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VOL 6.3

OCT/NOV 2019


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2019

CAPITOLA PLEIN AIR

5TH ANNUAL ART FESTIVAL

QUICKDRAW

1–4pm Saturday, Nov. 2 Watch artists paint outside during a timed Quick Draw at Esplanade Park. Paintings will be displayed and for sale. Enjoy live music by Alex Lucero!

EXHIBITION & ART SALE 11am–4pm Sunday, Nov. 3

New Brighton Middle School, Performing Arts Center 250 Washburn Avenue, Capitola

2019

• • • • •

Exhibition with 100+ paintings Fine art sale Live music by Acoustic Madness 5TH ANNUAL ART FESTIVAL Hands-on art making EXHIBITION & SALE PAINTOUT Food trucks, and more!Sunday, Nov. 3 Oct. 30–Nov. 2

CAPITOLA PLEIN AIR The competition kicks off Wednesday! Watch 40 artists paint all around Capitola.

11:00a.m.–4:00p.m. New Brighton Middle School Performing Arts Center 250 Washburn Avenue, Capitola

Free Admission!

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12:00–4:00p.m. Esplanade Park New this year! Watch artists paint during a timed Quick Draw. Paintings will be displayed and for sale. Enjoy live music by Alex Lucero.

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SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

PUBLISHER TYLER FOX

EDITOR ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PHOTO EDITOR ERIK L ANDRY

PHOTOGRAPHY

SCW PHOTOGRAPHERS TYLER FOX ALISON GAMEL BRYAN GARRISON JEFF “KOOKSON” GIDEON   ERIK L ANDRY  SEAN MCLEAN  LESLIE MUIRHEAD  DAVE “NELLY” NELSON  JEFF SCHWAB

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS JAIME BODDORFF KYLE BUTHMAN RYAN “CHACHI” CRAIG MICHAEL DANIEL  FISHER DEVOE CANDACE FALLON MEREDITH KEET AMY KUMLER RYAN MOSS GUERIN MYALL  ADAM STONE 

EDITORIAL

WRITERS ERICA CIRINO DAVE DE GIVE ALOE DRISCOLL TYLER FOX JOEL HERSCH NEAL KEARNEY LESLIE MUIRHEAD

DAMON ORION ARIC SLEEPER KYLE THIERMANN

PROOFREADER JOSIE COWDEN

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOSH BECKER

DESIGNER JULIE ROVEGNO

SALES & OPERATIONS

PRESIDENT STEPHANIE LUTZ

CFO SARAH CRAFT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES K ATE K AUFFMAN LESLIE MUIRHEAD SADIE WIT TKINS

OFFICE MANAGER LESLIE MUIRHEAD

DISTRIBUTION MICK FREEMAN

On the Cover: Capitola by the Sea looking oh-so pretty. Photo: Jeff Schwab

FOUNDER / CEO TYLER FOX The content of Santa Cruz Waves magazine is Copyright © 2019 by Santa Cruz Waves, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquiries, please contact steff@ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

2218 Mission St, Westside Santa Cruz (831) 429-8424 | f: thegardenco 2 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

F I N D US O N L I N E

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3 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

Sweetheart, the Santa Cruz 52, in all her glory. PHOTO: KYLE BUTHMAN

THE VOYAGE By TYLER FOX

I

t’s Sunday, Sept. 1 and I’m avoiding the Labor Day weekend hordes by hunkering down at my home in the Aptos Mountains. A warm breeze gently combs through the redwoods while the resident sparrows sing in the late summer sunshine. Assuming life is still operating as usual, you’ve just picked up our October/November issue and are starting to dive in to the meat and potatoes within its pages. Whether you’re sipping on your favorite smoothie or are midway through your morning meditation upon the porcelain throne, I will be about half way between Tahiti and Hawaii in the middle of a 2,500mile sailing voyage with a small crew from Santa Cruz and San Francisco. Floating like a grain of sand in a sea of cobalt surrounded by hundreds of miles of ocean on all sides, our crew will be following the route the ancient Polynesian explorers took more than a thousand years ago. But instead of hollowedout canoes we’ll be on a Santa Cruz 52 loaded with all of the modern-day navigation equipment.

As I sit here tapping the keyboard, it’s hard to keep my mind from racing. Will it be postcard perfection? Will we be waking up to perfect surf and swimming with whales, or will something more sinister happen—like getting caught in the middle of a squall with vicious winds trying to rip the boat apart? Only time will tell ... I’ll be the most green out of the bunch, so it’s fair to say I’m a tad nervous. The last time butterflies boogied this hard inside my belly was way back when I first started surfing Mavericks almost 20 years ago. That said, I’m also super excited, optimistic and eager to learn more about the current state of our oceans and to go somewhere few humans ever have. I’ll be doing my best to document what I see and experience, so keep an eye out on social media and within the pages of our February/March 2020 issue. With that I’ll bid you farewell and leave you with a question to ponder from the one and only Hunter S. Thompson: “Who is the happier man, he who has braved the storm of life and lived or he who has stayed securely on shore and merely existed?”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 1


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CA LICENSE # 698917


INSIDE

INSIDE

Volume 6.3 - OCT/NOV 2019

56

82

74 FIRST LOOK

31 Letter from the Founder 35 Best of the Web 37 Word on the Street 38 Causes: The Healing Heeler

DROP IN

46 In Depth: Saving the Monarchs 56 Behind the Lens: Ryan Moss 70 Mind & Body: Behind Biohacking 74 Adventure: Paddling Catalina 82 Art: Mission Street’s New Mural

46 FOOD & DRINK

91 Local Eats: Camping Grub 96 Dining Guide

COOL OFF

103 Sustainable Swaps 104 Sports Achievement: Emma Stone 109 Field Notes 110 Event Gallery: Power of Flower Festival

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 3


DAILY DEALS LAB TESTED PROFESSIONAL STAFF SANTA CRUZ-CAPITOLA

MONTEREY-SEASIDE

MONTEREY-CASTROVILLE

3088 Winkle Ave Santa Cruz, CA 95065 (831) 475-5506 License # C10-180000045 Delivery now available

1440 Canyon Del Rey Seaside, Ca 93955 (831) 583-8300 License # C10-0000517-LIC

10665 Merritt Street Castroville, CA 95012 (831) 453-7180 License # C10-0000149-LIC

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CHAICANNABIS.COM


BEST O F THE WEB

BEST of the WEB

I INSTAGRAM

5 VIDEOS

R NEWS

FOG BANK @levymediaworks ♥ 3,011

HAMMERHEAD SHARKS HUNT BLACKTIP SHARKS Every year massive hammerhead sharks migrate to the beaches of Florida to hunt and eat 6-foot blacktip sharks. 16,657 views

MAVERICKS SURFERS NAMED MOST UNDERRATED Big-wave surfers Patrick Shaughnessy and Tyler Fox were named as two of the five most underrated surfers at Mavericks in Surfer Magazine. Photo: Nelly 9,286 views

LIFE IS ALL ABOUT TIMING. @alison_gamel ♥ 2,607

BIGGEST WAVE OF THE SEASON Tom Butler in Nazare, Portugal on Dec. 14, 2018, when the conditions were perfect. 16,240 views

CALIFORNIA VS. PLASTIC A proposed law offers the most comprehensive framework in the nation to curb single-use plastics and packaging waste. 6,780 views

@SKYLERTHESURFINGDOG TOOK HOME FIRST PLACE AT THE DOG SURFING CHAMPIONSHIPS IN PACIFICA. @nellysmagicmoments  ♥2,483

TAHITI FROM BELOW Beautiful underwater footage of John John Florence surfing. 12,356 views

WAVES OF IMPACT COMES TO SANTA CRUZ The Oceanside, California-based organization provides free surf camps for those facing special challenges. 4,361 views

HEADING INTO THE WEEKEND @jschwab_24 ♥ 2,062

SURFING THE GALAPAGOS WITH NATHAN FLORENCE A trip to the Galapagos Islands in search of waves and wildlife. 10,090 views

MORE SWEEPING PLASTIC PROHIBITIONS Santa Cruz County is considering new additions to its pioneering plastic waste restrictions. 2,342 views

VISIT US:

santacruzwaves.com/videos @santacruzwaves santacruzwaves.com/local-loop SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 5


PETER MILLAR TOMMY BAHAMA JOHNNIE-O ROBERT BARAKETT ROBERT GRAHAM

34 HERITAGE TRASK BARBOUR BUGATCHI COLE HAAN LINKSOUL OLUKAI

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W W W. PAT R I C K J A M E S . C O M • 8 8 8 . 8 5 5 . 9 2 9 2


WORD ON THE STREET

Q: Darci Bogdan, captain: “Tequila, coffee and mac ’n’ cheese.”

