on stage for a few tunes. The two immediately hit it off and starting talking about forming an all-female band. They both wanted a third member to join them so they asked Barton’s friend Ottino, a melodica player, to come on board. 16

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Hot Honey steadily books gigs up and down the Rio Grande Valley playing a combination of original tunes and covers of songs by artists like Loretta Lynn, Patsy Cline, and Dolly Parton.

“Somehow word got out that we’d formed a band, and we were invited to play a four-hour gig [back at the Mine Shaft] in September,” Barna says. “The three of us had one month to pull our set together. We played our first gig as Hot Honey, which was a term that someone had used during a conversation with me and that I really liked. Many of the tunes we played in 2012 are ones we still play today.” Meier was invited to join Hot Honey in the spring of 2013 when Barna, Ottino, and Barton realized they needed a bass player to balance out the high sounds created by their instruments and voices. Hot Honey is currently working on their first CD, which they hope to release by the end of the year. For the band’s latest performance schedule, visit hothoneymusic.com.


Bouche Bistro

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Chef Charles Dale says that the tuna carpaccio niçoise salad pictured here is representative of the “modern style of classic bistro cuisine” his restaurant Bouche is known for, and it harkens back to his roots as well. Dale is an American who was raised in France, where he drew inspiration for his signature dishes and his unique blend of ingredients from the country’s Mediterranean cuisine. “Everyone does a riff on the classic niçoise,” Dale says. “I thought a sashimi-grade tuna sliced very, very thin would be a nice version and would keep it super light.” Dale also employs a unique interpretation of vitello tonnato sauce (typically served with veal) on his salad. “Our version uses sautéed tuna blended with garlic, anchovies, olive oil, and lemon juice,” he says. Less unusual niçoise ingredients include tomatoes, hardcooked eggs, poached potatoes, and black olives. Dale dresses his salad with arugula because, he says, “it’s robust enough to hold up to the tonnato sauce, which is pretty intense, [and it] grows everywhere in the Mediterranean.” —Cristina Olds Bouche Bistro, 451 W Alameda, bouchebistro.com

eating+ drinking

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Seen Around

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DANIEL QUAT

KAREN SCHULD

DANIEL QUAT

LISA LAW

DANIEL QUAT

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

DANIEL QUAT

photographs by Stephen Lang


Lucha Libre Exotica MEXICO CITY Inner Oceans DENVER FLCON FCKER HOUSTON The Fledgling by Christian Ristow Music on two stages // Art booths // Pop-up performance // Cash bar // Food trucks // Vendors

Saturday Sept. 13 @ El Museo Cultural TICKETED Sunday Sept. 14 @ Railyard Plaza FREE

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E AN T A F

KAREN SCHULD

IMAGES COURTESY OF BRANDON JOHNSON

Lucha Libre Exotica MEXICO CITY Inner Oceans DENVER FLCON FCKER HOUSTON The Fledgling by Christian Ristow Music on two stages // Art booths // Pop-up performance // Cash bar // Food trucks // Vendors

Saturday Sept. 13 @ El Museo Cultural TICKETED

DANIEL QUAT

Sunday Sept. 14 @ Railyard Plaza FREE

THE RAILYARD E AN T A F

DANIEL QUAT

KAREN SCHULD

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Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe IMAGES COURTESY OF BRANDON JOHNSON

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It’s Santa Fe’s high summer season, which means lots of openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was at a number of those shows’ recent receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we celebrated with.

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Abiquiú Ponies, oil on canvas, 52 x 72"

In her show The Spirit of the Horse at Manitou Galleries (September 5–September 19, reception September 5, 5–7:30 pm , 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com), Hawaiian-born artist Ethelinda showcases her signature confident style in a new series of oil paintings that center on horses. Created with bold, dramatic brushstrokes, Ethelinda’s works capture the unbridled spirit of the animal, the evocative local landscape, and, in her portraits, carefully researched depictions of traditional Native American dress.

