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Xica Hansen hucks a massive frontside punt somewhere on the North Coast. Photo: @chachfiles

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It’s More than a Grocery Store

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Santa Cruz Mountains

It’s a Destination.

24197 Summit Road, Los Gatos, CA 95033 V O L 1 .6 - AP R I L / M AY 20 15

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Check out New Leaf’s

COMMUNITY CLASSROOM Located inside our Westside Santa Cruz store, the Community Classroom is a space for: · · · · ·

Hands-on cooking classes Health and wellness lectures Forums and integrative panels Family and kids programs And much more

Rent the Classroom For meetings or events, we can accommodate up to 20 people. Rental includes: · Tables and chairs · AV equipment · Culinary equipment and tools Learn more about New Leaf’s classes and how you can rent the space at newleaf.com.

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1101 Fair Ave. · Santa Cruz 95060 831.426.1306


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long bar. happy hour. Grab your friends and join us for Happy Hour* from 4:00–6:00pm, Sunday–Thursday. Enjoy 50% off select appetizers, and $5 draft beers, select wines, and well drinks.

sanderlingsrestaurant.com • (831) 662-7120 One Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos (Across from Seascape Village on Seascape Blvd.) 10

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S ANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ I N E *Happy Hour is available in the Lounge/Bar area only


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S AN TA CR UZ WAV E S MAGAZ I N E Publisher Tyler Fox Editor Elizabeth Limbach Photo Editor Paul Topp Proofreader Josie Cowden

SCW Staff Photographers

VOLUME 1.6 - APRIL / MAY 2015

Patrick Bremser, Yvonne Falk, Tyler Fox, Tyler Frasca, Jeff “Kookson” Gideon, Steve “Birdo” Guisinger, Audrey Lambidakis, Sean McLean, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Mike Santaella, Matt Snow, Jake Thomas, Paul Topp, Vaughn Visnius

Best of the Web

20

Contributing Photographers: Nikki Brooks,

Word on the Street

22

Remember When ... ? The Wrigley Building

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Ryan “Chachi” Craig, Cory Hansen, Blake JÖrgensen, Nate Lawrence, Matt Rosado, Robbie Soria

Local Legends: Robert “Doc” Scott

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Nonprofit: O'Neill Sea Odyssey

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2015 Swellies Awards

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Perspectives: Aptos Post Office Jumps

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Faces of the Surfing World: Buck Noë

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Behind the Lens: Cory Hansen

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Travel: Costa Rica

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Sports Achievement: Cody Townsend

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Outdoor: Keith Bontrager

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Adventure: Skydive Surf City

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Artist Profile: Amadeo Bachar

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Director of Sales Stephanie Lutz Account Executives Julia Cunningham, Jack Neenan, James Rummonds, Sadie Wittkins Distribution Mick Freeman

Field Report: Small Gardens

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Santa Cruz Waves, LLC

Dining Guide

104

President Jon Free Founder / CEO Tyler Fox

Drink Up: New Bohemia Brewing Company

118

Product Review: The Night Shift

124

Nat Young tickles a topaz tube somewhere on the Central

Comic: In the Bubble #3

130

Coast. Photo: @chachfiles

Event Gallery: Swellies Award Ceremony

134

Contributing Writers Ryan Craig, Yvonne Falk, Tyler Fox, Tyler Frasca, Traci Hukill, Neal Kearney, Linda Koffman, April Martin-Hansen, Brad Oates, Damon Orion, Kyle Thiermann, Jake Thomas

Contributing Artists Amadeo Bachar, Joe Fenton

Design Design nomBat Brand Development Creative Director Julie Henry Contributor Josh Becker Ad Design Julie Rovegno

Sales

On the Cover

The content of Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is Copyright © 2015 by Santa Cruz Waves, LLC. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local

F I N D U S ONLINE

distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements.

www.SantaCruzWaves.com

For advertising inquires, please contact steff@santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755.

@SantaCruzWaves

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To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.


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Powered by:

L E T T E R F R O M T H E F O U N D E R You’ve heard the saying before: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” In my 33 years on this big blue planet, I’ve found this saying to be quite accurate. I’ve failed at more impractical endeavors than I can count on both hands and feet, yet each time a project or venture doesn’t work as planned I come away a little wiser, knowing what not to do next time. Below are a few well-known figures who also haven’t let life’s unrelenting roadblocks turn them around. • Stephen King’s first novel was rejected 30 times. King has now sold more than 350 million copies of his books, which have been made into countless major motion pictures. •

Thomas Edison claimed to have failed 10,000 times before creating a light bulb that worked.

• Jay-Z couldn’t get signed to any record labels so he created his own. Forbes has estimated his net worth at $500 million, and TIME ranked him as one of their “Most Influential People In The World” in 2013. •

After a 45-minute battle with the neverending walls of whitewater at Ocean

Bethany Hamilton had her arm bitten off by a shark and was back on her surfboard one month later. Two

Beach, Tyler locks into one of his most

years after that, she placed first in the Explorer Women’s Division of the NSSA National Championships.

memorable rides of the season. Follow Tyler’s adventures on Instagram at

Sure, these famous personalities are rarities, but don’t think you have to illuminate the world to find that light within yourself. You’ll be amazed at where a little tenacity can take you.

@zorro_del_mar. Photo: @chachfiles

Tyler Fox – Founder of Santa Cruz Waves and Big Wave World Tour competitor

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SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/LOCAL-LOOP

Obama’s Fighter Jet Circles Above Santa Cruz

Around 2:40 p.m. on Feb. 13, the F/A-18 aircraft was spotted above the Cement Ship off of Seacliff State Beach.

4,021 views

Is Vapor as Bad as Smoke?

The California Department of Public Health claims that vaporizing pens, while not as harmful as conventional cigarettes, still pose a significant threat.

2,182 views

Organizers Eye Santa Cruz for Giant Slide Event

A Utah-based company considered Santa Cruz as one of 150 sites across the country to host an epic pool party.

Suspected Japanese Tsunami Debris Found at Three Mile Beach

1,809 views

Debris from the 9.0-magnitude earthquake that shook Japan in 2011 and triggered a tsunami continues to wash up on the West Coast.

1,638 views

SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/VIDEOS

Grouper Eats Four-Foot Shark in One Bite

A goliath grouper devours a black-tip shark in one bite off the coast of Bonita Springs, Fla.

48,093 views

Seal Versus Octopus at Ogden Point Some lucky (or unlucky?) onlookers captured this battle to the death.

17,207 views

One of the Biggest Great Whites Ever Filmed

“Deep Blue,” who is almost as long as the 22-foot boat, is one of the biggest great whites ever filmed.

Jaws

Highlights from the Jan. 21 and 22 Jaws swell.

5,561 views

16,536 views

@SANTACRUZWAVES

Amazing sunset. Photo: @xbirdo

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Golden hour mist along West Cliff Drive. Photo: @tradersnow

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Beautiful sunset at Steamer Lane. Photo: @toppshots

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Double rainbow at Twin Lakes. Photo: @vvvcruz

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Fresh sea items asornal rivi daily ng

Best Grocery Store Best Wine Selection • Santa Cruz Sentinel V O L 1 .6 - AP R I L / MAY 20 15

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Word on the Street

WHICH LOCAL PERSON INSPIRES YOU MOST? → asked at NATURAL BRIDGES ← By Yvonne Falk

Aylana Zanville, who owns Ola Chica, is

Jesse Nickel from Barry Swenson Builder

The person locally who inspires me the

very inspiring to me. She’s always smiling

inspires me. He’s backed the bike

most is my herbalist teacher Michael

and has such good energy. She inspires

community for 20 years. He supported

Tierra. He is simply a local treasure.

me to try new things and find joy in my surroundings.

mountain bikers fully by allowing them

He’s a 50-year master herbalist and he’s

to have jumps and the pump track

helped a lot of people heal their bodies

—Melanie Wylie, undergraduate advisor at UC Santa

near the Aptos Post Office, which were

using natural medicine.

some of the best things for the Aptos

—Michael McEvoy, functional nutritionist

Cruz and capoeira/martial arts studio co-owner

community. —Shawn Wilson, owner of Epicenter Cycling

The most inspiring local to me was Tyler

Sussi Rowntree inspires me the most.

I’d say I’m inspired by Richard Schmidt.

Tenorio. He was a really good dude and

I met her through the Agile Monkey

shouldn’t have passed away.

Pilates Studio. She deeply affected my

He’s the man—a home-town legend from Santa Cruz.

—Andrew Tennyson, handyman

heart and soul and body and mind, and

—Konrad Schmidt, surf instructor with the Richard

connected them all together. She was a total motherly figure for me, but also a friend. She is just awesome and great. She is everything I love about Santa Cruz all in one person. —Ami Lebel, UCSC student

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Schmidt Surf School


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Remember When ... ?

Photo: Courtesy of Wm. WRIGLEY Jr. Company

REMEMBER WHEN…

… the Wrigley Building was a chewing gum factory? ECENTLY, nearly 20 years after the Westside behemoth known as the Wrigley Building ceased being a chewing gum factory, some contractors received a sweet surprise: as they worked to remove old firestops from the ceiling, down came a shower of Hubba Bubba gum—forgotten,

By Elizabeth Limbach

“Juicy Fruit flavor spilled on a table ... when they got back to work the next day, it had eaten a hole through the table.” —Cindy Kerwin Mori

it would seem, at least since the mid-1980s, when the William Wrig-

an economic cornerstone for Santa Cruz,

ley Jr. Company discontinued that

employing 300 and producing 20 mil-

particular flavor.

lion sticks per day at its peak. Westside residents were often able to tell what was

“We were going to save and display

being cooked up on any given day based

it but someone ate it,” says William

on what aromas—Juicy Fruit, Double-

Ow, the current proprietor of the

mint and Big Red, among others—drifted

385,000-square-foot building. “It

across the neighborhood. But production

was still pretty soft.”

fizzled over the years, leading to the Chicago-based company’s decision to shut-

From the time the plant was

ter the plant and relocate operations out

built in the mid 1950s until it

of the country. Its closure kicked off an in-

closed in 1996, the Wrigley factory was

dustrial exodus, locally, when other major Continued on Page 26 ▶

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Remember When ... ?

companies like Lipton and Texas Instruments followed suit and left town. The blow to Santa Cruz was substantial, but the Westside didn’t stay down for long. Under the influence of movers and shakers like Ow, the neighborhood has been reimagined as a hub of innovation and artisanship. Now called University Business Park (but still known to locals as the Wrigley Building), the former gum factory—the largest building in Santa Cruz County—is a hive of interesting business, with tenants like Tao San Kickboxing, Dog Day Vintage Guitar Straps, Uncommon Brewers and Blix Electric Bikes. Within those walls, however, its past life is never totally forgotten—memories of the era of chewing gum and booming industry is always just a faint whiff of spearmint away.