Lori Chavez, retired: “A variety of wine, lots of fresh fruit, and really good cheese.”

What are your three must-have things to eat or drink when camping or backpacking?

Gabe Torres, abled-bodied seaman: “Some type of salty fish snack, some type of nut butter—there are so many to choose from!—and coconut water, because that fuels me.”

Maya Campbell-Unsoeld, teacher: “I always bring chocolate, summer sausage and peppermint schnapps to put into my hot cocoa.”

Helen Christianson, sailor: “That’s easy! Coffee, tortillas and miso soup.”

Nina Jackson, marine biologist: “Lots of bananas, peanut butter and Pacificos.”

d BY LESLIE MUIRHEAD

ASKED AT THE INTERNATIONAL OCEAN FILM TOUR SANTA CRUZ

Kathy Ferraro, promoter: “I am actually going on a five-day trip coming up. I always bring wine, coffee and Trader Joe’s fruit nut packs.”

Ryan Silsbee, orchardist: “I love to bring some kind of hard cheese like an extra sharp cheddar, seeded crackers and avocados.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 7


A participant with the Operation Surf organization gets some quality time with Skyler. PHOTO: GUERIN MYALL

HEEL! HEAL! By NEAL KEARNEY

A

considerable crowd lines the beach, eyes fixed on the sea, bearing witness to a touching sight: pro surfers sharing waves with wounded veterans, many of whom are missing one or more limbs. There’s hardly a dry eye on the shore. The next set of waves leads to an eruption of applause from the crowd. An Iraq war veteran is sliding down a playful wave, hanging on with giant smile. The man riding alongside him throws shakas while a Queensland heeler perches on the nose, tongue hanging out and tail wagging furiously.

3 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

The pooch is Skyler, and she and her dad Homer Henard have been bringing their interspecies surf act to events like these for the past couple of years, combining surf and animal therapy in a unique and impactful way. Henard, a former professional surfer, and Skyler have become true local celebrities in recent years with this tandem surfing act. The 9-year-old cattle dog has been braving the punchy Santa Cruz surf with balance, bravery and panache since she was just a puppy. “At first I started going out in the water with Skyler to get exercise on small days [and] to keep the paddle arms

going,” explains Henard. “We kept it up, having an amazing time no matter the size of the waves. It was epic.” Skyler shreds with such proficiency that she has no problem riding waves to the shore solo these days, so long as her loving pops provides her with a gentle push. She even competes regularly at “surf dog” championships up and down the coast, earning a victory at the 2015 “World Surf Dog Championships” in Huntington Beach. Her Instagram following has gone worldwide and her Jimbo Phillips-designed merch is flying off the shelves. One day in 2016, Henard’s good


CAUSES

“ONCE THEY SEE SKYLER JUMP ON THE BOARD AND PADDLE OUT WITH ME, THEY GET ALL EXCITED, AND THE ANXIETY MELTS AWAY.” friend Adam Replogle called him up and told him that he was working with Waves of Impact, a surf therapy program for children facing exceptional challenges. He asked if Henard might come down and bring Skyler, sensing the kids would get a kick out of the dog’s surfing skills. “I didn’t know what to expect, but going down there with Skyler changed me forever,” Henard reflects. “I realized how important the kind of therapy [is that] my dog was providing these kids. They show up intimidated and scared of the ocean, but once they see Skyler jump on the board and paddle out with me, they get all excited, and the anxiety melts away. It’s a double dose of stoke!” Once they are out there, instead of focusing on the waves, the cold, or

sharks, they’re focused on the amazing sight of the surfing dog. “Next thing you know they’re on a wave themselves, squealing with joy and grinning ear to ear,” Henard says. “During these high-energy moments of surf and stoke, I look at these kids and it’s like their disability goes away—it may be brief, but for that moment I’m just blown away at the power of these therapies. The highs and joy levels are crazy.” Since they started surf therapy, they’ve volunteered for organizations such as Mauli Ola Foundation, which takes kids with cystic fibrosis out in the water, and Operation Surf, another surf therapy program for wounded veterans. The man/canine duo plans to expand its volunteer work by hitting every therapy event possible, starting

in California and branching out internationally should the opportunities arise. The potential for healing is personal for Henard, who suffered a major head injury when he was 18 in a head-on car crash. He woke up in a coma, losing a lot of information and memories—something that surfing and Skyler’s companionship have helped with greatly over the years. But it wasn’t until Henard was exposed to the brave, injured and ill men, women and children he met as these events that he felt comfortable discussing his own struggles. “Starting to tell my story, although vulnerable, has been another therapeutic thing,” Henard explains. “Surfing and animal therapy have saved my life and I’m so stoked we can bring it to others who can benefit from it.”

All smiles during the Waves Of Impact day at Pleasure Point. PHOTO: JAIME BODDORFF

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


When Skyler’s not spreading the stoke to those in need, she can be found sending it on set waves all over town with her papa, Homer Henard. PHOTO: GUERIN MYALL

4 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


CAUSES

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


Do you have an outstanding beach property that you want to use personally, while collecting vacation rental income?

My family and I take pride in owning a beach home in beautiful Pleasure Point (Santa Cruz, Ca.) which means it can be very scary to think about renting our property to just anyone, but Beachnest has not only eliminated our stress, they have become a true extension of our family. We rest easy knowing that each and every potential tenant has been through their screening process, and being local we also know that whether a simple maintenance or emergency issue arise, I know we can count on Beachnest to handle the situation. Being a business owner with very little time to tend to our property, yet maximizing our income, communication is also very important to me in any relationship and I could not be happier in choosing both Liz and John Pickart to manage all aspects of our rental property. —R. and S. ROSITANO

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YEARS

20

DISCOVERING THE PACE OF NATURE

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IN HONOR OF OUR 20 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WE INVITE YOU TO COME STAY IN THE MONTHS OF SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER, SUNDAY - THURSDAY OUR 20/20/20 SPECIAL: 20% discount off all Lodge, Cabins, and Bungalows 20% discount coupon for the General Store 20% discount off your breakfast or lunch for 1-2 people at Cascade Restaurant + Bar (excludes alcohol) Available Sunday - Thursday, not available Holidays. Valid through October 31st, 2019. Not valid with any other special or offer. Not valid for groups. Pricing does not include tax and fees. Certain blackout dates apply. Certain restrictions apply.

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IN DEPTH

Plight

the

of

Monarch

The western monarch butterfly population has plummeted in recent years. What does their disappearance mean, and what is being done about it locally? By DAVE DE GIVE

I

t’s fall and that means it’s time for the monarch butterflies to make their annual return to Natural Bridges State Park and to other monarch wintering spots throughout the Monterey Bay area. The western monarch was first documented in California when a seafaring Russian expedition made landfall near San Francisco in October of 1816, but the iconic orange-andblack butterfly has likely been around for thousands of years. In the 1980s, an estimated 4.5 million western monarch butterflies lived on the Pacific coast in California and Baja California, Mexico. But flash forward just a few decades to today, and their population has shrunk by more than 99 percent. While the reasons are not completely understood, experts agree that habitat loss, climate change and pesticide use are likely contributing factors. “This past year was striking to see,” says Samantha Marcum, a coastal program coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who has participated in numerous Thanksgiving Day counts in Santa Cruz County conducted by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. “In some areas, I did not find any butterflies. At other locations, the numbers were disturbingly low. I kept hoping that the butterflies were

THE WESTERN MONARCH POPULATION HAS DECREASED BY 99.5 PERCENT SINCE THE 1980S.

going to show up late to the sites, but that did not happen.” The numbers locally are stark. Of the 15 overwintering groves counted in Santa Cruz County in 2017, the three largest sites— Lighthouse Field State Park, Moran Lake and Natural Bridges—had approximately 12,000, 5,400 and 9,000 butterflies each according to Marcum, for a total of 26,400. Just one year later in 2018, the numbers at the same three largest sites dropped to approximately 1,800, 1,370, and 1,120 respectively—just 4,290 in all, or 84 percent

fewer monarchs Because year-to-year population trends can fluctuate, experts focus on long-term trends. However, those numbers are also alarming. “In 1997, the same three sites in Santa Cruz hosted approximately 70,000, 70,000, and 120,000, respectively,” for a total of 260,000, says Marcum. “The [entire] estimated western population was at least 4.5 million monarchs in the 1980s. The most recent overwintering population estimate [in 2018] was less than 30,000 butterflies, a 99.5 percent decline in the population since the 1980s.” The monarch has become the West Coast’s canary in the coal mine. “They are definitely telling us [about] the health

