Page 1

VOL 7.3

OCT/NOV 2020


533 Ocean Street 3600 Soquel Avenue Santa Cruz SantaAvenue Cruz 533 Ocean Street 3600 Soquel 8amCruz – 9pm Daily 8am – 10pm Daily Santa Santa Cruz 8am – 9pm Daily 8am – 10pm Daily View our full menu and place your Express Lane order at

kindpeoples.com View our full menu and place your Express Lane order at C10-0000172-LIC • C10-0000234-LIC 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

0-0000172-LIC • C10-0000234-LIC

kindpeoples.com


SW

EL LIE S 201

7

DALE FRIDAY Favorite Realtor

The Crew

SW

EL LIE S 201

8

DALE FRIDAY Favorite Realtor

DALE FRIDAY 831.440.7294 SW

SHEVAWN TORR 831.359.7119 BRENDA FRIDAY 831.440.7076

DALE FRIDAY Best Real Estate Agency Best Real Estate Team

EL LIE S 201

7

FRIDAY REALTY Favorite Real Estate Co.

F R I DAY R E A LT Y.C O M 1040 41ST AVE, SANTA CRUZ

SW

EL LIE S 202

0

BRENDA FRIDAY Favorite Realtor

FRIDAY REALTY Best Real Estate Team BRE-01900882

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3


THANK YOU TO OUR FIRST RESPONDERS TO SHOW OUR GRATITUDE WE WANT TO SHARE SOME EXCITING NEW PACKAGES THIS FALL

RESERVATIONS 877-262-7848 COSTANOA.COM 2001 ROSSI RD. AT HWY 1 (30 MIN. NORTH OF SANTA CRUZ)

4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

WE ARE ETERNALLY GRATEFUL FOR OUR CORNER OF THE COAST AND THE AMAZING COMMUNITY THAT SUPPORTS US FIRST RESPONDER PACKAGE: In thanks to those workers who risk their own safety for the safety of others. Available Sunday-Thursday, must show First Responder ID at check in. Discounted rate for 1 night in any accommodation which includes: $50 dining credit at Cascade Restaurant Bottle of House Wine or Craft Beer at check in Ice cream for 2 at Cascade Restaurant Lodge starting at $218 Bungalows starting at $137.50 GIVE FOR GRATITUDE PACKAGE: To participate mention “Give for Gratitude” and 10% of your stay will be donated to local wildfire relief funds. OUT IN THE AIR PACKAGE: It is time for some much needed fresh air! Discounted rate for 2 nights in Pine Village, Outer Pine or Cypress Bungalow which includes: $50 dining credit at Cascade Restaurant $30 credit towards book purchase in the General Store Diamond Kite Outer Pine $251 Pine Village $299 Cypress Village $313 All packages based on availability. Packages valid through November 30th, 2020. Proof of age required for alcohol consumption. Packages not valid with any other special or offer. Not valid for groups or holidays. Pricing does not include tax and fees. Certain restrictions apply.


Rates as low as

2.24 %

APR*

Need More Room? Enjoy your new vehicle with no payments for 90 days.**

Visit any branch or apply online at www.bayfed.com.

831.479.6000 • www.bayfed.com • 888.4BAYFED *Annual Percentage Rate (APR). Based on approval of credit with credit score (Experian FICO V9 Auto Score) of 730+, up to a 51 month term on the rate and term, for the refinance of a 2015 or newer vehicle. Rate example includes a .25% reduction for member loyalty of having a mortgage or checking account open prior to 4/1/2020 and a .25% reduction for enrollment in automatic payments. Payment per $1,000 for a 51 month term is $20.58 based on 2.24% APR. Minimum loan amount is $5,000. Maximum loan amount is 110% of Kelley Blue Book Adjusted Retail Value plus GAP. Your actual APR may vary based on your credit history along with the age and mileage of vehicle financed. ** First payment will be deferred for 90 days. Based on approval of credit with credit score (Experian FICO V9 Auto Score) of 640+. Minimum loan amount to qualify for the 90 day payment deferral is $10,000. Interest will continue to accrue from date of loan disbursement and becomes due once payments begin. All loans are subject to credit approval and income verification per Bay Federal Credit Union lending requirements and funded by December 31, 2020. Offer available on the purchase or refinance from another Financial Institution of a 2010 or newer vehicle. Credit Union membership required. Refinances of current Bay Federal loans are not eligible for this offer. Terms subject to change without notice and offer may not be combined with any other offer. Other restrictions may apply. For complete information, visit www.bayfed.com, visit any Bay Federal Credit Union branch, or call us at 1.888.4BAYFED.

Federally Insured by NCUA. Equal Housing Lender. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5


SURFING SANTA CRUZ SINCE 1969

Come by and say hi!

6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


TOMMY BAHAMA JOHNNIE-O ROBERT BARAKETT ROBERT GRAHAM OLUKAI

34 HERITAGE TRASK BUGATCHI COLE HAAN LINKSOUL

7538 SOQUEL DR • APTOS, CA 95003 PH : 831.688.2105 3744 THE BARNYARD, CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA • CARMEL, CA 93923 PH : 831.620.0167 W W W. PAT R I C K J A M E S . C O M • 8 8 8 . 8 5 5 . 9 2 9 2 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 7


"Pete Pearson is a friendly, personable guy with a great sense of humor. But he is a serious Realtor. He is willing to go the extra (many) miles to make sure your transaction goes smoothly whether buying or selling (he helped us with both). He pays close attention to the details and never makes you feel you are being railroaded into any decisions. He sticks close to be sure all the ducks line upright to the point when you sign on the dotted line(s). And he is also very good at making all the 'language' understandable to mere mortals. Thanks, Pete!"

PETE PEARSON

"THE REAL ESTATE GUY"

- Kim

DRE #00936463 | 831.818.1399

8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


Thank you for supporting renewable energy in Santa Cruz

AWARDED 2016 | 2017 | 2018 2019 | 2020

Learn more about our renewableenergy microgrid that fully powers our new Westside HQ

16

SE

RVICE

Microgrids solar + storage • Over 1,000 homes • NHS at Seabright Cannery • Plantronics • New Bohemian Brewery • University Park at The Wrigley Building • Santa Cruz High • Soquel High • Harbor High • Westlake Elementary • And more...

Imagine what we can do for you. sandbarsolar.com • (831) 469-8888 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9


Crisp, cold mornings. Powerful, long interval swells. Ahh, yes—fall is the season for the surfer. Xica Hansen tucks in somewhere on the Westside. PHOTO: @CHACHFILES

1 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 11


Jim Boothol Swim Scho

WE MISS SEEING YOU!

I WOULDN’T BE THE SURFER I AM TODAY WITHOUT THE HELP OF JIM’S SWIM SCHOOL!

SW

EL LIE S 202

0

“THIS IS THE WAY TO START KIDS IN THE WATER” —Mike Bottom U.S. Olympic Team, World Record Holder

—Tyler Fox

R VOTING US THANK YOU FO

FAVORITE L! SWIM SCHOO CALL NOW! 722-3500 JimBoothSwimSchool.com

We are with you and for you in Community! Honored SWELLIES recipient for Best Skincare and runner up Day Spa

Come visit us at: The Yoso Anex a wellnes shop located downtown Santa Cruz for all your personal and holiday gift needs.

True Care from Skin To Soul @yosowellness . 831-600-8053 www.yosowellness.com

74o Front St. Suite 110 Santa Cruz, Ca 95060 12 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SW

EL LIE S 202

0

FAVORITE HOME DECOR

beautifully curated lifestyle boutique SW

EL LIE S 202

0

FAVORITE GARDEN SHOP & ONLINE STORE

HOME GOODS I GIFTS I INDOOR P L A N T S D O W N T O W N S A N TA C R U Z

701A FRONT ST. SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060 I 8 3 1 . 5 1 5 . 7 7 1 0 I O P E N E V E RY D AY 1 1 - 6

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13


t-shirT | hoodies | & moRe SantaCRuzaloHA.Com 14 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

Team Rider: Waggy | Photo: Nelly

Advertise a gift, gift card, or service to our local community.

Prices include 2 social media posts and stories on both Facebook and Instagram Early Bird Discount, if you reserve by October 30. Limited space available - Deadline: November 4 Requirements 1. Image of product, must be 300dpi or larger 2. 50 words or less to describe product 3. Address of where to purchase product 4. Company website

Contact Steff@santacruzwaves.com to reserve your spot today

1502 PACIFIC AVENUE | DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ 831.458.9283 | PACWAVE.COM

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5


Sometimes the best holiday gifts are the memories we capture! We offer a wide selection of products to cover all of your Holiday needs, including Press Printed Cards, Traditional Greetings on Professional Photo Papers, Envelope Imprinting, Ornaments, and more. If you need help designing your Christmas gifts, please come to our local stores and ask for help!

25% Off Your First Order | bayphotolocal.com

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU!

