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Athena | acrylic on acrylic reverse painting | 72 x 72 in.

Christopher Martin Gallery Santa Fe | 644 Canyon Road | 505.303.3483 Dallas | 1533 Dragon Street | 214.760.1775

christopherhmartin.com

Aspen | 525 E. Cooper Ave. | 970.925.7649


2016 SEASON JULY 1 to AUGUST 27

THE SANTA FE OPERA 60TH ANNIVERSARY

The Girl of the Golden West

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GOUNOD

Don Giovanni

PUCCINI

Capriccio

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R. STRAUSS

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MOZART

Vanessa

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BARBER

Robert Godwin photo

Roméo et Juliette

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The 60 th anniversary season is filled with some of the world’s most powerful love stories. Join us to experience opera in one of the most unique settings ever created. Arrive early with a tailgate supper to enjoy the sunset and mountain views.

OPENING NIGHTS SPONSOR

855-674-5401 www.fourseasons.com/santafe

SantaFeOpera.org 800-280-4654 I 505-986-5900

Ask about a special offer for Opera guests.

800-955-4455 www.eldoradohotel.com

800-727-5531 www.innatloretto.com

800-378-7946 www.druryplazasantafe.com


MARK WHITE FINE ART 414 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico | Open seven days a week Learn more at www.markwhitefineart.com or 505.982.2073 Shown here: Mark White, Canyonlands Reflections II, oil on linen, 24 x 24 inches


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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

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contents

BRUCE ADAMS

Publisher

DAVID ROBIN

IN A WORLD THAT CONTINUOUSLY REINVENTS ITSELF, Santa Fe’s Canyon Road is no exception. While it may outwardly look the same (thanks to the Historic Districts Review Board), in the last couple of years, a few more dining options have cropped up, allowing visitors and local residents to grab a quality meal without having to get in their cars. More importantly, the evolution of the art world has reached Canyon Road. While there are still lots of traditional art galleries, there’s been a movement toward more collectible and more contemporary art. This is a direct reflection of the art world as a whole and speaks to the quality of the dealers on Canyon Road. Today Canyon Road has an excellent selection of galleries and shops, where you’re sure to find your next special treasure. Contemporary, traditional, and historical artwork fills these charming structures and former homes. Restaurants with national reputations are housed in extraordinary and historically significant yet understated buildings. Canyon Road is an evolving street with a friendly personality, where gallery and shop owners welcome an adoring audience of visitors. In the last several years, a welcome addition to the Canyon Road experience has been the wonderful events that build on the area’s history. I especially encourage you to experience the Canyon Road Spring Art Festival in May, the Paint Out & Sculpt Out in October, and the Farolito Walk on Christmas Eve, which fills even a Scrooge like me with the holiday spirit.

4 Publisher’s Note 10 Navigating Canyon Road 15 Annually Anticipated Canyon Road’s must-see events of the year 16 Cultivation to Creativity The history of Canyon Road 19 Blissful Browsing Canyon Road is famous for its art, but that’s not all there is to find 20 Imagination Destination Continuing Canyon Road’s creative legacy 24 Edible Art Canyon Road offers everything from fine dining restaurants to casual cafés 27 Canyon Road Spring Art Festival Getting involved in celebrating the arts 28 Bountiful Buildings How Canyon Road earned its eclectic collection of architecture

Cover photograph by Chris Corrie 4

visitcanyonroad.com

STEPHEN LANG

32 Last Look The past and present of Canyon Road


E STABLISHED 1978

DOWNSIZING YOUR ART COLLECTION? SEEKING AMERICAN WESTERN & AMERICAN INDIAN ART FOR AUCTION AUGUST 12TH & 13TH FOR A COMPLIMENTARY AUCTION EVALUATION PLEASE SEND IMAGES AND ARTWORK INFORMATION TO: INFO@ALTERMANN.COM 345 CAMINO DEL MONTE SOL, SANTA FE, NM 87501

ALTERMANN.COM • (855) 945-0448


canyon road magazine

PUBLISHER

bruce adams b.y. cooper

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 

KAREN MELFI

EDITOR

stephanie love GRAPHIC DESIGN

jenny grass, valérie herndon, allie salazar

collection

PHOTOGRAPHY

chris corrie, stephen lang

Wen dy M cEah ern for P aras ol P rodu ctio ns

lisa law, gabriella marks

225 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, New Mexico 505.982.3032 • karenmelficollection.com

douglas merriam, john schum

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER SALES REPRESENTATIVE

david wilkinson

karim jundi

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Sarah Siltala

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone 505-983-1444, fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafean.com

Still Life with Red Face Warbler Oil 9" x 12" 421 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 505.988.3444 sagecreeksf@aol.com sagecreekgallery.com 8

visitcanyonroad.com

CHRIS CORRIE

SAGE CREEK GALLERY


Wyland STEVE BARTON

ALEXEI BUTIRSKIY

Galleries

STEVEN QUARTLY

Santa Fe’s Finest Art Gallery Has The Cure For Your Spring Fever!