PHOTO: ERIK LANDRY

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PHOTO: ALISON GAMEL

of our environment,” says Martha Nitzberg, a lead interpreter at the Natural Bridges monarch preserve. They also speak for other species that aren’t as prominently noticed by the public. “Monarch declines are an indicator for the health of ecosystems across North America and the status of the larger pollinator community,” explains Marcum. “Restoration and protection of monarch habitat provides benefits to many species including other butterflies, bees, and birds.” It’s fitting that the well-loved monarch is the messenger. Many of us have fond childhood memories of school field trips to visit tree-clustering monarchs or collecting a caterpillar and releasing it as a butterfly in spring. Schools, outdoor festivals and film festivals embrace the monarch as their namesake throughout the state. The majestic monarchs are also popular with eco-minded tourists who spend vacation days and dollars to see them. While other species may contribute more tangibly to benefits like plant or crop pollination, the monarch is an apt

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bellwether to bring attention to the plight it shares with bees, beetles, flies, moths, and other butterflies. “It’s kind of a gateway insect into caring about pollinators,” says Emma Pelton, an endangered species conservation biologist for the Xerces Society, who notes that other pollinators face the same stressors that monarchs face. “Losing monarchs is a little bit of a wake-up call that we’re losing a really widespread, common butterfly that conveniently we’re able to count because they cluster. But there are tons of other butterflies that we also know are declining as much or more than monarchs. They’re unique because of their incredible migration, but unfortunately not unique in that a lot of our butterfly species are at risk and are declining.” The story of the western monarch’s migratory voyage verges on the magical—a multi-generational epic worthy of our fascination. Imagine yourself as a monarch making a long journey to a coastal oasis such as Santa Cruz. Picture yourself replenishing over winter with nectaring flowers


IN DEPTH

IN JUST ONE YEAR, THE NUMBER OF BUTTERFLIES AT SANTA CRUZ COUNTY’S THREE MAIN MONARCH WINTERING SITES— LIGHTHOUSE FIELD STATE PARK, MORAN LAKE, AND NATURAL BRIDGES STATE PARK—DECREASED BY 84 PERCENT. while communing with fellow travelers. Rejuvenated come spring, the monarch ventures inland, finds its mate, and lays eggs on succulent milkweed. Hatched caterpillars become butterflies—offspring who continue the parent’s quest after its short time on this earth is done. Imagine your “kids” then fly east and north, with succeeding generations eventually reaching as far east as the Rocky Mountains and as far north as southern Canada. When the cold of winter approaches again, the latest of your line return to the California coast—a place they have never been before and the same place your journey began—ready to start the cycle again. On every leg of that journey, the western monarch faces challenges, as does a largely separate eastern population that winters in central Mexico. The monarch’s migration is a delicate balance of many things that must go right. Disturbances to their habitats can upset that equilibrium. Because there is no single silver bullet to fix the problem, the Xerces Society website presents a five-part plan of action to help save western monarchs. It includes protecting overwintering sites, restoring breeding and migratory habitats

in California (which have suffered from land development incursion and loss of milkweed near Central Valley farms), and reducing agricultural and home use of pesticides. Efforts to protect and restore summer breeding and fall migration habitat outside of California and to find answers to key scientific research questions are also crucial elements of the plan. One focus locally is to improve overwintering sites. “Many overwintering groves are becoming more degraded as time goes by with trees and limbs falling or being cut down,” says Marcum, who notes that the overwintering season is a critical, vulnerable time for clustering monarchs. “Changes to the groves are apparent in some cases, including noticeable wind tunnels that can form when trees are removed.” Natural Bridges’ non-native but monarch-friendly eucalyptus trees provide monarchs both shelter and a source of nectar, according to Nitzberg. State park workers and volunteers have worked to shore up the grove’s eucalyptus, cypress and pine trees, the latter of which has dwindled in number from disease.

PHOTO: ALISON GAMEL

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PHOTO: ALISON GAMEL

At Lighthouse Field—a lesser known but also important local monarch site—the Fish and Wildlife Service is working with California State Parks, the Xerces Society and local non-profit Groundswell Coastal Ecology to protect, restore and manage its overwintering habitat. The management plan crafted for Lighthouse Field is now used as a template for other overwintering sites. Groundswell Coastal Ecology is implementing a wide range of land management practices at Lighthouse Field including reducing monarch-harming wind tunnels with planned tree planting and maintenance, adding nectar plants that bloom in late fall and early spring, and reducing monarch mortality by eliminating food waste that attracts predators such as yellow jackets and rodents, according to director Bill Henry. The organization also engages the local community and K-12 schools in hands-on stewardship. Henry urges visitors to overwintering habitats like Natural Bridges and Lighthouse Field to adopt practices to help the monarchs such as not feeding wildlife, disposing of garbage in predator-proof waste cans, and to participate in community pollinator events such as the one planned for 5 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

December at Lighthouse Field. Other ways for individuals to aid the monarch include planting native milkweed and native flowering plants in regions where they occur naturally. The Xerces Society website provides a helpful interactive map to determine if people live in coastal zones where nectaring flowers are needed or inland zones where both can be planted—with 5 miles from the coast being a good rule of thumb. The site also gives recommendations for native species of each plant since native plants typically require less water and are more resistant to climate change. Coastal residents can also volunteer to count monarchs or become docents at sites like Natural Bridges. The public can help with scientific research by uploading pictures taken of milkweed and monarchs using the Western Monarch Milkweed Mapper, the Monarch SOS app, or the INaturalist app; and using the #SaveWesternMonarchs hashtag on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Reducing or eliminating pesticide use whenever possible is another important step in protecting monarchs. That can include buying food from organic farmers and reducing or


IN DEPTH

“ECOSYSTEMS ARE AN INTERCONNECTED WEB OF ORGANISMS AND PROCESSES AND EVERY SPECIES IMPACTS THE BALANCE OF THE SYSTEM. … AN IMBALANCE IN ONE AREA OF THE SYSTEM CAN HAVE A RIPPLE EFFECT.” —SAMANTHA MARCUM, U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE COASTAL PROGRAM COORDINATOR

eliminating pesticides bought at home gardening centers for use in our own backyards. “There have actually been studies showing that the rates of pesticide use are much higher in urban areas than in agriculture,” says Pelton, who stresses not using pesticides to make gardens prettier. “Having a perfect lawn actually exacts a toll on the environment. A lot of the chemicals accumulate and our fresh water system is harmed.” Experts hope that steps taken by scientists, habitat managers and the public to protect monarchs will help their numbers rebound. The loss of the popular monarchs would also signal an upending of the delicate environmental balance required for a host of other species. “Ecosystems are an interconnected web of organisms and processes and every species impacts the balance of the

system,” says Marcum. “It is balance that allows an ecosystem to function in a healthy and efficient manner and an imbalance in one area of the system can have a ripple effect on other parts of the system. Humans are part of these systems as well. Monarchs … migrate across many different habitat types to complete their annual migration cycle. We want to ensure that the monarch migration phenomenon continues and that the species thrives.” Visit xerces.org, fws.gov, and groundswellecology.org to find further information on protecting monarchs. Welcome Back Monarch Day will take place at Natural Bridges on Oct. 13, followed by the Migration Festival on Feb. 8, 2020, also at Natural Bridges. Learn more at thatsmypark.org or by calling (831) 423-4609. PHOTO: CANDACE FALLON

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R Y A N

M O S S Expanding horizons and comfort zones with Ryan Moss 5 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

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By TYLER FOX

first met Ryan Moss about 10 years ago when he reached out to Shane Desmond (my tow-surfing partner at the time) and me asking if he could tag along and shoot photos on one of our winter wave-hunting missions. His youthful enthusiasm sold us on the spot. He assured us that he had a water housing for his camera and didn’t mind bobbing around in 50-degree, shark-infested waters. This was our type of kid!