@bayphotolocal 1 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Eastside Store 715 Soquel Ave. (831) 425-1100

Park Ave Store 2959 Park Ave. (831) 475-6090


BEST of the WEB I PHOTOS

5 VIDEOS

R NEWS

Hang in there Santa Cruz, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. Beautiful shot at Natural Bridges. Photo: @ricko_ photos ♥ 2,124 likes

It’s a cool 68 degrees by the sea during an unusually hot season farther inland. ♥ 1,600 likes

Bioluminescence waves with sweeping rain and a single lightning bolt—now that’s a combo. Photo: @johnnychien.photo ♥ 6,298 likes

With the local beaches closed this holiday weekend, the fresh water options are looking really nice. Photo: @wetfeetphoto ♥ 2,083 likes

@Jessecolombo locks into a beauty switch footed. If you look closely, you’ll see his leash on his front ankle. Photo: @mynamescameron ♥ 1,006 likes

Who was up for the lightning show last night? Photo: @wetfeetphoto ♥ 5,975 likes

Holy smokes, who else saw tonight’s sunset? Absolute stunner. Photo: @zorro_ del_mar ♥ 2,078 likes

Local band The Mermen perform on the Off the Lip Radio Show. ♥ 882 likes

Ash washed up at Manresa State Beach is yet another reminder of how destructive and widespread these fires are. Photo: @mollygonewild ♥ 3,766 likes

Milky Way over Natural Bridges the day before the lightning storms. @shea_ohlott_photography ♥ 2,234 likes

A juvenile great white shark prowls the warm shallows off New Brighton State Beach. Photo: @ernest.smith.89 ♥ 1,336 likes

BEST O F THE WEB

Fire engulfs the hillside above Waddell Creek along the coastal section of the CZU Lightning Complex fire. Photo: @teddyhmiller ♥ 16,527 likes

VISIT US:

santacruzwaves.com/videos @santacruzwaves santacruzwaves.com/local-loop

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 17


Nursery Gift Shop & Garden Art SW

EL LIE S 202

0

FAVORITE GARDEN SHOP

Locally owned since 1986

SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

PUBLISHER TYLER FOX

EDITOR ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PHOTO EDITOR JAIME BODDORFF

PHOTOGRAPHY

SCW PHOTOGRAPHERS JAIME BODDORFF ALISON GAMEL BRYAN GARRISON JEFF "KOOKSON" GIDEON TYLER FOX DAVE "NELLY" NELSON

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS IAN ABERNATHY JOHNNY CHIEN RYAN "CHACHI" CRAIG MICHAEL DANIEL MITCHELL FERRIS JOEL HERSCH MAT T HOFMAN TEDDY MILLER SHEA OHLOT T RICK OLIVER ERNEST SMITH JUSTIN SMITH SHMUEL THALER

EDITORIAL

WRITERS DAVE DE GIVE ALOE DRISCOLL TYLER FOX JOEL HERSCH NEAL KEARNEY ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PROOFREADER JOSIE COWDEN

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOSH BECKER

DESIGNER JULIE ROVEGNO

PRESIDENT STEPHANIE LUTZ

CFO SARAH CRAFT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES K ATE K AUFFMAN SADIE WIT TKINS

OFFICE MANAGER JENNIFER POLI

SALES & OPERATIONS

DISTRIBUTION MICK FREEMAN FOUNDER / CEO TYLER FOX

On the Cover: Austin Smith-Ford hasn't let the pandemic slow him down. Instead, he's been on a barrel-hunting rampage down in Mexico and loving every minute of it. Photo: Justin Smith

The content of Santa Cruz Waves magazine is Copyright © 2020 by Santa Cruz Waves, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquiries, please contact steff@ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

2218 Mission St, Westside Santa Cruz (831) 429-8424 | f: thegardenco 1 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

F I N D US O N L I N E

www.SantaCruzWaves.com @SANTACRUZWAVES


OSS Team Captain: Darryl “Flea” Virostko Photo: David Nelson “Nelly”

DOWNTOWN 24-HOUR SURF REPORT: 831-475-BARL(2275)

N I N E P O NOW ! E G A L L I V APTOS

110 COOPER ST. 831.469.4377

CAPITOLA

1115 41ST AVE. 831.475.4151 SURFBOARD, WETSUIT AND BODYBOARD RENTALS

BOARDWALK 400 BEACH ST. 831.459.9230

OUTLET

1149 41ST AVE. 831-479-5613 NEW & USED WETSUITS & SURFBOARDS

APTOS VILLAGE

105A POST OFFICE DR. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 9 831.708.2220


DOWBROOK A H RESTAURANT

S

CA

1947

PIT O

L A-B Y-T H E - S

EA

NOW RE-OPEN! DAILY DINING Indoor & Patios –– • ROCK ROOM •

Open Noon - 4pm Daily

• DINNER SEATING • Monday - Friday from 4pm Saturday - Sunday from 2pm

• RESERVATIONS ONLINE • shadowbrook-capitola.com OR CALL 831.475.1511

2 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

N! E P O e r a All Patios

SW

FAVORITE BURGER

2 EL LIE S 20

ys a S y t t Be 0

Since

S.COM R E G R U B BETTY t a e n i l n Order o

AptRods• 612.6668 ulch

G 415 Trout

EasAtves•i4d75e.5901

1000 41st

MidhttAovew• 4n23.8190 rig

505 Seab

wn o t n w o D Inn t a E s ’ y t Bet


LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

This was the eerie scene at Blacks Beach shortly after the CZU Lightning Complex fire erupted in the Santa Cruz Mountains, sending huge plumes of black smoke into the atmosphere.

APOCALYPSE NOW By TYLER FOX

ou’ve heard the warning before: If humans don’t clean up our act and stop spewing millions of tons of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere, we will set in motion a ticking time bomb that will ultimately be the demise of our civilization. But before I lead you down that road of doom, I think we could all use a refresher on what greenhouse gases are, exactly, and how they play an important role in our existence. Greenhouse gases get their name from, well, a greenhouse. Greenhouses allow sunlight in and then trap the heat inside, and that’s exactly how greenhouse gases work. They allow sunlight to pass through the atmosphere, which then gets trapped, causing our Earth to warm—hence the term “global warming.” The majority of greenhouse gases produced on Earth come from burning fossil fuels, deforestation and methane (like cow burps and farts). Greenhouse gases can be a good thing: without them, our planet would be too cold and life as we know it would not exist. However, there can be too much of a good thing and scientists from Switzerland to Sri Lanka are soiling themselves after witnessing our current atmospheric predictions.

Y

Thankfully for us Santa Cruzans, we don’t live on some low-lying island in the Maldives, which the World Bank predicted will be underwater by the year 2100 due to sea level rise. That’s not to say we are immune to the effects of global warming. These past couple of months, almost all of the West Coast of the United States was ablaze. These fires destroyed thousands of homes and fried forests. People, plants and animals lost their lives, and it’ll end up costing us billions in damages. Year after year, things get dryer and, year after year, these fires intensify. People can read the warnings or hear it on PBS, but sometimes it takes ash raining from the sky or an apocalyptic sunset to realize the severity of a warming planet. On a positive note, the love, kindness and generosity that emerged from our community was remarkable and inspiring. My sincere hope is that we will extend that same love and kindness to our Mother Earth, because what we do to her we inevitably do to ourselves. If we want an Earth that is habitable for our children and grandchildren, we must take action and focus on living a more sustainable lifestyle. Not tomorrow, not in a month. We must do this now.

5 ACTIONS Below are five ways you can make a difference in your daily life right now.

VOTE: From banning oil drilling or singleuse plastics to incentivising clean-energy production, our politicians have the power to make these changes.

THINK BEFORE YOU BUY: Corporations will continue to produce products if we continue to buy them. If we all stopped buying beverages in plastic bottles, for instance, these corporations will be forced to change their ways.

LESS IS MORE: Our society thrives off of “new” things. There is already an abundance of awesome reclaimed or repurposed products out there that can be just as special as something new.

BUY LOCAL: When you’re buying food or products from a big-box store, it is usually wrapped in plastic and shipped in some gas-guzzling container ship, semi or jet. When you buy local, you get healthier food and better quality products, and you’re directly supporting local workers. DON’T BE LAZY: Convenience is our nemesis. Walk or bike whenever possible and bring your reusable bags and containers with you everywhere.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 1


SW

EL LIE S

0 2 20

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US FAVORITE GENERAL CONTRACTOR!!! 9047 Soquel Dr. Aptos, CA 95003 | 831.684.2117 | www.testorffconstruction.com 2 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

CA LICENSE # 698917


INSIDE

INSIDE

VOLUME 7.3 - OCT/NOV 2020

60

42

34 FIRST LOOK

17 Best of the Web 21 Letter from the Founder 25 Word on the Street 26 Causes: Rising Hunger 30 Grom: Tyler Chin

DROP IN

34 In Depth: Localism's Racism 42 Behind the Lens: Documenting the Fires 60 Art: The Black Lives Matter Mural

30 FOOD & DRINK

65 Local Eats: Common Roots Farm 70 Dining Guide

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 3


Do you have an outstanding beach property that you want to use personally, while collecting vacation rental income?