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art

PROFILE

Mario Martinez, Yaqui Abstraction, acrylic and lace on canvas, 36 x 36"

connecting cultures

two solo exhibits explore traditional identity amid modern-day influences by Em ily Va n C le ve

DURING THE WEEK of Santa Fe’s 93rd annual Indian Market, the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) opened two solo exhibitions showcasing the work of artists who have close connections to Santa Fe but create very different kinds of art in dissimilar environments. The Desert Never Left “The City,” which can be seen in MoCNA’s North Gallery through December 31, features 21 oil, acrylic, and mixed-media paintings on canvas and paper by Mario Martinez, a former instructor at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), MoCNA’s parent organization. An Arizona native with strong ties to his Yaqui culture, Martinez has been painting in Brooklyn, New York, for the past decade. “Mario uses an abstract genre to draw upon the spiritual nature of his culture,” says MoCNA’s chief curator, Ryan Rice. “Sacred knowledge isn’t revealed in his work. He draws from animal and plant life from his home in Arizona and blends figurative [and] narrative [elements] to express his relationship to New York’s contemporary urban environment.” Martinez studied art in Arizona and earned a master’s degree from the San Francisco Art Institute. People, creatures from nature, and gray concrete buildings appear in his work, which has been exhibited at the Smithsonian’s 22

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National Museum of the American Indian in New York City and at the Heard Museum in Phoenix. In contrast to Martinez’s urban-influenced work is Da-ka-xeen Mehner’s show Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced), which centers on reclaiming the Alaskan Tlingit language. The show, in the South Gallery, also runs through the end of the year. A former student at IAIA and the University of New Mexico, the Alaska native is an assistant professor of Native Arts at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. He Da-ka-xeen Mehner’s drew from his family ancestry (Tlingit/N’ishga) show “celebrates the lasting and from his experience of having a Native and profound relationship American mother and between the Tlingit non-Native father to create a wall installation of language and song,” 12 rawhide hand drums called Call and Respond. says Ryan Rice, Mehner made a mold of his face and put it in the MoCNA’s chief curator. rawhide on one side of the drum to produce a 3-D sculptural effect. “Visual images that express his disconnection and reconnection to his Native language are projected onto the drums,” Rice says. “Accompanying the images are songs that he and his elementary school–age son have been singing together as a way for both of them to reconnect with their culture. The exhibit celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between the Tlingit language and song.” Running concurrent to the above shows are the exhibits BREACH: LOG 14, an exploration Detail from Da-ka-xeen Mehner’s wall installation Call and Respond, which comprises 12 hand drums made of historical ties to water of rawhide (elk) and wood (cedar) and features a mold of and material sustainabilthe artist’s face. The individual drums are 20 x 20 x 8". ity by artist, filmmaker, and IAIA instructor Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock Nation of Long Island, New York), and Rattlebone, a collection of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron (Arrow Lakes Band of Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla).


opening art reception

art

PREVIEWS

Florence Miller Pierce: In the Light Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 554 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com September 5–September 30, reception September 5, 5–7 pm The subtleties of light are the predominant focus of two- and three-dimensional pieces by Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007), who worked in diverse mediums (including paint on canvas, ink on rice paper, balsa wood, stone, and resin) and was renowned for her sculptures. Charlotte Jackson’s comprehensive survey showcases work from the 1960s through the early 2000s.—Eve Tolpa

Florence Miller Pierce, Spire #1, resin relief, 96 x 16"

Women in Cultural Context: A Multi-Media Group Exhibition Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon tanseycontemporary.com Through September 23 Gallery artists working in glass, ceramics, fiber, beading, and basketry (as well as painting and mixed media) explore women’s responses to cultural roles and expectations. Painter Patrick McGrath Muñiz’s elaborate tableaux, for example, incorporate iconography ranging from Christian to pop culture and offer sly commentary on history, while glass artist Susan Taylor Glasgow explores conf licting messages about femininity in a medium she terms “seductive but unforgiving.”—ET Patrick McGrath Muñiz, The Gathering, oil on canvas, 36 x 60" September 4, 2014 NOW

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ongoing

Charlotte Foust and Eric Boyer: Visual Poetry Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200-B Canyon hunterkirklandcontemporary.com Through September 7 Two very different artists are linked by their shared commitment to emotion and form. Abstract painter Charlotte Foust uses layers of pigment to chart the ever-changing dynamic between motion and stillness. Of his human torsos, sculptor Eric Boyer says, “I set out to show the physical body at its best as a function machine, but one that also contains hope, dreams, and aspirations.”—ET

Charlotte Foust, Cascadia, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48"

Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca LewAllen Galleries, 1613 Paseo de Peralta lewallencontemporary.com Through September 21 John Moyers, Eagle Feathers, oil on board, 12 x 12" Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca John Moyers and Terri Kelly Moyers: present meditative interpretations Through Our Eyes of tree branches. Japanese-born Nedra Matteucci Galleries Yamano is of a pioneering generation 1075 Paseo de Peralta, matteucci.com of glass artists who moved the meThrough September 6 dium away from vessels and toward Santa Fe–based couple John and Terri Kelly sculpture, and his pieces incorporate Moyers share a fascination with the Southwest, glass blowing, cutting, and etching and each has won multiple awards for their realas well as copper- and silver-plating. ist oil paintings, which incorporate landscapes Surroca’s focus on the line, light, and from the region and, recently, those of Europe. shadow of the branch form result in “John and Terri are exciting artists,” says gallerist paintings with a spare elegance.—ET Nedra Matteucci, “because they constantly challenge themselves through their work, and each new show ref lects a vitality and skill that sets Matthew Higginbotham: their paintings apart.”—ET Touching Land Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon, waxlander.com Through September 8 Matthew Higginbotham’s ninth annual summer show at Waxlander focuses on his signature high desert land- and cloudscapes while introducing pieces inspired by Oklahoma’s tallgrass prairie and the Bosque del Apache in New Mexico. The artist says he aims to “show the immense power and mystery imbedded within the land . . . a palpable force and presence that is alMatthew Higginbotham, Farmland Abundance, oil on canvas, 48 x 48" ways there if we take the time to notice it.”—ET

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Nocona Burgess: The Power of a Woman Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon, giacobbefritz.com, through September 7 Santa Fe–based Comanche painter Nocona Burgess (who is also a flute player) employs a contemporary sensibility, featuring graphic compositions and a bold color palette, as he brings attention to the culture, identity, and influence of a historically overlooked group: Native American women.—ET

Pedro Surroca, Portraiture of a Branch, oil on linen, 70 x 37"


Gallery Artists

Guest Artists

To m B e r g Lucinda Cobley Hans de Bruijn R e g i n a Fo s t e r D a n i e l l e Fr a n k e n t h a l Raphaelle Goethals Estate of Virgil Grotfeldt Joseph Marioni Wi n sto n Lee M a s c a r e n h a s Floyd Newsum Zachariah Rieke Pe t e r S a c k s B a r b a r a Va n C l e v e M y k e Ve n a b l e Mark Williams Joan Winter N a z a r Ya h y a K a t h e r i n e Po e p p e l & Richard Moiel Dante Marioni Chong-Ok Matthews Florence Pierce James Surls J o e l l e Ve r s t r a e t e n

Live Music

FroM the Best oF santa Fe Jazz • PoP • alternative • originals • covers • standards 2nd tuesday every Month First Performance: tues sept 9, 6-10 PM open Jam 10-11 PM $3 cover, Full Bar and special Menu available

A

Musicians wanted. For consideration, Please send recording or sound bite to: abbeycorp@zoho.com

217 W. Water Street Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone: 505. 660. 4393 w w w. wa d e w i l s o n a r t. co m 11am - 5pm Tuesday - Saturday


ARTIST SPOTLIGHT STAR LIANA YORK

Star Liana York: Wisdom Keepers, September 5–October 5, reception September 5, 5–7:30 pm, Sorrel Sky Gallery, 125 W Palace, sorrelsky.com

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[on the market]

two-story treasure This classic two-story Northern New Mexico pitched-roof home is nestled on 3.4 irrigated acres in the heart of the Chupadero Valley and includes a private well. With more than 5,000 square feet, the spacious residence, located just 17 minutes from downtown Santa Fe, has a master suite with a library on its main level. Traditional finish details include plaster walls, coved ceilings, and wood and tile floors. The upper level includes one guest bedroom and bath, two other rooms that could be used as bedrooms or offices, and a large multifunctional area that can be accessed from the lower level or from outside the home. An attached passive solar greenhouse is a wonderful feature for an avid gardener. A barn/outbuilding is located just north of the main house. List price: $799,500 Contact: Robin Zollinger, Barker Realty, 505-660-5170, santaferealestate.com DAVID RULON PHOTOGRAPHY