BEHIND THE LENS

Evan Austen | Koolau Mountains. This mountain range defined an era of my life and continues to. This was taken on a small traverse I was enjoying with some friends. It happened to grace the pages of National Geographic Travel Magazine, as well as be recognized as one of their best images of 2017. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 57


RYAN MOSS

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BEHIND THE LENS

“I loved the ocean and riding waves, so I put up with the heckles and made it a point to be on the coast as much as possible.” A couple of weeks later, as a solid 8-to-10foot swell marched down the coastline, we were set for an early morning strike mission. Coordinates were confirmed, and a meeting time and plan of attack were sorted. Coffee in hand, full tank of gas in the ski, 5mm wetsuits, 12-pound tow-board, towline, rescue sled, gloves, two-way radio—check, check, check. With a few stubborn stars dotting the sky above and the glow of tangerine tickling the horizon, Shane squeezed the throttle of our Honda Aquatrax jetski and we set off up the rugged Northern California coastline. Our plan was to pluck Ryan off of a secluded beach and take him into the line-up, where he’d try to capture us whizzing by in the golden earlymorning light. “I wonder if he’s going to be there,” I shouted to Shane over the engine noise. “We’ll see!” Shane yelled back. You see, young surfers don’t have the best reputation for punctuality and this early morning excursion had a time stamp of 5:30 a.m. To our amazement, the kid was there, standing stoically in the cold darkness, camera in hand. We quickly snatched him off the shore and proceeded back out into the pounding waves. Stiff offshore winds sent spray curling off the back of swells, blinding us momentarily. It was pumping and we were chomping at the bit to lock into our first rides

Angelo | Teahupoo Many people don’t know that Angelo is the man out at Teahupoo. He is a local legend. He started off bodyboarding and still does on the days that are considered borderline TOW. This image was inspired by him and Zak Noyle, who got an incredible image in similar conditions. Tahiti is the happiest place on Earth, and who can argue with images like this? SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 9


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BEHIND THE LENS

Dan Worden | Spitting Caves. This was another one of those images I willed the universe to produce. I was playing around with a GoPro and taking selfies of the spit blasting me overt the sharp lava rock shelf. I called Dan to come down and we lucked into this image. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 1


BEHIND THE LENS

“ I can become hyper focused and enjoy something that I really should be terrified of.” of the morning. “You good?” we shouted back to Ryan, who replied, “Yeah, all good!” And just like that, the boy slid off the sled and into the icy water. Shane and I quickly unstowed the tow line and began flinging each other down perfectly groomed walls at 40 mph, zooming by “seal boy” with careful precision. But our playtime came to a quick halt when we noticed Ryan frantically waving his arm in need of assistance. We were on him in seconds, praying he still had both of his legs. He hopped onto the back of the ski and started belting profanities. His water housing was half full of water. His camera was toast. We gave him a ride back to the beach, leaving him with our condolences, and went back into the line-up for four more hours of unadulterated fun. Since then, I had only seen Ryan at few social gatherings and a handful of times at various surf spots, so it wasn’t until recently that I noticed how far “seal boy” has come. With more than 23,000 followers on Instagram, he’s now shooting the world’s top surfers, landing covers of the 2018 Outside Magazine calendar and Freesurf, among other publications, and is even scaling razoredged tropical ridgelines sans safety ropes. Now 35 and living in Haleiwa, Hawaii, Ryan has clearly persevered through those early-stage road bumps. I recently caught up with the energetic entrepreneur to hear about that journey. Where did you grow up and when did you first pick up a camera? I grew up in San Jose and was pretty much public enemy No. 1 in Santa Cruz, being a transplant as well as a bodyboarder. <Laughs> I loved the ocean and riding waves, so I put up with the heckles and made it a point to be on the coast as much as possible. However it wasn’t until I completed college that I picked up a camera and started to explore the world of still [photography] and video production, which fascinated and challenged me.

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RYAN MOSS

Self Portrait | Joshua Tree  Someone once told me there is nothing scarier than a photographer with a vision.  Well, I decided to one up that and be the photographer and the subject. I remember heading to Joshua Tree and seeing this image that Tim Kemple shot. I wanted the image for my portfolio so I set up my camera on a tripod and put it into time-lapse mode. It took me probably an hour to capture this image and over 30 attempts.

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RYAN MOSS

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BEHIND THE LENS

When and why did you take the leap and move to Hawaii? In college, back in 2003, I took my first visit to the Hawaiian islands and absolutely fell in love with the place. However, it was always in the back of my mind that I would live in California and follow in the footsteps of my dad and uncle and become a firefighter. [But] I felt [photography] was my calling, so I ended up moving to Oahu full time in 2016 to pursue my passion for photography and video production. When did you start climbing, and what do you even call this extreme activity of scaling tropical mountain ridges? I started climbing and doing long ridge traverses back in 2012. I had just gone through a bad breakup and major heartbreak and needed to find something that truly cleared my mind. The ocean had become stale and just felt like an office. I could never separate the two after I made surf filmmaking my career. It was a pretty sad realization and low point. This thing that I spent 27-plus years loving and turning to for clarity had lost its magic from year after year of surf-industry politics and whatnot, so I decided to turn to the mountains. I have always been terrified of heights, so it’s pretty ironic that I fell in love with it the way that I did. There’s nothing like it. It has helped me find this state of mind where I can become hyper focused and enjoy something that I really should be terrified of. As for what it’s called … Maybe over-glorified strategic walking? I guess you could consider it tropical mountaineering. That’s the closest correct way to describe it. Of course that has led to me wanting to come back and explore Yosemite and climb some big walls and not such loose crumbly ridgelines. Do you prefer still photography or video? If you want instant gratification, still photography. If you want to really paint a motion masterpiece, video. But, I enjoy both equally.

Self Portrait / Free Solo Hawaii. I know what people are thinking: You can say what you want, but I am extremely calculated every time I do a free solo route. Here I am about midway up the 90-foot pitch. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 5


BEHIND THE LENS

What is your most memorable photography or video trip? I’ve been incredibly fortunate to be invited on so [many] photo trips over the years. But, probably my first Fox [Fox Racing] trip down to Mexico with Dave [Nelly] Nelson and Josh Mulcoy was the most memorable—for all the wrong reasons. Here I was on my first company surf trip and right off the start I didn’t have a passport. I had a passport card and a lady told me it would get me into Mexico. Well that’s only by land and sea. So I missed my flight and remember being nearly in tears and so embarrassed and trying not to show my emotions to these heroes I was joining. The next day I got an emergency rushed passport and made the flight, so I only missed a day. It was the last day of the trip and the waves were maybe knee to waist high at this little point break and the light was shot. Nelly went and grabbed a board to go surf, so I took it as I could too. I was wrong. Later that night Mulcoy came in and just set me straight and laid it out for me saying that if you get invited on a trip to shoot photos that is your job no matter what the conditions. I was pretty bummed because I had been grinding it out for days in blistering hot Salina Cruz sun. And in my head there was no way any of that footage was ever going to see the light of day. After I had time to reflect, I realized Mulcoy was just looking out for me and I took those words and just never quit. I never let anyone outwork me. I don’t think I would be where I’m at today without all of that happening. What’s next? Winter is right around the corner and so is 36. I have to prepare to give a talk on outdoor photography and a video-editing workshop for PhotoCon, Hawaii’s photo trade show. I plan on heading to Yosemite to climb some big multi-pitch climbing routes, and Matthes Crest has been on my bucket list for a while. Other than that, just keep expanding my comfort zones in uncomfortable situations and continue to tell stories through still and motion pictures. Follow Ryan’s adventures on Instagram at @ryan.moss.

Billy Kemper | Apocalypse. This was the first real surf trip I ever went on. This wave is real. It’s powerful, unpredictable and scary. I feel like this is one of those waves that truly tests your ability as a water photographer and I was incredibly grateful to link up with Billy on this image.

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RYAN MOSS

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If you haven't had the experience of heading out during the Wednesday night races, you need to add it to your list of Santa Cruz musts. Expect all types of characters, all kinds of sailboats, and views you just can't get from shore. PHOTO: TYLER FOX 6 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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MIND & BODY

CRACKING

THE HEALTH CODE Biohackers try to upgrade their brains by any means necessary. Can their favorite foods and drinks really boost mental performance? By J.D. Ramey If the idea of biohacking—the use of shortcuts (or “hacks”) to upgrade the body and mind for maximum performance—fills your head with images of Silicon Valley cyborgs using genome editing technology to alter their DNA, implanting microchips into their muscles and injecting nutritional supplements into their veins … well, in some cases, you’re absolutely right. But biohacking isn’t always the stuff of sci-fi movies. It can also take the form of simple modifications to posture, exercise, sleep, attitude or diet. Whatever you might think of the various methods biohackers use, it’s hard to argue with the basic premise from which they operate: Better input equals better output. In other words, the higher the quality of the things we ingest, whether it be food, drink, entertainment or information, the better our mental and physical functioning is likely to be. Things get a little more complicated when we start delving into the specifics of diet, though. With all the claims biohackers have made about the supposed abilities of various foods and beverages to enhance cognitive performance, how are we to know the real brain fuel from the snake oil? With a little help from registered dietician and nutritionist Christina Gaunce (christinalynnrd.com), Santa Cruz Waves tried to sort things out. Here’s what we learned.

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THE KETO DIET

Almost across the board, biohackers sing the praises of the ketogenic diet, which limits one’s nutritional intake to foods low in carbs and high in protein and fat. According to the keto diet’s adherents, sticking with foods like egg yolks, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, avocados and olive oil can lead to enhanced mental acuity and weight loss, among other things. Gaunce feels more research is needed before we can determine whether this diet improves cognitive performance. “I have only seen one 12-week study done on mice,” she notes, adding that the keto diet has unpleasant side effects like odd body odor and a metallic taste in the mouth and can be unsafe for people with certain medical conditions. “This diet can be quite taxing on the kidneys and liver,” she says.