My family and I take pride in owning a beach home in beautiful Pleasure Point (Santa Cruz, Ca.) which means it can be very scary to think about renting our property to just anyone, but Beachnest has not only eliminated our stress, they have become a true extension of our family. We rest easy knowing that each and every potential tenant has been through their screening process, and being local we also know that whether a simple maintenance or emergency issue arise, I know we can count on Beachnest to handle the situation. Being a business owner with very little time to tend to our property, yet maximizing our income, communication is also very important to me in any relationship and I could not be happier in choosing both Liz and John Pickart to manage all aspects of our rental property. —R. and S. ROSITANO

Beachnest Vacation Rentals (831) 722-0888 • beachnest.com

Complimentary evaluation and proposal of our full service and high-end management services.  Contact Liz and John Pickart for more information. 2 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Relax•Restore•Unwind


Q:

“What gives you hope?”

WORD ON THE STREET

ASKED AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALISON GAMEL

Greg Cotten, founder of Oceanexplorer.org: “What gives me hope for the future is witnessing how everyone has slowed down. People are not in such a rush. We realized what is happening is out of our control, and asked, ‘What can I do to help?’ Also people seem to have more compassion toward one another.”

Jeff Calhoon, UC Santa Cruz AV tech: “The primary thing that makes me hopeful is not being so isolated from friends and family. The conditions may continue to deteriorate, but I look forward to spending time with my friends and family that mean so much to me.”

Melissa Mooney, Crow’s Nest gift shop salesperson: “I’m hopeful that in 2021 people will be more aware of the relationships they have with one another, the things they can and cannot do, such as wearing masks and following COVID guidelines. And I’m hopeful people now see the impact that words have on one another.”

Amber Kramer, owner of Tipsy Gypsy: “I’m hopeful that my business will thrive in a community that has shown so much love, so much support throughout this last year. The amount of people who have reached out to me proved what a tight community we have, and I’m beyond grateful.”

Grace Lakovich, Lulu Carpenter’s barista: “Whatever crisis we have faced as a community, we pull together to help wherever help is needed. I have also noticed people become more generous with their time and with whatever financial problems people are going through. This makes me hopeful for 2021."

Cassie Rozinski, Coffeetopia barista: “2020 has made me aware of who my true friends are: they called and offered support when I needed them most. That love makes me hopeful for the following year."

Brian Snyder, Coffeetopia barista: “What I do to stay hopeful is watch cute and funny animal videos just to make me happy. Everything comes in cycles. One day there won’t be this level of animosity in the world. People are nice, but I feel we can all do so much more.”

Veronica Austin, server at Margaritaville: “I look forward to the opening of businesses that have been shut down due to COVID.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 5


2 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


HUNGER CRISIS

CAUSES

SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK WORKS TO EASE FOOD INSECURITY AMIDST UNPRECEDENTED RATES OF LOCAL NEED By DAVE DE GIVE

W

hen the coronavirus crisis hit in the spring, the Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Cruz County was faced with an unprecedented increase in the demand for food. Lost jobs and livelihoods due to the pandemic have nearly doubled the number of people requesting food. “As soon as shelter-in-place happened, we spiked,” says Suzanne Willis, Second Harvest’s chief development officer. “Instead of serving 55,000 people a month we were serving close to a hundred thousand people each month.” Prior to the COVID outbreak, the agency distributed food through over a hundred nonprofit partners and also via the organization’s own outreach and food education programs. And while those channels still exist, 2020 presented a new challenge. With more Santa Cruz residents than ever before needing food, and with the need for social distancing, the agency decided to open drive-through sites to distribute food more efficiently and safely. The Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, which had closed due to the pandemic, offered the use of a parking lot across from its shuttered Big Dipper Roller Coaster, and the Santa Cruz County Fairgrounds were secured as a second distribution site. Since spring, Second Harvest has conducted drive-up community food distributions each Friday, alternating weekly between the two locations. Roughly 100 staff members and volunteers, including members of California’s National Guard, work throughout the week to package groceries and take part in the Friday distributions.

In addition to revamping its operations, Second Harvest has also worked to eliminate any unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles for those needing assistance. “That’s always been our stance on food,” says Willis. “We’re not asking any kind of qualifying questions on food. We do ask people to self-certify that they need food, but if you show up to a distribution, you’re self-certifying that you need food. Most people don’t want to spend the time or deal with the kind of perceived stigma of showing up in a food line, but the pandemic has really changed things around significantly.” People who never imagined they would need help to feed their families are now seeking out services. “You have so many people who are working in small businesses and I think this is where we’re seeing the real growth in people needing services,” says Willis, noting how many small businesses have closed. “We’ve been seeing this trend more and more, but now it’s even more pronounced. People who felt they were solidly middleclass are suddenly not.” Willis says that Second Harvest saw a slight drop in demand for food in July, which she attributes to people getting government stimulus checks or finally receiving delayed unemployment benefits. But with federal unemployment benefits scaled back at the end of July, the dip was short-lived and Second Harvest was soon serving approximately 21,000 clients per week. “The food needs in our community have remained stable, but high throughout the pandemic and the fires,” says Willis.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 7


When shelter-in-place took effect, Second Harvest went from serving 55,000 people a month to nearly 100,000. In August, the CZU Lightning Complex fire brought with it yet another set of food challenges, this time for fire evacuees who needed grab-and-go meals. Second Harvest pivoted and began working with the Emergency Operations Center sending, for example, more durable products like apples and pears to evacuation centers and sourcing truckloads of foods like tuna and chicken salads that are nourishing but do not need to be cooked or prepared. Second Harvest also helps people apply for the State of California’s CalFresh program, which provides qualified applicants with a monthly stipend to purchase food in grocery stores and farmers markets using convenient debit cards. “CalFresh is kind of an amazing service for any community,” says Willis, “because it has an economic multiplier effect. So for every dollar that comes in on somebody’s EBT card, that dollar is actually creating jobs and creating income and taxes in our community.”

2 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Several local farmers markets provide market match benefits for CalFresh clients—enabling them to buy twice the fresh produce for the same price. Shopping at farmers markets is also a great way to support local farmers and ranchers, to buy fresh and organic food, and to help the environment. “Farmers markets are traditionally sources of local, direct-to-consumer foods,” says Willis, who points out that food often takes longer to get to grocery stores that use centralized distribution centers. “With the farmers market, the farm harvests it, puts it on a truck, and it goes right to the market. You cut out that distribution middleman.” Farmworkers have experienced a dramatic loss of work and income during the pandemic, resulting in the very people tasked with harvesting our food supply experiencing food insecurities of their own. Nearly half of the state’s 800,000 farmworkers reported decreased work due to the pandemic, according to the COVID-19 Farmworker Study released in July by the California Institute of Rural Studies. Farmworkers


CAUSES

“People who felt they were solidly middle-class are suddenly not.” —Suzanne Willis, Second Harvest chief development officer

and immigrant workers are often ineligible for government safety net programs or are fearful of seeking assistance, even with organizations like Second Harvest that don’t check on immigration status. “Santa Cruz has a big agricultural community as well as a hospitality community,” says Willis, adding that immigrant communities also suffer job losses when venues such as the boardwalk shut down. “And both of those work forces have been hit terribly hard by COVID.” Willis is quick to point out that it’s not only important for people to have access to food, but also to healthy food. When food funds are scarce, people will buy whichever groceries they can afford and it’s often not the healthiest choice, which can lead to long-term health problems. “We’ve known for a long time that chronic disease really is tied into food insecurity,” says Willis. “What hunger looks like in the United States is not those terrible images of starving babies in Africa—that’s famine. That’s war and devastation. What hunger and malnutrition look like in the United States is an obese 7 year old. Because those kids are not eating fresh

produce, they’re eating prepackaged, salt-laden products from the middle of the grocery store that are less expensive.” After the 2009 recession, Second Harvest’s raised numbers for both food provided and individuals served never went back down, according to Willis. With that history as a guide, she expects the economic recovery from the pandemic to last a minimum of two years. And, as a result, she predicts that Second Harvest's higher operational numbers (compared to pre-pandemic food assistance levels) will likely persist rather than go back down. “We’re anticipating,” says Willis, “that moving forward ... our operational numbers will consistently be minimally 40 percent more people and food served than pre-COVID numbers.” To learn more about community food distributions or to donate to Second Harvest, visit thefoodbank.org. Visit marketmatch. org to find farmers markets with market match for CalFresh. For a list of fire-related assistance and services visit cfscc.org/ updates/fire-resources.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 9