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◀ Continued from Page 24

WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ABOUT THE WRIGLEY FACTORY? We posed this question at Facebook.com/SantaCruzWaves, and here’s what you had to say. I would take my paycheck to the store every week and the checkers would always smell it and guess what flavor we made that day. I still have the last box of gum that was produced from the line I worked on. —Patty Hall

The Westside smelled of Juicy Fruit! The man we bought our home from had worked there. He said the liquid from the Juicy Fruit flavor spilled on a table and wasn’t cleaned up completely, and when they got back to work the next day, it had eaten a hole through the table. —Cindy Kerwin Mori

We used to knock on the back door and get the gum with the defective wrappers. Then [we'd] go sit in someone’s back yard or Derby Park and chew gum, until someone came up with the brilliant idea to climb into the dumpster and the security guard chased us away. —Tony Smith


SHAMANISM worlds away from your everyday

Alaska • Mt. Shasta • Italy • Crete • New Zealand • Germany • New York • Santa Cruz

“ Alaska, 2014

Quiet the mind. Pay attention to the beauty that surrounds you. – Brant Secunda

www.SHAMANISM.com V O L 1 .6 - AP R I L / MAY 20 15

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Local Legends

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From saving surfers’ ears to grooming a generation of pros, 87-year-old Robert “Doc” Scott has a rich legacy in Santa Cruz By Neal Kearney

| Photos: Mike Santaella

obert T. Scott, M.D., aka “Doc Scott,” is truly one of

1985, Scott continued to research ways to protect water athletes’

Santa Cruz’s living legends. Along with pioneering

ears, and he surfed until the age of 80.

the ear-saving Doc’s Proplugs, he was the District Two Director of the Western Surfing Association (WSA) from the late ’60s to the mid-’80s, during which time he

Santa Cruz Waves tracked down the local icon, now 87, to hear more about the experiences that shaped his legacy.

shaped opportunities for young surfers. He organized monthly contests at which he would often act as announcer, heat director,

Did you grow up in Santa Cruz? No, I grew up in Norwich, N.Y., a

statistician and judge, and would load throngs of young Santa Cruz

small farming community with a population of about 8,000. This

surfers into an old converted school bus and drive them to invita-

makes me a true Valley kook!

tionals in Southern California. “We’d all be singing and laughing all the way down,” recalls local professional surfer Marcel Soros. “He

At what age were you introduced to surfing? Age 4 was my first

was such a selfless man. If any of the kids couldn’t pay their way,

experience riding waves, although I was bodysurfing. Every sum-

he’d always cover them.”

mer for 20 years, we’d take two-week family vacations to Maine, where I would body surf despite the freezing cold water. The first

Soros, who calls Scott “the Mother Teresa of Santa Cruz surfing,”

time I rode a surfboard I was 22 years old, at San Onofre State

was greatly influenced by the mentor at an early age. “He did so

Beach in 1949.

much for all of us growing up,” says Soros. “When I was 11, I had to surf [in a higher] division and kept losing. I got so frustrated.

You had a long career as an M.D. here in Santa Cruz. How did

Doc just kept telling me, ‘Don’t give up, Marcel. Keep your head

the infliction of surfer’s ear come to your attention? During

up and try your best.’ With Doc’s support and guidance I went on

high school physical exams, doctors would tell me about seeing

a winning spree—over 100 wins.”

bumps in my ear canals. After 24 years of surfing the cold waters, and northwest wind exposure at Steamer Lane, I had frequent

Scott inspired and helped a whole generation of now-interna-

episodes of water blocking my ear canal per year. During a wipe-

tionally recognized surfers, all the while

out or pushing through a wave, the dense

performing his duties as a practicing M.D.

saltwater would be impacted deep to the

“My generation was the last group with him in the early WSA days,” says champion Adam Replogle. “We were really lucky to have such a wonderful man exposing us to competitive surfing. It wasn’t so much about winning as much as it was about having fun.” After retiring from his medical practice in

Doc Scott inspired and

narrowing of the canal. Once in the “inter-

helped a whole generation

ing ring of benign bone growth and the

of now-internationally recognized surfers, all the while performing his duties as a practicing M.D.

sanctum,” located between the constricteardrum, the seawater becomes trapped, blocking sound waves. When and how did you begin creating prototypes for Doc's Proplugs? [I started in] 1972. The original designs were similar to the “Frankenstein” plug,

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Local Legends

“The long, frequent sessions of exposure [to cold water and wind] lead surely to rapid worsening of the structure in the external canal.”

which is a rod upon which are located a series of discs. ketplace because the users think that there is nothing that beats I had problems with the earplugs available at that time in that I

out the original Doc’s Proplugs.

thought they were giving me a complete seal and that this was the reason for my loss of equilibrium. I would insert the plug so

Why should surfers in Santa Cruz take care to protect their

that it was not giving a complete seal and so there became an

ears from the elements? Anybody surfing in Santa Cruz should

on-and-off passage for air to flow back and forth. This is essen-

be concerned about the harmful effects of exposure to cold water

tial to prevent loss of balance. On a surf trip to Margaret River,

and cold wind. Worse than the temporary pain in the ear is the de-

Australia, my wife Janice was driving through the eucalyptus

velopment of surfer’s ear and swimmer’s ear. The long, frequent

trees and I was daydreaming looking for koala bears munching

sessions of exposure lead surely to rapid worsening of the struc-

on leaves. Suddenly a light went on in my head about putting a

ture in the external canal.

hole in the earplug. Back in Santa Cruz with a red-hot paperclip, I made a vent in the knob of a Voit earplug and went immediately

What are your proudest accomplishments? I’d have to say

to the point below the Santa Cruz Lighthouse. To my utter satis-

my contribution to the format of the current WSL [the World Surf

faction, I had several rides without falling off. Years later, I stuffed

League, formerly the Association of Surfing Professionals] compe-

the ear canal with a cotton ball impregnated with Vaseline, sewed

titions. In the late ’60s, the elite surfers were complaining about

a thread through the cotton ball so that I could remove it after the

having to surf the event on fixed dates during the weekends. Most

experiment. I further inserted a non-vented Doc’s Proplug. This

times it was a real slop. In order to change this, I came up with the

provided a watertight and airtight seal.

idea to set it up with waiting periods of one month. Notice was given 48 hours before the start of the event. However, sometimes the

I designed the current Doc’s Proplugs with a vent by including a

notice was only 24 hours. The contest went on, though, no matter

pin in the mold, which would leave a tunnel through which air

the day of the week or if there happened to be any other competi-

could pass in both directions. This enhanced balance and hear-

tions occurring in the world on that date. These conditions were

ing. A surfer could hear a whistle and know that he was cutting

usually appropriate for some challenging waves for a 4A contest.

someone off from their ride. I could not get a patent on the hole,

There was someone in each district who would receive a call from

but after two or three years, I stumbled upon an injection plastic

me when I decided to bring us all together. I would confer with the

having a density less than one. And what do you know, the plug

directors in the six districts before making a decision. We referred

floated. I showed it to my Patent Attorney Robert Slick LLD [fa-

to this as the “jungle telephone network.” I was happy that the

ther of Grace Slick, of Jefferson Airplane]. He threw his arms up in

elite surfers were much more satisfied with this upgrade.

the air and yelled, ‘That’s it!’ Sure enough that claim of flotation

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made it possible to patent the Doc’s Proplugs. The patent was 100

Other than that, I’d say [I’m most proud of] my involvement in

percent protected for 17 years. In recent years, there have been

the surf community, combating surfer’s ear, delivering babies and

some knockoffs. The copyright has saved its survival in the mar-

treating the ill.

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


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Nonprofit

Photos: Courtesy of O'Neill Sea Odyssey

O’Neill Sea Odyssey invites local kids

“The ocean covers 32 percent of the

waste composting, native plant restora-

Earth’s surface, provides half the world’s

tion, gardens for the homeless and native

to experience “the

oxygen, is the world economy’s shipping

plant restoration.

world’s coolest

able diversity of life, and creates weather,

This program, which served its 80,000th

among other things,” notes OSO Execu-

student this spring, raises funds so that

classroom”

tive Director Dan Haifley. “So it’s impor-

schools don’t have to pay for students to

tant to get youth onto the ocean to expe-

attend. OSO also provides bus transpor-

rience the world’s coolest classroom and

tation funds for lower-income students.

lane, provides a habitat for a remark-

By Damon Orion

learn how to protect it.”

For nearly two decades, O’Neill Sea Odys-

Jack O’Neill, the trailblazing local surfer/

years, including the California Governor’s

sey (OSO) has been offering economically

businessman often named as the inven-

award in Economic and Environmental

disadvantaged young people in grades four

tor of the wetsuit, launched OSO in 1996.

Leadership, Barbara Boxer’s Conservation

to six a chance to take part in free, interac-

The centerpiece of the program is a three-

tive lessons in marine science, navigation/

hour course aboard a 65-foot catamaran

mathematics and marine and watershed

equipped with a solar panel and a wind

ecology. Students learn about these sub-

turbine. Follow-up lessons are available

jects through hands-on activities like tow-

at an education center at the Santa Cruz

ing plankton, testing water samples, pulling

Harbor. Sea Odyssey also connects its

up crab pots and using hand-held compass-

students with community service pro-

es to take bearings on local landmarks.

grams such as school recycling, lunch

OSO has won numerous awards over the

“It’s been said that education is a great equalizer, and it’s a proven fact for O’Neill Sea Odyssey.” —Executive Director Dan Haifley Continued on Page 34 ▶

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Nonprofit

◀ Continued from Page 32

Champion award and the Silicon Valley Business Journal’s Community Impact Award. In 2009, the Adam Webster Memorial Fund, which makes it possible for cognitively and physically challenged students to participate in the program, received the Special Parents Information Network's Community Spinner Award. According to a three-year study of the program’s long-term impact on lower-income youth conducted by OSO instructor Lauren Hanneman, 75 percent of the students retained what they learned five to seven years after the program. An annual analysis of the results of OSO’s student surveys found that lower-income youth who begin the program with less knowledge than their higher-income peers have an equal level of knowledge after completing the program. “It’s been said that education is a great equalizer, and it’s a proven fact for O’Neill Sea Odyssey,” says Haifley. Learn more at oneillseaodyssey.org.

Feel the Difference

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This issue of Santa Cruz Waves magazine, our sixth, wraps up its first year in print. And what a year it’s been. We paddled from the familiar waters of the Web to those of publishing—dropping in on a wave that’s been gaining momentum ever since. We’re topping the ride off with another new endeavor: our first annual Swellies awards, a survey of reader favorites that will henceforth be an annual Waves tradition. Because, really, Santa Cruz Waves is more than a website or a magazine. It’s a lifestyle. It’s you—and the Swellies is your chance to weigh in on what you love most about this community. Hundreds of you voted at santacruzwaves.com, crowning winners in the surf scene— shapers, surf shops, groms and more—and for everything from breweries and burritos to banks and bike shops. Without further ado, we are happy to present the inaugural class of winners in the Santa Cruz Waves Swellies.

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2015 Swellies

Bike Shop

| Another Bike Shop

2361 Mission St., Santa Cruz, anotherbikeshop.com. Runners Up: Spokesman Bicycles, Family Cycling Center

Grom (under 16 /female)

| Autumn Hays

Runner Up: Isabella DeGaglia

Grom (under 16 /male)

| Sam Coffey

Runner Up: Korey Svardal

Gym

| Toadal Fitness

Multiple locations, toadalfitness.com. Runners Up: In-Shape, Santa Cruz Core Fitness + Rehab

Longboarder (female) Photo: Nikki Brooks

Longboarder (female) | ASHLEY LLOYD Ashley Lloyd is a gifted individual. Not only does this goofyfooted gal longboard with the best of ’em, she’s also an established musician who sings and plays guitar in a band

Longboarder (male)

Shortboarder (female) | Autumn Hays, Ashley Held (tie) Runner Up: Kim Mayer

Shortboarder (male)

are both an expression of the soul, enjoyable as a newbie

Runner Up: Ben Coffey

“There is always room for expansion.”

| Robert “Wingnut” Weaver

Runner Up: Bryce Suba, CJ Nelson (tie)

called The Shapes, alongside her husband, Alex. “They or well-advanced player,” Lloyd says of her two passions.

| Ashley Lloyd

Runner Up: Jeni Baer

Skate Shop

| Nat Young

| Bill’s Wheels Skateshop

1240 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, billswheels.com. The most memorable surf trip she’s taken was to New Zealand and Australia about 10 years ago, where she remembers scoring amazing waves and good vibes with great

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SUP

| Covewater Paddle Surf

friends. She used to compete regularly and at one point

726 Water St., Santa Cruz, covewatersup.com.

finished fifth in the world. These days she participates in

Runners Up: SUP Shack Santa Cruz, Capitola Surf and Paddle

the Log Jam events at The Point, where she relishes riding

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Runners Up: Santa Cruz Boardroom, Skateworks

the pre-1970s boards. She shapes her own boards, and de-

Surf School

scribes her style as a “Penguin versus Pelican.” This creative

Club-ed.com

soul has most definitely stamped her distinct style in and

Runners Up: Richard Schmidt Surf School, Surf School

out of the waters of Santa Cruz. | Neal Kearney

Santa Cruz

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

| Club Ed Surf School and Camps


Grom (male) | SAM COFFEY Sometimes being the little brother of a shredding stud can be a drag. All of your achievements and surfing prowess is subject to being compared to that of your elder sibling, and emerging from their shadow may seem impossible. Photo: Matt Snow

Surf Shop

Fortunately for him, this is not the case for 14-year-old Sam Coffey. He and his brother, Ben Coffey, are a tag team (think Andy and Bruce Irons), and Sam has had no problem

| O’Neill Surf Shop

making a name for himself as one of Santa Cruz’s top ris-

Multiple locations, oneill.com.

ing talents. His local haunt is The Lane, but his favorite surf

Runners Up: Freeline Design Surf Shop, Pearson Arrow Surf

spot in the world is Lava Flows in the Caribbean. His dream

Shop

trip would be to Fiji, and his favorite surfer is Hawaiian John

Yoga Studio

John Florence. When he’s not shredding The Lane with his

| DiviniTree Yoga & Art Studio

pals, he likes to skateboard and hang out with friends. With

1043 Water St., Santa Cruz; 2805 Mission St., Santa Cruz; divini-

a bevy of contest results under his belt, such as a third place

tree.com.

finish in a Surfing America event at The Lane, and a support-

Runners Up: Village Yoga, Pleasure Point Yoga

ive family, the horizon looks bright for this youngster. | NK

Pizza | PLEASURE PIZZA It’s no news that Pleasure Pizza is a local favorite. Since opening in 1975, the business has fed delicious pizza to multiple generations and, over those years, found a place in the hearts of their loyal customers. If you’re looking for a quick slice of pizza after a surf session, their original location on Portola Drive, at the corner of 41st Avenue, is conveniently situated and dishes up tasty pizza that’s satisfying after a day out in the water. Employees at the Pleasure Point Slice Shack, as the iconic eatery is called, say their most popular pizzas are the Santa Barbara and the Pleasure Combo, but the entire menu is worth the trip, whether it’s for a quick slice or a full pie with family and friends. It’s worth noting that slices are only $2 on Tuesday nights. You can also stop by the Pacific Avenue location in downtown Santa Cruz, or enjoy their famous pizza at the East Side Eatery on 41st Avenue. Pleasurepizzasc.com. | April Martin-Hansen

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2015 Swellies

Bar

| Parish Publick House

841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, polaro.com/parish. Runners Up: Brady’s Yacht Club, Motiv

Barbecue Restaurant

| Aptos St. BBQ

8059 Aptos St., Aptos, aptosstbbq.com. Runners Up: Cole’s Bar-B-Q, Mission St. BBQ

Burrito

| Taqueria Michoacan

21401 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, taqueriamichoacan.net. Photo: Sean McLean

3 BREWERIES, 3 BEERS

Our favorite brews from the winners Discretion Brewing (winner): Uncle Dave’s Rye IPA | Dis-

Runners Up: Tacos Moreno, Point Market

Breakfast

| Harbor Cafe

535 7th Ave., Santa Cruz, harborcafesantacruz.com. Runners Up: Zachary’s Restaurant, Walnut Avenue Cafe

Brewery

| Discretion Brewing

cretion Brewing has been making great beer for the last two

2703 41st Ave., Soquel, discretionbrewing.com.

years and this rye IPA is one of their classics. With 6.5 percent

Runners Up: Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing, Sante Adairius

alcohol volume and 68 IBUs, it has everything you want in an IPA: strength, bitterness and the right amount of body. The

Cocktails

| 515 Kitchen & Cocktails

rye grain gives the beer a darker look than your usual IPA and

515 Cedar St., Santa Cruz, 515santacruz.com.

makes this flagship ale a standout in the county. Uncle Dave’s

Runners Up: Süda, Hula’s Island Grill

Rye IPA can be found at SÜda, Zizzo’s Coffeehouse and Wine Bar, and other fine establishments in the Capitola area.

Coffee

| Verve Coffee Roasters

Multiple locations, vervecoffeeroasters.com. Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing: Dread Brown Ale | The Organic Dread Brown Ale is where it all began: Santa Cruz County’s first organic craft brew. When Emily Thomas found-

Runners Up: Coffeetopia, Surf City Coffee Company

Deli

| Garden Liquors & Deli, Zoccoli’s Deli (tie)

ed Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing with Chad Brill back in 2005,

Garden Liquors & Deli: 1815 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz;

this was her first recipe and it is still a favorite. With 5 percent

Zoccoli’s Deli: 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, zoccolis.com.

alcohol volume and 30 IBUs, it is a dangerously drinkable ale

Runner Up: New Leaf Community Markets

with smooth malty flavor and an easy finish. The Organic Dread Brown Ale can be found on tap at Pleasure Pizza, 99

Dog-Friendly Establishment

| Beer Thirty Bottle

Bottles of Beer, and New Leaf Community Markets in cans

Shop & Pour House

and bottles.

2504 S. Main St., Soquel, facebook.com/bthirty. Runners Up: Pono Hawaiian Grill, Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing

Sante Adairius Rustic Ales: Anais | Sante Adairius has a reputation for making distinctive ales and is greatly beloved lover of Henry Miller, the Anais is Sante Adairius’ version of a

Runners Up: Shopper’s Corner, Deluxe Foods of Aptos

A sexy glass of Belgian-styled ale, Sante Adairius has create

Happy Hour

| The Crow’s Nest Restaurant

a classic American version of a European standard. You can

2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, crowsnest-santacruz.com.

find the Anais at the Tap Room at Sante Adairius and at the

Runners Up: West End Tap & Kitchen, Hula’s Island Grill

Cremer House. | Jake Thomas

|

| New Leaf Community Markets

Multiple locations, newleaf.com.

Belgian farmhouse ale, and it lives up to its literary allusion.

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Grocery Store

by the craft beer crowd. Sharing a name with the famous

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Pizza

Smoothie

| Pleasure Pizza

| New Leaf Community Markets

Multiple locations, pleasurepizzasc.com.

Multiple locations, newleaf.com.

Runners Up: Pizza My Heart, Tony and Alba’s

Runners Up: Amazon Juices, Samba Rock Acai Cafe

Restaurant

Winery

| Cafe Cruz

| MJA Vineyards

2621 41st Ave., Soquel, cafecruz.com.

328 Ingalls St., Santa Cruz, mjavineyards.com.

Runners Up: Pono Hawaiian Grill, Assembly

Runners Up: Bargetto Winery, Beauregard Vineyards

Photo: Dave “Nelly” Nelson

Board Shaper | BOB PEARSON Bob Pearson, the man behind Pearson Arrow Surfboards, has been a significant presence in the surf industry throughout the years. His boards have carried countless profes-

Artist | Jimbo Phillips Jimbophillips.com Runners Up: Sarah Jane, F.J. Anderson

Band | The Expendables, Extra Large (tie) Runner Up: SambaDá

Bank | Bay Federal Credit Union

sional surfers across the waters of Santa Cruz and beyond,

Multiple locations, bayfed.com.

including big-wave legends like Ken “Skindog” Collins,

Runners Up: Santa Cruz County Bank, Lighthouse Bank

Darryl “Flea” Virostko, Peter Mel, Shawn Dollar, Mike and Sarah Gearhart, and Jay Moriarity, as well as international

Clothing, Men’s | O’Neill Surf Shop

stars Barton Lynch, Laird Hamilton, Shawn Thompson, Tom

Multiple locations, oneill.com.