MIND & BODY

BULLETPROOF COFFEE

SOYLENT

Biohacking started getting mainstream notice in 2014 with the advent of this controversial meal replacement drink … and yes, it does take its name from the food product made from human remains in the 1973 movie Soylent Green. Soylent’s inventor, a Silicon Valley engineer named Rob Rhinehart (we’ll try to resist the temptation to call him Soylent Bob) claims this stuff contains all the nutrients the human body needs, citing weight loss, improved concentration and greater strength among its benefits. However, not only has this beverage and related products such as Soylent Powder and the Soylent Bar been blamed for a slew of gastrointestinal issues, but also, in 2017, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency barred the sale of Soylent in Canada, stating that it does not meet the qualifications of a meal replacement. Our analysis: Soylent is better than no meal at all, but not a great long-term nutrition source, and far less conducive to mental clarity than healthy, unprocessed food.

Hot coffee blended with two tablespoons of butter and a tablespoon of MCT oil—aka Bulletproof Coffee—is the brainchild of Silicon Valley entrepreneur Dave Asprey, the self-dubbed “Bulletproof Executive.” Asprey asserts that by using this beverage as a breakfast replacement, he lost 100 pounds without dieting and raised his IQ by 20 points. Ordinary coffee, he says, is crawling with carcinogenic, performancekilling chemicals called mycotoxins (a byproduct of fungi that is found in some food), and he recommends his company’s clean coffee beans and its Brain Octane brand of MCT oil as the antidote. That said, according to the technology and science website Gizmodo, virtually every coffee roaster in existence uses a technique called wet processing, which eliminates almost all mycotoxins, to the point where a person who consumed 199 cups of coffee in a single day would still be under the safe mycotoxin limit. There is little evidence to support Asprey’s claims that Bulletproof Coffee promotes improved energy and brain function any more than ordinary coffee does. It may even present some health risks, including increased cholesterol levels and, when used in place of a morning meal as Asprey recommends, a decrease in nutrient intake. Gaunce says she is “not a fan” of Bulletproof Coffee as a breakfast replacement. “The best way to improve cognitive functioning is by consuming a healthy, anti-inflammatory, mostly whole foods diet that is high in a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins and plant-based fats,” she says.

MCT OIL

Along with increased brainpower, biohackers claim that Medium Chain Glyceride (MCT) oil, a dietary supplement usually made from coconut oil and palm oil, promotes rapid weight loss and better exercise performance. AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center physician Mary Onwuka backed up those claims earlier this year, telling USA Today that MCT oil improves mood and cognitive function and can be helpful to Alzheimer’s and dementia sufferers. As promising as the results of various studies on this subject might be, MCT oil is not without its contraindications. Medical News Today cautions that excessive use of MCTs can lead to weight gain, while Onwuka says this supplement can increase anxiety, exacerbate headaches, cause gastrointestinal distress, worsen symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes and cause complications related to liver disease. She further advises pregnant and nursing women against taking MCT oil and recommends that anyone considering taking the supplement consult a physician first.

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ADVENTURE

Paddle for the

PLANET How a young endurance athlete from Catalina Island is spreading higher awareness for sustainability and the health of the ocean By JOEL HERSCH

O

ne early morning in August 2018, three young women donned swimwear and shoved off on narrow, prone paddleboards from Two Harbors beach on Catalina Island. The journey they were embarking on would be no easy feat: it was a 58-mile circumnavigation around the whole island, which sits about 30 miles off the coast from Long Beach. The most experienced paddle boarder of the three was 26-year-old Natalie Foote, a Catalina local. Foote grew up on a horse ranch in the island’s interior, immersed in nature, which led her to become an avid ocean athlete, environmentalist and health coach. “I’d always wanted to go all the way around the island,” Foote says, “but it was hard to find anyone else who wanted to also.” Her regular paddle training consisted of rising before dawn, setting out to sea, and as the sun’s rays peeked over the horizon from the mainland, paddling directly toward the beams. “Just about every morning dolphins would join me, and I’d be back at the beach [in Two Harbors] by 6:30 a.m.,” she says.

A plan for the full loop around Catalina became a reality when friends Jaysea Devoe—a 17-year-old yogi whom Foote became close with while working at a dive shop—and Emily Homolkee, 22, signed on to the adventure. The three women paddled 20 miles daily, five to six hours each day, for three days, pulling into beaches to camp before nightfall. Devoe’s father shadowed the journey from a 12-foot Boston Whaler, and her younger brother, along with his friend, documented the paddle for what would become a short, beautiful film entitled Nature of the Journey, released last April by Sanuk. The story, which runs just over seven minutes long, takes a strong nod at female empowerment and athleticism, depicts stunning views of the island’s terrain from the water, and lends a view of plastic waste among expansive beauty from the paddlers’ vantage point. Prior to the paddle, the women formed a partnership with Changing Tides Foundation, which raises awareness of eco practices, including plasticwaste reduction and eco-friendly traveling.

PHOTO: FISHER DEVOE @_FISHSTICKS

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PHOTO: FISHER DEVOE @_FISHSTICKS

PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

PADDLE FOR THE PLANET

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“As much as the paddle was all about fun … we also wanted to add a bit of a deeper meaning to it and chose to collaborate with them for a cause we’re all mutually passionate about,” Foote says. Along the route of the paddle, the three women prioritized collecting floating plastic debris, developed a plan for zero waste during the campouts between paddles, and discussed the impacts of single-use plastics on the ocean. “When plastic gets in the ocean, I don’t think people realize the impact of it,” Devoe says in the film. “When they use [plastic] once and then throw it away, it’s here longer than we are.” The trip “went from adventure to having a greater message and a greater purpose behind it,” Foote says during one of her on-camera interviews. “The ocean gives me so much that I’m always seeking ways to give back to it. “Hopefully we’ll inspire some other girls to get out and do things that they think maybe would be too challenging,” she continues, “and to know that you can do really anything you set your heart to.”


PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

ADVENTURE

The three women paddled 20 miles daily, five to six hours each day, for three days, pulling into beaches to camp before nightfall.

PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

Today, Foote works for University of Southern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, a facility on the south side of the Two Harbors mainlandfacing entrance. She is the Education and Sustainability Outreach Specialist, which allows her to spend a lot of time exploring the island, running trails, paddling, and sharing stories about sustainability research and the natural world. And through her work at the Wrigley Institute, Foote has become involved with a new film that echoes her adventure last year with Devoe and Homolkee.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 7 7


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PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

ADVENTURE

PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

PHOTO: COURTESY NATALIE FOOTE

Australian big-wave surfer and 10-time consecutive Molokai to Oahu Paddle Board World Champion Jamie Mitchell experienced a similar calling as Foote—to share with the world the status of the ocean’s health and promote some of the most viable, sustainable practices being developed at the Wrigley Institute. Some of those initiatives at the institute, according to Foote, include creating biofuel from kelp, advanced, closed-loop foodwaste systems, and other alternative energy sources. The new endeavor, as well as its corresponding film, is called the Seven Crossings Project, and will feature Mitchell—a father of two young girls—paddling between all eight of the Channel Islands, beginning in the northern part of the island chain and finishing in Catalina. The paddle will cover more than 150 miles of ocean water off Southern California and raise funds for the Wrigley Institute’s climate change research and wider educational outreach efforts. The documentary film will be released in 2020. As carbon emissions cause sea temperatures to rise, plastic waste works its way into food chains and other man-made problems impact marine life, Mitchell says he wants to do what he can to ensure his daughters have the same opportunities to experience the natural world that he has had in his lifetime. “For me, it’s time I take a good hard look at myself,” says Mitchell. “I’ve taken so much from the ocean, that now it’s time for me to give back.”

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ART

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CLEAN OCEANS M

The collaborative effort that bestowed the Westside with a massive marine mural and a new sense of ocean pride By JOEL HERSCH

T

his past summer, a group of Santa Cruz muralists went to work creating an expansive 500-foot oceanic mural at the corner of Mission Street and Bay Avenue in Santa Cruz. While the artists plugged away, traffic would slow down as drivers blared their horns and waved in support, craning their necks to take it all in. As the months progressed, so did the mural, growing to include a trio of looming orcas behind a white shark, a free diver descending to recover sunken plastic rubbish, and a giant squid—drawn to scale—with its tentacles reaching through the windows of a deep-sea shipwreck. The mural, titled the Clean Oceans Mural, was organized by Taylor Reinhold, of the local nonprofit Fresh Walls Project, and features the work of eight collaborating artists, including Elijah Pfotenhauer (Painted Ladder), Erika Rosendale (Mysterikal Arts) and the Portugal-based husband and wife duo Justin and Bella Phame (Bellaphame). “We’re really proud of this thing—it’s been a saga and a labor of love,” says Reinhold.