3 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


GROM PROFILE

COMPANY FEATURE

TYLER

CHIN By NEAL KEARNEY

PHOTO: TYLER FOX

G

etting down on yourself after a bad performance. Hassling your best friend to catch the winning wave. Losing the first heat. Seventeen-year-old Tyler Chin knows the perils of taking surfing too seriously, yet he still enjoys putting on the jersey. The Santa Cruz High School junior realizes that he inhabits a world that is saturated with unbelievable surfers, especially here in Santa Cruz. Despite placing first in the Santa Cruz Scholastic Surf League and second in the NSSA Northwest Explorer Men’s divisions last season, Chin does not see performance as more important than experience. “I wouldn’t consider myself a contest surfer, although I do enjoy it—especially when there’s good surf,” says the Steamer Lane local. “These days, there are so many amazing surfers all over the world, so it’s just going to get tougher and tougher to stand out.” But Chin’s real competition is with himself. “My own goals are simple: to push myself to be the best surfer I can personally become, while still having fun doing it,” he says. Nevertheless, surfers and brand representatives have noted just how polished and powerful Chin’s act has become over the past few years. He’s earned respect from his peers and free gear and support from his sponsors. As a surf-fever-afflicted high school student living in a bona fide surf mecca, it is impressive to see Chin’s dedicated effort to excel at schoolwork as well in surfing. “It’s definitely a challenge balancing both surf and academics. I like to wake up early and make the most of my day, whether it is a quick session before school or finishing up last night’s homework,” he says with a laugh. This dedication to earning high scores both on his surfboard and on exams shows Chin’s grit—a mature approach that will serve him well, whatever direction he chooses for his life.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 1


SANTA CRUZ

APTOS

831.466.3444 420 Water Street, Santa Cruz

831.688.7011 7765 Soquel Drive, Aptos

DIGGARDENS.COM 3 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


GROM PROFILE

PHOTO: JEFF "KOOKSON" GIDEON

IN HIS OWN WORDS Age: 17

Sponsors: Vince Broglio Surfboards, Rip Curl Santa Cruz, Dragon Alliance

If you could have a Ben and Jerry’s ice cream flavor named after you what would it be? Tyler’s Tasty Tubular Swirl, [with] caramel, coffee, Oreos, fudge and chocolate.

If you could be any sea creature what would you be, and why? A whale shark because they just cruise and explore the ocean while being harmless.

What was the last good book you read? Fahrenheit 451. I think what hooked me was reading about the dystopian society that took place in the book.

Favorite thing about Santa Cruz besides the surf: One of my favorite things … is access to nature. There are so many cool beaches, hikes and swimming holes that you can explore.

If you had a hall pass to get the wave of the day anywhere in the world, where would you choose and why? J-Bay. I’m a regular foot in Santa Cruz so I love righthand point breaks. It looks so fun to surf that wave because of the barrels and the open face.

Stance: Regular

If you could step into the shoes of any surf legend and relive their exploits, who would you choose and why? This is a hard question, but I would probably choose John John Florence. I like how he has won two world titles but still seems like a humble and respectful guy. Also, it would be mental to relive the 2012 Volcom Pipe Pro, when JJF got an insane backdoor barrel in the last 30 seconds to take the win. Surf mission: Up the coast or down? Up the coast, because it’s closer for me and I love the variety of different waves up there.

Most underrated surfer in Santa Cruz: Shaun Burns or Willie Eagleton. Do you have any nicknames? I have so many nicknames. One of the recent biggest ones is Coyote. When I was a baby I was bald, and my dad would joke around calling me Caillou. Just over a year ago, my dad called me Caillou in the line-up and someone misheard it as Coyote. From then on Coyote became another one of my nicknames. Some people just call me “Chin” because there are a couple other Tylers.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 3


3 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


IN DEPTH

THE OVERLOOKED CONNECTION BETWEEN RACISM AND LOCALISM I N S A N TA C R U Z ’ S S U R F C U LT U R E By ALOE DRISCOLL

W

hen Sterling Whitley first attempted to paddle out at Cowell Beach in the late 1950s, a group of surfers told him he had no business there. “Anybody can surf the waves. The waves are free,” replied Whitley, who is Black. “You just go out there and see what happens,” the surfers responded. Whitley decided not to find out, and gave up on surfing rather than face harassment. Though this exchange may not sound remarkable to anyone who has ever been rejected from a Santa Cruz lineup, keep in mind that it occurred in a different era: when the waves at Cowell’s were still relatively empty, before the surfing hype of the 1960s gave rise to the particular brand of localism that is rampant in surfing today. Whitley himself was a local, having moved to Santa Cruz in 1952 to work at the cannery on Seabright Avenue. He lived in a boarding house near Shopper’s Corner—the only place in town available for Black people to rent. Living anywhere else “would have been a problem,” he explains. At the time, he says people of color were relegated to places like Watsonville or the circle streets on the Westside of

H Santa Cruzan Gary Croft behind the curtain. PHOTO: MITCHELL FERRIS

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 5


BLACKED OUT

Racial covenants were written into the deeds of many new homes in Aptos, Scotts Valley and Santa Cruz, stating that the premises “shall not be rented, leased, or conveyed to, or occupied by, any person other than of the white or Caucasian race.”

Santa Cruz. The water was more accessible to non-whites than in Southern California, where Blacks sequestered themselves to a spot called Inkwell Beach instead of risking endangerment at predominantly white beaches, and across the United States, where public swimming pools were still segregated. Santa Cruz beaches were open to people of color, and according to Whitley, Black people were allowed to use the swimming pool at the boardwalk; however, they were not permitted to jump off of the diving board. Despite its liberal and progressive image, Santa Cruz, like the rest of the United States, has a history of racism. In 1922, Ku Klux Klan organizers arrived in Santa Cruz County, with Jews and Catholics as their primary targets. According to local historian Sandy Lydon, there was at least one Klavern in Watsonville, one in Santa Cruz, and several in Live Oak. Beginning in the 1920s, developers and realtors wrote racial covenants into the deeds of many new homes in Aptos, Scotts Valley and Santa Cruz, which stated that the premises “shall not be rented, leased, or conveyed to, or occupied by, any person other than of the white or Caucasian race” with the exception of  “domestic servants of a different race domiciled with an owner or tenant.” Systematic denial of access to housing, also called redlining, was enforced not just legally, but also socially, through intimidation and violence. A local example is Rev. William Brant, a Black pastor who made a down payment on a Live Oak house in 1951. Arsonists set fire to it the night before he was scheduled to move in.  Racism doesn’t end at the water’s edge. If people of color were denied access to housing in

3 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

the 1950s, it follows that they—like Whitley— would also be denied access to surfing. Still, many people in Santa Cruz (including Whitley’s daughter, Brenda) maintain that localism is targeted more toward people from out of town than it is at people of color. “The localism thing has nothing to do with race, it’s really more of a surfing culture thing,” says Richard Schmidt, a white surfer who was born in Santa Cruz in 1960. He has traveled all over the world to surf, and sees localism as directed primarily at people who don’t follow surf etiquette. “I don’t really think that surfers are racist,” he says. However, localism and racism are more closely related than people think. Redlining prevented people of color from building wealth through real estate equity, and establishing roots in coastal communities. If certain families were prevented from living here, how could they ever be from here?  Mike Pitt, another white surfer who was born and raised in Santa Cruz, thinks that localism and racism essentially share the same construct. “Both are ways to maintain superiority in a situation,” says Pitt, pointing out that each system is based on a sense of entitlement and a system of hierarchy designed to benefit a specific group of people. “When you try to explain localism and the way things work to someone who doesn’t surf, it sounds kind of messed up—because it is.”  “Especially in America, localism and racism are intertwined,” says Kayiita Johnson, a Black surfer who lives in San Jose and regularly paddles out at Pleasure Point. “The idea of preserving things in the community for the community would have been OK if from the inception of the U.S.,


Dozens of surfers participated in the July 10 paddle-out for Tamario Smith at Cowell Beach.

IN DEPTH

PHOTO: TYLER FOX

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 7


BLACKED OUT

“The idea of preserving things in the community for the community would have been OK if from the inception of the U.S., Native Americans had been treated as equals, everything was equitable and everyone had the same level of access and resources, but that’s not what happened.” —Kayiita Johnson

Native Americans had been treated as equals and everyone had the same level of access and resources, but that’s not what happened.” For this reason, he thinks Santa Cruz should be more welcoming to people from other areas. “The reality is that the ocean doesn’t belong to anybody. It’s public,” he says. His Instagram account @black.surfers has received enraged commentary from staunch defenders of localism, and also from people who claim that surfing is colorblind. “People who say they don’t see color are ignoring the policies, history and structural racism that led us to this point,” Johnson says. A resident of Santa Cruz County since 1965, Gary Croft—whom readers may know by his former surname, Cocroft—is a standout who surfs tripleoverhead waves, takes off deep and makes the drop. He has managed to accumulate the two forms of wealth that matter in Santa Cruz surfing: skill and seniority. Still, “people make assumptions about me based on my skin color,” admits Croft, who is Black. Other surfers who haven’t lived here as long as Croft sometimes take off in front of him, assuming that he won’t make a wave, or that he isn’t from here and thus doesn’t deserve a turn in the rotation. Some express shock when he mentions that he shaped the surfboard they are riding. Despite these experiences, Croft claims that “on the whole it hasn’t been a big problem.” Other surfers are quick to defend him

Kayiita Johnson has built a community of over 4,900 followers through his @black.surfers Instagram account. PHOTOS: TYLER FOX

3 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


IN DEPTH

Gary Croft and his mentor Joey Thomas in the shaping bay. PHOTO: TYLER FOX

as a local whenever there are incidents in the water. However, he acknowledges that this kind of racial profiling makes it exceptionally difficult for people of color who come from out of town to surf. “It’s easier to fit in and pass as a local if you’re white,” he says. “Surfers of color get flagged.” Chelsea Woody, who moved to Santa Cruz in 2015, wonders if she will ever be fully embraced by the community. She says that her husband, “because he’s a white male, felt comfortable paddling to the top of the peak even as a newcomer. After he does it enough times, he will be tolerated.” Woody, a Black woman, does not feel that the same is true for her. She co-founded Textured Waves, a collective that celebrates women surfers of color, to document and give visibility to a demographic that is generally unseen in the surf media.