In her upcoming show Wisdom Keepers, which opens September 5 at Sorrel Sky Gallery, Abiquiú-based bronze artist Star Liana York is showing 25 works she created from the late 1980s to the present, some of which have never been seen in Santa Fe. “There’s a common thread in all these works,” says York, who attended the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C., before moving to New Mexico in 1985. “They’re about connecting earth and spirit and the connectedness we have to the greater whole.” Most of the pieces in Wisdom Keepers depict Native Americans engaged in ordinary rituals, like going to the market or telling stories, but the show also includes a selection of bronzes from York’s Talisman series, with works like Black Jaguar, Moon Bear, and Lion Heart celebrating animals as spiritual liaisons. A particularly noteworthy piece is York’s sculpture The Art Spirit, which shows famous San Ildefonso potter Maria Martinez The Art Spirit, bronze, 25 x 21 x 21" engaged in her work. Earlier this year, York was asked to create a sculpture of Martinez by the Millicent Rogers Museum, which owns the first piece of the 35-edition bronze. “I was scared to do [Martinez’s] face because I’m not a portrait artist,” says York, “but I was amazed. It just poured out of me, and I was happy with it.”—Emily Van Cleve


style

JONATHAN TERCERO

Street Talk by Robin Gray Design

[on the market]

community living This 3,050-square-foot fourbedroom residence is in the HeartStone cohousing community for active adults in Santa Fe’s northwest quadrant. Gardens located behind a walled courtyard lead to the home’s front door, and inside are an open-concept dining/ living room, a large kitchen, and an office space that could be used as a media room or an artist studio. The master suite has a kiva fireplace, a large bathroom, and a private portal outside, while the guest wing has two bedrooms with their own bathrooms. A huge garage has plenty of room for storage. The homeowner has access to HeartStone’s Community House, which is in the center of the 24home private community and has a kitchen and dining room where residents can enjoy meals or view films together. List price: $799,000 Contact: Philip Ross, Barker Realty, 505-670-1783, santaferealestate.com

PEELING PAINT, graffiti, sections of a wall, and parts of an old door are some of the images that inspired Robin Gray Design’s new abstract Street Talk rug collection. “We see these kinds of images on the street all the time,” says Gray, who’s a weaver and practicing architect as well as a textile designer. “We overlook many of them and see them as eyesores, but I focus on these images in a different light when I use them in my designs,” she adds. “While my inspiration for this collection came from locations around the world, it’s easy to imagine these images in many settings.” Gray is launching Street Talk—one of 17 rug collections she’s created since founding her Santa Fe business in 2004—September 7–9 at The Rug Show in New York City. Weavers in Nepal, with whom Gray has been working for years, execute the collection’s seven designs. The rugs, which are fully customizable, are made in either wool or a combination of wool and silk, with 100 knots per square inch. “They’re fairly fine rugs but not super fine,” Gray says. “For the intricacy of my rugs, 100 knots per square inch, which is standard in the industry, works well.” For more information, visit robingraydesign.com. —Emily Van Cleve

Clockwise from top right: Strata, Abra, and Gossamer designs from Robin Gray Design’s new Street Talk rug collection

September 4, 2014 NOW

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| L A S T LO O K |

the English Beat goes on

GABRIELLA MARKS

I confess, I confess, I confess I’ve enjoyed this seriously ‘80s band hailing from Birmingham, England. The group, whose infectiously danceable sound covers everything from first wave ska to punk, may be best known for dreamy pop ballads that fueled teen angst (including the classic “I Confess”). The band officially broke up in 1983, but it’s been reborn in various incarnations in the years since, and lead singer/songwriter and guitarist Dave Wakeling has kept the Beat alive by touring exhaustively with an A-list backing band. High-energy fun recently throbbed throughout the packed dance floor at Skylight in downtown Santa Fe as Wakeling and crew performed the Beat’s hits, Wakeling’s solo songs, and tunes by Fine Young Cannibals and General Public—groups the various band members went on to form in the post-Beat years.—Cristina Olds

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621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Sean Wimberly Meadow View acrylic on canvas 72" x 60"

Sean Wimberly Early Morning Snow acrylic on canvas 30" x 40"

Santa Fean NOW September 4 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW September 4 2014 Digital Edition

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