About a year of planning and fundraising went into the production, requiring 45 gallons of latex paint and roughly 150 cans of spray paint. As of press time, Reinhold was still working to raise funds for a clear coat application to finalize painting and ensure that it can endure Santa Cruz’s heavy marine layer for years to come. In partnership with Clean Oceans International, the mural, which spans the sound wall between Bay View Elementary School and Mission Street, aims to inspire and pay homage to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, as well as the creatures that make their homes there. The theme of single-use plastic pollution runs through the work, aptly alluding to the mission at Clean Oceans International, which is working to develop technology that can source plastic debris from the sea and convert it into clean diesel fuel, according to founder Jim “Homer” Holm. Reinhold, whom friends know as Tay Lion, explains that the mural is a continuous expression of the ocean’s habitats, from the intertidal zone all the way down to the deep sea.

ALL PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DANIEL

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THE CLEAN OCEANS MURAL

“I hope it helps people to remember that we can make a difference with our daily habits and choices, like what we choose to consume.”—Elijah Pfotenhauer “It goes from the shallows, along the rock reefs, through the kelp forest, and then out into the Pelagic [the open sea],” Reinhold notes. “It kind of sets this story for all the creatures giving the plastic waste back to land, sort of rejecting this contamination.” Collaborator Pfotenhauer says that the project is uniquely significant because of how many people drive by the site on a daily basis, creating the possibility of widespread

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impact. He hopes that the mural’s messages resonate with passersby. “I hope it helps people to remember that we can make a difference with our daily habits and choices, like what we choose to consume,” he says. “There’s so much byproduct and waste in this world, using things once, then tossing them—it doesn’t feel right to me.” For Pfotenhauer, these massive murals require a serious physical investment. He says that painting ocean subjects allows him to get into a natural rhythm. “We’re literally painting with our whole bodies when it’s on this scale, so you kind of have to internalize what you’re drawing and put that back out,” he says. “I like painting with motion; and [the] ocean’s got motion.” In February of last year, Bay View Elementary staff, Santa Cruz City School board and the City’s Arts Commission unanimously approved the project. It was made possible by partnerships with the Santa Cruz Economic


ART

Development office, Arts Council Santa Cruz County, CalTrans, The Newman Foundation, and Santa Cruz City Schools. City Arts Program Manager Beth Tobey, who helped move the project forward, says that this project has brought environmentalists, educators and artists together in celebration of values that the local community embraces. “We’ve already received hundreds of comments in support of the mural project, and Taylor and his team have done an absolutely amazing job,” says Tobey. “I have no doubt this mural is something Santa Cruz will be proud of and will be enjoyed by generations to come, not to mention the millions of people in cars passing by this mural annually.” According to Caltrans, the portion of Mission Street that lies west of the Bay Street intersection—where the mural is situated—has an average daily traffic volume of 38,900. Reinhold says that the mural not only beautifies this

About a year of planning and fundraising went into the production, requiring 45 gallons of latex paint and roughly 150 cans of spray paint. section of the Westside, but also raises a proverbial flag for the community’s priorities. “We have one of the most beautiful and diverse ecosystems in the world right here in our bay, and I think this mural can help remind people of what’s out there, and that it’s worth protecting and investing in,” he says. “We live on the ocean, we respect the ocean, and this portrays what we really care about in this town.”

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PHOTO: AMY KUMLER

FOOD & DRINK

CONSCIOUS Healthy and sustainable sustenance for your next outdoor adventure By ARIC SLEEPER

W

hether your next adventure is a five-day backpacking excursion through the Sierras or a weekend car camping trip in Pescadero, having the right provisions can make or break the experience. Instead of roughing it with a stockpile of sugar-laden protein bars or questionably sourced cans of tuna, consider these healthy, hearty, and sustainably sourced options.

PATAGONIA PROVISIONS:

Patagoniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent venture Patagonia Provisions, seeks to sell food that is ethically sourced, nutritious, and ready to eat anywhere water can be boiled. Try this menu for one of the long days of hiking a mile (or 10) on the trail, or ascending thousands of vertical feet in one bout.

BREAKFAST For breakfast, when you can still the get the water boiling from the coals of the night before, Provisions offers a variety of organic grain cereal mixtures comprised of all the good grains from buckwheat to rolled oats, offered in a variety of flavors. Of the choices, the tart apple rises above the rest with a zest that helps awaken the senses after sunrise. And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re camping in the right spot in the autumnal months, sliced wild apples make it a complete breakfast.

PRODUCT PHOTOS: COURTESY OF PATAGONIA PROVISIONS

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LUNCH

FOOD & DRINK

Making lunch a lighter meal can prevent too long of a siesta, which is key when you’ve got a lot of distance to close before sunset. For the most bang in a small package, try Provisions’ canned mussels (lemon herb, specifically). These delicious little morsels are sourced from the Galician coast of Spain. They are packed with protein and B-12 vitamins, and are impossible not to share with your fellow adventurers, so it’s best to grab more than a few cans for your next trip.

After a 10-hour day of bushwhacking up at least two mountainsides somewhere deep in the untrodden Sierras, making a hot dinner is the last thing anyone wants to do. With that in mind, Provisions has done all the legwork in advance. Its spicy red bean chili requires only two cups of boiling water and a pot. The company’s easy-to-make chilis and soups provide that good plant protein fullness and a warmth that will send you quickly to the sleeping bag to try and spot at least one shooting star before falling asleep. For the folks who prefer to have a little taste of the hard stuff before they retire to the tent, but also want to support organic regenerative agriculture, Patagonia is now canning a beer made from a perennial grain called Kernza. The long roots of the plant literally rehabilitate the soil they grow in and reduce soil erosion. The beer is mellow yet bitter with hints of citrus and a touch of viscosity, which makes one (or two) adequate for a nightcap.

PHOTO: AMY KUMLER

DINNER

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9 3


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FOOD & DRINK

Santa Cruz Salmon Jerky atop a toasted Companion Bakeshop slice with avocado and goat cheese equals heaven for your taste buds.

PHOTO: TYLER FOX

DON’T FORGET THE JERKY After a series of long, staggered ascents, somewhere after the 1,300th vertical foot, when one more step seems like too much and mealtime is still so far away, slow down, find a makeshift sitting circle, and snack about it. By ARIC SLEEPER

SANTA CRUZ SALMON JERKY

PESCAVORE

LOCAL JERK

Son of the Fish Lady Casey Cowden is continuing his family’s business in his own unique flavor with Santa Cruz Salmon Jerky. Cowden’s jerky is smoked, not dehydrated, gluten-free, and made from Canadian king salmon sustainably ocean raised by Creative Salmon, the first certified organic hatchery in Canada. Cowden makes four flavors of salmon jerky: spicy, teriyaki, wasabi, and sriracha. All the varieties of salmon jerky have a nice kick to pull you out from the funk of exhaustion and mild oxygen deprivation, and back onto the trail for the next ascent.

Inspired by a chance encounter with a unique, dried and seasoned fish snack in Micronesia, founders of Pescavore sought to create an ethically sourced morsel of the same caliber here in Santa Cruz. Having partnered with the seafood sustainability consultant Fishwise, and using manufacturing techniques adopted from indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest, Pescavore has created a jerky-like snack made from wild-caught and whole-cut ahi tuna. At 1.5 ounces and about 12 grams of protein per pack, these little snacks are a great alternative to a sugary protein bar.

The newest addition to the Santa Cruz jerky scene, Local Jerk is based out of the Downtown Metro Station. Founder Emma Magelssen is stoked about her new headquarters, which, despite being only 284 square feet, is zoned as both a restaurant and a slaughterhouse. A bartender turned entrepreneur, Magelssen began experimenting with a dehydrator after receiving one as a gift. When her friends and patrons kept demanding more, she decided to go big. The jerky, made in small batches, comes in three flavors: original, hot, and sweet heat.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9 5


CAFE CRUZ

DINING GUIDE Downtown 515 KITCHEN & COCKTAILS With a focus on inventive small plates and cocktails, 515 Kitchen & Cocktails has been offering a nuanced take on internationally influenced California cuisine in downtown Santa Cruz since 2006. 515 Cedar St., (831) 425-5051, www.515santacruz.com

AQUARIUS DREAM INN Spectacular oceanfront dining just off the beach in Santa Cruz. One of Santa Cruz's top dining destinations, Aquarius offers seafood and organic Californian cuisine. Open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as brunch on Sundays. 175 W. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, www.dreaminnsantacruz.com

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BETTY'S EAT INN

IDEAL BAR & GRILL

PACIFIC THAI

Locally owned burger joint with a fun vibe. Features award-winning burgers, fries, salads, beer, wine and shakes. Soak up the sun on the outdoor patios at all three locations. Expanded menu and full bar at this location only. 1222 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7056, www. bettyburgers.com. Other locations: Midtown (505 Seabright Ave.) and Capitola (1000 41st Ave.).

