Santa Cruz Waves Oct/Nov 2017 Issue 4.3

Page 1

L I V E T H E L I F E S T Y L E

MAGAZINE

VOL 4.3

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 OCT/NOV 2017


Stay Connected. Live Green. Visit the model home today! Imagine a home that feels like an adventurous retreat. Rich with history and opportunity, Santa Cruz provides a beautiful juxtaposition of coastal ambiances and mountain lifestyles all in one vibrant city. Savor your downtime in your eco-friendly home, explore all that your new neighborhood has to offer. Relax in comfort thanks to your new NEST® Learning Thermostat™, upgraded appliances, and designer fixtures &

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Tour our beautiful model today! 831 .85 4.745 4 | beachwood@cit y ventures .com 1018 Rodriguez Street , S anta Cruz, C A 95062 | Sales Office Open Daily 10am to 6pm SantaCruzSol arHomes .com

All renderings, floor plans, and maps are artist’s concepts and are not intended to be an actual depiction of the buildings, fencing, walkways, driveways or landscaping. Walls, windows, porches and decks vary per elevation and lot location. In a continuing effort to meet consumer expectations, City Ventures reserves the right to modify prices, floor plans, specifications, and amenities without notice or obligation. Square footages shown are approximate. Please see your Sales Manager for details. ©2017 City Ventures. All rights reserved. BRE LIC #01877626.

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D A L E F R I D AY Favorite Realtor

F R I D AY R E A LT Y Best Real Estate Team F R I D AY R E A LT Y Favorite Real Estate Co.

F R I D AY R E A LT Y . C O M

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WELCOME TO

CAPITOLA VILLAGE

1. Von Lux - beauty, skin care, aesthetics 2. Beach House Rentals - vacation rentals 3. Vanity by the Sea - designer and sport sunglasses 4. Capitola Candy Co. - candy, chocolates & more 5. Lumen Gallery - art, decor, jewelry 6. Capitola Reef - beach boutique/toe rings 7. Beach Break by Marianne’s - ice cream & eats 8. Sea Level - t-shirts/sweatshirts/gifts 9. Capitola Hotel - boutique hotel 10. Sotola - farm-to-table lunch/dinner 11. Margaritaville Capitola - coastal mexican cuisine 12. Zelda’s on the Beach - breakfast/lunch/dinner/music

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*Artistic representation. Locations are generalized.

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CANDY CO.

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Vanity by the Sea

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Deluxe Foods has been the Aptos area’s favorite grocery store for

almost 40 years and we are proud to offer great products and services to our customers year round. Deluxe is a one stop shop for all your entertaining needs. The managers are always happy to work with the customer’s requests and special orders to make sure you are getting exactly what you want.

Local & family owned 783 Rio Del Mar Blvd #25 Aptos, CA 95003 (831) 688-7442 www.deluxefoodsofaptos.com

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Come to Deluxe Foods of Aptos for all your holiday needs ...

Our Deli

has standard holiday trays to choose from, or you can customize to fit your specific needs. We have specialty meats and cheeses to choose from. We can put your entire holiday meal together, call in your order now. We create customized gift baskets filled with everything from wine, and cheese to local handmade soaps. We have the best selection of meat, seafood and poultry to offer your family this holiday season. Our Bakery offers homemade cakes and pies.

local wine

artisan cheese tasty bakery

specialty meats

fresh flowers

fresh produce

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your Taste b n e ud ak w s a !with our new"

from the grill menu & Popular Craft Cocktails

MAKE TODAY SPECIAL with our mouthwatering From The Grill menu featuring Premium Prime Beef — along with tasty cra cocktails and host of weekly specials. sanderlingsrestaurant.com • ( - • One Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos (Across from Seascape Village on Seascape Blvd.)

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We’re not allowed to show you any of our products, so here’s a kitten on a skateboard.

See our complete menu kindpeoples.org

Cannabis for you. 14 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

3600 Soquel Ave • Santa Cruz 140 Dubois, Suite C • Santa Cruz


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From the base of the Grand Teton Mountain Range in Eastern Idaho, Patrick Bremser captured this image of the elusive diamond-ring phenomenon during this year’s Great American Eclipse. PHOTO: PATRICK BREMSER

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GROWING COMMUNITY ORGANICALLY SINCE 2009

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P I C T U R E D F R O M L E F T T O R I G H T: TA I B O U T E L L , A N D R E A S C H E N K , J E S S I E B R U M B A U G H , A N D V I C T O R R O M E R O

Your Santa Cruz Lending Team! We are proud to announce the opening of the Santa Cruz Lending Group! We have an incredible Team of

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XCEL QUIKSILVER ROXY HURLEY VOLCOM O’NEILL GSI MERRICK Quality Yarns • Supplies • Classes All levels welcome!

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WWW.QUICKSILVERSANTACRUZ.ORG

Accepting Applications for Preschool - 8th Grade

reesscch res cho hoo Prrro rog grram ra am Pre hho oooooll P oog g ra m

!  Developmentally appropriate program features enriching academics, including Spanish !  Children explore arts, crafts, cooking, music, yoga & garden-based education in outdoor Life Lab !  Flexible schedule available between 7:30 am - 5:30 pm !  For a tour, please contact Director Crissy Roubal at (831) 425-1782 or crissy.roubal@holycsc.org Preschool is located behind Holy Cross Church 170 A High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 2 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

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GOOD SHEPHERD CATHOLIC SCHOOL

Providing children the tools for success for over 50 Years! Call to set up your private tour 2727 Mattison Lane, Santa Cruz 831-476-4000 www.gsschool.org

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All Faiths are Welcome! Preschool through 8th Grade Half & Full Day Preschool Full Day Kindergarten Extended Care Science, Art, Life Lab, Spanish, Music Middle School Overnight Field Trips: Marin Headlands, Yosemite & Colonial Virginia Afterschool Sports: Basketball, Golf, Lacrosse, Co-ed Flag Football & Soccer, Volleyball, Track & Cross Country

Good Shepherd Catholic School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, nationality and/or ethnic origin, age or gender in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loans programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 7


GROM

GUIDE

Come Join the Fun this Fall!

Classes & Open Gyms

Join us for Fun & Games at our y Book Halloween Anniversary Party Biourrthndaext Pa y Tuesday, October 31 wit rty h us!

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Currently enrolling children ages 3-5 years Spanish - Mindfullness Life Lab Enrichments

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Winter d n a l r e Wond pitola ❆

Bringing Purpose Back To The Forgotten Reclaimed Wood Home & Kitchen Decor | Custom Pieces Wedding & Event Rentals | Reclaimed Vintage Finds Corporate & Retail | Interiors | Wedding Gifts

in Ca Village

FREE HOLIDAY PARKING

IN THE VILLAGE 11/23 - 12/25

DEC. 15TH–JAN. 7TH SKATING SESSIONS 10AM-12PM, 2PM-4PM, 6PM-8PM

Find our home decor pieces at Art Inspired 409-A Capitola Ave., Capitola, CA 95010 OR Call to schedule an appointment at our warehouse showroom in La Selva Beach, CA

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Join us for all the festivities! Sponsored by: the Capitola BIA and Capitola-Soquel Chamber of Commerce

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Follow Capitola Village on for more info www.capitolavillage.com/ice-skating-capitola SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 9


SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

PUBLISHER TYLER FOX

EDITOR ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PHOTO EDITOR ERIK L ANDRY

PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHERS PATRICK BREMSER BRYAN GARRISON A ARON HERSHEY AUDREY L AMBIDAKIS ERIK L ANDRY DAVID LEVY GRANT LY JEANINE OLSEN JEFF SCHWAB NEIL SIMMONS MAT T "ROOTS" WALKER

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS LIZ BIRNBAUM DEAN BENTLEY MIKE BRENSEN DWAIN CHRISTENSEN RYAN "CHACHI” CRAIG MICHAEL DANIEL JUSTIN DELAND JUDY DOHERTY RACHAEL ETTER DANIELA GERSON KELLY M. GROW KYLE HIRAYAMA

JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI FLORENCE LOW BLAKE MOHR PAUL OTTE TRAVIS RUMMEL DOC SEARLS JAKE SIMMONS RYAN STIRM MATT STOECKER ALYSSA TWELKER CHAD UNDERHILL-MERAS CASSIE WINSLOW

WRITERS DAVE DE GIVE TYLER FOX JOEL HERSCH NEAL KEARNEY LINDA KOFFMAN DEAN L ATOURRET TE LESLIE MUIRHEAD DAMON ORION

PROOFREADER JOSIE COWDEN

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOSH BECKER

DESIGNER ELI ROE

SALES & OPERATIONS

PRESIDENT STEPHANIE LUTZ

CFO SARAH CRAFT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES SUZIE JOSEPH K ATE K AUFFMAN SADIE WIT TKINS

OFFICE MANAGER LESLIE MUIRHEAD

EDITORIAL

DISTRIBUTION MICK FREEMAN

ARIC SLEEPER MELISSA DUGE SPIERS KYLE THIERMANN CHAD UNDERHILLMERAS PAUL WET TERAU

On the Cover: Sunset season is now upon us and Natural Bridges rarely disappoints. Photo: Neil Simmons

FOUNDER / CEO TYLER FOX The content of Santa Cruz Waves magazine is Copyright © 2017 by Santa Cruz Waves, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquiries, please contact steff@ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

F I N D US O N L I N E

www.SantaCruzWaves.com @SANTACRUZWAVES 3 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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FIRST LOOK

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

The paddle out for my close friend Benny Millburn brought friends and family together to celebrate someone who truly lived in the moment and whose generosity and contagious grin will live on for years to come. PHOTO: AARON HERSHEY

THE FRAGILITY OF LIFE By TYLER FOX

W

hen the Dalai Lama was asked what surprised him most about humanity, he answered, “Man, because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present—the result being that he does not live in the present or the future. He lives as if he’s never going to die, and then he dies never having really lived.” That Dalai Lama is one wise dude. I’ll sometimes read this quote to recalibrate my overly anxious self. The pressure of achieving success

(whatever that really means) can weigh heavily on our psyche. Millions of people deal with the dilemma of self-worth in a society enamored with image, wealth and celebrity. In our ongoing race to riches, sometimes the jarring reality of a death is what it takes to break through the fog of fantasy and bring us back to the present. I’m not going to lie, 2017 has been a rough one for me. I’ve had multiple friends deal with the death of someone close and I, too, recently lost one of my best friends. It’s an awful experience that often leaves you with the feeling that you could’ve done

more—been there more and spent more time with that person. However, deaths can also offer opportunities to grow or to learn from a loved one, whether it’s as simple as honoring the way a person smiled or their generosity to those in need. I think one of the best ways to celebrate a life is to emulate the person’s golden qualities and take those onward with us. Spread that contagious smile and stop and reach out to someone less fortunate. By doing this, that person's light will continue to shine and his or her spirit will live on and thrive for years to come.

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The Art & Science of Building

335 Spreckels Dr, Suite D, Aptos CA | 831-684-2117 | www.testorffconstruction.com

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CA License # 698917


INSIDE Volume 4.3 - OCT/NOV 2017

74

123 FIRST LOOK

33 Letter from the Founder 37 Best of the Web 39 Word on the Street 42 Remember When ... ? 50 Causes: Gravity Water

112 DROP IN

54 Faces of Surf: Shannon Quirk 60 In Depth: The Undoing of Dams 68 Environment: The Local Trump Threat 74 Behind the Lens: Neil Simmons 88 Mind & Body: Immune Boosters 94 Art: The Eight Deadly Sins 112 Travel: Picture-Perfect Indonesia

54 FOOD & DRINK

123 Local Eats: The Best of Instagram 129 Drinks: Stirm Wine Co. 132 Dining Guide

COOL OFF

147 Field Notes 148 Upcoming Events 150 Event Gallery

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SANTA CRUZ’S NICKELODEON & DEL MAR FEATURING STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL PROJECTION, AWARD WINNING ORGANIC GMO FREE POPCORN & DELICIOUS, LOCALLY CRAFTED TREATS

I’M SHORT ON TIME, BUT VERY, VERY LONG ON LEGS. YOUR FIRST WAX IS FREE* ONE WAX IS ALL IT TAKES TO FALL IN LOVE. CAPITOLA | 831 477 9331 1955 41st Ave WAXCENTER.COM I europeanwax

Our theatres showcase a wide variety of films — ranging from independent and foreign film to 3-D movies and smart films from Hollywood. We deliver a unique, sophisticated entertainment experience through our embrace of compelling content and unsurpassed customer service.

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*Offer expires 11/26/17. First-time guests only. Valid only for select services. Additional terms may apply. Participation may vary; please visit waxcenter.com for general terms and conditions.