Curren and Mark Healy. Pearson started teaching himself to

Runners Up: Stripe Men, Pacific Wave Surf Shop

shape in 1966, riding various shapes in order to figure out what made them able to do certain things better, and mea-

Clothing, Women’s | Synergy Organic Clothing

suring their dimensions exactly so he could compare them

Multiple locations, synergyclothing.com.

to other boards. In his own words, Pearson “put[s] a lot of

Runners Up: Camouflage, Pacific Wave Surf Shop

energy into making things exact.” He uses his technical, mechanical way of thinking when he designs a new board

Nonprofit | Save Our Shores

for someone—a process that begins with a lengthy talk

345 Lake Ave., Santa Cruz, saveourshores.org.

with customers about what they want out of a board, de-

Runners Up: Grind Out Hunger, Surfrider Foundation

sign ideas, what they like and dislike about current boards, and what their style of surfing is. 2324 Mission St., Santa Cruz

Photographer | Dave “Nelly” Nelson, V Vaughn Visnius (tie)

(retail shop), 1115 Thompson Ave. #7, Santa Cruz (factory); ar-

davenelson-photography.com, vvaughnvisnius.com.

rowsurfshop.com. | AMH

Runner Up: Jake J. Thomas

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2015 Swellies

Real Estate | Bailey Properties 1602 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, baileyproperties.com. Runners Up: Nicole Woods (Taylor Property Management), Patti Boe (American Dream Realty)

Salon | VICE Salon 309 Capitola Ave., Capitola, salonvice.com. Runners Up: Urban Groove Hair Salon, David Adams Salon

Startup | Looker Looker.com Runners Up: Civinomics, Acorn

Surfboard Shaper | Bob Pearson arrowsurfshop.com Runners Up: Buck Noë, Travis Reynolds

Tech Company | Plantronics Plantronics.com Runner Up: Cruzio Internet

Photo: Courtsey of Synergy Organic Clothing

Women’s Clothing: SYNERGY ORGANIC

Videographer | Santaella Media Santaellamedia.com Runners Up: Kyle Buthman, Paul Topp

CLOTHING This Santa Cruz-based women’s clothing brand stands out for a number of reasons: at the top of the heap is their uncommon commitment to creating fashion-forward clothes that are also environmentally and socially conscious. Husband-and-wife team Kate Fisher and Henry Schwab created Synergy Organic Clothing with the goal of maintaining a sustainable business model and producing modern-yet-timeless pieces that help women feel and look their best. They draw inspiration for their designs from the world around them, such as urban and natural landscapes and modern and ancient cultures. The soft fabric they use is made with organic cotton and low-impact, nontoxic dyes in India. The clothes are hand sewn in Nepal, where the owners have a longstanding relationship with manufacturers. They are dedicated to fair-trade practices, making sure that the women employed receive livable wages, have the opportunity to work from home, gain economic independence, and can take care of their families. Multiple locations; Synergyclothing.com. | AMH

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S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E Photo: V Vaughn Visnius


Photo: Dave “Nelly” Nelson

Photographer | DAVE “NELLY” NELSON and V VAUGHN VISNIUS (tie) Dave “Nelly” Nelson: “This evening was really nice. I saw some

and the motion in the water. It was a great night to be in Santa Cruz.”

crazy cloud formations and jammed down to Windansea [surf spot] to meet up with Birdo [Steve Guisinger]. I shot into the twilight and

V Vaughn Visnius: “The challenge not to miss the shot made this

then turned my attention to the sunset, which was lighting up like

photo one of my best last year. July saw an unusual weather pattern

crazy. After the sunset I hooked up my 600mm with a doubler and

that blossomed into the most amazing after-burn sunset. Unable to

started shooting long exposures of the Boardwalk. I was so stoked

capture the fast-changing scene in a single frame, I hand held the

when I saw how good they looked. I love the lit-up houses on the hill

camera vertically to shoot six frames for this panorama.”

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2015 Swellies

Surfer | NAT YOUNG Nat Young is a beast. He trains harder than 99 percent of the other surfers out there and has an insatiable hunger for winning. Match that with a lethal backside attack and futuristic air game and you've got the towheaded Westside wonder boy who is sure to leave his mark as one of the Photo: @chachfiles

Best Surf Photo | Kenan Chan 44

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S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

best surfers to ever hail from Santa Cruz. | Tyler Fox

Miles Clayton clocks some tube time somewhere on the Westside.


Best Sunrise Photo | Patrick Bremser

- TO OUR SPONSORS -

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More Than Just Sneakers Socksmith Santa Cruz Waves Knee-highs

1017 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz, CA 95060

(831) 423-2700

oldschool-shoes.com

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kauboi grill and sushi bar open 7 days a week 4pm to late 831-661-0449 8017 soquel drive, aptos kauboigrillandsushi.com

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Perspectives

THE END OF AN ERA

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Words by Tyler Frasca Photos by @chachfiles

For the last decade or so, roughly an acre of perfectly sculpted

would be needed sooner or later, and, as is so often the case, that

dirt bike jumps have adorned the lot across from the post office in

the jumps would be plowed to make way for new commercial de-

Aptos, putting the small community on the map as one of the top

velopment. On Feb. 17, that borrowed time ran out, and bulldoz-

dirt-jumping destinations in the world. In recent years, the jumps

ers leveled one of the most well-known jump parks in the world.

drew talent from far and wide and helped produce some of the

There are tentative plans to rebuild the jumps in a new location,

best riders from right here in Santa Cruz. The kids who started

and the entire Santa Cruz cycling community is rallying around

shoveling in an empty lot in the late ’90s are now among the top

the cause. There will be another jump park. There will be more

names in the freeride mountain bike scene. But, as the saying

pump tracks. But there will never be another "Post Office."

goes, everything good must end. Everyone knew that the land

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Remembering the Aptos Post Office Jumps

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Faces of the Surfing World

Second-generation shaper Buck Noë makes the case for handmade, custom boards By Neal Kearney | Photos: Sean McLean The signs of a homegrown operation are

the walls. A photo of his larger-than-life

ing on, not forgetting to mention the mer-

everywhere inside Buck Noë’s Westside

father, Rick Noë, hangs prominently over

its of a good ol’ fashioned hand shape in

surfboard factory: a dusty shaping room

the space, posthumously watching as his

a world saturated with big-name brands

plastered with order forms; pictures of

son carries on his legacy.

and mass-produced pop-outs. He dives

Noë threading Indonesian tubes and lo-

into a discussion on the craft of shap-

cal team riders pushing the limits on their

Noë looks up from his current shape when

ing, his inspirations and what keeps him

custom boards; and signed photos of lo-

I enter his hallowed workshop and throws

going. Here is a taste of what the unique

cal legends like Jason “Ratboy” Collins

me a sly grin. His orange hair is cut into a

shaper has to say:

and Matt Rockhold. Obscenities are finger

wide, almost tribal-looking Mohawk. Noë

written into the foam dust that clings to

shows me the shape he’s currently work-

What’s your motto? I’m not here for a Continued on Page 56 ▶

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Utah Kokopelli Trail, Moab,

Monte Cristo, Utah

Rock Corral near Millford, Utah

1-800-301-9874 Sales@Tepuitents.com 2703 41st Ave, Unit E, Soquel, CA 95073

TepuiTents.com

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Faces of the Surfing World

◀ Continued from Page 54

How would you describe your style of shaping, and why do you choose to do it that way? I hand shape boards with oldschool tools and techniques. That’s how I learned to shape—not by pushing buttons on a keyboard. If you can’t hand shape a board, well then I can’t even consider you a shaper—you’re just a button pusher. The craftsmanship that goes into a handshaped board is paramount. It’s a creative process that could never be achieved through a shaping machine. It’s a trip— most people don’t even know how to shape a board these days. It’s pretty sad, a dying art, and so I make a very con-

Photo: Nathan Lawrence

“There’s something to be said for the ability to actually shake the hand of the guy who shaped your favorite board.”

scious effort to keep the tradition alive by wielding my planer. A crazy amount of modern surfboard manufacturers have zero mastery with a planer and sanding block. I always remember my father telling me that it’d take me 1,000 surfboards shaped to realize I didn’t know shit about surfboards, and he was right. [Laughs] … I really enjoy creating unique project boards—taking someone’s ideas of what a good board is to

long time but I’m here for a good time. I’m not in it for the money

[him or her] and bringing it to life. It tests me and my ability, and

or my health, I’m in it because I like making surfboards and going

it breaks the monotony of building similar boards over and over

out and riding them.

again. Being a production shaper would completely kill the creative expression that I get out of making boards.

Why work with a local shaper? It’s imperative that you speak with the person who’s going to actually create your surfboard.

How do you stay inspired? I try not to shape if I’m in a sour

Especially if it’s a custom board. It’s the shaper’s job to interpret

mood. If I really don’t feel like shaping, there’s a lot of other work

what it is that the surfer is looking for, regardless of the con-

to be done: glassing, sanding, hot coating, returning phone calls,

sumer’s ability to describe what they want and how they want it

cleaning the shop, or designing digital files ... I have a strong be-

to surf. It’s a board builder’s job to build the best board for that

lief that the energy flowing through me that goes into a shaped

particular individual and deduce the most practical information

blank is vital to a good board—the “mojo” as my pops used to call

needed every single time.

it. I don’t want any negative vibes going into my boards. If all else fails, I consider my customer and what it feels like every time I

There’s a disconnect when you simply walk into a surf shop and

make a magic board—when I have someone tell me that they got

grab a mass-produced board off the rack. Usually these boards, es-

the best wave of their life, or were surfing at a level beyond their

pecially the big-brand names, have a “master shaper” who creates

ability because they were riding a board that I carefully crafted to

a design using a computer. It’s only the “ghost shaper” [a surfboard

suit their surfing. It’s a great feeling that inspires me to carry on

shaper hired to clean up the blank after it emerges from the shap-

even if I am not in the mood. It motivates me to make the best

ing machine] who touches the foam, so the whole thing becomes

possible board for each individual each and every time. It’s my

very impersonal. There’s something to be said for the ability to ac-

job and I love it.

tually shake the hand of the guy who shaped your favorite board.

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Behind the Lens

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Photographer Cory Hansen’s quest for out-of-this-world shots By Neal Kearney

Jesse Colombo races through a crystal cavern.

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Behind the Lens

IN

his work, Santa Cruz photographer Cory Hansen strives for

Did you have formal training to become a photographer? I’ve

the transcendental. Whether it’s using flash strobes to illuminate

been shooting as a hobby since I was old enough to carry a cam-

an airborne surfer at dusk or time-lapse videography to trace the

era, and professionally for over 10 years. I’ve had no formal train-

movements of the moon, he’s always chasing that elusive, once-

ing, just awesome mentors such as my father [John] and Dave

in-a-lifetime shot. The 30-year-old journeyman has dedicated the

“Nelly” Nelson.

last decade of his life to not only sharing the natural beauty of

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the world with the public, but also to giving back by working with

What type of photography would you say you’re best known

various nonprofits and charities. Here’s a glimpse into what pro-

for? Creating images that evoke a sense of exploration and curi-

pels this artist forward.

osity while always letting my heart lead the creativity. My credo is

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


quality over quantity any day, unless I’m working with time-lapse.

To you, what makes the “perfect photo?” I am not sure one

My goal has always been to go that extra mile to nail that seldom-

such individual “perfect photo” exists because there are so many

seen, one-of-a-kind cosmic image. I’d also say I’m known for be-

elements that can create a great photo. I have always liked focus-

ing part of a team with Dave Nelson that revolutionized surf-flash

ing on familiar things but in a new or unseen light—an image that

photography with new innovative water-lighting techniques that

stirs curiosity of the mind while stopping you dead in your tracks.

had never been seen before. This enabled me to work in the surf

When creating, I try to keep in mind the sense of evoking passion,

industry and travel the globe exploring exotic locations for the

compassion, exploration and wanderlust. I want the viewer to

last 10 years.

feel as if they are right beside me and involved in whatever that cosmic moment may be.