A Santa Cruz institution with amazing beach, boardwalk and wharf views. Open every day, featuring nightly specials and a full bar. 106 Beach St., Santa Cruz, (831) 4233827, www.idealbarandgrill.com

Authentic Thai cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

EL PALOMAR Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-7575, www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

HULA'S ISLAND GRILL California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

LAILI Santa Cruz's answer to high-quality Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani / Afghan food. 101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-4545, www. lailirestaurant.com

MOZAIC A Mediteranean and Middle Eastern fusion menu, filled with vibrant dishes from arugula pesto pasta to Greek moussaka. Enjoy a belly dancer on Friday nights and daily happy hour specials. Open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 110 Church St., Santa Cruz, (831) 454-8663, mozaicsantacruz.com

PONO HAWAIIAN GRILL AND THE REEF Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7666, www.ponohawaiiangrill.com

POUR TAPROOM Gastropub fare with vegan and gluten-free options. Sixty beers and eight wines on tap. 110 Cooper St., Ste. 100B, Santa Cruz, (831) 535-7007, pourtaproom.com/santa-cruz.


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SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 97


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE

ROSIE MCCANN'S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT Serving fresh, seasonal food, such as salads, grass-fed burgers, and sustainable fish dishes, with 29 beers on draft. 1220 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-9930, www.rosiemccanns.com

SOIF RESTAURANT & WINE BAR A comfortable place to drink great wine, eat food that is as good as the wine, and then—if the wine is to your liking—buy some and take it home. The restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., and until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 105 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2020, www.soifwine.com

STAGNARO BROS. SEAFOOD INC. Seaside eatery turning out fresh seafood staples on the Santa Cruz Wharf with views of the Pacific. 59 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2180

ZOCCOLI’S Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711,www.zoccolis.com

Harbor

LA POSTA RESTAURANT With inventive Italian dishes crafted from local and seasonal ingredients, La Posta is a neighborhood restaurant that brings the soul of Italian cuisine into the heart of Seabright. Open Tuesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. 538 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 457-2782, lapostarestaurant.com.

SEABRIGHT BREWERY Rotating beer selection, with dog-friendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, www.seabrightbrewery.com

Westside/Scotts Valley BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

CASCADES BAR & GRILL AT COSTANOA California cuisine, local, organic, and handcrafted ingredients. 2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1, Pescadero, (650) 879-1100, www.costanoa.com

THE CROW’S NEST

MISSION ST. BBQ

Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

Midtown AKIRA Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7093, www.akirasantacruz.com

CHARLIE HONG KONG Vegan-oriented menu. Southeast Asian fusion, organic noodle and rice bowls. Chicken, beef, pork and salmon offered. Family and dog friendly. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-5664, www.charliehongkong.com

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com

Eastside/Capitola AVENUE CAFÉ Serving traditional breakfast and lunch, along with some Mexican favorites. 427 Capitola Ave., Capitola (831) 515-7559, www.avenuecafecapitola.com

CHILL OUT CAFE EL JARDÍN RESTAURANT Delicious and authentic Mexican cuisine featuring locally grown, fresh ingredients. 655 Capitola Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 4779384, www.eljardinrestaurant.net

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Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com


SC WAVES Fall 2019

FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

EAST SIDE EATERY, PLEASURE PIZZA

SOTOLA

Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

California farmstead concept focusing on local farms, ranches and seafood. In convivial quarters with an outdoor patio. 231 Esplanade Ste. 102, Capitola, (831) 854- 2800

KAITO

ZAMEEN AT THE POINT

Quaint atmosphere, specializing in ramen, sushi, Japanese tapas, beer and sake.in the heart of Pleasure Point. 830 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 464-2586, www.smilekaito.com

Fresh, fast and healthy Mediterranean cuisine. Made-to-order wraps, bowls and salads. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 851 41st Ave, Capitola, (831) 713-5520

MARGARITAVILLE

Indoor and outdoor dining with a beachfront deck, where American dishes, including seafood, are served. 203 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 475-4900, www.zeldasonthebeach.com

Waterfront restaurant offering a lively setting for casual Californian cuisine and cocktails. 231 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-2263, margaritavillecapitola.com

PARADISE BEACH GRILLE Fine dining in the Capitola Village. An award-winning beachside restaurant with spectacular ocean views. 215 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-4900, www.paradisebeachgrille.com

THE POINT CHOPHOUSE A traditional neighborhood steak “chop” house restaurant where generations of local families, friends and visitors to the area meet to celebrate in a casual setting. With good honest food, local draft beer and wine, and premium cocktails, the Point Chophouse offers something for everyone—even the little ones. Dinner and happy hour daily; breakfast and lunch weekends. 3326 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-2733, www.thepointchophouse.com

PONO HAWAIIAN KITCHEN & TAP CAPITOLA Hawaiian-style kitchen featuring 16 rotating taps with craft beer from the islands and beyond, Sabe cocktails, ciders, wine and, of course, the aloha spirit! Pupus, poke plate lunches and more. 3744 Capitola Road, (831) 476-7458

THE SAND BAR Capitola's new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola. (831) 462-1881

SHADOWBROOK Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 4751511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

FELTON 6240 Highway 9 9a.m.-9p.m. Daily 335-7322

BOULDER CREEK 13159 Highway 9 9a.m.-9p.m. Daily 338-7211

ZELDA'S ON THE BEACH

.

Soquel CAFE CRUZ Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

Farmer

Know Your

ROOTS

THE JERK HOUSE Traditional and fusion Jamaican cuisine made with fresh, organic and locally sourced ingredients. Mellow vibe and outdoor patio. 2525 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 316-7575, www.jerkhousesantacruz.com

SURF CITY SANDWICH Fast-casual dining with craft sandwiches, gourmet soups, salads, and a microtaproom. 4101 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 346-6952, www.surfcitysandwich.com

TORTILLA FLATS For more than 25 years, their Mexican food has blended the fieriness of Mexico with the sophistication of French sauces, and the earthiness of the Yucatan and complexity of Santa Fe with all the freshness and lightness that Californians expect. 4616 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 476-1754, tortillaflatsdining.com

2111 Soquel San Jose Rd FARM STAND OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, 10-6

Aptos/Watsonville AKIRA Now in Aptos, sushi made with freshcaught seafood and locally grown produce. 105 Post Office Drive, Ste. D,  Aptos, (831) 708-2154,  akirasantacruz.com

Available around town on tap and in bottles! SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9 9


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE APTOS ST. BBQ

CAFE BITTERSWEET

THE HIDEOUT

Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

Breakfast and lunch served Tuesday through Sunday. Outdoor dogfriendly patio. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831-662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service. 9051 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-5566, www.thehideoutaptos.com

BITTERSWEET BISTRO With its vast menu options from burgers to filet mignon, locally sourced produce, fresh fish and amazing desserts, the varied ambiance is perfect for an intimate dinner or casual gathering with family and friends. Enjoy a local beer on tap in the lounge while watching one of your favorite sports. Relax during happy hour with a handcrafted cocktail. The heated outdoor patio welcomes good dogowners and their furry friends. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, (831) 6629799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www.burgeraptos.com

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CAFE RIO Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

CILANTROS Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood. 1934 Main St., Watsonville, (831) 761-2161, www.elpalomarcilantros.com

FLATS BISTRO Coffee, pastries and wood-fired pizzas. 113 Esplanade, Rio Del MarBeach, Aptos, (831) 661-5763, www.flatsbistro.com

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE BEACH RESORT Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-7120, www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

MANUEL'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos, (831) 688-4848, www.manuelsrestaurant.com

PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive tequila selection. Happy Hour, and dinner specials. 21 Seascape Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9000,www. palapasrestaurant.com

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE Two full bars, rotating taps, delicious pub fare, patio seating and thirstquenching cocktails. 8017 Soquel Drive, (831) 688-4300, theparishpublick.com

SEVERINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients. 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 6888987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

ZAMEEN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE Flavorful meals in a casual dining setting. 7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-4465, www.zameencuisine.com


Santa Cruz

Favorite Breakfast Burrito

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HAPPY HOUR

Mon - Fri Noon - 6pm

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Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm $1 OFF most drinks

– 413 SEABRIGHT AVE. 10am – 2am Daily • 21+

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– 712 OCEAN STREET

6am - 2am daily • 21+


PHOTO: MEREDITH KEET

SUSTAINABLE SWAPS

The Right Razor The lowdown on switching from plastic to metal razors | By ERICA CIRINO