“It’s easier to fit in and pass as a local if you’re white. Surfers of color get flagged.”—Gary Croft Growing up in Orange County, Kevin Craft, a Black surfer, learned how to navigate racially non-diverse places before moving to Pleasure Point in 1998. He thinks that this background, along with the fact that he already knew how to surf and skateboard, helped him fit in. “Once people got to know me, it was all love,” Craft remembers. Though his experience of the Santa Cruz surfing community was positive, he says the region is known among people of color for being racist. “In African American communities in the Bay Area,

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


BLACKED OUT Santa Cruz has a reputation for being intolerant to outsiders,” he says. “Numerous Black people commented on the racism they experienced here when I tell them where I’m from.” Craft relocated to Los Angeles County a few years ago, where he’s observed even more intense localism in Palos Verdes. He says he’s noticed a correlation between heightened localism and racism in California surf towns. “Places where there is more localism … also seem to be more racially intolerant,” he says. “This is definitely the case with Palos Verdes, or at least Lunada Bay.”  Though Whitley and his wife, Carrie Whitley, own their home in Santa Cruz, and enjoy close relationships with their neighbors, racism is still a part of their lives. It comes in different forms: subtle, like when they were initially denied a home buyer loan; and overt, like when Carrie was verbally accosted by a customer who refused to be served food samples by a Black person at Costco, where Carrie worked from 2005 to 2012. “You can try to create laws, but people will be resentful,” Sterling Whitley says. “People need to change what’s in their hearts and that takes time.”  Following the killing of George Floyd, numerous paddle-outs were held across Santa Cruz County to demonstrate solidarity and support for people of color. In addition, many surfing publications made a point of featuring Black surfers. Though the paddle-outs helped promote diversity and inclusion, more must be done in the surf community to help dismantle systemic racism. Understanding historical inequities and how they have shaped localism and persistent inequities today is an important step. Consistently featuring people of color in surf media (not just when it’s trendy) will provide representation and role models for an underrepresented group. Santa Cruz can expand existing programs, like local surf clubs and junior guards, to make them more accessible to people of color. Croft suggests that locals act as mentors and advocates for people of color, to help them feel more comfortable in a predominantly white community and a largely white sport. “The most important thing is learning how to be an anti-racist,” Johnson says. “When you get out of the water, what are you doing to make sure that the infrastructure is less racist?”

4 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Take Note:

Nick Gabaldón (Feb. 23, 1927–June 6, 1951) Credited by surfing experts with being California’s first documented surfer of African-American descent. Gabaldón taught himself to surf at Inkwell Beach in Santa Monica, and routinely paddled 12 miles up the coast to surf at Malibu. He died in a surfing accident while attempting to “shoot” the Malibu Pier. “To Know My Name: A Chronological History of African Americans in Santa Cruz County,” by Phil Reader, available at history.santacruzpl.org. For a good explainer on the history of redlining and equity, search for “How the GI Bill’s Promise Was Denied to a Million Black WWII Veterans,” by Erin Blakemore, on history.com. Black Surf Club Santa Cruz (@blacksurfclubsc on Instagram) recently launched as a way to tackle barriers to surfing while “learning to surf together.” (Pictured above.)


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE Advertise a gift, gift card, or service to our local community.

Prices include 2 social media posts and stories on both Facebook and Instagram Early Bird Discount, if you reserve by October 30. Limited space available - Deadline: November 4 Requirements 1. Image of product, must be 300dpi or larger 2. 50 words or less to describe product 3. Address of where to purchase product 4. Company website

Contact Steff@santacruzwaves.com to reserve your spot today

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


BEHIND THE LENS

Inside the

B L

ON

Aug. 16, a stunning summer lightning storm ignited dozens of small fires across the Santa Cruz Mountains. These spread into blazes that collectively became known as the CZU Lightning Complex fire, which burned more than 86,500 acres over the following month. Thousands were evacuated, nearly 1,500 structures—including more than 900 homes—were destroyed, and one life was lost. Waves asked a handful of local photographers to share snapshots and memories from their time spent documenting the fires. Here, we share their images in a collection that captures this horrific moment in local history. As we rebuild from the ashes, let us appreciate the generosity and kindness that emerged within our community and the heroic efforts from our firefighters, law enforcement and first responders. It will take time to heal, but we have faith that our mountain towns will rise again, stronger than ever before.

4 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


A Z E “Two days after the lightning storm, I drove up to Waddell reefs and it was a surreal experience. I looked out at an apocalyptic cityscape. Flames had engulfed the entire hillside north of the creek. Occasionally subsiding, then a new tree would ignite. It was a domino rally from hell.” —Teddy Miller

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 3


BEHIND THE LENS

 ome were calling S this one of the most beautiful lightning storms they'd ever seen. Soon after, there were some of the most destructive fires we've ever experienced. PHOTO: MATT HOFMAN

4 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 5


4 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


BEHIND THE LENS

“|A fire moves toward Felton near Felton Empire Road.” —Michael Daniel

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 47


4 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


BEHIND THE LENS

“Around 3:30 a.m., we sat glued to the windows, watching as endless cracks of lightning marched closer. Jagged bolts were now simultaneous with the claps of thunder. Moments later, my wife pointed out an orange glow on the hilltop above our house in Davenport. Flames ensued, along with a stream of fire engines, racing toward the ridgeline. The next morning, I hiked up to check out the scene. Two air tankers circled overhead, alternately bombing straight into the smoke and releasing a blanket of hot-pink fire retardant. They sure seemed to have a good jump on the situation, but clearly Mother Nature had other plans.” —Teddy Miller

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 9


“Cal Fire’s David Widaman trains his hose on flames as he and his Cal Fire crew defend a home on Twilight Lane in Bonny Doon as the CZU Lightning Complex fire ravages the Santa Cruz Mountains on Aug. 19.” —Shmuel Thaler

5 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


BEHIND THE LENS

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 1


“A glowing haze of smoke moves in behind St. Vincent De Paul Church in Davenport.” —Michael Daniel

5 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


BEHIND THE LENS

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 3


E 

“The remains of a home on Brooks Lane in Boulder Creek.” —Michael Daniel

H “When I was able

to see what was left of our house, reality hit me hard. ... I had low expectations that anything I owned would be left standing. To my surprise, this angel was sitting on what used to be my house. I, too, put my head in my hands and started to cry.” —Alison Gamel

5 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


BEHIND THE LENS

E

The Banks Brigade: This ragtag crew of local surfers and firefighters chose to stay and defend their community of Bonny Doon. Many residents claimed that dozens of homes would have been lost if the brigade hadn't been there. PHOTO: COURTESY OF ALEX BIRKHOFER

F“A firefighter battles a fire near Felton Empire Road." —Michael Daniel

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 5


EDITOR'S NOTE: Author, biologist

My dearest Wallace Grayce,

and "Slowcoast"

We built your home around you when you were still inside your mother.

fixture Wallace J.

We built it stronger and more sturdy than it needed to be. I thought a

Nichols wrote this letter to his eldest daughter after their family's home was lost in the fire.

lot about every piece of wood and stone. Every knob and switch. We filled it with our books, musical instruments and interesting animal bones. I imagined you looking down after a bath through the railing upstairs. People who visited always asked about the overbuilt stoutness and soulfulness of our home. I always said that I built this house around my baby girl to protect and raise her, and her sister, to be strong and healthy. I hoped that it would instill a sense for natural quality, authenticity and design. Your house in the redwoods, by the creek and ocean, lasted nearly 19 years. It survived fires, droughts, floods and earthquakes. It also survived some of our great parties, our friends’ weddings, holiday gatherings and many sleepovers. It held thousands of visitors, beautiful music, salmon dinners and rich, deep conversations. You were there for it all. I had hoped that it would be yours someday and I was working hard to keep it. The day after you left for college, it burned to the ground in a wildfire caused by lightning in the most beautiful storm I have ever seen. I believe it served its original purpose fully and completely. All that remains standing is the chimney and fireplace that warmed us as we slept—it was built tall of stone to last for millennia. You are strong, thanks to this home. You carry the memories of our canyon. You are made of Mill Creek water, the fruit from our trees, Swanton berries and Pacific salmon. You are my wild child. I am so proud of you. I wish I could have protected our home from the fires. But I couldn’t and I didn’t. But please carry the sweet memories with you wherever you go. I love you, peanut. Stay safe, study hard and come home often for hugs. Please.