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Behind the Lens

Tell us a little bit about the charity

been working with the Dark Skies Associ-

and nonprofit work that you’ve been

ation. We are brainstorming projects that

involved with lately. I’ve been working

could help curb light pollution as well as

with numerous nonprofits and organiza-

educate the youth about the wonders and

tions to create different “limited series”

delicacy of our infinite night sky.

fine-art prints, of which a percentage of

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proceeds will go back to support those

You were very close to your father,

in need or directly to the research itself.

who passed away more than a year

This has been a great way to continuously

ago. How did his death impact your

give back to charities close to my heart.

photography? I recently finished a pas-

Right now, my ALS “McWay Falls” series is

sion project in his honor: a time-lapse

a fine-art collection of five photographs

video that revolved around revisiting

featuring a rare beach-level view of the

cherished places I had been previously

falls at night, colorfully lit by the fading

with my father. It’s basically a collection

hues of astronomical twilight and the

of footage from the High Sierras to the

setting crescent moon. Fifty percent of

California coastline, a glimpse into a six-

the [proceeds from the] first 100 limited-

month journey to reconnect with myself,

edition [prints] will be donated to the

my father and the ideals he has instilled in

ALS Association’s research fund. Also, I’ve

me. I traveled to places where my father

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“When creating, I try to keep in mind the sense of evoking passion, compassion, exploration and wanderlust. I want the viewer to feel as if they are right beside me and involved in whatever that cosmic moment may be.” —Cory Hansen

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Behind the Lens

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Matt Rockhold lets it fly.

and I had previously shared epic adventures; where he taught

a trip to some islands in the Philippines to try out a new water

me about the universe and where we could experience the soli-

housing I have been attempting to architect for the last year.

tude of truly dark skies. I decided this tribute would be best with

I can’t give it all away, but it includes flashes and underwater

only moon[light] and starlight so the whole thing is shot at night,

ports, and is designed mainly for “astro-night” photography.

hence its title, “In Search of Night.” To learn more about Cory Hansen and to view more of his phoWhat’s on your horizon? I’m getting excited to head out to some

tos, check out photohansen.com and find him on Instagram

of the clearest waters in the world in a couple months. I’ve got

@surfingthemoon.

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Old School Craftsmanship

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BRE: 01958028 Photo by StudioR Santa Cruz


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Travel

The

Caribbean Persuasion A photographer’s long overdue journey to Costa Rica Story and photos by Ryan Craig

Up until Dec. 30, 2014, I had not been to Costa Rica and had no desire to go. While I consider myself a fairly well-traveled individual, Costa Rica never made the cut—I preferred to visit Nicaragua, which I saw as more rural and vast, and Panama, for its many islands and diversity of waves. But that all changed by Jan. 1, when a last-minute invitation from Volcom had me on a plane to Costa Rica just in time to catch a healthy swell that was about to rock the Caribbean the following week. My senses were on high alert as I took in the surprising sights and sounds of a place I’d never really considered visiting. The culture along the Caribbean coast is vibrant, the food is delicious, and the vibes are reggae-tinged with humble attitudes and friendly conversation. To top it off, we were greeted by a group of talented surfers who welcomed us like family. Tropical rains consumed most days—even the clearest day on the trip eventually succumbed to angry downpours later in the evening. This weather made for lots of sandbars mixed in with the occasional reef-break and typical bathtub-warm water. Not only was I happy to have gone, I now look forward to returning in the not-so-distant future.

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Sports Achievement

Santa Cruz’s Cody Townsend sets the freeskiing world on fire By Brad Oates Photos: Swatch / Blake Jörgensen

There he is!

Most kids who grow up within arm’s reach of the Pacific Ocean in Santa Cruz—aka Surf City—aspire to become professional surfers. Not Cody Townsend. He had other plans. You see, although Townsend hails from a surf mecca, he is one of the world’s top professional freeskiers. “My parents were weekend warriors,” says Townsend of his childhood spent partially in Tahoe. “We had a tiny little cabin—a Forest Service Cabin that you had to hike to off Highway 89. They loved to ski, so they started bringing me up when I was 2 years old. I just immediately fell in love with it.” Raised on the Eastside of Santa Cruz, Townsend spent his grom years like many do in Santa Cruz—chasing waves all over the county, skateboarding, playing football, and, less commonly, devouring the competition at any Tahoe ski race he entered. “I was winning the races and beating all these people who lived in the mountains,” he recalls. “I was 14 years old. [I thought] maybe I had a chance at this.”

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Sports Achievement

◀ Continued from Page 74

“When I started riding [the Crack] I realized how terrifying it was. I equate it to being in a barrel at Jaws. There is no way out. If anything happens you are getting mucked up. There was zero option of falling.” In a town where surfing and skateboard-

ing, there are times when [the ski] is re-

ing are king and beach culture is to be

ally good and times when it’s really bad.

worshipped, the way-uncool sport of ski-

You find ways to have fun with it. The two

ing was something most of Cody’s friends

sports always played well off each other.”

shook their heads at. Why would you

Well enough, in fact, for Townsend to

want to go anywhere else when paradise

combine the two. In the winter of 2010,

is right out your front door?

Townsend, along with freeskier Mike Douglas, spent six weeks “skiing” the surf

“Even growing up at the beach, skiing

off the coast of Maui.

somehow really grabbed me,” Townsend explains. “All I wanted to be was a skier.

“I put skis on and surfed on Maui. I re-

Even though I was surfing, I was dreaming

member being 13 and looking at steep

of skiing. All my friends knew I skied in the

waves and wondering if you could ski

winter on the weekends but they didn’t re-

down them. We ended up doing it,” he

ally know what was going on. I definitely

says. “It was probably the single-most

got a lot of shit for being a skier at the

dangerous thing I have ever done. It was

height of snowboarding’s popularity. How

absolutely terrifying and I would never

do you skateboard, surf and ski? I just put

do it again and it didn’t really work. You

my head down and kept going forward.”

can go down and it’s fun, but you are just barely holding on. I got a lot of crap in the

Thirteen years into his professional ca-

surf world for doing it.”

reer, the 31 year old has indeed kept going forward. His perseverance and pas-

If Maui was to be his most dangerous feat,

sion for skiing reached critical mass in the

his scariest was reserved for an event that

last 12 months as he became a household

transpired last spring—75 miles north-

name in the skiing world and beyond.

west of Anchorage, Alaska in the Tordrillo Mountains. The setting for this achieve-

True to his Santa Cruz roots, Townsend’s

ment, dubbed “The Crack,” is a snowy,

trademark style—fluid, loose and seem-

6-foot-wide couloir that’s barrel shaped

ingly effortless—makes it appear as if he

and extends downward at 45 degrees for

is literally surfing the snow.

about the length of a football field.

“Growing up with surfing changed the

“There were a couple of lines I skied in the

way I look at mountains,” he notes. “I try

past that were similar to The Crack,” says

to always do surf turns on my skis but

Townsend, adding that the trip in ques-

they're not really set up for that. They

tion was his 10th to Alaska. “Not nearly as

share so many similarities—they are so

gnarly … but I had skied stuff where you

weather dependent. Just like with surf-

were that committed to riding really fast

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Sports Achievement

with no exits. If anything goes wrong it’s bad news; there is no escape plan. When I started riding it I realized how terrifying it was. I equate it to being in a barrel at Jaws. There is no way out. If anything happens you are getting mucked up. There was zero option of falling.” Of course, he didn’t fall. Instead, at speeds approaching 60 miles per hour, he whooshed down the menacingly narrow crevasse in such a way that appeared both bizarrely graceful and completely radical. After the feat, Townsend appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America and CNN. The thrilling video of his ride has been viewed nearly 8 million times on YouTube and he went on to win Powder Magazine’s Best Line and Best Male Performance of the Year. Asked if he was surprised by the success, Townsend replies, “We make ski films for skiers, so to have it go outside of that was pretty outstanding. I think it was just visually such a stunning line that your average Joe could understand how gnarly [it] was.” As his skiing career skyrockets, Townsend still feels just as at home in the waters of his hometown. “I will be back in Santa Cruz this summer and it’s fun to walk up to The Point and paddle out and see all the people you grew up with,” he says. “I always feel at home when I paddle out to Sewer Peak and I see all my old buddies still out there.” Watch Townsend conquer The Crack at santacruzwaves.com.

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Outdoors

KEITH BONTRAGER AND THE

METAPHYSICS OF CYCLING By reinventing the mountain bike in a Santa Cruz garage, a motorcycle-racer/science geek took the new sport to awesome heights | By Traci Hukill

T

he godfather of the full-suspension mountain bike is stand-

have taught him the wisdom of operating within the constraints

ing on the front porch of his Eastside Santa Cruz home looking

of whatever system he’s working in, be it mechanical, business

over a half-dozen forlorn-looking raised beds. Normally in early

or climate-related. “Push when you can,” he says, “but there are

February he’d be thinking about planting vegetables, as would

constraints for a reason.”

any self-respecting home chef with a coop full of rescued chickens and a taste for foraged edibles—but he did a water conserva-

Bontrager has pushed plenty. In the late 1970s, he was drawn to

tion spreadsheet last fall and the garden just didn’t pencil out.

study physics at UC Santa Cruz by specialists in the field of dy-

“I’m putting in some succulents this year,” Keith Bontrager says.

namics. In his off-hours he worked out of a garage on Morrissey

“Maybe some tomatoes in the back.”

Boulevard, combining his passion for physics and his love of all things two-wheeled. Before long he became well known among

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A former motorcycle racer who now competes in cyclocross and

hardcore enthusiasts as the guy who built super-strong frames for

endurance races, Bontrager exhibits the relaxed alertness of a life-

the new sport of mountain biking, which was still basically using

long athlete. There’s a wariness too: 35 years in the bike industry

road-bike construction.

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


“Frames were breaking left and right,” Bontrager says. “It wasn’t a problem with the material, it was a problem with the way they were being assembled. That’s what I did different.” Solving mechanical problems came naturally to Bontrager, who had paid for rac-

“Keith Bontrager to mountain biking is like Neil Peart of Rush to drumming.”—Gary Boulanger, editor of Bicycle Times

ing motorcycles by working on them until injuries and expenses finally took their toll. All through the 1980s,

would just be sitting here shaking their heads,” Bontrager laughs. Working in Santa Cruz—then, as now, a mountain biking paradise with high rents—was good and bad. “You could get people to test-ride who were pro racers,” he says. “The bad thing is it’s Santa Cruz. Hans and I would go months in the winter

without a salary so we could make payroll.”

still working out of his garage on Morrissey, he pushed the accepted constraints of bike construction. He famously dumpster-dived at

In 1995, mighty Trek Bicycles came knocking with an offer to buy

Specialized, then headquartered in Santa Cruz, to find light road-

Bontrager Cycles, and with Heim having departed to become a

bike rims, which he retooled to make the first lightweight moun-

partner at Santa Cruz Bicycles, Bontrager gladly accepted. The

tain biking rims. He invented components now universally used on

Bontrager name now graces an extensive line of bike components

mountain bikes, like effective brakes (the V-brake) and a fork crown

and accessories, from wheels and stems to helmets and socks. It’s

used in the world’s first suspension fork, the RockShox RS1.

a major player in a $6 billion industry.

In other words, Bontrager made it possible to go faster and jump

Bontrager’s role now is one of mentor to the engineering team in

higher and stop quicker on a mountain bike than ever before. He

Wisconsin. He tests their new stuff out on Santa Cruz trails (“San-

made it possible to shred.

ta Cruz is the best place to ride, and I’m not just saying that”) and tells them when he thinks their ideas stink. (“I’m not too good

In 1988 Bontrager and a team of engineers from Santa Cruz-based

about doing it with velvet gloves.”) He flies back a few times a year

Cycle Composites, Inc. built the first production full-suspension

to deliver news in person.

bike, the Kestrel Nitro. We all know what that did for the mountain bike industry: today any mountain biker worth his or her salt

He also lives the dream, Santa Cruz-style. He likes to forage for

owns at least one full-suspension beauty.

mussels on the North Coast and hunt for mushrooms by bike while the other foragers walk. (“I can cover a lot more ground on

“Keith Bontrager to mountain biking is like Neil Peart of Rush to

my bike than they can walking, but don’t tell them that!”)

drumming,” says Gary Boulanger, editor of Bicycle Times. “He’s usually in the background of things, but his presence is always

Then there’s training for races. Most of this spring he’ll be in Eu-

felt at the back of the arena every time people gather. His fresh

rope doing endurance races. His biggest competition is the Three

impact is still felt by thousands of riders around the world every

Peaks Cyclocross in Yorkshire held each fall, where last year he

day, like it has been ever since 1980.”

took second place in his age division—his best performance yet.

Inside Bontrager’s house, at a cluttered dining-room table in a

Lately he’s been thinking Santa Cruz is going to become the next

classic 1960s kitchen, Bontrager talks about his company while

big mountain-biking destination. “We’re going to be Moab. We've

a well-fed cat patrols for empty laps. The lessons about the con-

got world-class trails,” he says. “But a lot of it is [the group Moun-

straints on the business were hard-won. Although they moved the

tain Bikers of Santa Cruz]. The guys who build trails—they’re ON

company out of the garage on Morrissey and into a limited-pro-

it. There's a whole bunch of new areas opening up, like Coast

duction facility, growing to be a famous brand in the process, he

Dairies, and those guys are getting in on it early.

and his partner, Hans Heim, were bike guys, not bean-counters. “Between their hustle and their skills, and the climate and terrain “If I were to sit here and tell a businessperson what we did, they

here,” he adds, “it’s perfect.”

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Adventure

How Skydive Surf City turned a reluctant skydiver from skeptic to fan By Kyle Thiermann

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this sunny February morning, enjoyment

States, according to the U.S. Parachute As-

seemed to be the last thing on her mind.

sociation. “But, let’s be real,” she reminded

I shoved a GoPro in her face like an over-

me, “numbers can only comfort you so

enthusiastic reporter and asked her to

much when you think about jumping out

tell the camera how she was feeling. Her

of a plane for the first time.”

eyes were fixed on a book and never left the pages while, with a nervous smile on

As we pulled into the parking lot we were

her face, she replied, “Well, I’m reading a

greeted by Matt Rosado and Robbie Soria,

book on handling emotional stress ... ”

each of whom have more than 7,000 jumps under their belt and the highest skydive cer-

She breathed consciously in through her

tifications possible. Last year, Soria broke a

nose and out through her mouth. I decid-

world record for being part of a 57-person

ed that if I still wanted a girlfriend at the

vertical formation. Skydive Surf City, which

end of the day, it would be wise to turn off

has been operating for six years, can offer as

the GoPro for the time being.

many as 60 jumps in a single day during the busier summer months.

This is the story of the transformation I witnessed in my girlfriend, Mara, who said “yes” to an experience that scared her, and jumped out of an airplane for her first time. The moment you step out of your comfort zone is the moment life truly begins. It’s fortune-cookie wisdom, sure, but I’m a big believer in the mantra. As we took the Freedom Boulevard exit to the Skydive Surf City headquarters on

The moment you step out of your comfort zone is the moment life truly begins. It’s fortune-cookie wisdom, sure, but I’m a big believer in the mantra.

Friday the 13th (a date I chose because I am a cruel boyfriend), Mara had the look

Within 10 minutes we were suiting up and

of a G.I. who had been drafted into World

en route to the airstrip. As we walked to

War II and whose ship was about to reach

the aircraft, I asked Rosado what it was

the beach at Normandy. She had come to

like to jump out of planes for a living. He

terms with the fact that she was going to

looked at me and said, “Man, it’s changed

battle, and she was preparing herself.

the way I operate in life, the way I do business—all of it.” Then he looked at Mara

Photo: Matt Rosado

When I asked her why she agreed to the ex-

and said, “Just try to enjoy it. It won’t be

perience, she explained that her reasoning

anything like you expect it to be.” That,

was based on statistics. There have been

she later told me, was the most comfort-

0.003 student fatalities per 1,000 tandem

ing thing that he could have said, because

jumps over the past decade in the United

what she was expecting was to have a

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panic attack and possibly an uncontrollable bowel movement. We climbed into the five-person plane; Mara and I strapped to Rosado and Soria, respectively. As the plane ascended, the ground began to disappear and was replaced with the geometric patterns of Watsonville farmland. As the pilot steered us out over the ocean, Rosado and Soria pointed out snowcapped mountains in the distance that can be seen only from that altitude. It was beautiful. For a moment I almost forgot that we were about to jump out of the plane. Mara, however, never forgot this fact, and while also trying to enjoy the scenery, never stopped her breathing exercises—in through her nose, out through her mouth, as if each lungful was a momentary antidote to fear.

The experience of jumping out of a plane is nothing like you’d expect it to be. It’s surprisingly peaceful.

Soon, it was time for the main event. Soria opened the door. The two of us jumped. A few seconds later, Mara and Rosado followed. The experience of jumping out of a plane is nothing like you’d expect it to be. It’s surprisingly peaceful. “For some reason, all of the fear and anxiety leaves your body the second your body leaves the plane,” said Mara. “Instead of feeling like you’re falling, it feels like the Earth is coming toward you and you are barely moving. Then, without warning, the para-

Photo: Robbie Soria

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◀ Continued from Page 88

“It feels like you’re a hawk swooping above the Earth.” chute opens, and before you can even process the change, it’s just silent. You can take off your goggles, and take in the view. It feels like you’re a hawk swooping above the Earth.” The second Mara landed, it was clear to me that her body language had changed somewhere in the 40 seconds she was freefalling from the sky. She radiated confidence—the kind of confidence someone gets when they surprise themselves. It was inspiring to watch. She ran up to me and said, “I feel like we should go fight some tigers now!” Later that day, as Mara and I enjoyed a celebratory beer, she told me that she never expected to like skydiving so much. “I really never thought of myself as the kind of person that needed, or would even enjoy, that kind of rush,” she said proudly as she sipped her beer. “But I kind of want to do that 100 more times.”   Visit santacruzwaves.com to see the author’s GoPro footage of his skydive. Learn more about Skydive Surf City at santacruz-skydiving.com.

Photos: T. Fox

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Artist Amadeo Bachar takes an in-depth look at ocean life and cutting-edge science By Damon Orion Long before As Above, So Below was the

Bachar, whose work has appeared in pub-

name of a critically panned horror flick, it

lications like National Geographic and

was a saying that was linked to a mysti-

Scientific American, has spent much of his

cal tradition called Hermeticism. On the

life on the beach. While growing up on the

most basic level, this maxim expresses

coast, he wasted little time following in the

the idea that what is true on a larger level

footsteps of his surfer/fisherman father.

is also true in the realm of the very small.

This soon led him to venture deeper into the ocean. “Just being in the water and on

While carving out a career as an artist,

the water, it was a really natural step to be

40-year-old La Selva Beach resident Amad-

curious about what was underneath the

eo Bachar has come face to face with the

water,” he recalls. “A walk on the seashore

“as above, so below” principle. Although

reveals some stuff, but the majority is be-

his primary artistic focus is to create draw-

neath the waves.”

ings and paintings of marine life, Bachar

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often takes gigs as a scientific illustrator

Once he’d taken a good look under the

for nanotechnology organizations. In ap-

water, Bachar began to draw the “ocean

plying himself to these two different disci-

critters” that he found there. “Some

plines, he has learned that many of the be-

people write about ’em, some people

haviors of microscopic organisms match

study ’em, research ’em, observe ’em,

those of animals and ecosystems. “I’m still

but I think for me, it was more [about]

young, and I still haven’t put it all together

drawing what they look like,” he says.

yet, but there’s this interconnectedness

“It’s a pretty intimate relationship you

with everything, and studying things at a

have with the subject matter if you have

macro level and a micro level allows you to

to observe it and try to replicate all of the

see that,” he muses.

features that make it look like what it is.”

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Artist Profile

The knowledge that Bachar gained from drawing these life forms would later help him learn and memorize material for tests while earning a bachelor’s degree in marine biology at UC Santa Cruz. Research still plays a big part in Bachar’s art: In the interest of keeping his work as accurate as possible, he often tries to catch a fish that he’s about to draw

“There’s this

across the ocean, he was drawing in his

interconnectedness with

book all of the new species he had seen,”

everything, and studying

from taking a few specimens back, for

things at a macro level and

if someone wants to say, ‘How does this

a micro level allows you to see that,” he muses.

he notes. “That was the only way, aside him to share that with people. Nowadays, fish swim?’ most of the time, people can go out to film that stuff. But with that microscopic world, it’s still pretty tough to film it. You’re really relying on the artist

or paint, or he’ll go to the harbor to see

in partnership with someone who knows

if someone has caught the species in

how the process works for that artist to

question. He also frequently asks his

bring that whole thing to life. You put it

connections in the Department of Fish

in animation, and it can tell a lot about a

and Wildlife to check the accuracy of his

particular subject.”

work. Referring to his side gig as a teacher of zoological, marine science and digital

He hopes to unite the mediums of ocean-

science illustration (at Cal State Monterey

themed art and science illustration. As op-

Bay for the first and UCSC for the latter

posed to illustrating in a strictly straight-

two), he offers, “I tell all my students,

forward, realistic way, he is searching for

‘Your illustration is only going to be as

ways “to be able to be more creative and

good as the references you have, and re-

loose and let color, transparencies and

search is part of collecting references.’”

different artistic techniques convey the feeling of what the critter was or what the

Bachar, who graduated with a master’s de-

process was.”

gree from UCSC’s science illustration program, frequently creates animations for

Bachar says he enjoys drawing and paint-

various nanotechnology institutions. As he

ing as much as he enjoys diving or surfing

explains, these animations are the most

for a day. “It doesn’t feel like work at all,”

efficient way to explain various principles

he states.

of nanotechnology to potential investors. See more of the artist’s work at “When Darwin was on his boat, going

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Field Report

Turn your small space into a full garden By Linda Koffman

The availability of a peaceful retreat with curtains of chlorophyll-

Those of us with slim real estate can op-

induced greenery shouldn’t be dictated by how much square

timize any balcony, porch or other nook

footage you can afford.

and cranny by utilizing what we’ve got to work with from the ground up … minimal floor space,

Whether or not sprawling land is at your fingertips, you deserve a

be damned! The key is to think outside of the typical

private place to relax, replenish and refill your waning well in the

planter box and utilize your given architectural pieces

company of abundant plant life. So become a gardening alche-

at hand.

mist by transmuting limited space into a lush sanctuary. Got a wall or fence? Put a vine on it. When Gardening in small areas

your twirling (and fragrant) jasmine ten-

doesn’t have to be diffi-

drils are reaching out around you, you’ll

cult—just don’t be afraid

feel like your garden is a welcoming hug

to reach for the sky. Liter-

each time you step outside. Bushy bou-

ally. Trellises and hanging

gainvilleas climb in full sun, bringing pops

planters will help your

of color in the form of their signature

foliage wind expansively

bright tissue-paper flowers.

“Living walls” are all the rage these days, made easier with wall-mounted hanging pockets.

without being wayward, while simple add-ons like

Don’t let a plethora of pavement in place of a soil-laden yard get

cylindrical-wire

tomato

you down. Again, spin straw into gold: What may seem like a limit-

cages can also guide your

ing blockade just might be the remedy that buoys your garden to

potted vines and veggies

a whole new level. “Living walls” are all the rage these days, made

toward the clouds.

easier with wall-mounted hanging pockets (check out Woolly Continued on Page 100 ▶

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Field Report

◀ Continued from Page 98

When communal herb living is the call, crowd small containers with complementary choices—like rosemary and white sage—and watch your family of edibles proliferate, remembering that the more you pick off, the more you’ll produce. Other tasty options are hanging strawberry plants, which can drape sugary morsels over railing containers, while decorative

You might be surprised to find how little it takes to transform a small vacant space into your cherished

purple kales and cabbages are a hit for their hardy nature and brilliant color.

happy place.

Because sometimes you don’t want to be alone in your precious secret garden, those who want winged visitors can summon beloved pollinators with flowers known to attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Clematis, lavender, nasturtium, fennel and oregano are just some whose blossoms are known to lure flutterPockets), vertical succulent boxes crafted into all sorts of shapes,

ing friends.

and even gutter gardens (take that half pipe meant as a gutter and hang it to hold soil and plants instead).

Finally, add more company to the mix with a decorative statue—a sitting Buddha, mini birdbath or other calming piece—as a contrast

If you’re in reach of a sewing machine and DIY obsessed like this

amidst the vibrant life branching out around you. Just that one or-

writer, quickly stitch doubled-up pieces of burlap together for an

namental element can make the scene so much more multi-facet-

instant hanging herb planter, held up with some less-than-profes-

ed, while retaining that silence and stillness you seek.

sional hammer and nails handiwork. When all is said and done, and the gardening gloves are off, you Treasure hunters can scour the local scrapyard or Craigslist for

might be surprised to find how little it takes to transform a small

an old (aka cheap) door or window to be upcycled as an artsy al-

vacant space into your cherished happy place.

ternative to a standard trellis. What sells for big bucks on Etsy as “shabby chic” can be acquired for just a few bucks. Meanwhile, mini stepladders double as great plant stands in any corner; you can stagger small pots on each step, extending your garden on vertical shelves in an easy-peasy way. For edibles, herbs and dwarf varieties of fruit trees are an amenable alternative to the massive orchard you wish you could nurture. The popular and container-friendly dwarf Meyer lemon and kaffir lime trees boast aromatic flowers to spruce up the night air in addition to their juicy citrus yields. Speaking of that sense of smell, mint will fill any spot with its weedlike voracity, leaving you with virtually no work other than periodic watering. Just be sure to plant it on its own, because that sucker doesn’t like to share and will strangle any roommate in its way.

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Dining Guide

. Dining . Downtown .

Guide . Woodstock’s Pizza Craft Brews. Legendary Pizza. Heated Outdoor Patio.

Assembly Seasonal rustic California cuisine.

1108 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.assembleforfood.com

710 Front St., Santa Cruz (831) 824-6100

Zachary’s Diner-style American cuisine in a casual family-friendly atmosphere.

Cafe Mare Authentic Italian dining, fresh, organic local ingredients.

www.zacharyssantacruz.com

740 Front St., Santa Cruz

(831) 458-1211

El Palomar Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

(831) 425-7575

1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.zoccolis.com

221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz

www.hulastiki.com

(831) 426-4852

(831) 423-1711

The Crow’s Nest Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor.

Kiantiʼs Pizza & Pasta Bar Unique menu, family style, full bar.

www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

1100 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

(831) 427-0646

The Wharf, Boardwalk . & Harbor .

Hulaʼs Island Grill California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar.

819 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

Zoccoli’s Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides.

www.cafemare.com

(831) 427-4444

www.woodstockscruz.com

(831) 469-4400

2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz

(831) 476-4560

www.kiantis.com

Deke’s Market Complete mini-market and the “In Mah’ Belly Deli.”

Laili Santa Cruz's answer to high-quality organic Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani /

Afghan food.

101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz

www. lailirestaurant.com

www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

Ideal Bar & Grill  located by the wharf, fun atmosphere.

106 Beach St., Santa Cruz

www.idealbarandgrill.com

(831) 420-1700

493 Lake Ave., Santa Cruz

www.johnnysharborside.com

Pleasure Pizza Downtown Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and 1415 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.pleasurepizzasc.com

(831) 600-7859

120 Union St., Santa Cruz

www.ponohawaiiangrill.com

(831) 426-7666

River Cafe Local, organic, farm-fresh gourmet.

415 River St., Santa Cruz

1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

(831) 600-7093

www.akirasantacruz.com

Aloha Island Grille Authentic Hawaiian-style plate lunches.

fresh ingredients, full bar.

Akira Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce.

Pono Hawaiian Grill and The Reef Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar,

(831) 479-3430

. Midtown .

exciting tastes and textures.

(831) 423-5271

Johnny’s Harborside Fresh seafood with stunning view of the harbor.

atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

(831) 476-5897

www.dekesmarket.com (831) 423-4545

Pacific Thai Authentic Thai Cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining

334 7th Ave., Santa Cruz

1700 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz

www.alohaislandgrille.com

(831) 479-3299

Chaminade Indulge in decadent culinary choices and fine dining in Santa Cruz. (831) 420-1280

1 Chaminade Lane, Santa Cruz

(831) 475-5600

www.rivercafesantacruz.com

www.chaminade.com

Rosie McCannʼs Irish Pub & Restaurant High-quality pub fare, 29+

Charlie Hong Kong Offering healthy, flavorful Asian street cusine.

rotating beer taps, and a generous selection of Irish whiskeys.

1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

1220 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.charliehongkong.com

(831) 426-9930

(831) 426-5664

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The Crêpe Place Array of savory and sweet crêpes, French food and live muisc.

Parish Publick House British-influenced pub food with full bar.

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz

www.thecrepeplace.com

www.parishpublickhouse.com

(831) 429-6994

Ristorante Italiano Vintage venue featuring fish and Italian entrees.

555 Soquel Ave., Ste 150, Santa Cruz

www.ristoranteitalianosc.com

(831) 421-0507

Ristorante Avanti Featuring local, sustainable, organic foods. Menu, wine list,

(831) 458-2321

and list of local farmers and ranchers.

1917 Mission St., Santa Cruz

(831) 427-0135

Seabright Brewery Rotating beer selection, with dog-friendly outdoor patio.

www.ristoranteavanti.com

Vasili’s Authentic and fresh, with vegetarian-friendly Greek food.

519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz

(831) 426-2739

www.seabrightbrewery.com

. Westside . 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz

1501A Mission St., Santa Cruz

www.vasilisgreekrestaurant.com

(831) 425-5300

Canton Cantonese, Szechuan and other Asian fare, full bar.

outstanding wine list. 20 Clubhouse Road, Santa Cruz www.pasatiempo.com/hollins-house

(831) 459-9177

1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

900 41st Ave., Santa Cruz

(831) 475-8751

www.cantonsantacruz.com

Mission St. BBQ Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music.

(831) 471-8115

. Eastside & Capitola .

Hollins House At Pasatiempo. Magnificent views, award-winning cuisine, and

334 Ingalls St., Santa Cruz

www.westendtap.com

www.burgersantacruz.com

(831) 458-9808

West End Tap & Kitchen Traditional pub flavors with a California twist.

burger. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu.

Caruso,s Tuscan Cuisine & Pizzeria Authentic Tuscan cuisine and

(831) 458-2222

pizza, cozy atmosphere, in the heart of Capitola Village.

115 San Jose Ave., Capitola, CA 95010

(831) 465-9040 Continued on Page 110 ▶

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Cava Wine Bar Fine wine, good company, great ambiance.

115 San Jose Ave., Capitola

www.cavacapitola.com

(831) 476-2282

Chill Out Cafe Fatty breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden.

2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz

www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

(831) 477-0543

East Side Eatery, Pleasure Pizza Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures.

800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz

www.pleasurepizzasc.com

(831) 431-6058

Shadowbrook Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947.

1750 Wharf Road, Capitola

www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

Süda

(831) 475-1511

Contemporary cuisine  in  retro-modern  restaurant. Voted best new

restaurant 2013.

3910 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz

(831) 600-7068

www.eatsuda.com

Surf City Sandwich Gourmet sandwiches, homemade soup, salads, beer and wine. Opening 2015.

4101 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz

(831) 239-5801

www.surfcitysandwich.com

Zelda’s on the Beach Breakfast, lunch, brunch and dinner overlooking beautiful Capitola Beach.

203 Esplanade, Capitola

www.zeldasonthebeach.com

(831) 475-4900

Zizzo’s Coffeehouse & Wine Bar Full-service coffeehouse and excellent wine selection.

3555 Clares St., Capitola

www.zizzoscoffee.com

(831) 477-0680

. Soquel . Cafe Cruz Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local.

2621 41st Ave., Soquel

(831) 476-3801

www.cafecruz.com

La Gioconda

Completely renovated and under a new Italian ownership.

Organic Italian Mediterranean in a beautiful landscaped garden.

3101 N. Main St., Soquel

(831) 477-9265

www.mainstreetgardencafe.com

Michael’s on Main Serving cutting-edge California comfort cuisine, small plates, and salads.

2591 S. Main St., Soquel

www.michaelsonmain.net

(831) 479-9777

Continued on Page 112 ▶

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Dining Guide

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SPRING FLING ANYONE?

. Aptos & Watsonville . Aptos St. BBQ Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night.