L

ast year, 163 million Americans shaved with disposable plastic razors and blades, according to a recent Statista report. That adds up to billions of razors and blades used. And because there are no large-scale recycling programs for these shaving utensils, most pile up in landfills, and perhaps even end up in the oceans. A great alternative is the safety razor, like the Albatross Safety Razor by Albatross Designs ($19.99) for sale at The Zero Shop in Capitola Village. Santa Cruz Waves interviewed several experts on personal health and beauty to learn how to say goodbye to your wasteful plastic razor and hello to a more sustainable shave. What is a safety razor? If you’ve ever seen someone use a safety razor, it was probably your grandfather, says Meredith Keet, founder of The Zero Shop. “They were widely used many, many years ago and are only in the past few years making a resurgence,” she adds. Like a disposable razor, safety razors have a guard over the blade. Yet, “safety

razors are different than plastic single-use razors because you manually change the metal razor blade and not the razor itself,” says Dana Cutolo, founder of natural skincare company Ny-Ala. “That makes a safety razor forever reusable.” How do you use a safety razor? CEO and founder of Albatross Designs Andrew LaCenere recommends watching “safety razors” YouTube videos to learn. “Generally, I recommend using short strokes in the beginning, having a well lubricated shaving area, and simply concentrating on holding the razor at the correct angle—30 degrees,” he says. “When shaving over uneven topography, like your shins or jaw line, you should pull your skin to shave over a flatter surface.” When it comes to shaving aids, LaCenere says, “The key here is good lubrication so the blade can slide easily across your skin.” To stay green, he recommends using a natural, package-free bar soap. “Shaving cans and creams that come shipped with their water already mixed need more energy emissions to ship around” than bar soaps, he explains.

SHAVING TIPS: • Store your safety razor and blades in a dry place. Standing your safety razor in a jar of dry rice can wick moisture away, preventing rust, says LaCenere. • Change your blade after about seven shaves. • For maximum sustainability, upcycle your used blades: Albatross Designs will reuse them as part of their take-back program. • If you’ve held on to your plastic disposable razors, you can send them to TerraCycle and Preserve for upcycling. • As an alternative to shaving altogether, check out other waste-free hair-removal options like sugaring or laser hair removal.

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PHOTO: ADAM STONE 1 0 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SPORTS ACHIEVEMENT COMPANY

FEATURE

EMMA

S TONE

THE METEORIC RISE OF A CALIFORNIA SURFING PRODIGY By ALOE DRISCOLL

T

he treacherous waves of Ocean Beach aren’t exactly a mecca for learning to surf, but that’s where 17-year old Emma Stone cut her teeth. The 2018 Scholastic Surf

Series (SSS) State Championship hails from San Francisco’s Outer Sunset, and has been surfing the notorious beach break with her father since grade school. When it comes to her favorite surf spots, “definitely Ocean Beach is No. 1,” she says. “No. 2 is probably Sunset.”

Growing up, Stone and her parents spent a week or two in Hawaii every summer. Her earliest surfing memory is of her dad pushing her into a wave at Pine Trees on Kauai. “I pearled right into the sand,” she remembers. However, even as a 7-year-old, she enjoyed the resultant pounding. “I wanted to do it again, and again, and again. I thought it was really fun, going over the falls.” In the following years, Stone’s passion and resilience

propelled her into the turbulent surf at Ocean Beach. At age 11, she began competing on the Santa Cruz Scholastic Surf League (SCSSL) representing Half Moon Bay. Proving to be an apt competitor, she added on the National Scholastic Surfing Association (NSSA), SSS, USA Surfing Prime, and the World Surf League (WSL) Junior Tour, racking up numerous first-place finishes. In 2018, she won the SSS California State Championship at Oceanside. And she completed the

2018-2019 season with three major wins: National Scholastic Surfing Association (NSSA) Women’s Open Division Champion, SCSSL Women’s Shortboard Champion, and SCSSL Longboard Champion. Eric Arakawa designs most of her boards, and Stone takes a handson role developing shapes with him in his factory on the North Shore of Oahu. Though she can wield a shortboard or a longboard, Stone’s wave-slaying weapon of choice is a gun. “I really like big waves,” she admits. Bianca Valenti and Emi Erickson, both WSL Women’s Big Wave Tour contestants, are two of her most important mentors. “I look up to them,” she says. Stone is among the first generation of surfers to have such role models. The inaugural WSL Women’s Big Wave Tour event took place in 2016, and this year is the first contest season in which the WSL will offer equal prize money for men and women. “Right at the age that I was old enough to understand it, they started talking about equal pay,” says

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“EMMA'S

SURFING IS PROGRESSING AT THE SPEED OF A ROCKET GOING TO SPACE.”

Stone. She’s currently aiming for the WSL Championship Tour (CT), and though she’s quick to clarify that it wouldn’t be for big-wave surfing, she has plenty of time to change her mind. According to Valenti, “Emma’s surfing is progressing at the speed of a rocket going to space.” She’s had her eye on the young prodigy for a few years now, and characterizes Stone’s style as out-of-thisworld high performance. “I feel honored and delighted that the teens are appreciative of the hard work we are putting in to create waves of opportunity and equity in surfing,” says Valenti. “I hope Emma and the other up-and-comers follow suit and use their talent in surfing as a platform to create positive change.” Stone’s platform is growing, with more than 10,000 followers on Instagram (@ emmastone.415). Her joyful, energetic vibe is a reflection of her chief objective in life: “Have the most fun I can possibly have. That’s definitely one of my goals just overall, in surfing and outside of surfing.”

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PHOTO: TYLER FOX

—BIANCA VALENTI


SPORTS ACHIEVEMENT

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 07


SantaCruzAloha.com

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FIELD NOTES

A Pair of Shorts is Judging Me By KYLE THIERMANN

M

y favorite pair of shorts is missing the top button. If I use a belt I can keep the shorts from falling down to my knees, but the system is far from ideal. Replacement buttons are sewn to the inside of the shorts, and every time I lock eyes with the buttons, they mock me, and I am forced to look away. The buttons know that I never learned to sew and I can feel their disappointment. They are replacement players, and now that the first string is down, their coach is too incompetent to put them in the game. If the busted shorts belonged to my father, they would have been sewn in minutes. Alas, they are stuck with me, a millennial who would rather wear a pair of malfunctioning shorts for years than learn how to sew. My father tried to teach me the old ways.

He has repeatedly walked me through the process of fixing a lawn mower. (Because if you can fix a lawn mower, you can fix anything, or so he tells me.) But, like that dude from the movie Memento, I forget the steps the moment we finish the job. “Automate and outsource!” If there were a slogan for my generation that might be it. The mindset has allowed us to save time, but it doesn’t go without corrosive side effects, like the feeling of total overwhelm every time the shower head needs replacing. Household items of all shapes and sizes expected more from my generation. Leaky sinks wait for years before a plumber is called, and all they needed was five minutes with an Allen wrench. Every day, bike chains are tossed into the dumpster, when all they needed was a little love from WD-40.

Industry propels the throwaway mindset through planned obsolescence. Computer chargers, vacuum cleaners, and even refrigerators all seem to have shorter lifespans than their predecessors. Of course this has environmental impacts, but it also has a pernicious effect on our self-esteem. Take it from me: I can’t even look a pair of shorts in the eye, let alone another adult. Whenever I have taken the time to fix something with my hands, though, I felt a sense of calmness that is difficult to achieve behind a computer screen. Perhaps we shouldn’t only adopt a “fix it” culture for Mother Earth, but also for own well-being. And with that self-reverential idea now put to paper, I should probably shut up and mend my shorts.

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MAKING

WAVES Photos: Sean McLean

POWER OF FLOWER The First Annual Power Of Flower Music and Cannabis Festival, hosted by Santa Cruz Naturals, took place under sunny skies last August at the Santa Cruz Fairgrounds. The event was the first of its kind, with attendees being able to consume and smoke cannabis on site. Live music, entertainment and dozens of vendors made the event something truly special. For more info about the event visit powerofflower.org.

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MAKING WAVES

V I E W MORE GAL L E RIE S @

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A silhouette slide with Bianca Dootson.

PHOTO: BRYAN GARRISON / @WETFEETPHOTO 112 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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Licenses: C10-0000172-LIC • C10-0000234-LIC

Thank you for your support and placing your trust in us for the past 5 years. Valid ID Required | All 21+ Welcome | 18+ Medical

3600 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz 8am – 10pm Daily

533 Ocean Street, Santa Cruz 8am – 9pm Daily SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 11 5


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Sereno Group 1% For Good Charitable Foundation in partnership with Community Foundation Santa Cruz County

Sereno Group is proud to suppor t local charitable community organizations. Over $2.6 million donated since 2006. WE ARE REAL ESTATE THAT GIVES BACK. 11 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

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SANTA CRUZ WAVES 6.4 October / November 2019  

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