FN  ichols and his younger

daughter, Julia Nichols, embrace on the rubble where their home once stood. PHOTO: IAN ABERNATHY

5 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Dad


BEHIND THE LENS

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 57


SW

EL LIE S 202

0

We are excited to be open and offering private swim lesson and limited swim babies classes.

Instruction by Award Winning Photographer

Tony Pagliaro

Favorite Nature Photographer Favorite Art Gallery 121 San Jose Avenue, Capitola Village Class Registration at www.tonypagliarogallery.com

OFFERING FAMILY SCUBA COURSESFUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! ADVENTURE SPORTS UNLIMITED 303 Potrero St #15, In the Sash Mill, Santa Cruz | 831.458.3648

VOTED ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE

MORTGAGE BROKERS Tom Powers Mortgage Consultant | nmls# 338236

(831) 425-7880 tom@seabrightmortgage.com www.seabrightmortgage.com/tpowers

1734 Seabright Avenue Santa Cruz, California 95062

Brent Edwards branch manager | nmls# 279289

(831) 425-7880 brent@seabrightmortgage.com www.seabrightmortgage.com/bedwards

All applications are subject to underwriting guidelines and approval. Not all programs available in all areas. Rates and terms are subject to change without notice. This form may not be reproduced. Mountain West Financial, Inc. DBA Seabright Mortgage. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act. NMLS# 164497.

5 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


S H I L S H O L . C O M @SHILSHOLSTUDIO

109 LOCUST STREET DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ

FAVO RIT E NEW BU SINESS — RETAIL

Photos: @boundlessbutts

Eco-Friendly Weddings & Event Planning www.paigeevents.com @paige.events (831)566-3574

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

SANTA CRUZ'S FAVORITE HEADSHOP!

OPERATING WITH REDUCED HOURS DAILY, 11A-7P TO ALLOW FOR SANITATION OF PREMISES DAILY

THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT THROUGH THESE CHALLENGING TIMES.

Poppy Magic by Maggie Renner Hellmann

FinestThe in Local Art Finest in Local Art THEThe FINEST IN LOCAL ART

Thank You for voting us your “Poppy Magic” by

Favorite Art Gallery

Thank Y voting us

Maggie Renner Hellmann

Many Hands Gallery

Favorite Art

Magic” by us Thank you for voting 510“Poppy Bay Ave, Capitola

FAVORITE ART GALLERY

831-475-2500 Maggie manyhandscapitola.com Renner Hellmann SW

EL LIE S 202

715 Capitola Ave Ste B, Capitola 831-475-2500 | manyhandscapitola.com

0

Many Hands Gallery SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 9

510 Bay Ave, Capitola


MORE THAN A STATEMENT

6 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


ART

SANTA CRUZ’S BLACK LIVES MATTER MURAL AIMS TO INSPIRE ACTION By JOEL HERSCH

A

bi Mustapha, the artist and activist who conceptualized the Black Lives Matter mural in downtown Santa Cruz, would have preferred for the project to be unsanctioned by the city. She was concerned that without any substantial commitment to policy changes from the City of Santa Cruz, an official partnership could cast the BLM mural as a form of empty virtue signaling. “A mural like this has a way of being performative if it’s not backed up by any real purpose or commitment,” says Mustapha, who lives in Bonny Doon. “We had to measure out the benefits of either going rogue or working with the city. … We had to ask ourselves, ‘What is our city actually doing to become more racially equitable for people of color?’” Mustapha formed a partnership with Taylor Reinhold, a local muralist and activist, and reached out to Santa Cruz Mayor Justin Cummings, the city’s first Black male mayor. She expressed her concerns and hoped for a nod from Cummings to do the project without any official authorization from the city. Cummings embraced the mural idea, but advised she pursue a permit. The decision to get the project legitimately sanctioned led Mustapha and Reinhold to a partnership with the city Arts Commission’s vice chair Sean McGowen. McGowen helped the mural team develop a proposal for the city that required accountability among local officials, as well as an annual maintenance plan. The city unanimously approved the project in June and established an agreement that the city council will draft an annual report on what its members have done to support equitable policy or programs, says McGowen. The report from the council on equity was

agreed to as a part of the city’s Health In All Policies. The Arts Commission also agreed to help facilitate an annual event around the mural’s upkeep on June 19, the national holiday known as Juneteenth that commemorates the ending of slavery in the United States. Each year, a local organization will support the re-painting of the mural and speak about its own commitments and actions in support of racial justice. The fiscal sponsor for the mural was local nonprofit Yoga For All Movement (YFAM), headed by Shandara Gill. As of this writing, Gill had helped raise $5,000 for the mural and was aiming to reach $10,000. She believes that the mural can become a conversation starter for how people support and “show up” for Black people, and generate tangible action plans that align with the Black Lives Matter movement. “The important question is how we are going to collaborate for this change,” Gill says, “because it doesn’t happen in silos, it doesn’t happen in cultures of exclusivity … and we can’t let this time fade into history as a passing trend.” On the day of the mural’s painting, in mid-September, Cummings told Santa Cruz Waves that the piece will serve as a reminder to the community that it must continue to fight for social justice and change locally. “The hope is that this will be installed for as long as is necessary, but hopefully one day—once we’ve overcome a lot of the inequities within our society—we won’t need this message anymore,” he says. Mustapha said that she hopes the mural inspires people to ask themselves questions about racial equity. “Nobody in our society is really free until the most marginalized people are free,” she says, “and right now, the focus needs to be on Black people.”   

OPPOSITE PAGE: ARTIST ABI MUSTAPHA ON THE DAY THE MURAL WAS PAINTED. PHOTOS: JOEL HERSCH

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 1


HUMAN SHAPED ANIMAL

6 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


ART

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 3


6 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FOOD & DRINK

The little

Farm

that could

By ELIZABETH LIMBACH

How Common Roots Farm fulfilled its mission while navigating 2020’s hardships

“I

f you can stand the echo, I can paint while we talk.” As a farmer, Heidi Cartan does not have a moment to waste. On a hot day in midAugust, she is busy painting the walls of a freshly built housing unit at Common Roots Farm, a small organic farm tucked away just one mile from downtown Santa Cruz at the base of Pogonip Open Space preserve. The farm was founded by a group of 10 families, including Cartan’s, that have grown children with disabilities. In search of safe, permanent housing for their children, the parents came together with an ambitious plan to build a “pocket neighborhood” for disabled and non-disabled Santa Cruzans, alike, on a sustainable farm that is designed to be accessible for everyone—meaning farmers and volunteers with and without disabilities contribute and collaborate. When we speak, Cartan and her crew are suffering through a scorching heat wave and are on day two of a power outage. A few days later, ash and smoldering leaves rain down on the farm’s fields as the CZU Lightning Complex fire creeps nearer, never—thankfully— reaching its borders. As soon as it was safe to return, Common Roots volunteers harvested and donated many hundreds of pounds of cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, beans and melons to the Salvation Army and Santa Cruz Bible Church, both of which were feeding evacuees. This wasn’t the first time in 2020 that Common Roots stepped up during a crisis. Talking as she paints the new house, Cartan explains how the COVID-19 pandemic both shook the farm’s foundation and presented an opportunity to live up to its guiding mission. PHOTOS BY JAIME BODDORFF

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 5


SW

EL LIE S 202

0

ite Sushi in ted Favor rs in a row o V urant z 6 yea rite resta os Santa cru o v a F d e t Vo n sc & apt in mid-tow SW

EL LIE S 202

0

OUT E K A T OR PM OPENFFFLUNCH FROMa1k2e -s4pecials 20% O

eer & s -4pm b 2 R U O H IONS HAPPY 8PM 2 LOCAT EEK 12-

W 7 DAYS/ SDAYS. T: OPEN H ON TUE D IG E R S B O L C SEA , Y IL A OPEN D APTOS:

Santa Cruz

WE ROLL THE FATTIES! THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

FAVORITE BREAKFAST BURRITO SW

EL LIE S

0 202

22 DIFFERENT KINDS OF BREAKFAST BURRITOS

HOUSE-MADE CHAI • ESPRESSO DRINKS • ORGANIC FAIR TRADE COFFEE STEEL CUT OATMEAL • BAGELS • SMOOTHIES • SANDWICHES & SALADS

WE’RE OPEN FOR TAKE OUT! NEW HOURS

M-F: 7AM-1PM SAT-SUN 7AM-2PM CALL IN ORDERS: 831-477-0543 6 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


PHOTO: COURTESY OF COMMON ROOTS

PHOTO: JAIME BODDORFF

PHOTO: COURTESY OF COMMON ROOTS

FOOD & DRINK

“My goal all along has been that people with disabilities would be providing something for their community. … I never expected we’d have an opportunity during a pandemic to do it sooner and in a bigger way.” —Heidi Cartan, director of Common Roots Farm

“My goal all along has been that people with disabilities would be providing something for their community—and I assumed it would be normal farm produce through the normal outlets,” she says. “I never expected we’d have an opportunity during a pandemic to do it sooner and in a bigger way.” Only in its fourth year of production, Common Roots Farm was still learning to navigate the rough and uncertain waters of farming when the pandemic abruptly capsized the markets and relationships Cartan had worked so hard to build over recent years. The Common Roots farm stand shuttered out of caution over food safety, and all of the restaurants and florists that buy its produce and flowers closed. Cartan reconsidered the year’s planting plan accordingly, ditching the greens in the wheelchair-accessible hydroponic greenhouse that would normally go to restaurants and

forgoing the mint it was meant to grow for Santa Cruz Shakespeare to use in intermission mojitos. “Because,” she explains, “the rule in farming is you shouldn’t plant anything until you know where you’ll sell it.” Elaborate harvesting schedules emerged to allow for new safety guidelines, and eventually, once it was deemed safe, the farmers and volunteers with disabilities returned, socialdistance style. Amidst these changes, Common Roots was given the chance to support locals who were hit hardest by the pandemic’s economic downturn. With assistance from a Central California Alliance for Health grant, the farm supplied produce to the Salvation Army, which passed it on to lowincome Medi-Cal recipients in Santa Cruz County through grocery distribution and hot-meal programs. “It’s been so

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 67


GREAT WINES....