8059 Aptos St., Aptos

(831) 662-1721

www.aptosstbbq.com

burger. Aptos Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu.

7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos

(831) 662-2811

www.burgeraptos.com

Cafe Rio Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views.

131 Esplanade, Aptos

(831) 688-8917

www.caferioaptos.com

Cantine Wine Pub Extensive selection of wine & beer. Eat, drink, savor.

8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos

(831) 612-6191

www.cantinewinepub.com

Cilantros Parrilla y Cantina

Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh

ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood.

1934 Main St., Watsonville

www.elpalomarcilantros.com

(831) 761-2161

The Hideout Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service.

9051 Soquel Dr, Aptos

(831) 688-5566

www.thehideoutaptos.com

Kauboi Seasonal organic ingredients, traditional Japanese.

8017 Soquel Drive, Aptos

www.kauboigrillandsushi.com

(831) 661-0449

Manuelʼs Mexican Restaurant Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile.

261 Center Ave., Aptos

www.manuelsrestaurant.com

Palapas Restaurant & Cantina

(831) 688-4848

Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive

tequila selection. Happy Hour, and dinner specials.

21 Seascape Blvd, Aptos

www.palapasrestaurant.com

831662-9000

Sanderlings in the Seascape Resort Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seacscape Resort Drive, Aptos

831-688-7120

www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

Severino’s Bar & Grill Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients.

7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

www.severinosbarandgrill.com

(831) 688-8987

Zameen Mediterranean Cuisine Flavorful meals in a casual dining © 2015 EWC

setting.

7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos

www.zameencuisine.com

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open seven days a week.

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1520 Mission st. santa Cruz 95060

7941 soquel drive aptos 95003

burgersantaCruz.CoM 831.425.5300

burgeraptos.CoM 831.662.2811


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Drink Up

New Bohemia Brewing Company crafts beer for the Santa Cruz lifestyle By Damon Orion

| Photos: Jake Thomas

ith his easygoing chuckle, flourishing goatee and dreadlocks that cascade to the floor, 40-year-old Dan Satterthwaite is Santa Cruz personified. You couldn’t ask for a better representative of New Bohemia, which is both the name of Satterthwaite’s new brewery on 41st Avenue and his pet name for Santa Cruz itself. “There’s a quality of life here that’s exciting, inspiring, free, clean and clear,” the brewer offers. “It encapsulates a renaissance of freedom that you may not find in other cities that have the sort of rat-race mentality. The bohemia of Santa Cruz can be seen in our brands, our art, the lifestyle here. Finding a beer that’s going to go well with that life is what we’re attempting to do.” Both Satterthwaite and his business partner Mike Hochleutner cut their teeth in Europe: After graduating from the brewing school Siebel Institute of Technology in Munich, Satterthwaite worked at a small family brewery in the Black Forest for a year, while Hochleutner learned about European beer culture during a year-long stay in Czechoslovakia. The two brewers are putting their knowledge of tra-

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ditional European lager production to use at New Bohemia. “We want to be known

Those customers need not be bohemian to

for our lagers, our lager production and

feel welcome at this new gathering place,

our lager capability,” Satterthwaite notes.

which opened in March. Satterthwaite

“Many breweries will make a lager here or

says he and Hochleutner “hope to get the

there, make an Oktoberfest here, make a

grandpas and the family folk and the peo-

seasonal here and there, but we want to

ple who may not drink to add [NuBo] to a

have a steady lineup of at least four lagers

list of beers they’ve had in their lifetime,

on tap all the time, and, from there, take

but just drink for the sake of social lubri-

the traditional and add the American in-

cation, freedom and ease of chatting it up

novative, creative spirit and craft.” This

with their good buds.”

melding might look like barrel-aged, dry hop, fruit-infused and old spiced lagers.

Though Satterthwaite feels that “beer doesn’t have to be complicated all the

“Things that people have been doing for

time; it can be smooth and easy,” he and

decades now in the American craft beer

Hochleutner have encountered a few

scene with ales, we want to now use with

complications while working to acquire

lagers,” he adds. To that end, they have

a use permit and building permit for the

sourced malts from Germany and hops

brewery. He attributes this difficulty to

from the Czech Republic.

the relative scarcity of breweries in Santa

The European influence can also be seen in New Bohemia’s use of horizontal aging tanks. Whereas the settling process takes place in 8 feet of liquid in vertical fermenters, these traditional European tanks make for a settling distance of approximately two-and-a-half feet. The large bed of yeast found in this style of tank allows the beer’s flavor to mellow at a faster rate. “It both matures the beer and clears the

Mike Hochleutner and brewer Dan Satterthwaite

“Finding a beer that’s going to go well with that [Santa Cruz lifestyle] is what we’re attempting to do.”— Dan Satterthwaite

beer naturally, [as opposed to] these tanks

Cruz County. “We had to train, educate, quadruple-check and verify everything in here, because very few [county officials] had seen it often enough to understand it,” he says. With those obstacles out of the way, Satterthwaite feels that NuBo is coming into being at an auspicious time. Citing the Brew Cruz microbrewery tour as an example, he notes that whereas 15 years ago, one would probably be more inclined to call Santa Cruz a wine county, it has recently morphed

where the beer will sit and mellow for three

into more of a beer destination. “I feel like

to five weeks at a time,” Satterthwaite ex-

clear view of the brewers and the tanks.

here at New Bohemia, we’re coming right

plains. He adds that New Bohemia’s brew-

“One of our philosophies here at New

into that ripeness of Santa Cruz being po-

ers use steam heating rather than putting

Bohemia is to keep everything open and

tentially well known for its craft beers,” he

a direct flame under their kettles. In so do-

exposed,” Satterthwaite says. “There’s

states. “I’m excited to become a part of

ing, they avoid creating a hot spot that can

nothing hiding behind closed doors or ga-

that community, work with everybody and

caramelize the beer.

rage doors or curtains. We want it to be an

make it a great destination.”

educational experience for our customAnother unique aspect of this brewery is

ers, so they can come in, try our beers, ask

To learn more about NuBo, go to

its gallery-style setup: Whether upstairs

questions about them and see the beer-

nubobrew.com or

or downstairs, patrons always have a

making process in action.”

facebook.com/NuBoBrew.

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WINE DIRECTORY

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Product Review

The Night Shift

“Fire Road” by GRIT Santa Cruz

Photos and Review By Tyler Frasca

The Basics: The Night Shift is a versatile, inexpensive bike light for anything from a beach cruiser to a mountain bike. It consists of a durable silicone housing that holds a single 200-lumen flashlight, mounts to any bicycle handlebar with the included silicone band, and has a mesh cover on the front to protect it from rocks and debris. Because of the silicone construction and sealed flashlight, the entire unit is extreme-

this light out of the box and had it

ly water and impact resistant. The

on a bike in about 30 seconds. The

Night Shift will also be available as

light can be removed just as quickly,

the housing alone, so the buyer can

which makes it perfect for hiking

use any flashlight that fits. Pricing

and camping, as well as riding.

will range from $14 without a light to $98 for two housings and match-

Durability is another plus for the

ing 700-lumen lights.

Night Shift. All the fragile parts of

First Impressions:

the flashlight itself are protected beUsing the Night

Shift light couldn’t be any easier. I in-

hind nearly half an inch of silicone.

stalled the provided aluminum flash-

Drawbacks: The model I tested came

light into the housing, and mounted

equipped with a 200-lumen light,

it to the handlebars with what is es-

which is not bright enough for any

sentially a large rubber band. It can

serious riding. Anyone who is actu-

be mounted above or below the bars,

ally riding his or her bike at night

or on almost anything else that is

should consider the “Patrol” model,

roughly 7/8-inch in diameter.

as mentioned above. The rubber band-style mounting system is ex-

The light that comes with the Night

tremely easy to use, but doesn’t hold

Shift “Fire Road” takes three AAA bat-

the light as steadily as some more ex-

teries, and produces about 200 lu-

pensive options. It works flawlessly

mens. That’s bright enough for early

for commuting or riding on smooth

evening rides on the beach cruiser,

surfaces, but it shakes a little too

but more serious nightriders will want

much on mountain bike trails.

to upgrade to the “Patrol” model, which includes a 700-lumen flashlight and rechargeable batteries.

Highlights: The best thing about the

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The Verdict: The Night Shift is a perfect, inexpensive solution for dawn patrol surf checks, early evening rides to dinner, or adding some

Night Shift bike light is its simplicity.

safety to your favorite grom’s bike

Other lighting systems have com-

before they head out. For serious

plex mounting arrangements and

night riding on technical trails, you’ll

remote battery packs that can take

want to look for something a little

some time to set up properly. I took

sturdier.


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Summer Camp • DIRECTORY •

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2015 Sammy Slug Summer Camp @ UC Santa Cruz Boys and Girls entering 1st through 6th grade

Registration Open Now!

opers.ucsc.edu Full Day Camp 9am - 5pm only $250! Half Day option for $150 Pre & Post Camp Care - $25 each Eight one-week sessions offered June 29 - Aug. 21

Grades PreK - 8 Daily transportation included! June 18 to August 21

Easter Egg Hunt Open House Saturday, April 4 9:30-11:30am

Sunday, April 26 1-4pm

831.479.6714 • www.kennolyncamps.com

KID’S CAMP COOKING SERIES June 22-26, 11am-2pm

Westside Santa Cruz Community Classroom

Bring out the chef in your child! This culinary experience includes a wealth of cooking knowledge, full bellies and healthy eating habits. Ages 8-12. at Sign up om c newleaf.

Parks & Recreation

CITY OF SANTA CRUZ

Register Beginning

April 11

for Day Camp, Classes and more!

#innersal ly

Friends of Parks and Recreation scholarships available for Santa Cruz residents.

santacruzparksandrec.com │831.420.5270

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Comic

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We Carry

OVER 150 LOCAL & CALIFORNIA WINES WE NOW HAVE BEER ON TAP FROM ONE OF OUR LOCAL BREWING CO

e It’s Wine Tym st was voted Be ar ing b Wine & Tast z in Santa Cru

ENJOY A NICE GLASS OR BOTTLE EITHER INSIDE OR OUTSIDE BY OUR FIRE PIT.

WE OFFER APPETIZERS AND FLATBREAD PIZZAS LIVE MUSIC MOST NIGHTS 132

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CA 95010 • 831.477.4455 • www.itswinetyme.com


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FIRS T ANNUAL SWE LLI E S AWAR D CE R E MON Y March 20, 2015

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| Photos by Yvonne Falk and Sean McLean


V I EW M O R E G ALLER I ES @ S ANTACRUZWAVE S.COM

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Bird’s-eye view over the Santa Cruz Wharf and beyond. Photo: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

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craft tap room & seasonal eatery

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334 d Ingalls Street Santa Cruz, CA - 831.471.8115 - westendtap.com


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Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol1.6  

April / May 2015

Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol1.6  

April / May 2015

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