MICHAEL CHEVAL

STEVEN HARLAN

STEPHEN MULDOON

WALFRIDO

JIM WARREN

Fine Art for Ocean Lovers by World Renowned Marine Life Artist Wyland & Other Leading Contemporary Artists ORIGINAL OILS & WATERCOLORS LIMITED EDITION GICLÉES • SCULPTURE SCULPTED GLASS & MURANO GLASS ORIGINAL MUSEUM-FRAMED DRAWINGS BELOW THE SURF BY WYLAND

WYLAND GALLERIES OF SANTA FE 202 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 844-795-7300 • www.wylandkw.com

DAVE WIGHT

BEN WRIGHT


navigating Canyon Road

Free Santa Fe Pick-Up to Canyon Road Route

Getting around Canyon Road is a breeze. It’s an easy half-mile stroll (many people start at the eastern end and work their way down the gentle slope) and a quick drive. Santa Fe Pedicabs are available, and there’s a free Santa Fe Pick-Up shuttle.

The Santa Fe Pick-Up route starts and ends near the Roundhouse on Don Gaspar Avenue and runs to Canyon Road and Museum Hill with the following stops:

Santa Fe Pedicabs provide transportation and tours downtown, around the Railyard arts district, and along Canyon Road.

DOLORES SMART

• Capitol/PERA Building • Santa Fe Children’s Museum • Three Museum Hill Stops: near the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, near the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and near the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art • The corner of Old Santa Fe Trl and Camino del Monte Sol • Camino del Monte Sol, between Mt. Carmel and Camino de Cruz Blanca • Santa Fe Preparatory School (stops both ways) • Camino de Cruz Blanca, before it intersects with Camino Cabra • Near the entrance to St. John’s College • Two Stops on Calle Picacho • Camino Cabra, before Camino de Cruz Blanca • Paseo de Peralta, two blocks south of Canyon Road • Canyon Road, before Café des Artistes • Canyon Road, after Camino Escondido • Canyon Road, near The Compound • Canyon Road, before Geronimo • Between Canyon Road and East Alameda • East Alameda, halfway between East Palace and El Alamo • East Alameda, before El Alamo • East Alameda, before Delgado • East Alameda, near the Inn on the Alameda

The Santa Fe Pick-Up, a small van that shuttles visitors around town, is free and runs every 15 to 30 minutes. There are four designated Santa Fe Pick-Up stops on Canyon Road, with an additional one on Palace Avenue between Canyon Road and East Alameda Street (see map below). Look for the signs with the red pickup truck.

Shuttle Hours

For a map and more information,

visit santafenm.gov

Monday–Sunday, 10 am–5:30 pm

To Plaza Ave E Palace Santa Fe

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S eda

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EA

225 Canyon

RESTROOMS

PUBLIC PARKING

River

Bonnie French, president of the Canyon Road MerchantsThe Teahouse SF PICK-UP Association, enjoys engaging in Canyon Road’s special community events.

d Canyon Roa

The Compound

PUBLIC PARKING El Farol Geronimo

SF PICK-UP

PARKING

od

e Pas

SF PICK-UP

SF PICK-UP

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Mad a i u q e c

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SF PICK-UP

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cia

Gar

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Café des Caffe Artistes Greco

St Canyon Road offers a beautiful half-mile walk beginning at Paseo de Peralta. Restrooms and parking are available at 225 Canyon. 10

visitcanyonroad.com

Ca Mo min nte o de So l l


Phyllis Kapp

All the Dreams Come True 43 x 60 fr watercolor

Waxl ander Gallery

celebrating thirty-two years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


LINO TAGLIAPIETRA

SCARLETT KANISTANAUX

JUDITH CONTENT

SHERYL ZACHARIA

The intersection between contemporary craft, fine art and design Contemporary Glass • Mixed Media Painting • Sculpture • Ceramics • Fiber 652 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505-995-8513 | www.tanseycontemporary.com


409 CANYON ROAD SANTA FE, NM 87501 (505) 795-7476

www.pippincontemporary.com

GRAND OPENING & 5th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION at our new permanent location

409 Canyon Road

Friday, May 27th, 5-8pm

Lively reception with visiting and local artists

Saturday, May 28th, 2pm

Artist talks - hear from gallery owner and artist Aleta Pippin, Rosenberg (AKA Tom Ross) and more Painting & sculpting demonstrations will take place throughout the weekend. All are welcome! RSVP for Friday Reception 505-795-7476 or email info@pippincontemporary.com


ART + INTERIOR DESIGN GYPSY ALLEY 708 Canyon Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87501