FIRST LOOK BEST OF THE WEB

BEST of the WEB

I INSTAGRAM

5 VIDEOS

R NEWS

OREGON COAST @jschwab_24 ♥ 2,968

HUMPBACK WHALE HEAVEN A 40-ton humpback whale leaps entirely out of the water. 30,120 views

WAVE OF SICK SEA LIONS HITS THE MARINE MAMMAL CENTER Eighty-two sea lions received medical attention for domoic acid toxicity. 3,764 views

LIVE, LOVE AND ENJOY LIFE. SLOW DOWN AND TAKE IT ALL IN. @hersheyspix ♥ 2,795

ANNA ‘FREEDIVING’ DEAN’S BLUE HOLE A free diver takes you under the surface to explore the beautiful natural wonder of the Bahamas. 12,580 views

SURFER DEMOS SANTA CRUZ PARKCARD A primer on how to use the Santa Cruz ParkCard for parking meters and pay-by-space machines. 3,159

POST-ECLIPSE SUNSET @levymediaworks ♥ 2,576

JACK'S GLOBAL IMPACT Videos of Jack O’Neill memorial paddle outs from around the world. 10,769 views

KEELY ANDREWS JOINS BUELL SURF TEAM Keely Andrews, currently ranked No. 11 on the WSL Championship Tour, teams up with the Santa Cruz surf brand. 3,099 views

FOG WAVES @grant_ly ♥ 2,358

WHALE MINGLES WITH SWIMMERS Swimmers at Newport Beach, in Southern California, don’t notice the amazing creature right beside them. 8,658 views

A WALK ON WATER COMES TO SANTA CRUZ FOR THE FIRST TIME This surf-therapy event celebrated courageous kids at Cowell Beach. 2,987 views

VISIT US:

santacruzwaves.com/videos @santacruzwaves santacruzwaves.com/local-loop SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 7


THIS IS HOME This is where stories are told, gratitude is taught and meals are shared…sometimes in secret. Coldwell Banker. Where home begins. Whether you’re searching for your first home or moving to your next, I will make the process a memorable one. Get in touch for a consultation.

CHRISTINE PINI Website: www.greatsantacruzhomes.com Facebook: facebook.com/greatsantacruzhomes

831-515-2281 christine.pini@cbnorcal.com

Join us for a pint on the patio ... or GRab a 4-pack to go!

The only brewery in town with a FULL BAR! SAN TA C R U Z , C A • E S TA B L I S H E D 1 9 8 8 •

FOLLOW US ONLINE TO SEE WHAT’S NEW:

S A N T A CHOUR: RUZ, CA HAPPY • E S TA B L I S H E D 1 9 8 8 •

• Mon-Fri 3-6pm • 1/2 Off Select Appetizers • Drink Specials

Open Daily: 11:30am - 11:30pm • 519 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz • 831.426.2739 • SeabrightBrewery.com 3 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FIRST LOOK

WORD ON THE STREET

Q: Ron Toledo, architect: “I’m from New York, now living on the coast. My biggest fear is sharks because I live right by the Cement Ship, and I have photographs of a 14-foot great white [here]. And, yeah, you think I want to learn to surf with a great white in my front yard?”

Amy Watson, artist: “The thing I’m most afraid of is losing my children. No parent should outlive their children. I think that would probably be the worst pain a person can go through.”

What are you most scared of?

Erik Osgood, college student at San Jose State University: “Probably heights, to be honest, but it’s something I’m trying to get over by being on things that are taller.”

Phil Watson, mad scientist: “I’m most afraid of missed opportunities to do awesome things. I want awesome stuff to happen and I want to be part of it—I don’t want it to slip away because I’m too busy doing nothing.”

Elissa Zucchi, recent college grad: “I’m most scared of the future and finding a job, but I’m also excited. I want to be a teacher, so working with kids is what I’m hoping to do.”

Tyler Mendoza, college student: “Snakes! Snakes are just terrifying to me. They are slithery and they can kill you if they are the right type.”

d BY JEANINE OLSEN

ASKED IN CAPITOLA VILLAGE FOLLOWING THE WHARF TO WHARF

Taylor Hall, dental assistant: “I’m most scared of getting attacked at night while on a run.”

Shari Silva, realtor and mom: “I’m most fearful of fear. Fear of loss comes into play a lot; fear of pain; fear of missing out. Life is short, so the stifling effect that fear has on us as humans is what I fear.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


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Visit our Central Coast sister properties

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R E A L E S T AT E ...A LIFEST YLE

Bloch Real Estate Team 831.588.1588

Mike Bloch, Realtor Listings & Buyer Specialist BRE – 03182661

Kari Murr, Realtor “Master of Tasks” BRE – 02011099

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9/18/17 7:58 PM


LOCAL ENERGY

services + shops + restaurants + wine

Carmel, Ca 93923 TEL 831.625.4106 THECROSSROADSCARMEL.COM SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


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FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

REMEMBER

WHEN … THE MOST FAMOUS BRIDGE IN THE WORLD ALMOST WASN’T BUILT?

I

By DEAN LATOURRETTE

t was the project they said was impossible: building a suspension bridge to connect San Francisco to its neighbors to the north across the mile-wide Golden Gate Strait. Opened to the public in May of 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge recently celebrated its 80th birthday. But building the iconic structure that is hailed as one of the world’s civil engineering wonders almost didn’t happen. Numerous experts proclaimed that a bridge couldn’t be built across the strait due to unruly winds, strong currents, deep water, and blinding fog, among other issues.

Santa Cruz's Noah Wegrich enjoys the famous Fort Point break beneath the bridge. PHOTO: @CHACHFILES

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Find Your

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FIRST LOOK

?

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

The Golden Gate Bridge in 1935. PHOTO: TEWY/Public Domain

“There were a lot of concerns, but the fog was a big one,” says Robin Seeley, a volunteer for San Francisco City Guides (sfcityguides.org) and bridge expert. “The workers needed visibility to see what they were doing.” Dealing with extremely strong currents at the mouth of the Bay was also a major concern. “They said that building the

fender that surrounds the south tower was like trying to build a football field in the middle of a river,” adds Seeley. That wasn’t the only hurdle the bridge faced. There was also the small issue of money: who was going to pay for what was, at the time, one of the largest civil engineering projects in the country? Compounding the financial challenges was the

timing. After years of lobbying efforts, the project was approved by the state legislature in 1923 by creating the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District, which was then incorporated in 1928. But after the stock market crash in 1929, the District was unable to raise the construction funds and was forced to pursue a bond measure. Even though the measure passed (in the midst of

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FIRST LOOK

PHOTO: GOGA PARK ARCHIVES/PUBLIC DOMAIN

?

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

the Great Depression), the District was unable to sell the bonds until Bank of America founder Amadeo Giannini stepped in and bought the entire initial issue on behalf of the bank. “They call Giannini the sugar daddy of the bridge,” says Seeley. The initial design submitted by engineer Joseph Strauss was for a cantileverstyle bridge, and by most accounts would have been

a potential eyesore. After receiving significant input from other engineers, including Leon Moisseiff and Charles Ellis (neither of whom received proper credit at the time, particularly Ellis, who was fired part way through the project), the design was altered to a suspension bridge, and eventually to the two-tower suspension design that today is recognizable worldwide. Irving

Morrow, who up to that point had been primarily a residential architect, is credited with the bridge’s unique Art Deco design, as well as its distinctive orange color. Construction of the bridge began in 1933, and remarkably took just over four years to complete, at a price tag of $35 million. It was finished ahead of schedule and under budget—an impressive feat unto itself.

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BRI DGE BITES

THE BRIDGE’S SIGNATURE ORANGE COLOR WAS A HAPPY ACCIDENT.

The color of the bridge is officially called “International Orange,” and was initially inspired by the reddish-orange primer that was already painted on some of the steel parts. It was chosen both for its visibility in fog as well as to complement the surrounding natural environment. The U.S. Navy wanted to paint the bridge black and yellow stripes, like a bumblebee, and the Army Air Corps favored a red-and-white stripe candy-cane color scheme. Thankfully, the orange won out.

PAINTING THE BRIDGE IS A HUGE JOB.

The bridge is comprised of more than 10 million square feet of steel, and painting all that metal is no small task. Contrary to the popular myth that the bridge is painted from one end to the other in perpetuity, in reality the process is one of constantly touching up various areas—not just for the color but also to protect against corrosion from the salty air.

THE BRIDGE CABLES ARE ENGINEERING MARVELS.

The main bridge cables are each 7,659-feet long, and more than 3 feet in diameter. They’re comprised of 80,000 miles of steel

wire less than a quarter of an inch in diameter—enough to circle the world more than three times. They were installed using a “spinning” technique, a tedious process that involves spooling each wire one at a time, end-to-end across the milelong passage. They eventually developed a way to spool six wires at a time, greatly reducing the time and cost required to install the cables.

THE TOWERS ARE HELD TOGETHER BY 1.2 MILLION STEEL RIVETS.

As the original rivets corrode, they are replaced with galvanized high-strength bolts, which have to be carefully calibrated for correct tension when installed.

PHOTO: MATT "ROOTS" WALKER

PHOTO: @CHACHFILES

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

IT’S HOME TO A CLASSIC SURF SPOT.

Deep beneath the towering shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge lies one of the most novel surf spots in the world: Fort Point. Located at the south end of the narrowest part of the entrance to San Francisco Bay, the wave at Fort Point bends northwest swells nearly 180 degrees to create an unusual left point break that, due to the bridge backdrop, is also one of the most photogenic waves you’ll find. Despite its location and notoriety, the fickle spot remains less than welcoming to outsiders due to challenging currents, a dangerous rocky shoreline, and protective locals.

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PHOTO: MICHAEL DANIEL

CAUSES

GRAVITY WATER By JOEL HERSCH

A LOCAL NONPROFIT’S MISSION TO BRING CLEAN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS TO DEVELOPING NATIONS AROUND THE GLOBE

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n many poor, developing nations around the world, where sanitation infrastructure and waste-management systems tend to be limited or nonexistent, contaminated drinking water is the leading cause of death among children. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 80 percent of all diseases worldwide are related to either water or sanitation, and 30,000 adults

and kids die every day due to waterborne diseases. With that knowledge, Santa Cruz native Danny Wright—formerly a volunteer for the local Surfrider Foundation’s watertesting program—founded the nonprofit Gravity Water, a surprisingly simple, low-tech solution to improve access to safe drinking water on an international scale. The Gravity Water system combines a rainwater-catchment design


FIRST LOOK CAUSES

PHOTOS: TOP AND BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY OF GRAVITY WATER; BOTTOM LEFT BY MICHAEL DANIEL

“ Storing water at an elevated level allows us to use the most abundant free energy source in the world: gravity.”

PHOTOS BY CORY HANSEN

—Gravity Water founder Danny Wright

with elevated storage tanks and a gravity-fed filtration system. The idea was born following the 2015 earthquakes that devastated Nepal’s infrastructure, the first and largest of which had a magnitude of 7.8 and rippled outward from the capital city of Katmandu. As Nepal began to rebuild, the nation’s lack of clean water sources in rural communities were underscored,

spurring Wright and a small team of water activists into action. “Storing water at an elevated level allows us to use the most abundant free energy source in the world: gravity,” Wright explains. The elevated storage tanks— which store up to 10,000 liters, are designed to last 10 to 50 years, and require no electricity or pump systems—create an important

alternative to Nepal’s most common water source: ground water. By mounting the tanks above the ground and harvesting rainwater, instead of sourcing from wells or rivers, Gravity Water avoids contact with any contamination associated with human waste, the leading cause of disease carried by water. “The water flows through our sub-micron filters, which removes

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“ Contaminated water is causing people to die all over the world, and we can’t wait 30 years for these nations to build proper infrastructure to make their water safe.”

any contaminants that could have been picked up before entering the system,” Wright explains. “The rainwater in Nepal is 99.9 percent safer than groundwater, and since the systems are energy free and don’t use pumps, they’re easy to manage longterm for the local communities.” In 2016, Gravity Water deployed to Nepal, where the team built five systems at public schools in Katmandu. Based on the city’s average

PHOTOS BY CORY HANSEN

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF GRAVITY WATER

—Danny Wright

rainfall, the Gravity Water tanks will provide 3,000 students with clean drinking water annually. This November, Gravity Water will ship out once again to Nepal, where their goal is to set up 11 new water-tank systems. The nonprofit will also scout out regions in Vietnam this fall where Gravity Water could help save lives, which Wright says is the reason he initially embarked on this journey.

“Contaminated water is causing people to die all over the world, and we can’t wait 30 years for these nations to build proper infrastructure to make their water safe,” Wright says. “That’s why we need to create solutions that can be managed by these communities on the ground level, and that’s exactly what Gravity Water offers.” Learn more at gravitywater.org.