LO CAL VINES WEB STORE DISCOUNT CURB SIDE PICK UP CALL FOR INFO

831.728.5172 420 HAMES RD CORRALITOS ALFA ROWINE.COM

NOW RE-OPEN! Come in and see us today! WE’VE MISSED YOU.

LOTS OF PATIO SEATING NOW AVAILABLE! THURSDAY 2-8, FRIDAY 2-9, SATURDAY 12-8, SUNDAY 12-7

stockwellcellars.com | 831.818.9075 6 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Open Daily at 11:30am for Lunch and Dinner 215 Esplanade Capitola, CA. 95010 831-476-4900 | Paradisebeachgrille.Com


PHOTO: COURTESY OF COMMON ROOTS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF COMMON ROOTS

FOOD & DRINK

The pathway will encircle the farm’s four acres, giving folks in wheelchairs, kids on scooters and parents with strollers a scenic place to stroll. gratifying for us to feel like our food is helping our community,” Cartan says. The grant allowed Common Roots to keep its fields in production during the COVID slump. Loath to compost the farm’s surplus cut flowers (it grows 25 varieties of these pollinator-friendly crops), Cartan donated bouquets to the Salvation Army recipients. “They are thrilled, because they never have money for flowers,” she says. “Flowers are a luxury.” A bouquet of fresh flowers is also a staple of the farm’s community-supported agriculture (CSA) service, which has doubled in size this year. This increase has helped to keep the farm afloat through direct-to-consumer support. Once the CSA season ends in mid-October, Common Roots will rely on sales of its delectable jarred products sold through commonrootsfarm.org. Made by local food-wastefighting business Terroir in a Jar, Common Roots’ products include a Bloody Mary mix featuring hot peppers and tomatoes; a strawberry margarita mix; hot sauces; strawberry jam; and a strawberry tarragon shrub that is delicious in cocktails or added to sparkling water. Looking toward the horizon, Cartan is pleasantly surprised that 2020’s challenges have not steered Common Roots off course. Its pocket neighborhood is on schedule to have occupants by spring, when 19 disabled individuals and renters from the

wider community will move into its 10 houses and one studio. The farm is also on target to finish an accessible garden around then—a shady spot where visitors and volunteers can utilize wheelchair-friendly garden beds and a potting area. Another piece of the farm’s inclusivity plan will wrap up come spring, as well: a wide, smooth pathway made from eco-conscious materials that will encircle the farm’s four acres, giving folks in wheelchairs, kids on scooters and parents with strollers a scenic place to stroll. “The farm … has been from the start and will continue to be a community-wide resource,” Cartan says. For now, Common Roots must keep its fields healthy while patiently waiting for restaurants, florists and its own farm stand to open back up. “We talk a lot about how nature keeps going,” Cartan says. “The farm field, the insects [and] the soil don’t care that there’s a pandemic going on—and we need to continue caring for those resources. [We need to] continue to build our soil so we can grow the healthiest products possible, continue to take care of our land so it’s productive and healthy for the long term, and try to figure out how to do things in a new way that really nobody could have ever prepared us for.” Learn more and shop products at commonrootsfarm.org. Find the farm on Instagram: @common.roots.farm.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 9


*PLEASE NOTE: Restaurants need our support more than ever. Call or check a restaurant's website before visiting to learn about ordering and dining options.

CAFE CRUZ

DINING GUIDE Downtown 515 KITCHEN & COCKTAILS

With a focus on inventive small plates and cocktails, 515 Kitchen & Cocktails has been offering a nuanced take on internationally influenced California cuisine in downtown Santa Cruz since 2006. 515 Cedar St., (831) 425-5051, www.515santacruz.com

AQUARIUS DREAM INN

Spectacular oceanfront dining just off the beach in Santa Cruz. One of Santa Cruz’s top dining destinations, Aquarius offers seafood and organic Californian cuisine. Open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as brunch on Sundays. 175 W. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, www.dreaminnsantacruz.com

BETTY’S EAT INN

Locally owned burger joint with a fun vibe. Features award-winning burgers, fries, salads, beer, wine and shakes. Soak up the sun on the outdoor patios at all three locations. Expanded menu and full bar at this location only. 1222 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7056, www. bettyburgers.com. Other locations: Midtown (505 Seabright Ave.) and Capitola (1000 41st Ave.).

7 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

HULA’S ISLAND GRILL

California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

IDEAL BAR & GRILL

A Santa Cruz institution with amazing beach, boardwalk and wharf views. Open every day, featuring nightly specials and a full bar. 106 Beach St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-3827, www.idealbarandgrill.com

KIANTI’S PIZZA & PASTA BAR

Located in the heart of Downtown, stands boldly amongst fellow businesses with it’s vibrant colors and welcoming atmosphere. The indoor lively and update vibe is a crowd pleaser, with weekend performance. For those preferring a more relaxed experience, dine within the heated patio and cozy up to the fireplace. Kianti’s is as kid friendly as as they come. 1100 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz (831)4694400 www.kiantis.com

MISSION ST. BBQ

Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 4582222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

PACIFIC THAI

Authentic Thai cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

SOIF RESTAURANT & WINE BAR

A comfortable place to drink great wine, eat food that is as good as the wine, and then—if the wine is to your liking—buy some and take it home. The restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., and until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 105 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2020, www.soifwine.com

STAGNARO BROS. SEAFOOD INC.

Seaside eatery turning out fresh seafood staples on the Santa Cruz Wharf with views of the Pacific. 59 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2180

ZOCCOLI’S

Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711,www.zoccolis.com

Harbor THE CROW’S NEST

Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

Midtown AKIRA

Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7093, www.akirasantacruz.com

CHARLIE HONG KONG

Vegan-oriented menu. Southeast Asian fusion, organic noodle and rice bowls. Chicken, beef, pork and salmon offered. Family and dog friendly. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-5664, www. charliehongkong.com

EL JARDÍN RESTAURANT

Delicious and authentic Mexican cuisine featuring locally grown, fresh ingredients. 655 Capitola Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 477-9384, www.eljardinrestaurant.net


FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

LA POSTA RESTAURANT

With inventive Italian dishes crafted from local and seasonal ingredients, La Posta is a neighborhood restaurant that brings the soul of Italian cuisine into the heart of Seabright. Open Tuesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. 538 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 457-2782, lapostarestaurant.com.

SEABRIGHT SOCIAL

Rotating beer selection, with dog-friendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, seabrightsocial.com

TRAMONTI RESTAURANT

Made with organic, local or Italian-imported ingredients, Tramonti’s authentic recipes reflect its family traditions and the simplicity and warmth of true Italian cuisine. The original Italian-style thin crust is baked in a brick oven, with fresh for di latte mozzarella and San Marzano tomato sauce. 528 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426 7248, www.tramontisantacruz.com

Westside/Scotts Valley BRUNO’S BAR & GRILL

Offers American cuisine for lunch and dinner all week long and brunch on the weekend, plus onsite and offsite catering and banquet space for special events. With two bars, it’s the perfect spot whether you are craving burgers, steaks, ribs or salads, or just want to have some fun in Scotts Valley. 230 Mount Hermon Road, Ste. G., (831) 438-2227, www.brunosbarandgrill.com

MISSION ST. BBQ

Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE

British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com

SUSHI GARDEN

Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls and hot entrées. Spacious dining area with live music performances every Friday and Saturday night. 5600 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, 831-438-9260, www.sushi-garden.com

VIM

Vim is named for the energy and vitality that it brings to the Santa Cruz culinary scene. Patrons are invited to linger over approachable New American cuisine, decadent desserts, and modern cocktails. Chef Jesikah Stolaroff brings the feeling of home together with local ingredients and refined technique to create food that fills the heart. 2238 Mission St, Santa Cruz, (831) 515-7033, vimsantacruz.com

Eastside/Capitola AVENUE CAFÉ

Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

Serving traditional breakfast and lunch, along with some Mexican favorites. 427 Capitola Ave., Capitola (831) 515-7559, www.avenuecafecapitola.com

BURN HOT SAUCE

BURN HOT SAUCE

CASCADES BAR & GRILL AT COSTANOA

CHILL OUT CAFE

BURGER.