Two Moons, diptych, each 40"x 30", Acrylic on Canvas by Carole LaRoche

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( 5 0 5 ) 9 8 2 -1 1 8 6

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w w w. l a ro c h e -g a l l e r y. c o m Laurie Allegretti

em a i l @l a roc he- ga l l ery. c o m

The Art & Design Studio

M on - Sa t by Appoi ntment

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( 5 0 5 ) 9 1 3 -0 1 0 4

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w w w. j e n n i f e r a sh t o n i n t e r i o r s. c o m


STEPHEN LANG

ch a r les a zbell

annually anticipated Canyon Road’s combination of history and culture allows visitors to enjoy a unique experience year-round, but on certain days the legendary art district’s offerings are even more noteworthy than usual. Exhibition openings, often celebrated on Friday evenings, are a Canyon Road staple. Many galleries schedule them on the fourth Friday of every month, and those Fourth Fridays can be particularly lively. Galleries welcome guests to take in their latest shows along with their permanent collections, usually while offering light refreshments and sometimes live entertainment, too. For a comprehensive schedule of gallery openings, visit santafeancalendar.com. In spring, the Canyon Road Spring Art Festival (May 6–7), a public art event, offers crowd-friendly fun like an Artist Slow Draw competition and a live auction. Many galleries and shops host artist receptions, demonstrations, trunk shows, and live music. Proceeds go to Santa Fe Public Schools’ music programs (visitcanyonroad.com). During Santa Fe’s busy summer season, the annual ARTfeast festival presents its Edible Art Tour (June 10–11). Visitors and locals stroll between galleries, taking in art while enjoying food from top restaurants. Proceeds support arts education programs for Santa Fe’s youth (artfeast.com). Before the winter weather rolls in, enjoy a day of plein air painting with more than 100 artists during the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (October 14–15). The annual event features live music, a parade, art shows, and refreshments (visitcanyonroad.com). The Christmas Eve Farolito Walk is arguably Canyon Road’s most popular event. On the night of December 24, the street is lined with glowing farolitos, and thousands of visitors stroll along the road guided by their light. While galleries and shops serve cookies and hot beverages, carolers sing and bonfires are lit to celebrate the magic of the season and this special street. cr

Celebrating 26 Years

CH A R LES A ZBELL G A LLER Y 203A CANYON ROAD, SANTA FE, NM 87501 505·988·1875 charlesazbellgallery@q.com www.charlesazbellgallery.com

Rya n Benally

Abr ah a m Mohler

Joseph Bir dsong

Debor ah M artin

Lor r i Acott

Celebrating 26 Years CH A R LES A ZBELL G A LLER Y 203A CANYON ROAD, SANTA FE, NM 87501 505·988·1875 charlesazbellgallery@q.com www.charlesazbellgallery.com XX

“If all the galleries along Canyon Road were English pubs, we’d be inebriated and happy within half a mile!” —Lisa Rodgers, owner, The Longworth Gallery

canyon road

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cultivation to creativity the rich history of Canyon Road by Eve Tolpa

JOHN SCHUM

I “I think one of the unique things that we enjoy and have to offer our visitors is this ultra-concentrated and uninterrupted opportunity to focus on art.”

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visitcanyonroad.com

JOHN SCHUM

—Deborah Fritz, owner, GF Contemporary

t’s hard to imagine one of Santa Fe’s artistic epicenters as a dirt path running along the river from the mountains, but over time Canyon Road has evolved from a familyoriented farming area into a vibrant and internationally known art district. One of the key factors in this development has been Santa Fe’s long history as a center of trade. “An art community that settles in a trading center is going to have a very distinctive feel, with very vital art,” says historian Elizabeth West, editor of the book Santa Fe: 400 Years, 400 Questions. “It’s going to bring in new ideas, and the people who stay and contribute artistically are going to be much more interesting.” One person who stayed and made an indelible mark was the Portuguese-born photographer and painter Carlos Vierra, Santa Fe’s first resident artist. Vierra, like many others, came to Santa Fe for health reasons, seeking treatment for tuberculosis at Sunmount Sanatorium in 1904. Sunmount’s treatment philosophy contended intellectual stimulation was a key element in curing TB. In the interest of revitalizing body and soul, the sanatorium hosted lectures by literary luminaries such as Carl Sandburg, Robert Frost, and Santa Fe poet and bon vivant Witter Bynner. According to West, “Bynner knew everybody in the world,” from Rita Hayworth to Ansel Adams. “[Santa Fe] really didn’t become an artist community until the time of Carlos Vierra,” says West. “Then word spread, and one thing led to another.” One of those things was the railroad, which, in the decades after its arrival in town in 1880, transported artists here from across the country. A rise in plein air painting, popularized by the impressionists, motivated painters to trade their urban studios for outdoor inspiration. Santa Fe’s unique charm and high desert light made it a magnet for artists, and Canyon Road became a desirable place to live because “it was safe, easy, inexpensive, and beautiful,” West says. The first artist to settle on Canyon Road was commercial lithographer Gerald R. Cassidy, who came west in 1915 to seriously pursue painting. Cassidy and his wife Ina first visited Santa Fe in 1912. Three years later, entranced with the area and its Native population, they bought a house at the corner of Canyon and Acequia Madre. The couple thoroughly remodeled their home, expanding it to showcase altar paintings from a ruined Nambé mission church. Their


“Canyon Road has over 100 world-class fine art galleries along its historic half-mile road. What city of a population of 70,000 can say that?” —Sherry Ikeda, owner, Gallery 901

© WARD RUSSELL

JOHN SCHUM

neighbors included New York artist Randall Davey, who in 1919 bought a sawmill at the end of Upper Canyon Road that today is home to the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary. Indiana native and celebrated muralist Olive Rush moved to Santa Fe shortly after Davey, residing in what’s now the Quaker Meeting House. Santa Fe painter Jerry West, son of the late artist Harold West, recalls spending part of his childhood with Rush, who had orchards on her property. “When I was a kid in 1942,” Jerry says, “I’d work for Olive on the weekend and help her with her gardens.” Through most of the 1950s, Canyon Road remained primarily residential, hosting just a handful of businesses—four of which were grocery stores. “There were hardly any galleries before then,” Jerry recalls. A creative atmosphere had already begun to emerge on the street, but it gained significant momentum in 1962, when the street was officially designated “a residential arts and crafts zone,” which meant that artists living on Canyon Road could now sell work from their homes. The number of businesses on the street began to rise, and, not surprisingly, many of them were arts-related. Modern-day Canyon Road is a narrow lane boasting old adobes that house an eclectic mix of galleries, shops, and restaurants. In 2007, the American Planning Association named Canyon Road one of the 10 “Great Streets in America,” noting that “the buildings themselves are works of art—doors and gates all painted in rich shades of turquoise, purple, red, and yellow.” In 2013, Canyon Road finished second in a USA Today poll of readers’ favorite “Iconic American Streets.” According to an early 1900s piece in The Santa Fe New Mexican, archaeologist and anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, who founded the Museum of New Mexico, said that “the arts have kept Santa Fe from becoming an ‘up-to-date’ burg and made it unique and beautiful. Artists and writers constitute only a small percentage of the population, but their influence is everywhere you look.” Nowhere is that influence more visible than on Canyon Road. cr


CANYON

YOUR PAS SAGE TO ART

FINE ART

Paige BRADLEY Joseph BREZA Fannie BRITO Margret CARDE Caroline CARPIO Michael DEVORE Martin EICHINGER Mark Yale HARRIS Carol HARTSOCK Timothy HORN James HOYLE Karol MACK Lange MARSHALL Stan METZGER Miguel PEIDRO Dennis SMITH Richard WEINSTEIN Alice WILLIAMS

canyonfineart.com | 205 Canyon Road Santa Fe NM | 505.955.1500 Santa Fean New Name HP-H ART.indd 1

blissful browsing

2/22/16 10:51 AM

STEPHEN LANG

STEPHEN LANG

Canyon Road is world famous for its abundance of artwork, but it has many other goods on offer as well. Independent shops abound, befitting the City Different’s origin as a trading post. You can spend a full day walking the’length of the street, buying art for your home—from paintings to pottery to sculptures—or choosing the perfect one-of-a-kind gift for family and friends. Stop by one of the many distinctive jewelry stores for handcrafted, locally made adornments (perhaps a turquoise-embellished silver concho belt or a custom-made gold and diamond ring); or check out chic, sophisticated Western wear and high-end home furnishings. Beautifully made textiles (from clothing to tapestries) are also among the many popular items you’ll find while perusing this famous shopping destination.

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visitcanyonroad.com


822 Canyon Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87501• www.lucadecor.com • 505-930-5140


imagination destination artistic tradition on Canyon Road by Ben Ikenson

CHRIS CORRIE

visitcanyonroad.com

CHRIS CORRIE

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LISA LAW

LISA LAW

W

hen 17th-century Spanish settlers used burros to haul firewood from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to customers in Santa Fe, they could never have known that the little backwater would become a world-class destination—thanks largely to a vibrant arts scene that would emerge here in the early 1900s. Today the city is home to a large number of accomplished creative talents. Boasting the third largest art market in the country, Santa Fe ranks among the world’s major cultural metropolises—an accomplishment that’s particularly impressive given that the city’s population only numbers around 70,000 people. The strength of Santa Fe’s artistic soul is especially evident on Canyon Road, a half-mile stretch that winds into the shadowy folds of forested mountains and was once the route for those Spanish settlers and their loyal if not overburdened burros.   With its dense assemblage of more than 100 art galleries—plus shops, restaurants, and historic adobe homes—Canyon Road is a draw for locals, tourists, and art collectors from around the world. In this quaint enclave, visitors can enjoy a broad range of work, from Native American pottery and Spanish Colonial–inspired wood carvings to contemporary sculpture, photography, and abstract paintings. At a handful of galleries, visitors can check out works by early-20th-century artists like Carlos Vierra, Olive Rush, Theodore Van Soelen, Agnes Sims, and Randall Davey, whose depictions of the area’s natural beauty and rich cultural traditions put Santa Fe and Canyon Road (where many of the artists lived, worked, and congregated) on the map in terms of its importance as an art destination. Throughout the year, Canyon Road hosts gallery openings that showcase exciting exhibitions and typically include refreshments and live entertainment and sometimes artist demonstrations and discussions. The storied and picturesque road further comes to life during the annual Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (held in October), when over 100 artists take to the street to set up easels and turn their creative process into an interactive experience between them, the viewer, and the one-of-a-kind setting. cr


NICOLAI PANAYOTOV Balance, Acrylic on canvas, 83”x63”

STEPHEN LANG

C AT E N A R Y ART GALLERY

616 1/2 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM, 87501 (505) 982 2700 i n f o @ c a t e n a r y a r t g a l l e r y. c o m w w w. c a t e n a r y a r t g a l l e r y. c o m

“Canyon Road is like nowhere else, and it is an honor to be part of its ongoing story. We think Canyon Road is an essential part not only of Santa Fe’s art world, but also of Santa Fe’s overall identity!”

GABRIELLA MARKS

—Mark White, owner, Mark White Fine Art

RUMI VESSELINOVA Edge, Archival print on cotton rag paper, 17”x27”


STEPHEN LANG


“Canyon Road is a journey for the senses and a place to imagine. Give yourself the freedom to leave the everyday struggles in which decisions demand your time. There is no price for the constant inspiration that art can bring to your life. Before you inquire about price, ask yourself the question: ‘What will this inspiration bring to my life?’ Canyon Road can expand your experience of living.” —Bill Hester, owner, Bill Hester Fine Art

STEPHEN LANG

“I think Canyon Road is the heart of Santa Fe.” —Cass Schuck, owner, Dancing Ladies


edible art Canyon Road’s cuisine for all occasions by Kate McGraw

R

EFRAÍN M. PADRÓ

Relax over a decadent dessert and a cup of tea from India, China, or Sri Lanka at The Teahouse.

esidents of the City Different use the ultimate compliment to describe the restaurants on Canyon Road: “so Santa Fe” is what they often say. But not only are the restaurants indicative of the area’s unique charm and hospitality, they’re also ranked among some of the best fine-dining establishments in the country, with chefs earning accolades from the likes of the James Beard Foundation and Bon Appétit magazine, and eateries winning AAA Four Diamond and Forbes Four Star awards. The gastronome and art lover will find Canyon Road dotted with places to feed both body and soul. To be sure, the culinary delights are as tempting as the art on display, because, simply put, Canyon Road makes an art of dining. You can pamper your palate with comestibles ranging from sprightly gourmet teas to succulent elk tenderloin, French roast coffee and pastries to Oregon pinot noir and Spanish tapas. Hungry for history and the plato del día? Try small plates of grilled octopus and shrimp on the cozy back patio of an 1835-era adobe while local flamenco dancers swirl around you. Or sit on the front portal and let Canyon Road’s passing parade of pedestrians be your entertainment. You can also visit a mid-20th-century eatery nestled in a cluster of homes, while a serene example of Santa Fe’s outdoor dining, secluded behind high walls and leafy trees, tempts with a high-end menu featuring salmon, striped bass, and Muscovy duck. The epicure will find no lack of delightful sustenance here. No matter what your tastes or taste buds crave, Canyon Road is a well-chosen spot for all things artistic, and a gastronomic must. cr

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

The Four Corners rack of lamb is a favorite entrée at Geronimo, a fine dining establishment.

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visitcanyonroad.com


SERGIO SALVADOR

Canyon Road restaurants

LISA LAW

—Julia Linder Bell, part owner, Caffe Greco

SERGIO SALVADOR

“The thing that I love most about Canyon Road is that it exudes an incredible creative vibe. I love to walk up from Caffe Greco and get lost in a myriad of art, architecture, food, fashion, and the sense that I am on a magical journey right here where I live.”

Café des Artistes 223-B Canyon, 505-820-2535 cafedesartistessf.com Caffe Greco 233 Canyon, 505-820-7996 caffegrecosantafe.com The Compound Restaurant 653 Canyon, 505-982-4353 compoundrestaurant.com El Farol 808 Canyon, 505-983-9912 elfarolsantafe.com Geronimo 724 Canyon, 505-982-1500 geronimorestaurant.com The Teahouse 821 Canyon, 505-992-0972 teahousesantafe.com

In between galleries and shops, visitors can pause to rest their feet and grab a bite at numerous spots along Canyon Road.

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CANYON ROAD SPRING ART FESTIVAL NOW IN ITS FIFTH YEAR, THE CANYON ROAD SPRING ART FESTIVAL WAS FORMERLY CALLED PASSPORT TO THE ARTS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY | MAY 6 & 7 Plan to spend the weekend on historic Canyon Road in Santa Fe for this exciting special event that connects art lovers with world-class artists and galleries in the famed art destination. All events are free and open to the public. FRIDAY EVENING GALLERY OPENINGS LATE NIGHT DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY ARTIST SLOW DRAW | ARTIST RECEPTION SILENT & LIVE AUCTIONS

VCR. 505.795.5703 PRESENTED BY THE CANYON ROAD MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION | CRMA.SF@GMAIL.COM | 505.795.5703


Canyon Road Spring Art Festival fifth annual interactive arts event

C

anyon Road’s creative and artistic legacy is celebrated during the Canyon Road Spring Art Festival (CRSAF), an annual public event held May 6–7 along the famous halfmile-long street. More than 100 artists from around the country—with styles ranging from abstract to figurative, traditional to contemporary—make the event, presented by the Canyon Road Merchants Association (CRMA), the unofficial kickoff to Santa Fe’s high art season. “The Canyon Road Spring Art Festival is a unique and exuberant event, as it showcases the extraordinary talents of artists while they create live art in one exhilarating day, in one of the most exceptional art districts the world has known,” says CRMA secretary Nancy Ouimet, owner and director of the gallery Canyon Road Contemporary Art. “The tradition of live art has always been what sets Canyon Road apart from other districts.” On May 6, in addition to the usual Friday-night show openings (which are typically accompanied by refreshments and often live music and entertainment as well), galleries will host artist demonstrations, lectures, and other goings-on. That evening and the following day, you can also bid on artwork that will be included in the Spring Art Festival’s silent auction. An Artist Slow Draw kicks things off on May 7. During the event, 70 Canyon Road artists take to the street—rain, shine, or even snow—to complete an original work, providing both locals and visitors a chance to experience Santa Fe’s plein air tradition firsthand. Collectors and spectators can then head to Wiford Gallery & Sculpture Garden for a cocktail

reception, which will feature live entertainment by student musicians, followed by a live auction of the unique, quality artworks created during the Slow Draw event. A portion of the auction’s proceeds will go to student music programs, and Bruce Adams, publisher of Santa Fean magazine, will serve as auctioneer. Bonnie French, CRMA president and director of Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden, says, “Here on Canyon Road, the Spring Art Festival honors local, national, and international artists, and nestled within the galleries are paintings and sculptures by these same groups of artists. . . . Combined with the rich history and congeniality of the road, any visitor can get the feeling of world travel while staying in the heart of Santa Fe.” For artist and bidder registration information, as well as a detailed schedule of events and general information about the Canyon Road Spring Art Festival and the Canyon Road Merchants Association, go to visitcanyonroad.com. cr

“Waxlander Gallery has been on Canyon Road for 32 years. In that time it has been amazing seeing the Canyon Road Art District grow into a vibrant destination for art collectors from the United States and the world.” —Phyllis Kapp, owner and artist, Waxlander Gallery

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bountiful buildings “Having had a gallery on or near Canyon Road since 2006, I can’t think of a better location. To be in the midst of the beauty and uniqueness that is Canyon Road, a road that has experienced its growth as a result of being an art colony during its historically long past. Walking the road, visitors and locals alike can imagine how the road may have been, about the artists who once lived here, and contemplate how [it] has evolved into such a concentrated art market much larger than most U.S. cities, regardless of size.”

JOHN SCHUM

—Aleta Pippin, owner and artist, Pippin Contemporary

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visitcanyonroad.com

adobes and Americanization on Canyon Road by Charles C. Poling

S

anta Fe’s unique aesthetic is vividly demonstrated along its world-famous thoroughfare, Canyon Road. During the half-mile walk up the road, visitors encounter seemingly straightforward adobes. Rooted in Pueblo Indian architecture, many of these structures, however, reveal Territorial-era updates on their original Native design. Canyon Road winds beside the Santa Fe River to the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, eventually forming a steep-sided canyon. This terrain offered little flat land for settlement, but the nearby river, via the abutting acequia madre (“mother ditch”), supplied precious water for farming. A few Spanish Colonial farmers homesteaded in the middle 1700s along a burro track just wide enough for a wagon. They built Pueblo-style homes comprising local materials—mud, stone, and timber—and incorporating lessons learned from neighboring native tribes. Canyon Road displays several examples of these originally simple homes. In addition to being constructed from mud, the structures were also distinctive for protruding beams known as vigas, which sit below shallow parapets and flat roofs. Deep-set windows with plaster-wrapped, bull-nosed corners punctuate rippling, lumpy adobe walls that sometimes run four feet thick. Many galleries and adobe buildings at the lower end of Canyon Road illustrate this earlier Pueblo style. An early-1700s casita on Canyon Road demonstrates a subtle evolution; its blue window framing and lintels evokes the Territorial style, a mid-19thcentury aesthetic that was introduced by army design influences. Reflecting New Mexico’s new status as a U.S. territory, this style increasingly incorporated manufactured materials like firedclay bricks and milled lumber. Many


LAURIE ALLEGRETTI

Diverse aesthetic sensibilities tend to converge on Canyon Road; interior designer Jennifer Ashton (pictured) shares a space with painter and gallerist Carole LaRoche at 415 Canyon.

people simply added ornamentation to their existing Pueblo-style homes, but new projects increased building size, made possible by imported materials and construction techniques. An incredible example of Territorialstyle architecture, El Zaguán (now the Historic Santa Fe Foundation), shows the evolution of a mid-18th-century farmhouse. Many remodels later, the home’s Pueblo roots appear beneath an overlay of Territorial ornamentation— wood shutters, crown molding over wood window framing, and a portal with white milled 8 x 8–foot posts. A periodperfect, pedimented lintel forms a shallow pyramid atop the framed entry door. Not far from El Zaguán, the former First Ward School flaunts a lovely brick exterior, capped with a white cupola. Now an established art gallery, this building demonstrates non-Native architecture that sprang up following railroad expansion into New Mexico in the late 19th century. With Western-bound trains came more Anglo-Americans, manufactured materials, and East Coast influences. To balance this Americanization of

“Canyon Road (and Santa Fe) is a magical place that changed my life and has made my dreams come true for 34 years now.” —Carole LaRoche, owner and artist, The Carole LaRoche Gallery

“The magic on Canyon is found in the artistic tempo, God’s amazing light and creative energy, and the spirit in the air! I believe in starting with an artistic eye with my clients; taking them down the path—literally—on Canyon Road always leads to a good place for design projects. The collaboration with an artist like Carol LaRoche is exciting. Her natural talent and eye for color keep me inspired; her range is amazing—a great artist will do that! I am blessed to be in the heart of the Santa Fe art and design experience.” —Jennifer Ashton,

Jennifer Ashton Interiors the region, legendary local architect John Gaw Meem reimagined the area’s original pueblos for public buildings, churches, and private homes in the early- to mid-20th-century. In 1939, the Catholic diocese commissioned his masterpiece of Pueblo Revival architecture, the Cristo Rey Parish Church at Canyon Road and Camino Cabra. Built with more than 150,000 clay bricks, the church remains one of the largest adobe structures in New Mexico. cr

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S PEC I AL ADVER T IS IN G S E CT I O N

CANYON ROAD

treasures

Tresa Vorenberg Goldsmiths

Manitou Galleries Classic Collection Birger Sandzen, West Kansas Landscape, oil, 40 x 48", 1940 The Manitou Galleries’ Classic Collection features the finest and most quintessential examples of Western Art. One can find paintings and sculptures from some of the best living Western artists, as well as works by legendary artists such as Birger Sandzen. Manitou Galleries -- the True Spirit of the West. 123 West Palace Avenue, 505-986-0440 225 Canyon Road, 505-986-9833 manitougalleries.com

Featuring wildly imaginative handcrafted designer jewelry by over 35 artists. Specializing in unique custom jewelry since 1974. 656 Canyon Road 505-988-7215 TVGoldsmiths.com

Casweck Galleries Canyon Road Contemporary Art Joy Richardson, Casanova, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48" Energetic tone and texture intertwine against a serene backdrop, often with a saucy jolt that leaves one ruminating about why they are uplifted. The nuances that occur while Joy blends colors create unprecedented new shades for which the dictionary hasn’t names yet! 403 Canyon Rd, 505-983-0433 canyoncontemporary.com

Ernest Chiriacka, The Preparation, oil on board, 30 x 24" Ernest Chiriacka (1913-2010) is Internationally known as an impressionistic painter of dramatic Western moods and the American landscape. He is one of few fine artists that successfully transitioned from illustration to fine art. 713 Canyon Road 505-660-0246 casweckgalleries.com

Carole LaRoche Gallery Carole Laroche, Moonlight, limited edition giclee “Look at the Wolves… And they will look right back at You Powerful but not Threatening… Wise yet Unsentimental… Above All…They are Alive” The Paintings of Carole LaRoche. 415 Canyon Road 505-982-1186 laroche-gallery.com

Desert Son of Santa Fe Fabulous colors and textures from our Italian designers, Officine Creative Booties and Sandals, Numero 10 Handbags. 725 Canyon Rd, 505-982-9499 desertsonofsantafe.com 30

visitcanyonroad.com


S PEC IAL AD VER T IS IN G S E CT I O N

Scarlett’s Antique Shop & Gallery Welcome to Scarlett’s—a favorite shopping haven of locals and visitors alike. We feature a beautiful array of authentic, high quality Native American jewelry by many award-winning artists. Whether you prefer the sleek contemporary look or traditional Classic Revival style, you are sure to find your treasure from the Land of Enchantment at Scarlett’s! At-door parking available. 225 Canyon Rd, 505-473-2861 ScarlettsGallery.com (for preview)

Proudly Presents Annie OBrien’s new exhibition

“Floriography”

Canyon Road Contemporary Art Lydia Piper, Fire in the Sky, kiln formed glass, 17 x 27" Lydia’s luxuriant kiln formed glass artworks evoke the Southwest, yet are distinctly contemporary. Broad in color spectrum and almost electrifyingly vibrant, her works are infused with symbolism and meaning while remaining abstract enough to create a unique dialogue with the viewer. 403 Canyon Rd, 505-983-0433 canyoncontemporary.com

Opening Friday May 6, 2016 Reception 5-7 The artist will be in attendance signing her Nationally published number one selling book,

“Bold Expressive Painting”

Also Representing:

WENDY PERKINS

Glass Painting and Sculpture

Alexandra Stevens Fine Art Gallery Juan Dell, Shepherd Girl, bronze, 60" H Juan Dell’s West Texas Heritage gave her the imagination and spirit that has made her the gifted artist that she is. Juan Dell has undeniably earned the title First Lady of Western Bronze. Alexandra Stevens Gallery is one of Santa Fe’s finest galleries showcasing contemporary, representational award-winning artists in painting and sculpture. Whether representational art, impressionism, illuminism, high realism or contemporary abstract.We cater to our collector’s sophisticated taste in choosing work among both emerging and award-winning artists. Located on Upper Canyon Road, across from the public parking lot the gallery is open year-round. Open Monday-Saturday 10 am–5 pm and Sunday 10am–4 pm 820 Canyon Rd, 505-988-1311 alexandrastevens.com

The Globe Gallery 727 Canyon Road Santa fe, NM 87501 505 989 3888 GlobeFineArt.com

“Meet me at The Globe!”


last look

past to present

AGNES SIMS. COURTESY OF THE PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES (NMHM/DCA), NEGATIVE #028984

Agnes Sims The first artist to establish their own gallery space on Canyon Road, Agnes “Agi” Sims is pictured here at #716. This building acted as a studio where Sims both created and sold her works. Inspired by the bold, flattened forms in prehistoric rock art in New Mexico, her illustrative interpretations were wildly successful.

FIRST WARD PUBLIC SCHOOL (BROWNELL-HOWLAND SCHOOL) ON THE CORNER OF CANYON ROAD AND GARCIA STREET, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO, CIRCA 1915-1920?. COURTESY OF THE PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES (NMHM/DCA), NEGATIVE #015222

The First Ward School, c. 1915

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GABRIELLA MARKS

Now numbered as #922 rather than #1000, the former Cassidy home preserves its Santa Fean legacy in a residentially concentrated area of Canyon Road east of most of the galleries, shops, and restaurants.

716 Canyon Road

GABRIELLA MARKS

The first artist to purchase property on Canyon Road, Gerald Cassidy redirected history by selecting #1000 as his home in 1915. The casita functioned as an artist studio for Gerald to create paintings, etchings, and sketches, while also doubling as a writing retreat for his wife Ina.

922 Canyon Road

McCall Fine Art now shows vibrant paintings in Agnes Sims’s former space. Current owner Judy Broughton discusses the wall behind Sims in the far left photograph: “I took part of that wall out, as there was just a small low door between the rooms. Now there is a large opening supported by beams and corbels.”

400 Canyon Road

The first school on Canyon Road, The First Ward School’s structure at #400 replaced its original building in 1906. Designed with rooms for classes and dancing, this building contrasts the adobe convention that otherwise dictates the street’s aesthetic. visitcanyonroad.com

The current incarnation of the #400 space exhibits a variety of exquisite paintings and sculptures under the prestigious title of Ventana Fine Art. GABRIELLA MARKS

GERALD AND INA SIZER CASSIDY AT THE ENTRANCE TO THEIR CANYON ROAD RESIDENCE, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO, DATE: 1920?. COURTESY OF THE PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES (NMHM/ DCA), NEGATIVE #091632

Gerald and Ina Sizer Cassidy, c. 1920

by Stephanie Love


AXTON - “The Edge of Hope” • 24" x 24" • Oil Angus - “Reclining Iris on a Purple Cloth” • 18” x 24” • Acrylic ISENHOUR - “Many Souls, One Light” • 8” x 16” • Oil BALAAM - “Autumn Tangle” • 36” x 36” • Oil

CANYON ROAD SPRING ART FESTIVAL GROUP SHOW JOHN AXTON • DOUG DAWSON • NATASHA ISENHOUR • BARRY MCCUAN Friday, May 6, 2016 • 5 to 7pm

CANYON ROAD SPRING ART FESTIVAL SILENT AUCTIONS • ARTIST QUICK DRAW • ARTISTS’ RECEPTION & LIVE AUCTION Saturday, May 7, 2016 • 10am to 7pm

CHROMATIC IMAGININGS FRANK BALAAM • ANGUS Friday, May 20, 2016 • 5 to 7pm

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


Canyon Road Magazine 2016 | Digital Edition  
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