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SHANNON

Q U I R K

Reporting from the front lines of big-wave surfing 5 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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FACES OF SURF

he waves were 25 to 30 feet at Puerto Escondido, Mexico, aka “The Mexican Pipeline,” on July 31, detonating on the hard-packed sandbars with unbridled power. It was stop No. 1 on the World Surf League Big Wave Tour, where horrendous wipeouts outweighed completed rides and the energy on the beach was electric. The crowd gasped when any surfer mad enough to take that insane leap of faith stroked into a monster. When the heat ended, WSL sideline reporter Shannon Quirk was on hand to interview the exhausted and elated victor, Kai Lenny. By NEAL KEARNEY

Quirk, who often goes by “Shannon Reporting,” has made a career out of chasing swells and documenting big-wave surfing, with a particular passion for shining the spotlight on female surfers. As a child, the San Mateo native was encouraged by her father to participate in sports. She trained and practiced many varieties, not just to impress her father, but also to beat her brothers at everything they did. In the process, she met many other active girls and also learned to surf, which was a natural fit for someone who lived about 25 minutes from Half Moon Bay and its surrounding breaks. A desire to surpass the “tomboy” stereotype led Quirk to brave heavy breaks

like Ocean Beach in San Francisco. “Being a woman in sports, in general, can be frustrating at times,” Quirk admits. “I feel more pressure to prove myself and my abilities, and to want to be professional on camera. Surfing is so male dominated that our voices and needs can go unnoticed.” After graduating from UC Los Angeles and working as a sports journalist in South America, Quirk co-founded The Surf Channel television network in 2013 with Steve Bellamy, founder of The Tennis Channel. She wore many hats during the channel’s early days: editor-in-chief of the website, digital director, and host for many of the network’s features and surf news reports.

This position allowed Quirk a platform to create content that starred female athletes. She wanted to take advantage of the opportunity to provide a fresh perspective on the women in the waves, from a female point of view. “I would argue that female viewers want to be inspired by other women,” Quirk writes to Waves via email. “I think we are sitting on a gold mine of rich storytelling about ‘the girl next door’ who loves an adrenaline rush; the mom who drops her kids off at school and rushes to launch the Jet Ski before the swell peaks; or the story of a Santa Cruz science teacher who surfs Mavericks after school with her husband. There’s a plethora of

PHOTO: MIKE BRENSEN

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF SHANNON QUIRK

FACES OF SURF

relatable characters in women’s surfing, which is important to expose when creating a fan base for the athletes. In television, we can humanize these all-star surfers through compelling storytelling.” In 2016, this passion for storytelling—paired with her keen social media prowess— landed Quirk a job as a sideline reporter and event coordinator with the WSL Big Wave World Tour. She was offered the job after conducting interviews with Mavericks competitors and the Big Wave Tour event team for the Surf Channel. “My first live television gig was in the channel at Mavericks, as we watched Mark Healey take a two-wave hold-down in the first heat,” Quirk recalls. “That was probably when I caught the big-wave bug and started to process how intense and strong the characters are in the big-wave community. I want to share their stories.”

“ The women of big-wave surfing have been underground for far too long.”

The Big Wave Tour is not for the faint of heart. For the past few years, this tour has thrust the world’s most experienced surfers into deadly waves across the globe. Big-wave surfing has always been associated with masculinity and bravado, but in the past 25 years, more and more women have entered the fray—led by pioneers like Sarah Gerhardt, Keala Kennelly, and, more recently, Santa Cruz’s Savannah Shaughnessy and Maui’s Paige Alms. Quirk believes in equal billing for men and women’s surfing, be it in big waves or small. She points out that, historically, women have been receiving the short end of the stick. “The women of big-wave surfing have been underground for far too long,” she says. “They don’t get nearly enough media coverage for how incredible they are. I hope to change that and open doors for sponsorship for all surfers, but especially the underdogs.” The tide is starting to shift: Last year at Pe’ahi, Maui, the WSL held its first-ever big-wave contest for women. Quirk was on hand as the event coordinator, caring for competitors and orchestrating operations. She says the 2017 Pe’ahi Challenge Women’s

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF SHANNON QUIRK

FACES OF SURF

“There are a plethora of relatable characters in women’s surfing. ... In television, we can humanize these all-star surfers through compelling storytelling.” “I love my job and am really grateful to have the flexibility to travel to new waves and new places,” she says, adding, “As a surfer, I am definitely guilty of

scheduling meetings around the prime surf conditions.” Follow Quirk's adventures on Instagram at @shannonreporting.

PHOTO: MIKE BRENSEN

Championship will commence later this year, with the event window opening Oct. 15. She is also helping to organize a Waimea Women’s Championship, which will take place this winter. Quirk thinks that garnering more sponsors for women surfers is key to advancing women’s surfing overall. “The endless supply of women’s products on the market and a woman’s buying power should give us a leg up when it comes to sponsorship opportunities,” she explains. “It’s likely that we haven’t yet explored many avenues of potential sponsorship in big-wave surfing due to the previous lack of women in the scene. Female empowerment is something I hope everyone everywhere can get behind.” Quirk is currently based on the North Shore of Oahu during the winter, and splits her summers between Puerto Escondido and Santa Cruz. Most of her mornings consist of fulfilling her social media responsibilities while keeping a close eye on the surf forecast and storm graphs, as potential WSL Big Wave Tour events have a 72-hour green-light notice.

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Dam A f t e r

By Joel Hersch

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Up and down the West Coast, dams blockade most of the major rivers, where they have stifled fish populations and corked water and sediment flow. Many have steadily aged into states of disrepair. In 2015, the antiquated San Clemente Dam, in Monterey County, was deconstructed and removed, unshackling the Carmel River after more than 90 years. How is the river doing two years after the fact?

T

he San Clemente Dam was an old behemoth built more than 90 years ago, 18 miles from the coast of the Monterey Bay atop the Carmel River. Its purpose was to provide municipal water to the Monterey Peninsula, but an unintended consequence—true for most major dams—was its impact on the river’s ecology and surrounding landscape.

The rivers of California, and all around the planet, play critical roles for the Earth that many people may not give much consideration. One is their part in flushing the land’s discarded sediments out through waterways, which help to form countless miles of riparian habitat, before flowing into the ocean and accumulating along coastlines, where they reinforce beaches.

Across the West Coast, more than 200 dams are becoming backlogged with sediment and are potentially eligible for removal, which would mean major revitalization for the nation’s rivers.

Opposite Page: The 106-foot-high San Clemente Dam pictured in July 2015, when its removal process got underway. PHOTO: KELLY M. GROW/CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

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Above: The site of the former San Clemente Dam in November 2015, soon after its deconstruction. PHOTO: FLORENCE LOW/CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

Right: Engineers discuss the San Clemente Dam Removal Project and Carmel River reroute plan in November 2015. PHOTO: FLORENCE LOW/CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

Another is their role as nutrient “conveyor belts,” in the words of University of Washington Professor David Montgomery at the opening of a short film entitled Remove the Dams to Save the Salmon? He explains that open waterways allow salmon to spawn as tiny fish upriver before swimming out into the ocean, where they grow to full size, and then finally returning to their respective rivers. That eventual homecoming—what’s known as a fish run—is a critical delivery system, allowing proteins consumed by salmon in the open ocean to move back up into the land, inevitably becoming food for bugs, birds, coyotes, and trees, and fertilizing the

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Dams oversimplif e natural waterways—so myucth h necessary biodiversi so that the for fish, becomes imty, especially possible.

Earth by rippling up the food chain. So when, in 2015, the San Clemente Dam was deconstructed and removed, it was celebrated as an opportunity for the 36-mile river to return to its natural state and hopefully yield an uptick in its dwindling salmon and endangered steelhead trout populations. The $83 million removal project, which included an innovative river re-routing, was led by the California State Coastal Conservancy (CSCC) and represents the largest dam removal in California history to date. The removal frees up 25 miles of fish-spawning habitat and opens the river channel for fish to swim up and down as their life cycle intended. Though it’s too soon to say with scientific certainty, Tommy Williams, a fish biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), says that the fish spawning rates appear to be increasing, and that the entire river system is bouncing back much faster than he could have anticipated. “Rivers are very complex things— there are backwaters, eddies, shallows,

pools, runs, ripples, gravel flowing, boulders,” he enthuses. “They’re very, very dynamic systems. These fish are taking advantage of all that diversity, and many fish use the habitat differently. “The river is variable, and it’s all very messy,” he continues. “Messy,” here, refers to the complexity of these habitats that makes the biodiversity thrive. When rivers flow freely, their banks are defined by the water’s unbridled movement and the flow of sediments—what Williams describes almost ecstatically as a “continually shifting mosaic.” That messiness, he says, is what makes all of a river’s beautiful life possible. In defiance of big rivers’ messy, free-flowing, life-inducing tendencies, dams oversimplify the natural waterways—so much so that the same caliber of biodiversity, especially for fish, becomes impossible. “By simplifying them, we’ve controlled the variability, and by controlling their variability, we’ve reduced fish’s ability to move around and persist,” Williams says. The San Clemente Dam and its rural

Above: After the dam's demolition, the Carmel River was rerouted to carry the combined flows of both the Carmel River and San Clemente Creek downstream into Carmel Valley, Calif. PHOTO: FLORENCE LOW/CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

reservoir, located in the foothills of the Santa Lucia Mountain Range, was once a crucial water resource (and water scarcity continues to pose a threat on the Monterey Peninsula). But due to safety concerns, the dam was decommissioned in 2002. Approximately 95 percent of the reservoir’s storage capacity had become filled with sediment, pushed along by the river before corking up behind the towering wall of concrete. According to experts, an earthquake or heavy storm—like was seen last winter—could have caused the dam to fail, which would have likely sent thousands of tons of river mud and muck flowing into the Carmel Valley and its communities. This posed a complex engineering hurdle for the dam removal project,

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Above: The San Clemente Dam captured by DamNation filmmaker Matt Stoecker. Right: Wild summer steelhead swarm back to the undammed North Umpqua River in Oregon. PHOTO: MATT STOECKER/DAMNATION COLLECTION

Williams says. In order to manage such a massive amount of backlogged sediment, the CSCC developed a channel through a nearby ridge to reroute a half-mile portion of the Carmel River into the adjacent San Clemente Creek, where they used the abandoned reach as a sediment storage area. The river re-route allowed the engineers to create a safe passage for fish around the sediment mass during its relocation. The Carmel River and the San Clemente Creek have a confluence not too far above the old dam site, where they both flowed into the reservoir. While the San Clemente Dam Removal Project did return the river to its natural state, at least one dam-removal expert took

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m removal in The largest data te resulted in Washington S comeback of the a spectacular s surrounding Elwha River, it the native fauna. landscape and

issue with some aspects of the plan. “I’ve been both a supporter of removing San Clemente Dam and also a critic of the project design they employed,” says Matt Stoecker, a biologist and producer of the award-winning film DamNation. Stoecker, who grew up in the Santa Cruz Mountains, learned to trout fish while staying at his family’s cabin on the San Clemente Creek, upstream from the former dam. Stoecker is critical of the re-route strategy, which he says reduced the natural length of the Carmel River mainstream by half a mile and its habitats, demolished part of an oak-studded ridge line, and failed to utilize the accumulated reservoir sediment as a resource for restoring the downstream river channel and feeding beaches in the Monterey Bay. He says we know more now than we did a decade ago about “the seriousness of sea-level rise, and the fact that dams trapping sediment is putting our coastlines at greater risk” by not allowing it to flow out through our country’s rivers. Stoecker believes it is still feasible for stakeholders to update the plan and utilize

the sediment, metering it out down the river over the years. “Dam removal—with controlled sediment mobilization and progressive flood-protection measures—is one of the most effective ways in which we can replenish, expand, and protect our coasts,” he says. The CSCC chose to store the sediment in the excavated channel due to concerns that letting it flow out through the river could worsen flooding conditions downstream. Across the West Coast, more than 200 dams are becoming backlogged with sediment and are potentially eligible for removal, which would mean major revitalization for the nation’s rivers. While the implications of dam removals on fish spawning are not fully realized yet (we must wait up to 15 years for real data, explains Williams), the prospect for deconstruction is increasing. “We are seeing more dam removals with time, and bigger and bigger systems are being removed,” says Jonathan Warrick, a Santa Cruz-based researcher for the United States Geological Survey

Above: The former Elwha Dam looms overhead as DamNation producer and underwater photographer Matt Stoecker prepares to film salmon and steelhead trapped below the impassable wall of concrete. PHOTO: TRAVIS RUMMEL/DAMNATION COLLECTION

who specializes in sediment movements and the intersection of rivers and the sea. Warrick worked on the largest dam removal in Washington State in 2011, the Elwha Dam, which resulted in a spectacular comeback of the Elwha River, its surrounding landscape and the native fauna. “From my experience working on dam removal projects, and looking at the San Clemente Dam removal from the geological and hydrological sides of the matter, I would say that Mother Nature heals herself in amazing ways, and fairly quickly,” Warrick says. “We’re seeing the restoration of these systems taking place much faster than we would have thought. It tells us a lot about the resilience of the Earth [and] her natural systems.”

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DID YOU KNOW … ? 90K 72 Estimated number of dams in the United States

Dams removed in 2016

SIX TEEN

The number of jurisdictional dams removed in California since 2004, according to Kristen Martin, design engineer with Division of Safety of Dams

1,384 1IN3 Dams removed since 1912

Amount of Americans who get their drinking water from rivers

2.9 MILLION Miles of rivers covering the United States

$97 BILLION The size of the country’s river-related recreation and tourism industry

Left: The San Clemente Dam, seen here in July 2015, was destined for deconstruction after a study deemed it seismically unsafe. PHOTO: KELLY M. GROW/ CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

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“We can’t just put our blinders on and ignore the rest of the coast. It’s all one ecosystem and what happens anywhere on the coast is still our concern.”—Save Our Shores Executive Director Katherine O’Dea

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HOW A TRUMP EXECUTIVE ORDER THREATENS MARINE SANCTUARIES ALONG THE CALIFORNIA COAST

E n d a n g e r e d

SEAS By ARIC SLEEPER

I

t’s no secret that the people of Santa Cruz County view the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary—with its distant mountain silhouettes, sailboats, seals and sea birds—as a sacrosanct monument unparalleled by anything manmade. The Trump administration feels differently, however. They want to put a price tag on the invaluable coastline with the implementation of the America First Offshore Energy Strategy. “We call it Trump’s ‘Oceans Last’ strategy,’” says Save Our Shores Executive Director Katherine O’Dea. The executive order, signed in April 2017, calls for a federal review of all U.S. marine sanctuaries to determine whether they contain oil, gas, or rare-earth minerals.

California’s coastal ecosystems have been endangered by the threat of offshore drilling and mineral extraction many times in the past. These same issues spurred the formation of a grassroots environmental movement in the 1970s, which led ultimately to the founding of Save Our Shores in 1980, and the Monterey Bay’s sanctuary designation, which was granted by an Act of Congress in 1992. Because the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) just celebrated its 25th anniversary in September, it seems to be outside of the executive order’s purview, which only threatens marine sanctuaries designated in the last decade. But an addendum to MBNMS, the Davidson Seamount, was added in 2008, and the

sanctuary status of the nearly 30 miles of underwater mountains may be found expendable under the executive order. “It’s not contiguous with the rest of the sanctuary and sits quite far offshore—which may make it sound like it’s not a big deal—but the reason they’re looking at any of these new or expanded sanctuaries is primarily for the opportunity to perform extractive energy exploration,” says O’Dea. She points out that if energy extraction were to happen on the seamount, the oil, gas, or minerals would have to be piped or shipped back to shore. “And as we’ve seen play out over and over and over again, there is likely to be a mishap—a leak somewhere—and that would be very devastating to

Opposite Page: The Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig famously exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010, causing the catastrophic BP oil spill. Incidents like this further local concerns about drilling and mining off the California coast. PHOTO: U.S. COAST GUARD/PUBLIC DOMAIN

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the original acreage designated as the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary,” she explains. Researchers haven’t found overwhelming evidence for large oil or natural gas reserves under the seamount that would interest the private sector, but there is a possibility that the sanctuary contains rare-earth minerals. If the federal review found evidence of potential mineral deposits, the

executive order allows for further productive exploration. “To explore for minerals, they would have to use explosives on the seabed, which would create a tremendous disruption to the immediate habitat and ecosystems. How far out is hard to estimate,” says O’Dea. “And if the rareearth minerals were to escape into the open water, the flow would take them into the Monterey Bay

Sanctuary. They would get into the sea life’s food chain, and ultimately the human food chain. And, unlike oil spills, there are no measures designed to clean up minerals.” Even if the federal review decided to maintain the Davidson Seamount’s sanctuary status, the Monterey Bay could still be in hot water. If offshore oil drilling is allowed north, off the coast of Sonoma and Mendocino counties,

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On Jan. 25, 1969, a huge blowout in the ocean floor occurred at this site in Santa Barbara, Calif., spilling thick sludge across Santa Barbara’s harbor and the nearby coast. PHOTO: DOC SEARLS

and an oil spill occurred, the ocean currents would guide the pollutants directly into the Monterey Bay. “There’s an ocean eddy off the coast where the oil would be trapped. It would be extremely difficult to clean up because the eddy motion would contaminate our shores over and over again,” says O’Dea. “We can’t just put our blinders on and ignore the rest of the coast. It’s all one ecosystem and what happens anywhere on the coast is still our concern.” The executive order is considerably frustrating to anyone familiar with the processes that created the six marine sanctuaries and five marine national monuments now subject to federal review. The sanctuary designation is a grueling process that consists of reviews and studies by multiple organizations

and individuals that can span a decade or more. “They wouldn’t be designated a sanctuary if serious review hadn’t already been conducted,” says O’Dea. The Department of Commerce (DOC) held a public comment period for the executive order over the summer of 2017, during which time Save Our Shores and more than 52,000 others offered their opinions. The DOC will complete and submit the results of their review to the Office of Management and Budget, the Council on Environmental Quality and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy no later than Oct. 25. They will then decide on further actions. Save Our Shores is one of hundreds of organizations worldwide working to prevent this executive order from threatening the coastline.

Local lawmakers have also vowed to ensure the continued protection of our marine sanctuaries, like Assemblymember Mark Stone, who O’Dea considers “an asset to our community,” and Congressman Jimmy Panetta, the son of one of the sanctuary’s original champions, Leon Panetta. “Our nation’s marine sanctuaries were created to protect the living treasures that are our oceans,” Panetta tells Waves. “California has had a long history of oil drilling, and oil spills, so local and federal governments have stepped up to protect our oceans and coastal communities. I’m going to keep fighting to protect and preserve our ocean so that my daughters, and future generations, can enjoy everything that our coast has to offer.”

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O N S THE SANTA CRUZ PHOTOGRAPHER CHASES RAINBOWS, WATERFALLS AND THE MILKY WAY By DAVE DE GIVE

M

ost people chalk up finding a rainbow to a stroke of good luck or chance, but acclaimed Santa Cruz photographer Neil Simmons has refined the art of rainbow spotting practically to a science. While he enjoys seeing rainbows as much as anyone, he also takes a certain satisfaction in putting himself in the right place at the right time to photograph them, whether it’s in the Monterey Bay, at a Yosemite National Park waterfall, or at a geyser in Yellowstone National Park.

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X "The Milky Way over the Pfeiffer Beach arch with a crescent moon. Each year for two days, a crescent moon lines up with the Milky Way. Though the moon appears round, it's just a sliver—the 25-second exposure makes it show up as a circle."

X "The Milky Way from an old tunnel in Davenport, lit with a flashlight."

“I kind of have a knack for rainbows,” says Simmons, who has honed the skill of determining the exact angle between the sun, his camera and the water needed to see and photograph these auspicious streaks of colorful light. Whether it’s finding the perfect rainbow by day or capturing incredible shots of the Milky Way at night, Simmons fills the role of not only outdoor photographer, but also of amateur astronomer, budding meteorologist, and a steadfast collector of maps and apps that help him track what the Earth and the

stars are doing on any given day. He has, for example, mapped out and recorded the best times and positions to capture rainbows at the various Yosemite waterfalls and he recently began doing the same thing for geysers in Yellowstone. Planning and preparation are an important part of his craft, and getting a great picture is the reward that motivates him to put in the hard work. “If I put myself in the right position, good things happen,” says Simmons. Waves recently caught up with Simmons at his Capitola Village photo gallery. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 7 7


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X "One-hour star trails over Upper Yosemite Falls. Cars and buses drove by on the road below, illuminating the mountainside."

X "My favorite photo I've ever taken: an Ancient Bristle Cone under the Milky Way, lit up with a flashlight."

What is your favorite time of day to shoot your fine-art photography? Night photography is my favorite because you kind of know what’s going to happen but you kind of don’t. You can manipulate things with flashlights and other lights. Do you have a favorite photograph? [The above shot from Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest] is my favorite shot I’ve ever taken. Those trees are the oldest living things on Earth;

they’re called the Ancient Bristlecone Pine trees. Just being in that place is so special. You’re up at 11-12,000 feet, not a lot of people are around. That orange glow, that’s L.A., like, 300 miles way. I’m nowhere near Southern California or L.A. but you just can’t escape the glow it gives off. But it kind of helps make the shot—it shows you the mountain range there. If you look at that shot long enough, that tree looks like some crazy creature, like it’s from another planet [with] sci-fi, crazy Halloween colors. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 79


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How do you illuminate both a tree and the stars in the same shot? It’s a 25-second exposure and I’m just lighting up the tree with a flashlight for three seconds. I’ve seen the Milky Way, but the camera picks up way more of it because it’s sitting there for 25 seconds, letting in more light. So I can flash the tree for a couple of seconds. If I did it for more than three seconds, it just blasts out the whole picture, just way too bright. We call it painting with light—just a couple seconds and then it’s done.

X "This rainbow lasted an hour, so I had time to get a turtle near the surface."

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"Four inches of snow fell on my 39th birthday—June 12—while backpacking near Sonora Pass." PHOTO: JAKE SIMMONS

What are the roles of planning and spontaneity in your work? I’d say most of it’s planned, because I know where [for example] the Milky Way’s going to be. I know East, West, North, and South, where everything lines up. And there are apps out there that certainly help you know were the moon is going to be, or the Milky Way’s going to be, and what time, what day—so I just try to use those creatively. There are things in Yosemite that everyone, especially photographers, knows about, like a

moonbow [lunar rainbow] twice a year … [or] the 10 days a year the sun is lined up at Horsetail Fall, when it gets that reddish color. I’m trying to create the Santa Cruz version of that: how the moon will line up with the Cement Ship or the lighthouse. Where do I need to stand to see that?

the North Star up above something like a geyser or [line up] Yellowstone Lake with the North Star, I’m already thinking [about it]. I’ll look at a map or walk around, because not many pictures happen at 1 in the afternoon, so I might as well think of stuff and get the compass out and try to figure out what I can line up later.

How do you prepare for a specific shot? When I show up to a place like Yellowstone, I’m already thinking, “OK, West is here, East is there,” … so that later at night if I want to get

Visit Neil Simmons' gallery at 309 Capitola Ave., Capitola. Find him online at neilsimmonsphotography.com and on Instagram: @neilsimmonsphotography.

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MIND & BODY

This cold and flu season, let food be thy medicine

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Natural Defense


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MIND & BODY

By LINDA KOFFMAN

W

inter is coming. With the threat of sickness looming, you might be surprised to find that your pantry or local farmers market are already armed with plenty of natural soldiers to help you ward off attacks on your immune system. That means you can keep the pharmaceutical concoctions at bay and take some preemptive measures against seasonal colds and flus simply by cultivating everyday ingredients. Santa Cruz herbalist Dr. Darren Huckle, L.Ac., of Roots of Wellness, and Dr. Lonna Larsh, M.D., of Holistic Family Doctors, recommend a balanced regimen of hydration, herbal remedies, healthy foods and sleep—because when the temps drop, it doesn’t mean you have to, as well. Here are their top tips for fall and winter wellness.

FRESH GINGER

Fresh ginger is an effective diaphoretic, meaning it causes perspiration. “Sweating is a very traditional way to clear early-stage colds, quite the opposite of our modern tendency to take things like Aspirin [or] Ibuprofen, which help us feel more comfortable for the moment but actually may prolong our suffering by dampening our immune response,” says Dr. Huckle. Follow these easy steps: • Grate 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger • Pour 12 ounces of boiled water over ginger, cover, and let steep • Bundle up and drink the ginger infusion • Enjoy the light sweat that the beverage induces, enhancing your immune system and decreasing the rate of virus replication

GOURMET MUSHROOMS “Mushrooms like shiitake, oyster and all the gourmet edible mushrooms like porcini and chanterelle help activate our immune system to be more effective at preventing the colonization and proliferation of cold and flu viruses,” explains Dr. Huckle.

ZZZS

“Rest is second only to love as the best healer,” says Dr. Larsh. “Sleep deprivation is a sure way to get sick.” At the end of the day, a comfy bed and pillow remain keys to good health.

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RAW GARLIC

CANNING SALT

PHOTO: DWAIN CHRISTENSEN

Dr. Larsh relies on canning salt “because it dissolves best” when gargling with warm water to soothe a sore throat, and for use in warm water via a Neti Pot for nasal washes.

BONE BROTH

Hydration via water and warming soups is a must during fall and winter. “Bone broth is great any time, even on its own, because it’ll keep your gut healthy, which is so important in maintaining overall immunity,” says Dr. Larsh. “I love to add astragalus and turmeric to soup for immunity boosting in the fall and winter.”

“Garlic is amazing at fending off more than just vampires,” says Dr. Huckle. “It activates the immune system, decongests the lungs, and your off-gassing of garlic breath is actually fumigating your lungs, throat and sinus, making it hard for viruses and bacteria to establish themselves.” Combat early-stage colds with this recipe: • Crush or finely chop 6 cloves of garlic • Add garlic to 1 tablespoon of honey or 2 tablespoons of olive oil • Consume over the course of the day. Raw garlic can be irritating to an empty stomach so be sure to have some food in your belly before ingesting the mixture.

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ORANGE OR TANGERINE PEELS

Dr. Huckle says adding these citrus peels to hot water can help strengthen digestion and decongest the lungs and nose. Try this recipe: • Finely chop or grate 1 teaspoon of organic orange or tangerine peels • Finely chop or grate 1 teaspoon of grated ginger • Pour 16 ounces of boiling water over the grated ingredients, cover, allow to cool, and add a teaspoon of honey

CARDAMOM

BEAUTY AND THE YEAST

Dr. Huckle recommends cardamom as a warming moodlifter for dreary days: Deeply inhale the aromas as you drink 1 teaspoon of ground cardamom in a cup of hot water.

When it’s cold and you’re craving cheesy warm comfort foods, try nutritional yeast as a healthy substitute. While cheese is fatty, nutritional yeast is a vegan-friendly topping that’s only about 30 calories per tablespoon. The yellow flakes boast protein, fiber, folic acid, and vitamin B12 in a flavorful form that adds salty, cheesy appeal to your fireside meal.

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Photographer Gary Irving’s new series explores humanity’s dark side

L

By DAMON ORION

ocal multimedia artist Gary Irving has never been one to shy away from dark subjects. In the past, he has used everything from zombies to alien abductions as themes for his vivid, cinematic-looking composite photos. Irving takes a painterly approach to his work, using his Photoshop skills to create instantly striking pictures that more than live up to his tagline of “images unrestricted by reality.” In his latest series, Irving uses the Christian symbolism of the deadly sins to shine a light on humanity’s gluttony, greed and disrespect of nature, which manifests in overconsumption and pollution. As opposed to the seven deadly sins more commonly known in the present day, Irving has titled his exhibit Eight Deadly Sins—a

reference to the concept of eight cardinal sins that prevailed before Pope Gregory I revised the list in 590 A.D. Eight Deadly Sins is set in the Elizabethan era, a turning point in history just prior to the invention of the steam engine and the subsequent rise of the oil engine, fossil fuels and plastic. To replicate the look of the time period, Irving rented costumes from San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theater. “I lucked out,” the Wales-born photographer explains. “Because of the size of the people, there were only seven dresses that fit [the models]; then it went into really large dresses.” Happily, no costume was needed for the final piece in the series, VAINGLORY (Vanity), which consists of a mirror within a stylized frame.

Opposite Page: "Divine retribution is supernatural punishment by a deity in response to some action," explains the artist. "The sin of wrath can be seen in the production of genetically modified food. When humans discovered agriculture, we began to destroy the land as we sucked nutrients from the Earth. In response, Mother Nature brought the dust bowl upon us and was unable to provide the food we needed. Being the sinful creatures that we are, we took food creation into our own hands, as if to say, 'How dare you not feed us; watch us pump chemicals into you and feed ourselves!' We chose to play God, and bring our wrath upon the Earth."

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“I WOULD HAVE NEVER THOUGHT IN MY DAY THAT THERE WOULDN’T BE FISH IN THE OCEAN, AND WE’D HAVE TO MAKE THEM. TO ME, THAT’S SURREAL.”

This is the first series in which Irving used only one light source for his photos. “I didn’t want that many shadows on [the models’] faces,” he says. “I wanted them to look kind of like porcelain, like from the olden days when they used to make themselves white.” The one-off casings for these photographs are works of art unto themselves. Irving has crafted elegantly ominous skeletons, skulls and ravens within black frames whose archlike shapes serve as a reminder of the Catholic Church’s hardline stance on cardinal sins. Every picture in this series shows a different female representing Mother Nature. Between each subject’s hands is an item that represents the sin for which the piece is named. For example, in GULA ​ (Gluttony), a stark-faced woman holds a fish skeleton with a bar code, symbolizing the genetic modification of fish and the

VANITY

"Vanity was the eighth sin that was eliminated in 590 A.D. However, vanity surrounds us today; it may be the biggest sin of all. Our society has become focused on how we look, how we represent ourselves on social media, judgement of someone who looks what we consider to be 'wrong.' So look in the mirror. It is one of a kind, just like you. Look deep into your own eyes and embrace your differences, along with everyone else’s."

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GLUTTONY

"The sin of gluttony is represented here in the overconsumption of food. Humans are the only animals that gather more food than is necessary for survival, and are then wasteful of that food. Genetically modified fish, and the evolution of fish farming, are a prime example of this."

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“ALMOST EVERY DEAD SHOREBIRD FOUND HAS A PIECE OF THAT [COCA-COLA BOTTLE CAP] IN ITS STOMACH. THEY THINK IT’S A CRUSTACEAN, SO THEY EAT IT.”

evolution of fish farming as consequences of overfishing. Irving feels this exemplifies our society’s waste and overconsumption of food. “I would have never thought in my day that there wouldn’t be fish in the ocean, and we’d have to make them,” he muses. “To me, that’s surreal, and it’s been going on forever.” SUPERBIA ​(Pride) deals with the smugness that humans display as they poison themselves. The portrait’s subject holds a bottle made of BPA and topped with a red cap that looks suspiciously like a Coca-Cola bottle cap. As Irving explains, the CocaCola Company continues to manufacture these unrecyclable caps in spite of the fact that they have killed millions of birds. “Almost every dead shorebird found has a piece of that [Coca-Cola bottle cap] in its stomach,” he says. “They think it’s a crustacean, so they eat it.”

PRIDE

"A huge step forward in civilization and technology was the creation of plastic in 1907. This was something to be very proud of as humankind, therefore symbolizing the sin of pride here is a plastic bottle. Our invention may have been life changing in technology, efficiency, and affordability, but in 110 years we have managed to overuse plastic in ways [so that it has] gotten into our bloodstreams and bodies."

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GREED

"One of the many ways in which humans commit the sin of greed is the production of wind farms. Wind farms are built in areas with high wind, which are also known to be areas that birds utilize for flying through. The more energy we use, the more we want, and with the progression of the electronic age, human greed for energy is being disregarded. We are producing energy at the price of nature."

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“WE’VE GOT ONE-WHEELED THINGS THAT WE CAN RIDE AROUND ON INSTEAD OF WALKING. WE’RE ALL ON PHONES. WITH SPELL CHECK, YOU DON’T NEED TO LEARN TO SPELL.”

INVIDIA (​ Envy) explores our tendency to covet each other’s material possessions. It specifically targets our collective fetish for fancy cars, which leads to the overuse of fossil fuels. This particular picture was the last one that Irving shot for the series. “I just couldn’t think what it was going to be,” he recalls. “I was driving home, and a Johnny Cash song came on. I think the lyric was, ‘Driving my car with dinosaur bones.’” In spite of the fact that fossil fuels do not actually come from dinosaur remains, the lyric was enough to kick-start Irving’s creative process. In ACEDIA (​ Sloth), we see a cyber-ized infant representing the birth of electronics—a development that Irving feels has made us lazy. “We’ve got one-wheeled things that we can ride around on instead of walking,” he notes with a laugh. “We’re all on phones. With spell check, you don’t need to learn to spell.” Asked which of these deadly sins Irving himself is most guilty of, the photographer ventures, “Well, I drive a truck, so I daresay

ENVY

"People are inevitably envious of each other, wanting bigger houses, fancier cars, and more stuff. The sin of envy is represented here by the use of fossil fuels to produce bigger and better, so that we might keep up with wanting the next best of what each other has."

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SLOTH

"The infant here represents the birth of electronics. Humans have created technology that has caused the sin of sloth at an unstoppable rate as it has made the world lazy. We have stopped learning to do things ourselves, stopped going outside, and become addicted to screens."

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PHOTO: DEAN BENTLEY

IRVING HAS CRAFTED ELEGANTLY OMINOUS ONE-OFF FRAMES FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHS THAT ARE WORKS OF ART UNTO THEMSELVES.

it would have to be the oil.” He quickly buffers this admission with an explanation that although he has an electric car, he was obligated to buy a gas-powered truck in 2004 when he took a gig shooting for Fox Racing and Transworld Motocross in unpopulated parts of Moab, Utah, and England. “My truck is fully self-sufficient and can get me out into the wilderness for weeks on end, looking for those empty, barren lands to shoot my backdrops,” he explains.

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The Eight Deadly Sins exhibit opened at Irving’s Westside Santa Cruz studio (located at 1010 Fair Ave., Ste. K in Santa Cruz) on Sept. 1. It will move over to the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History in January 2018, but, in the meantime, seeing these pictures in their natural habitat makes a perfect way to ring in the dark season. Learn more at garyfoto.com.


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LUST

"The sin of lust leads to rape. Shown here is how people have raped the Earth’s land by clear cutting and deforestation. Trees and plants are the lungs of the Earth, and yet we are destroying what gives us the air we breathe in order to fulfill our lust for money."­­­

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Dane Anderson over the step and into the turquoise tunnel somewhere on the Central Coast. PHOTO: BRYAN GARRISON

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y e n r u o J e h t to ais w a t Men

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Siberut

Sipora

North Pagai

South Pagai

By CHAD UNDERHILL-MERAS

I

t all started at 5 a.m., when two full-size trucks and a dump trailer made the rounds, acquiring a crew of intergenerational Santa Cruz legends and getting stacked to the brim with hefty board bags and luggage. Friends from Hawaii and Australia joined us as we made the long trek to our final destination—the Mentawai Islands, a group of remote, pristine islands in Indonesia. Along the way, there were full-terminal Home Alonestyle sprints with 50-pound board bags, stuffed buses and trams, and small propelled puddle-jumper planes.

Left: Draw a line, hold on, and drive. One of the least publicized stops we made ended up delivering the biggest, best, most consistent waves of the trip. This was a day that made it impossible to come back to the boat. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI

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Top: The beautiful D'Bora, anchored at our home for the time being. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI Bottom Left: Tyler "the Hog" Smith gracing into a green, tender wall. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI Bottom Right: This was the full crew. Top (left to right): Boat guide Joey "MC Smooth," Joey "The Head" Hutson, crewman Agust, Mark "Munster" Taylor, crewman/captain Frankie, Tyler "the Hog" Smith, crewman Ekka, Aaron "Mouse" Taylor, Kory "Zone" Kvenild, crewman Ari, chef Ruley. Bottom (left to right): Marin "Rin" Brandt, Darren "Dazza" Morgan, James "Robbo" Robinson, Chad "Cheeedles" Underhill-Meras, Kyle "Bolo" Hirayama, and boat mechanic Nana. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI

STILL DARK OUT, ONE BY ONE THE ZOMBIES ARRIVED ON DECK FOR A CUP OF COFFEE.

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We made our way through Hong Kong, Singapore, and Kuala Lumpur before finally arriving in Sumatra, Indonesia, where we boarded our boat, the D’Bora, on a warm evening. On board, five fine Indonesian crewmembers and our guide Joey (whom we later nicknamed “MC

Smooth”) greeted us. Soon, we set off into the pitch-black open sea for our first of 13 nights aboard. Even with several full days of travel and time changes behind us, the anticipation of our first sunrise and views of the most beautiful, perfect islands and waves in the world


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Top: The landscape matched the beauty of the waves and water. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI Bottom Left: The islands were endless and postcard worthy. PHOTO: KYLE HIRAYAMA/@SC_HAMACHI Bottom Right: A standard evening visual: unwinding while enjoying the sunset, with dinner on its way. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI

woke everyone up before dawn. Still dark out, one by one the zombies arrived on deck for a cup of coffee. We watched as the sunrise bloomed in pink and orange clouds over the deep blue. As quickly as the sun had risen, the men turned to boys and let loose with a variety of hilarious, sometimes

vulgar, next-level heckling that would have us all in tears of laughter the entire trip. The islands were what we liked to call “postcard worthy” and “so tender.” Nothing was out of place. The white sand beaches were covered with palms, banana trees, shells

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Top: Kory "Zone" Kvenild slicing it to the sky at HT's. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI Bottom Left: Days often ended with cotton-candy skies and a cold Bintang beer, helping to put our weathered bodies at ease. PHOTO: CHAD UNDERHILL-MERAS/@CUM_QUAT Bottom Right: We were dropped off at a few different islands on this particular night and discovered some rad sights. PHOTO: JOEY/@DBORA_MENTAWAI

and fallen coconuts. Surrounding the greenery were turquoise waters pumping with swell that kept us in the water every day of the trip. Our boat and the kindhearted crew kept up with the beauty of the islands, providing us with amazing food, navigation, knowledge, and laughs.

With their skills and plenty of planning, we were able to hit all of the islands from South Pagai up to Siberut, which was a difficult feat in the amount of time we were aboard. During our final dinner we exchanged gratitude, gifts, and hugs, making it known how thankful we were.

OUR BOAT AND THE KINDHEARTED CREW KEPT UP WITH THE BEAUTY OF THE ISLANDS, PROVIDING US WITH AMAZING FOOD, NAVIGATION, KNOWLEDGE, AND LAUGHS.

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Exceptional Grill Stylishly Casual

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16

ROTATING DRAFTS & OVER 1000 BEERS - FULL BAR -

SUNDAY

CHEF’S SPECIAL BRUNCH OPEN AT 10AM FOR FOOD AND FOOTBALL (BRUNCH 10AM-3PM)

follow us on taphunter

New Aptos Location Coming Soon

Open 11am-1:30am

Happy Hour: $2off all pints (Mon-Sat 4-6pm & 11pm-Mid Sunday 11am-6pm & 11pm-Mid) 841 ALMAR AVE SANTA CRUZ, CA 95067 (831) 421-0507 THEPARISHPUBLICK.COM

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santa cruz

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FOOD&DRINK

PHOTOS: @DECOTARTELETTE

LOCAL EATS

A Feast for the Eyes By MELISSA DUGE SPIERS

F

rom sharing a new favorite beer to documenting our first perfectly hand-rolled, homemade croissant, we have all occasionally given in to the nearly universal urge to snap photos of our food and post them to Instagram. Most of our efforts are decidedly off-hand and amateur, however, with no grand scheme for color, theme, or presentation. But then there are these five Santa Cruz Instagrammers, whose feeds are quite the opposite: utterly drool-worthy, sexy feasts of photos that elevate the art of food portraiture to a whole new level of “food porn.”

@decotartelette Self-described “mama, amateur baker, cocktail shaker, [and] fashion enthusiast” Cassie Winslow has curated a chic, pink-saturated feed that gorgeously showcases food, scenes, and riots of beautiful flowers in photos worthy of glossy lifestyle-magazine spreads. Not simply satisfied with providing pretty images, however, Winslow also offers clear info on where to buy the things featured in her posts, and she backs up the enticing food pics with full details and recipes on her eponymous website, decotartelette.com.

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Friendly Service ... Fantastic Food! Â

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FOOD&DRINK

LOCAL EATS

@foodandhealth Judy Doherty is a professional publisher and food photographer who produces sophisticated, stunning visual presentation materials for health educators that are sold on her website, nutritioneducationstore. com. In her personal @foodandhealth Instagram feed, however, she has nothing to sell or teach, no long descriptions, and sometimes no words at all. She offers up only a celebration of the beauty of food in the most exquisite photos of meals, dishes, produce and drinks, from dimly lit Rembrandt-esque still-life tableaux to displays of sexy dancing peppers and glowing translucent orange slices. Followers are also alerted to Doherty’s upcoming gallery shows, where her mouthwatering photographs are viewable magnificently larger than life.

@missionhillcreamery 31 Flavors this is not: more like 3,001 (and counting) unique and addictively delicious ice cream masterpieces. Mission Hill Creamery, a 7-year-old shop on Pacific Avenue, has developed an ardent following (including the Monterey Bay Aquarium) that eagerly awaits each release of their constantly changing, unusually flavored selections created from fresh, local, organic ingredients. In their weekly Instagram “flavor patrol” posts they offer tantalizing sneak peeks of the surprising elements appearing in upcoming blends. Recent examples include basil, serrano chilis, candycap mushrooms, figs, goat cheese, grapefruit, and wakame.

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FOOD&DRINK

LOCAL EATS

@chef_daniela Chef Daniela Gerson is in the enviable position of plying her trade as caterer, personal chef, and cooking instructor not only in Santa Cruz, but in Hawaii and the San Francisco Bay Area, as well. Equally enviable is her talent for brilliantly plating and photographing her organic, locally sourced creations, showcasing them in an Instagram feed drenched in richly saturated colors, textures and flavors. She pairs all of her photos with short, user-friendly ingredient specs, guidance, and descriptions that inspire us all to step up our kitchen game and believe that we, too, are capable of such culinary artistry.

@thecuratedfeast Food historian and specialevent producer extraordinaire Liz Birnbaum orchestrates intricate dinners around themes like Botanical Imperialism, in which everything from the table setting to the dessert applies to the history, mythology and culture of her chosen topic. Likewise, her Instagram feed is an always-enlightening stream of deliciously packaged food education, with posts about subjects like the etymology of the word fervent (as it relates to food passion), the origin of doughnuts, and the geographical history of Santa Cruz food production. Each informational nugget is, naturally, paired with an elegant, scrollstopping photo and a fuller, more detailed version available on her website, thecuratedfeast.org.

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NOVEMBER 18

PASSPORT DAY! PURCHASE A SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS WINE PASSPORT TODAY! Wine aficionados are welcomed to over 50 wineries throughout the region, each offering a unique and unforgettable time. Wine passports are $65 and good for 2 years.

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FOOD&DRINK

DRINKS

1

PHOTO: COURTESY OF RYAN STIRM

Endless

HARVEST For winemaker Ryan Stirm, everything happens for a Riesling By PAUL WETTERAU

Much like surfer Robert “Wingnut” Weaver in 1994’s classic surf film Endless Summer II, 29-year-old Ryan Stirm gets his stoke from following the season. Whether it’s harvesting Riesling in Santa Barbara or jumping on a plane to pick Chardonnay grapes in Western Australia, the easygoing vintner thrives off of the sense of adventure that harvests bring him—and it doesn’t hurt that he often finds himself in wine regions that also have good waves.

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Winery & Tasting Room

Watsonville, CA 95076 Sat & Sun 12p-5p Sat & Sun 12p-5p

Soquel, Wed CA 95073 - Sun 12p-5p

888.247.8333

888.247.8333

Tasting Room

5015 Soquel Drive Tasting Room Soquel, 5015 Soquel Drive CA 95073

11 Hangar Way Winery & Tasting Room Watsonville, CA 95076 11 Hangar Way

Wed - Sun 12p-5p

831.708.WINE

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831.728.5172 420 HAMES RD CORRALITOS ALFAROWINE.COM


FOOD&DRINK

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF RYAN STIRM

DRINKS

Stirm helms Stirm Wine Company, an Aromas-based custom-crush operation that helps those looking to make their own wine. With his earnings, Stirm makes his own product. Whether it’s a client who is looking to start a one-barrel project or another who already has a serious brand, he offers thorough consultation: Do you want to use new barrels or old? Were you thinking of de-stemming or going whole-cluster? Do you want to harvest early to preserve acid and freshness, or were you thinking of making a fruitforward and full-bodied style? He’s open-minded with clients and encourages creativity—with a few limitations (he won’t let them make Pruno, aka “prison wine,” for one). Many winemakers tend to imbibe their own juice, but Stirm eschews the idea of acquiring a “house palate.” Instead, he can be found sipping Brézé—a high-acid Chenin Blanc from France’s Loire Valley—at Soif Wine Bar, in downtown Santa Cruz, with fellow nonconformists. Stirm’s winemaking style is as hip and untraditional as his tastes—he has, after all, chosen to sell his Riesling in cans. Although he holds a degree in viticulture from Cal Poly San Louis

Obispo, Stirm gives more of the credit for his wine career to his mentor, Justin Willet, owner/winemaker at worldrenowned Tyler Winery in Santa Barbara, whom he met rock-climbing. “Justin didn’t come from an academic background and had more of an oldschool approach,” Stirm says. “He inspired me to try some great wines, when I really didn’t know any better.” Stirm went on to work for Willet as an apprentice for four years before becoming his assistant winemaker. On the day of our interview, something seems amiss about Stirm’s typically laid-back and soft-spoken nature. I could hear it in his voice: He had the harvest on his mind. He’s intent on finishing the conversation so that he can begin netting his vines. “The starling birds will peck at your perfect fruit and ruin the vintage if you’re not careful ... and I don’t have the money to hire falconers to send their hawks off to scare away bad birds,” he says. Stirm doesn’t have enough funding (yet) to own his own vineyards, so he farms for clients in exchange for some of their fruit. “I farm about 32 acres of vineyards and only four of those acres actually go into my brand,” he explains. A lot of the vines he’s

working with have been neglected, which, he adds, is actually a great opportunity for him: “Creativity is my biggest asset,” he notes. A health-conscious person, Stirm brings natural and sustainable values to his winemaking. His mission is to pioneer the new age of Riesling, not cause health ailments. As such, he doesn’t fall in line with winemakers who add toxic ingredients to their wines to stabilize their products. “Copper sulphate is used to help aid unhealthy fermentations, but it’s super-toxic,” Stirm says. “Velcorin is another monstrosity. It’s used in CocaCola to stabilize the product, but is so harmful to the body that a licensed doser needs to be present on the bottling line when it’s administered.” Instead, he leaves it alone, and tries not to add anything at all save for grapes. He relies on the yeast that comes in on the fruit’s skins, rather than adding store-bought stuff that he says promotes homogeneity. At the end of the day, he says his focus is on growing quality fruit. “I spend 90 percent in the vineyard, and 10 percent in the cellar,” he says. Learn more at stirmwine.com.

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MICHAEL'S ON MAIN

DINING GUIDE Downtown ASSEMBLY Seasonal rustic California cuisine. 1108 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 824-6100, www.assembleforfood.com

AQUARIUS - DREAM INN Spectacular oceanfront dining just off the beach in Santa Cruz. One of Santa Cruz's top dining destinations, Aquarius offers seafood and organic Californian cuisine. Open every day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, as well as brunch on Sundays. 175 W. Cliff Drive, www.dreaminnsantacruz.com

outdoor patios at all three locations. Expanded menu and full bar at this location only. 1222 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7056, www.bettyburgers.com. Other locations: Midtown (505 Seabright Ave.) and Capitola (1000 41st Ave.).

EARTHBELLY Food stop featuring 100-percent non-GMO and organic sandwiches, soups, salads, burgers and delicious desserts. Eat-in, take out and delivery available. 381 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 621-2248, www.eatearthbelly.com

EL PALOMAR BETTY'S EAT INN Locally owned burger joint with a fun vibe. Features award-winning burgers, fries, salads, beer, wine and shakes. Soak up the sun on the

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Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-7575, www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

HULA'S ISLAND GRILL

PACIFIC THAI

California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

Authentic Thai cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

LAILI Santa Cruz's answer to high-quality Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani / Afghan food. 101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-4545, www. lailirestaurant.com

THE OASIS TASTING ROOM & KITCHEN A collaboration between Uncommon Brewers and el Salchichero. Enjoy beer, small plates, burgers, and ramen. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. 415 A River St., Santa Cruz, (831) 621-8040, www.oasissantacruz.com

PLEASURE PIZZA Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 1415 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7859, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

PONO HAWAIIAN GRILL AND THE REEF Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7666, www.ponohawaiiangrill.com


Live Music Tuesday thru Sunday Sat/Sun Brunch at 9am | www.michaelsonmain.com

(831) 479-9777 / 2591 Main St. Soquel

TUE - FRI 11 AM - LATE / SAT - SUN 9 AM - LATE / CLOSED MONDAYS

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP

Food-Spirits-Entertainment

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FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE POUR TAPROOM Gastropub fare with vegan and glutenfree options. Sixty beers and eight wines on tap. 110 Cooper St., Ste. 100B,(831) 535-7007, pourtaproom.com/santa-cruz.

ULTERIOR

OPEN EVERY DAY OPEN EVERY DAY 11:30am – 10:00pm

Lunch 11:30am Dinner 5:00pm

SEABRIGHT BREWERY

ZOCCOLI’S

Westside/Scotts Valley

Harbor

Tuesdays 3pm-Close. Happy Hour Drink Prices!

TUESDAY NIGHT NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT “Locals Night” – Happy Hour allCUISINE night “Locals Night” – Happy Hour all night CALIFORNIA FARMSTEAD Tuesdays 3pm-Close. Happy Hour Drink Prices! +½ ½ off off Bar Bar Bites Bites Menu Menu + Sotola overlooks the ocean in the heart of

Capitola Village. Our menu showcases seasonal CALIFORNIA FARMSTEAD CUISINE WEDNESDAY NIGHT California Cuisine prepared mostly with locally “Oyster Night” Night” new toppings at discounted discounted “Oyster –– new Sotola overlooks the toppings ocean in at the heart of sourced,prices sustainably produced ingredients. prices + $2 $2 oyster oyster shooters + shooters Capitola Village. Our menu showcases seasonal

California Cuisine prepared mostly with locally

THURSDAY NIGHT

THURSDAY NIGHTCA 95010 231 Esplanade, Ste 102, Capitola, sourced, sustainably produced ingredients. “Local Line Line Caught Caught Special” Special” only only $20 $20 “Local

(831) 854-2800

231 Esplanade, Ste 102, Capitola, CA 95010

www.sotolabarandgrill.com (831) 854-2800

www.sotolabarandgrill.com

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Delicious and authentic Mexican cuisine featuring locally grown, fresh ingredients. 655 Capitola Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 477-9384, www.eljardinrestaurant.net

Exquisite foraged, organic, local and gluten-free dining and cocktails in the heart of Santa Cruz. 110 Pearl Alley, Santa Cruz, (831) 295-3100, www.ulteriorsc.com

Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711, www.zoccolis.com

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Thurs 3-6pm & Fri 3-5pm MONDAY NIGHT “Burger + Beer” Beer” Night HAPPY HOUR “Burger + Night NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT American Burger + Local Draft Beer $13 $13 American Burger + Local Draft Beer Mon-Thurs 3-6pm & Fri 3-5pm

EL JARDIN RESTAURANT

THE CROW’S NEST Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

Midtown AKIRA Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7093, www.akirasantacruz.com

Rotating beer selection, with dogfriendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, www.seabrightbrewery.com

BACK NINE GRILL & BAR Offers daily fresh grill favorites and specials, including a special kids' menu, along with a selection of local California wines and a spirited list of specialty cocktails. 555 Hwy 17, Santa Cruz, www.backninegrill.com

BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

CASCADES BAR & GRILL AT COSTANOA California cuisine, local, organic, and handcrafted ingredients. 2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1, Pescadero, (650) 879-1100, www.costanoa.com

HOLLINS HOUSE

Authentic Hawaiian-style plate lunches. 1700 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 479-3299, www.alohaislandgrille.com

At Pasatiempo. Magnificent views, award-winning cuisine, and outstanding wine list. 20 Clubhouse Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 459-9177, www. pasatiempo.com/hollins-house

THE CRÊPE PLACE

MISSION ST. BBQ

ALOHA ISLAND GRILLE

Array of savory and sweet crêpes, French food and live music. 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 429-6994, www.thecrepeplace.com

Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

CHARLIE HONG KONG

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE

Vegan-oriented menu. Southeast Asian fusion, organic noodle and rice bowls. Chicken, beef, pork and salmon offered. Family and dog friendly. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-5664, www.charliehongkong.com

British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com


& Authentic Hawaiian Style Cuisine...

VOTED BEST HAWAIIAN CUISINE BEST DOG FRIENDLY RESTAURANT 2017

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Open 8:00am-2:00pm Everyday (Closed Tuesday) 427 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Paul Topp Photography

831- 515-7559 avenuecafecapitola.com

EAKF VOTED FAVORITE BR

AST

Now serving brunch Saturday & Sunday We use locally sourced

A Santa Cruz neighborhood brewery and pub specializing in hand-pulled, cask conditioned ales. 21517 EAST CLIFF DR • 831-713-5540

IN THE EAST CLIFF VILLAGE | www.eastcliffbrewing.com ww

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organic ingredients.

salads - sandwiches burgers - soups house specialties pizza - bakery - brunch

www.eatearthbelly.com

Soquel Ave. & Ocean St. Santa Cruz, CA 831-621-2248


4 –7p.m.

LUNCH: MON-SUN 11:30-3:15 HAPPY HOUR: MON-FRI 4-6 LIVE MUSIC: THURS 6-9 • SAT & SUN 2-5 15% OFF LUNCH MENU 11:30 - 3:15 AT BAR STOOLS ONLY

Specials

SUNDAY "LOCAL'S NIGHT" 3 COURSE PRE-FIXED DINNER $30 MONDAY "GARY'S RIB NIGHT" (FULL RACK) $20 ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR WEDNESDAY "SURF & TURF" $30 THURSDAY "DATE NIGHT" FEATURED WINES BY THE BOTTLE HALF PRICE WITH ANY ENTREE

VOTED FAVORITE

RESTAURANT!

RUNNER-UP FAVORITE BAR

215 ESPLANADE

Mon. - Sun. 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 113 Esplanade Rio Del Mar Beach (831) 661-5763

CAPITOLA, CA 95010

831-476-4900 PARADISEBEACHGRILLE.COM

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Voted Favorite Breakfast Burrito

Santa Cruz

WE ROLL THE FATTIES! 22 DIFFERENT KINDS OF BREAKFAST BURRITOS •••• HOUSE-MADE CHAI • ESPRESSO DRINKS ORGANIC FAIR TRADE COFFEE • STEEL CUT OATMEAL BAGELS • SMOOTHIES • SANDWICHES AND SALADS

Live Acoustical sets are back! Every Sunday from 11am-1pm

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M–F: 6:30am–3pm • Sat–Sun: 7am–4pm 831-477-0543 • ChillOutCafeSantaCruz.com • 860 41st Ave


FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

WINGSTOP

ZAMEEN AT THE POINT

The go-to destination when you crave fresh wings, hand-cut seasoned fries and tasty sides. Save time and order online. 845 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 454-9464, www.wingstop.com

Fresh, fast and healthy Mediterranean cuisine. Made-to-order wraps, bowls and salads. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 851 41st Ave, (831) 713-5520

Eastside/Capitola AVENUE CAFÉ Serving traditional breakfast and lunch, along with some Mexican favorites. 427 Capitola Ave., Capitola (831) 515-7559, www.avenuecafecapitola.com

CHILL OUT CAFE Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

EAST SIDE EATERY, PLEASURE PIZZA Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

MARGARITAVILLE Waterfront restaurant offering a lively setting for casual Californian cuisine and cocktails. 231 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-2263, margaritavillecapitola.com

PARADISE BEACH GRILLE

ZELDA'S ON THE BEACH Indoor and outdoor dining with a beachfront deck, where American dishes, including seafood, are served. 203 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 4754900, www.zeldasonthebeach.com

Soquel CAFE CRUZ Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

MICHAEL'S ON MAIN Elevated bar and eatery with a whimsical feel serving a New American menu of small plates and entrees. Weekly live music. 2591 S Main St., Soquel, (831) 479977, www.michaelsonmain.net

SURF CITY SANDWICH Fast-casual dining with craft sandwiches, gourmet soups, salads, and a microtaproom. 4101 Soquel Drive, (831) 346-6952, www.surfcitysandwich.com

TORTILLA FLATS

THE SAND BAR

For more than 25 years, their Mexican food has blended the fieriness of Mexico with the sophistication of French sauces, and the earthiness of the Yucatan and complexity of Santa Fe with all the freshness and lightness that Californians expect. 4616 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 476-1754, tortillaflatsdining.com

Capitola's new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola. (831) 462-1881

Aptos/Watsonville

SHADOWBROOK

APTOS ST. BBQ

Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 4751511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

SOTOLA

BITTERSWEET BISTRO

California farmstead concept focusing on local farms, ranches and seafood. In convivial quarters with an outdoor patio. 231 Esplanade Ste. 102, Capitola, (831) 854- 2800

With its vast menu options from burgers to filet mignon, locally sourced produce, fresh fish and amazing desserts, the varied ambiance is perfect for an intimate dinner or casual gathering with family and friends. Enjoy a local beer on tap in

Fine dining in the Capitola Village. An award-winning beachside restaurant with spectacular ocean views. 215 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-4900, www.paradisebeachgrille.com

Lunch, Dinner, Full Bar M,W,TH,FRI, SAT, SUN 11:30-9:30

Tuesday's Dinner only 5-9:30

Semi private room available for parties up to 24 guests

831-688-5566 9051 SOQUEL DR APTOS

www.thehideoutaptos.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 9


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE

the lounge while watching one of

CAFE RIO

FLAT'S BISTRO

and dinner specials. 21 Seascape

your favorite sports. Relax by the

Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

Coffee, pastries and wood-fired pizzas. 113 Esplanade, Rio Del Mar Beach, Aptos, (831) 661-5763, www.flatsbistro.com

Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9000,

CALIFORNIA GRILL

THE HIDEOUT

koi pond during happy hour with a handcrafted cocktail. The heated outdoor patio welcomes good dog owners and their furry friends. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www.burgeraptos.com

CAFE BITTERSWEET Breakfast and lunch served Tuesday through Sunday. Outdoor dog-friendly patio. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831-662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

Featuring fresh, local, organic produce from Lakeside Organic Gardens, choice meats, fresh seafood and refreshing drinks. 1970 A Freedom Blvd., Freedom, (831) 722-8052, www.californiagrillrestaurant.com

CILANTROS Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood. 1934 Main St., Watsonville, (831) 761-2161, www.elpalomarcilantros.com

Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service. 9051 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-5566, www.thehideoutaptos.com

MANUEL'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos, (831) 688-4848, www.manuelsrestaurant.com

PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive tequila selection. Happy Hour,

www.palapasrestaurant.com

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE BEACH RESORT Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seacscape Resort Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-7120, www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients. 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 6888987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

ZAMEEN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE Flavorful meals in a casual dining setting. 7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-4465, www.zameencuisine.com

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FROM WINGSTOP SANTA CRUZ

SANTA CRUZ 845 ALMAR AVENUE • (831) 454-WING (9464) CORNER OF MISSION BLVD & ALMAR AVE IN THE SAFEWAY SHOPPING CENTER

SKIP THE WAIT. ORDER @ WINGSTOP.COM OPEN DAILY FROM 11AM-MIDNIGHT

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 1


FOOD&DRINK SI N C E 1 9 6 5

DINING GUIDE

San Lorenzo Valley COWBOY BAR AND GRILL Sandwiches, steaks and American fare served in a kid-friendly joint with a country-western theme. 5447 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 3352330, www.feltoncowboy.com

THE CREMER HOUSE The perfect spot to enjoy a cold, handcrafted beer, a glass of local wine, or a homemade soda while trying dishes using local, organic, farm-raised sustainable ingredients, as well as vegetarian items. 6256 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 335-3976, www.cremerhouse.com

Chill hangout with a patio and live music. Dishes up classic American eats plus a variety of brews. 479 Alvarado St., (831) 655-3031, www.bullandbearca.com

CANNERY ROW BREWING CO. A family-friendly, beer-concept restaurant that offers the second largest number of beers available on tap in Northern California. 95 Prescott Ave., Monterey, (831) 643-2722, www. canneryrowbrewingcompany.com

JACKS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

Moss Landing

Eatery at the Portola Hotel serving sustainable cuisine in a nauticalthemed dining room and lounge. 2 Portola Plaza, Monterey, (831) 6492698, www.portolahotel.com/jacksrestaurant-lounge

HAUTE ENCHILADA CAFE

MISSION RANCH

An eclectic menu made with sustainable seafood and local organic produce. Wine and beer tasting plus two art galleries featuring local artists. 7902 Moss Landing Road, Moss Landing, 633-5843, www.hauteenchilada.com

THE WHOLE ENCHILADA Mexican seafood restaurant with a relaxed harbor atmosphere. 7904 CA-1, Moss Landing, 633-3038, www.wholeenchilada.com.

Monterey County ABALONETTI Specializes in Monterey Bay calamari and offers almost a dozen varieties of squid dishes. 57 Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey, (831) 373-1851, www.abalonettimonterey. com

ALVARADO STREET BREWERY Brewery serving craft beer and local eats in a historic space with an industrial vibe. 426 Alvarado St., (831) 655-2337, www. alvaradostreetbrewery.com

BIG FISH GRILL Open for lunch, brunch, and dinner, or stop by to enjoy a cocktail and stunning views at the restaurant’s bar and lounge. The ambiance is casual California. 101 Fisherman's Wharf #1, Monterey, (831) 372-7562, www.bigfishmonterey.com

14 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

BULL AND BEAR WHISKEY AND TAP HOUSE

Serving American comfort food in a farmhouse restored by Clint Eastwood with pastoral views. 26270 Dolores St., Carmel-By-The-Sea, (831) 624-6436, www.missionranchcarmel.com

MY ATTIC A great place to take a date or go with friends after work for appetizers and signature cocktails with a plush vibe. 414 Alvarado St., Monterey, (831) 647-1834, www.myattic1937.com

MYO FROZEN YOGURT Create your own fro-yo masterpiece with rotating yogurt flavors and creative toppings. Multiple locations around Monterey County. 1091 S. Main St., Salinas, (831) 759-9769 and 840 Obama Way, Seaside, (831) 375-3769

PETER B’S BREWPUB This casual eatery and on-site brewery offers American bar bites, beer flights and growlers. 2 Portola Plaza, Monterey, (831) 649-2699, www.portolahotel.com

SARDINE FACTORY This recently made-over seafood spot is still a classic, serving American fare in an upscale setting. 701 Wave St., Monterey, (831) 373-3775, www.sardinefactory.com

TASTE BISTRO AND CAFE Treasured by the local community for excellent food and service. 1199 Forest Ave., Pacific Grove, (831) 6550324, www.tastecafebistro.com


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 3


DESIGN

& & ART D&A STUDIO GRAPHIC DESIGN: LAYOUT | LOGOS | BRANDING | ART | ILLUSTRATION PRINT DESIGN: ADVERTISING DESIGN | PUBLICATION DESIGN | BROCHURE DESIGN & MORE 831.332.9883 | DESIGNANDART365.COM 14 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


Unlimited Yoga Membership *

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79/ month

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lumayoga.com 831.325.2620 | 1010 Center Street Santa Cruz CA, 95060

SAIL ABOARD THE

65' TEAM O’NEILL CATAMARAN SMOOTH SAILING FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! Afternoon and sunset sails, Wednesday night regatta cruises, wine and beer tastings, and seasonal firework sails.

SAILING TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE $22 1-Hour Sails $33 1.5-Hour Sails $44 Special Event Sails

private charters available all year for special occasions.

OYC’s captains and the Team O’Neill are U.S. Coast Guard licensed, insured and inspected annually. Aerial Imagery ©2017 Archer Koch of MultiRotorCam.

w w w . o n e i l lya c h t c h a r t e r s . c o m

( 831) 818 - 36 4 5 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 5


SANTA CRUZ COUNTY MARKET REPORT Single Family Residential CLOSED SALES

MED. SALES PRICE AVG.DOM

$825K $820K

40 46

%LP REC’D MO. TO SELL

AUG 2017 AUG 2016

181 169

QUARTILE

SOLD

MED SALE PRICE

Top

46

$1,302,500

54

2,749

$579

72,214

Second

45

$950,000

36

1,999

$474

68,943

AVG DOM

SQ.FT.

99% 100% AVG. $ SQ.FT.

3.2 3.2 LOT SQ.FT.

Third

45

$680,100

37

1,520

$460

27,130

Bottom

45

$498,000

33

1,234

$386

15,921

Nursery Gift Shop & Garden Art

AVG. $ PER SQ. FT. - 12 MONTHS

ACTIVE INVENTORY - 12 MONTHS

Locally owned since 1986 MED SALE & LIST PRICE VS. DOM - 12 MONTH HISTORY

Med. Sale Price Med. List Price Avg. DOM

ALISTAIR CRAFT Realtor, Broker Associate

831.234.1093

alistaircraftalliance.com 14 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

CalBre Lic #01402715


COOL OFF

FIELD NOTES

TEACHING A PICKUP MASTER HOW TO SURF By KYLE THIERMANN

S

not flies out of Neil Strauss’ nose like a bungee cord as he swings his 9-foot hybrid surfboard toward the shore to paddle for the biggest wave of his life. “Go!” I shout. With ice in his eyes, the famous author strokes hard. The once-airborne bungee of snot is now strewn across his left cheek and looks like war paint. For a moment the storm clouds part for the rising sun to witness what will only result in one of two outcomes: a successful ride, or a spectacular yard sale. A decade ago, Strauss was one of the most infamous pickup artists in the world. His bestseller, The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists, a book about his transformation from a sexually frustrated music journalist to the Luke Skywalker of picking up women, has sold more than 2.5 million copies. Once The Game hit the scene, Strauss became the

de facto resource for young men who wanted to learn how to meet women. More than a decade after its release, Strauss’ Twitter feed is still inundated with a panoply of requests, usually along the lines of “@neilstrauss how do I make it out of the friend zone with this girl who I have no chance with?” I imagine these questions get old for the 48 year old, who is now in a committed relationship, is the father of a young child, and has written multiple best-sellers on other subjects since the release of The Game. Whether or not you agree with the antics of his most well-known book, one thing about Strauss is undeniable: he is a skilled teacher. Most men struggle with approaching women and The Game provided millions of readers with the equivalent of a freestyle stroke in a world where most beachgoers never learn to swim. But it turns out Strauss is also an excellent student.

I’ve spent the last few months in Los Angeles, where a mutual friend introduced me to Strauss. Our acquaintanceship quickly blossomed into a surf bromance. The relationship works well: I need someone to motivate me to surf at 5 a.m. and he needs pointers on how to become a better surfer. Unless you’re a horse-racing scout looking for the next jockey to mount Seabiscuit, no one would describe the 5-foot-6-inch Strauss as possessing an athletic bodytype. In the short time that I’ve been coaching him, however, he has progressed more quickly than any beginner I have ever witnessed. Out of the dozen times we have surfed together, today is by far the biggest. Chilly storm wind blows against us as we walk down the cobblestone point. No one is in the water. The typically userfriendly reef break is now an unruly soup of 6-foot waves lurching in no

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 147


EVENTS OCTOBER & NOVEMBER

OCTOBER 8

MONTE FOUNDATION 23RD ANNIVERSARY AND FIREWORKS SHOW Celebrate the 23rd anniversary of the Monte Foundation with a fireworks show in Capitola Village. Fireworks can be viewed from the beach, the Capitola Wharf, or on nearby bluffs overlooking the water. x Sunday, Oct. 8, 8 p.m. Capitola Village, Capitola, monte-foundation.com.

11-15

SANTA CRUZ FILM FESTIVAL Appreciate the arts with local filmmakers as they share their films. Films will be screened at the Tannery Arts Center. x Wednesday, Oct. 11-Monday, Oct. 15. Tannery Arts Center, Santa Cruz, santacruzfilmfestival.org.

13-15

PINOT PARADISE: A TASTE OF THE MOUNTAINS Four days of wine tasting featuring vino from local winemakers. Events include Pathway to Pinot Paradise, Reserve Tasting, and Pinot Picnic at the Park. x Friday, Oct. 13-Sunday, Oct. 15. Locations and times vary, scmwa.com.

17

SANTA CRUZ CHILI COOK OFF Professional and amateur chefs compete to win the title of best chili recipe at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk. Sample the food, visit the beach, enjoy the rides and help decide who you think should take home the honor of best chili. x Saturday, Oct. 28, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, beachboardwalk.com.

NOVEMBER 4-5

SANTA CRUZ SEA GLASS AND OCEAN ART FESTIVAL Peruse a bounty of ocean-inspired creations from more than 40 artists who are striving to make environmentally sustainable art and jewelry. The event will include a raffle, food for purchase, and a full bar. x Saturday, Nov. 4-Sunday, Nov. 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz, santacruzseaglass.com.

9

SAVE THE WAVES FILM FESTIVAL Sit back and get inspired by the environmentally minded documentaries in this year's Save the Waves Film Festival lineup. x Thursday, Nov. 9 at Patagonia Outlet Santa Cruz, 415 River St., Santa Cruz. Visit savethewaves.org/filmfest for more info.

THE LOST BOYS 30TH ANNIVERSARY ENCORE Catch an encore screening of The Lost Boys on the beach. The cult classic, which was famously filmed in Santa Cruz, is celebrating its 30th anniversary with a special showing. Experience the flick right where it was filmed. x Tuesday, Oct. 17, 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, beachboardwalk.com.

LIFE ON THE RANCH DAYS Learn about life on the ranch with activities including sack races, tug of war, hoops, stilts, and old-fashioned bubbles. x Saturday, Nov. 11, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wilder Ranch State Park, 1401 Coast Road, Santa Cruz, parks.ca.gov.

15

18

ANNUAL LOBSTER FEED Lobster and live bluegrass music in the redwoods—what could be better? Fresh Maine lobster will be available with all of the fixings: salad, corn on the cob and garlic bread, plus dessert and coffee. x Saturday, Oct. 15, 4:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park Picnic Area 1, Felton, mountainparks.org.

14 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

28

11

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION PASSPORT DAYS Passport Days are a fun way to visit a bevy of local wineries in one day. The purchase of a wine passport gives access to more than 50 wineries, and commemorative stamps are added to the passport at each stop. x Saturday, Nov. 18, noon-5 p.m. Locations vary, scmwa.com.


COOL OFF

FIELD NOTES

IF A MAN SEES A WOMAN HE’S ATTRACTED TO, HE HAS THREE SECONDS TO EITHER APPROACH HER OR WALK AWAY. IF THE MAN WAITS ANY LONGER THAN THREE SECONDS, THE WOMAN WILL NOTICE THAT HE’S STARING AND GET CREEPED OUT.

particular sequence. When we put our leashes on at the water’s edge, Strauss turns to me and asks, “So on these bigger waves, should I just widen my stance?” “Wide stance and low center of gravity,” I say. Strauss asks questions every time we surf together. I can tell that sometimes he feels like he is annoying me, but I assure him that he is not. I enjoy giving him advice because he actually applies it. “Just give me feedback on my writing sometime and we’re square,” I tell him. Heeding advice is like going to yoga: we talk about doing it a lot more than we really do. In Strauss’ book, he writes that if a man sees a woman he’s attracted to, he has three seconds to either approach her or walk away. If the man waits any longer than three seconds, the

woman will notice that he’s staring and get creeped out. I would wager that nine out of 10 men reading this will not follow the three-second rule. That beautiful wave will pass them by and they won’t even paddle for it. But one man, the Strauss of the group, will apply this knowledge, set down this magazine, walk up to that barista and say, “Hi, my name is Neil and you look like someone I’d like to meet.” The wave grows behind Strauss as he digs in and completes his final stroke. But before he can make it to his feet, a puff of onshore wind causes whitewater to avalanche down from the top of the lip. “Oh, shit,” I say under my breath. Strauss is three-seconds away from a head-over-heels disaster. As the whitewater catches his ankles,

however, Strauss pops to his feet with a wide stance and low center of gravity. All at once he launches forward in unison with the lip of the wave. I can’t see what happens next. I hold my breath and scan the impact zone, waiting for his board to pop up. I see nothing. An LA Times headline flashes across my mind: “Santa Cruz Surfer Accidentally Kills Famous Author.” Then, 50 yards inside of me, I see a small man successfully eject himself out the back of the wave. I stand on my board and raise my fists over my head in triumph. Breathing hard, Strauss paddles back to me. The stubborn snot is still strung across his cheek. He sits up on his board and says, “Holy shit man, when I widened my stance it really helped.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 9


COOL OFF

MAKING

WAVES

Photos by AWOW Vision Team: Justin DeLand, Rachael Etter, Blake Mohr, Paul Otte

A WALK ON WATER NORTHERN EXPOSURE AT COWELL BEACH 1 5 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

A Walk On Water is a nonprofit dedicated to providing surf therapy to children with special needs.


V IE W MORE GAL L E RI ES @

.COM SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 1


SUSTAINABLY HANDCRAFTED IN CALIFORNIA

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DEDICATED TO MAKING YOUR DENTAL VISIT A POSITIVE EXPERIENCE... ...in every way, from our comfortable office environment and gentle, patient-centered care to our state-of-the-art equipment and technology.

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At this speed, the water feels like cement. Trevor Rowedder knows this well and prepares for a world of hurt at Mavericks. PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

1 5 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 57


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W W W .T H E A P T O S V I L L A G E . C O M

WELCOME TO APTOS VILLAGE A Collection of New Homes in Aptos

At Aptos Village you are truly stepping back to days gone by. A simpler time where life strolls by at a leisurely pace. Where you know your neighbors. Quaint shops, a variety of restaurants for any occasion. Even a historic apple barn, which will house a new neighborhood grocer. It’s all here in the hear t of Aptos, thoughtfully planned among 11.5 spacious acres.

IT TAKES A VILLAGE Nestled between trees and the ocean, this traditional, pedestrian-friendly town square provides timeless architecture and small town charm that harkens back to another era, while providing all the luxury and energy efficiency of today. A distinct collection of 69 homes, with plans ranging from 2-4 bedrooms and townhouse options, this vibrant community has a design for every modern family.

RESIDENTIAL INQUIRIES: ALISTAIR CRAFT

1 6 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

JERID KIEDROWSKI

Sereno Group 831.234.1092 alistair@serenogroup.com

Sereno Group 831.818.1717 jerid@serenogroup.com

CalBRE # 01084861

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