Burn Hot Sauce hand-made sauces are fermented for a year with local organic peppers, and are loaded with natural living probiotics. Spice levels range from mild to wild. Available at Santa Cruz Westside and Live Oak Farmers Markets. (831)888-6576

Burn Hot Sauce hand-made sauces are fermented for a year with local organic peppers, and are loaded with natural living probiotics. Spice levels range from mild to wild. Available at Santa Cruz Westside and Live Oak Farmers Markets. (831) 888-6576

California cuisine, local, organic, and handcrafted ingredients. 2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1, Pescadero, (650) 879-1100, www.costanoa.com

Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

MALONE’S GRILLE

PLEASURE PIZZA

Long-standing eatery and pub offering steak, seafood, burgers, vegetarian options and patio seating. 4402 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, (831) 438-2244, www.malonesgrille.com.

Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

OPEN

Sun - Wed 11:30-9pm Thurs - Sat 11:30-10pm HOURS MAY CHANGE DEPENDING UPON BUSINESS CONDITIONS.

261 CENTER AVE. APTOS | 831-688-4848

DAHLIA GARDEN NOW OPEN FOR OUTDOOR LUNCH

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 7 1


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE KAITO

Quaint atmosphere specializing in ramen, sushi, Japanese tapas, beer and sake. in the heart of Pleasure Point. 830 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 464-2586,www.smilekaito.com

MARGARITAVILLE

Waterfront restaurant offering a lively setting for casual Californian cuisine and cocktails. 231 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-2263, margaritavillecapitola.com

THANK YOU SANTA CRUZ

FOR YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT! Authentic, Organic, Locally owned and operated since 2012. Real Italian food & wine in the heart of Seabright

OPEN EVERYDAY

EXTENDED OUTDOOR DINING AREA & TAKE OUT PRIVATE PARKING & DOG FRIENDLY PATIO

528 Seabrignht Ave, 95062 | tramontisantacruz.com

RESERVATIONS & TAKE OUT (831)426-7248 FOLLOW US ON I & f TRAMONTI_SANTACUZ

THE POINT CHOPHOUSE

A traditional neighborhood steak “chop” house restaurant where generations of local families, friends and visitors to the area meet to celebrate in a casual setting. With good honest food, local draft beer and wine, and premium cocktails, the Point Chophouse offers something for everyone—even the little ones. Dinner and happy hour daily; breakfast and lunch weekends. 3326 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-2733, www.thepointchophouse.com

PONO HAWAIIAN KITCHEN & TAP CAPITOLA

Hawaiian-style kitchen featuring 16 rotating taps with craft beer from the islands and beyond, Sabe cocktails, ciders, wine and, of course, the aloha spirit! Pupus, poke plate lunches and more.  3744 Capitola Road, 831-476-7458

413 seabright ave. 11am -10pm 21+

72 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

0

Favorite Dive Bar

CAFE CRUZ

Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

SURF CITY SANDWICH

Fast-casual dining with craft sandwiches, gourmet soups, salads, and a micro-taproom. 4101 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 346-6952, www.surfcitysandwich.com

TORTILLA FLATS

For more than 25 years, their Mexican food has blended the fieriness of Mexico with the sophistication of French sauces, and the earthiness of the Yucatan and complexity of Santa Fe with all the freshness and lightness that Californians expect. 4616 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 476-1754, tortillaflatsdining.com

Aptos/Watsonville AKIRA

SHADOWBROOK

APTOS ST. BBQ

Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 475-1511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

Santa Cruz County’s best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

SOTOLA

BITTERSWEET BISTRO

SUSHI GARDEN EL LIE S 202

Soquel

Now in Aptos, sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 105 Post Office Drive, Ste. D,  Aptos, (831) 708-2154, akirasantacruz.com

California farmstead concept focusing on local farms, ranches and seafood. In convivial quarters with an outdoor patio. 231 Esplanade Ste. 102, Capitola, (831) 854- 2800

SW

Indoor and outdoor dining with a beachfront deck, where American dishes, including seafood, are served. 203 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 475-4900, www.zeldasonthebeach.com

THE SAND BAR

Capitola’s new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola. (831) 462-1881

Outdoor dining patio Covid responsible Outdoor big screen tvs

ZELDA’S ON THE BEACH

Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls and hot entrées. Relaxing atmosphere with a beautiful koi pond. Separate sake bar with extensive list of sake pairings and local wine/beer during dinner. 820 Bay Ave.,831-464-9192, www.sushi-garden.com

With its vast menu options from burgers to filet mignon, locally sourced produce, fresh fish and amazing desserts, the varied ambiance is perfect for an intimate dinner or casual gathering with family and friends. Enjoy a local beer on tap in the lounge while watching one of your favorite sports. Relax during happy hour with a handcrafted cocktail. The heated outdoor patio welcomes good dogowners and their furry friends. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com


FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

BURGER.

Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www. burgeraptos.com

CAFE BITTERSWEET

Breakfast and lunch served Tuesday through Sunday. Outdoor dog-friendly patio. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831-662-9799, www. bittersweetbistro.com

CAFE RIO

Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

CANTINE WINE PUB

Winepub serving wine, craft beer, cider, bubbles, and tapas. 8050 Soquel Dr, Aptos, www. cantinewinepub.com, 831-612-6191

FLATS BISTRO

Coffee, pastries and wood-fired pizzas. 113 Esplanade, Rio Del MarBeach, Aptos, (831) 661-5763, www.flatsbistro.com

MANUEL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos, (831) 688-4848, www.manuelsrestaurant.com

PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE BEACH RESORT

Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-7120, www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL

Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive tequila selection. Happy Hour, and dinner specials. 21 Seascape Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9000, www.palapasrestaurant.com

Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients. 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 688-8987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE

Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls, hot entrées and unique house specials. Casual and friendly atmosphere.   1441 Main St. Watsonville, 831-728-9192, www.sushi-garden.com

Two full bars, rotating taps, delicious pub fare, patio seating and thirst-quenching cocktails. 8017 Soquel Drive, (831) 688-4300, theparishpublick.com

PERSEPHONE

Persephone serves a seasonally changing farmto-table menu with influences ranging from Italian to Middle Eastern. All of the dishes are based on the locally available products and produce. Locally owned and family operated. 7945 Soquel Dr., Aptos, 831-612-6511, www.persephonerestaurant.com

SUSHI GARDEN - WATSONVILLE

SUSHI GARDEN - APTOS

Brand new location in Rancho Del Mar Center, serving fresh sushi/sashimi and delicious hot entrées in a spacious dining area and large communal bar seating. 38 Rancho Del Mar, 831661-0721, www.sushi-garden.com

San Lorenzo Valley COWBOY BAR AND GRILL

Sandwiches, steaks and American fare served in a kid-friendly joint with a country-western theme. 5447 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 335-2330, www.feltoncowboy.com

THE CREMER HOUSE

The perfect spot to enjoy a cold, handcrafted beer, a glass of local wine, or a homemade soda while trying dishes using local, organic, farm-raised sustainable ingredients, as well as vegetarian items. 6256 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 335-3976, www.cremerhouse.com

Bon appétit!

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 73


NOW

R HASMMUNITY. E ECIALN R O C AND SP O S S E C R IN E Z W SHOPPE SANTA CRU Y MEATS, PRODUACCE,K YARD. THE BEST , S R A E 0 Y RVING TH IGHEST QUALIT IN OUR OWN BIENTS, YOU GET HERE AND 8 R E V FOR OPROUDLY SE INGING YOU THEALHVENDORS RIGAHVTAILABLE INGRNEODW THAT WE ANREER A CHERC K R BR ST FEAST, BEEN ERS CO ROM LO THE BE LVES IN URSE ICH COME F SING RFECT KING SHOPP IGHT O H AT BY U HAT PE A WE DEL , MANY OF W VE FOUND TH O PREPARE T YOU FOR M K T S A N M H G A E TY I T RS WE HEN LOOKIN YOURS....TH W HE YEA O OVER T E MELAS! SO UR FAMILY T UNITY. O M L M IB O S O FR POS UZ C M O HELP. E SANTA CR T Y P P HA F TH PART O ISHED

74 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

SW

ERED

AR P SOL OW

EL LIE S 202

0


SunVault™

Never Feel Powerless Again Rolling blackouts during fire season can put your life on hold. Keep your fridge cold when you need it most with a home battery.

Easy to scan

1. Open Phone Camera 2. Point at QR Code 3. URL Link Appears!

(831) 256-4101 SolarTechnologies.com

SANTALIC#932914 CRUZ WAVES | 75


THE LOCAL CHOICE. THE LOGICAL CHOICE.

Visit SantaCruzNaturals.org for delivery, menus and more! 76 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

C10-0000237-LIC | C10-0000238-LIC

We’re on a mission to prove that sustainably sourced, local cannabis creates thriving communities and a resilient planet.

Profile for Santa Cruz Waves

Santa Cruz Waves October/November 2020 Issue 7.3  

Santa Cruz Waves October/November 2020 Issue 7.3  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded