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VOL 6.1

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 JUNE/JULY 2019


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SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

PUBLISHER TYLER FOX

EDITOR ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PHOTO EDITOR ERIK L ANDRY

PHOTOGRAPHY

SCW PHOTOGRAPHERS TYLER FOX ALISON GAMEL BRYAN GARRISON ERIK L ANDRY DAVID LEVY SEAN MCLEAN LESLIE MUIRHEAD DAVE "NELLY" NELSON JEFF SCHWAB NEIL SIMMONS

IAN COLLINS SACHI CUNNINGHAM YVONNE FALK SCOT T FOSS JODI FREDIANI MICHAEL HECKMAIR RR JONES STERLING LORENCE AL MACKINNON GARY MEDEIROS PAIGE MCQUILL AN LONG NGUYEN BOB PEARSON WILLIAM PRECH NOL AN SULLIVAN SHMUEL THALER WILLIWILDFLOWER.COM

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS BORIS BEYER ROBIN BOLSER-GRANT DREW CARSON

EDITORIAL

Locally owned since 1986

WRITERS ERICA CIRINO TYLER FOX JOEL HERSCH NEAL KEARNEY LESLIE MUIRHEAD DAMON ORION ARIC SLEEPER

KYLE THIERMANN

PROOFREADER JOSIE COWDEN

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOSH BECKER

DESIGNER ELI ROE

SALES & OPERATIONS

PRESIDENT STEPHANIE LUTZ

CFO SARAH CRAFT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES K ATE K AUFFMAN LESLIE MUIRHEAD SADIE WIT TKINS

OFFICE MANAGER LESLIE MUIRHEAD

DISTRIBUTION MICK FREEMAN FOUNDER / CEO TYLER FOX

On the Cover: During this session, Wilem Banks snapped every single one of his boards but was lucky enough to find an old 6’6” from a nearby shed to keep this lucid dream alive. PHOTO: AL MACKINNON

The content of Santa Cruz Waves magazine is Copyright © 2019 by Santa Cruz Waves, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquiries, please contact steff@ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

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FIRST LOOK

PHOTO: SACHI CUNNINGHAM

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

moment This Is Our

By TYLER FOX

I

n this issue’s letter, I am passing the torch to awardwinning photographer, cancer survivor and all-around badass Sachi Cunningham. Her recent post to Instagram shook me to my core, so instead of giving my two cents, here are her words of truth, wisdom and warning: “On the same day that the U.N. released a report that one million species are at risk of extinction, this gray whale washed up on the shore of my home break on Ocean Beach in San Francisco. While the gray whale population is

currently stable, this whale here is the ninth gray whale to wash up on our Bay Area shores in less than two months. In Washington state, 13 gray whales have washed up on state beaches since April. Scientists attribute the deaths to blunt trauma from ships and malnourishment. In other words, their food supply is likely being affected by climate change just as ours will dramatically be affected if we continue to pretend to be innocent bystanders [while] doing nothing. The U.N. report was the work of 150 authors from 50 nations over three years [and was] signed off by a panel of 132 member nations. Mass extinction means human

extinction. There is no time but now to change our habits of consumption and to urge our legislators to do more. This is our moment! Let this unite us, not divide us. Think of this whale as Mother Earth and the elephant in the room warning us of what is to come. All of the barnacles and sea lice pictured on the whale are like our human population. The death of this whale means the death of the ecosystem that it supports. We can right this wrong but not until every single one of us wakes up to the problem and becomes part of the solution.” —Sachi Cunningham SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 1


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INSIDE Volume 6.1 - JUNE/JULY 2019

76

50 FIRST LOOK

31 Letter from the Founder 35 Best of the Web 37 Word on the Street 38 Causes: Parking Lot Problems 42 Remember When: Before Leashes 50 Local Legend: Keith Meek

88

56 DROP IN

56 In Depth: In Legalization's Shadow 68 Outdoors: Tyler McCaul 76 Behind the Lens: Jodi Frediani 88 Adventure: 10 Travel Tips 97 Mind & Body: Sunscreen 101

FOOD & DRINK

103 Drinks: Summer Sips 109 Local Eats: Feasts for the Mind 112 Dining Guide

COOL OFF

121 Sustainable Swaps 123 Field Notes 124 Company Spotlight: FloWater 126 Event gallery 128 Event gallery SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 3


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FIRST LOOK BEST OF THE WEB

BEST of the WEB

I INSTAGRAM

5 VIDEOS

R NEWS

FOGGY FLOW @levymediaworks ♥ 2,764

10-YEAR-OLD PRO SKATER AND SURFING PRODIGY Young gun Sky Brown can surf and skate with the best of them and spreads stoke within the industry. 17,357 views

FIFTH-ANNUAL SANTA CRUZ WAVES SWELLIES PARTY The community gathered at the Museum of Art & History on April 18 for the fifth-annual Santa Cruz Waves Swellies Awards party. Photo: Sean McClean 9,928 views

MOONRISE @jschwab_24 ♥ 2,181

JUNK BOARD Artist Korey Nolan made this surfboard from materials like plastic straws and more than 700 EPS Dunkin’ Donuts coffee cups. 16,890 views

CELEBRATING DAN HAIFLEY Dan Haifley retired from O’Neill Sea Odyssey, which welcomed new Executive Director Rachel Kippen. Photo: Nikki Brooks 5,323 views

LOOKS LIKE WE ARE NOT THE ONLY ONES ENJOYING THIS HOT WEATHER. @alison_gamel ♥ 1,855

NICE SPRING SUNSET AT PIGEON POINT. @neilsimmonsphotography ♥ 1,843

FOUR DAYS IN HEAVEN Sometimes surf trips line up perfectly and you score pictureperfect waves. 12,556 views

SPLASH TALK Morgan Maassen gives us a unique perspective as he follows Trevor Gordon on waves. 10,124 views

“CLEAN OCEANS” MURAL The largest mural in the county is planned for Bay View Elementary School. Learn more at gofundme. com/cleanoceansmural. 5,024 views

CITY CHALLENGES DRIVERS TO ‘SILENCE’ THE DISTRACTION Every day, at least nine Americans die and 100 are injured in distracted driving crashes, according to the National Safety Council. 2,103 views

VISIT US:

santacruzwaves.com/videos @santacruzwaves santacruzwaves.com/local-loop SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 5


When you choose solar, you’re choosing to protect our coast. Going solar is more than a good financial decision. You’re playing a key role in supporting positive stewardship of the environment. And it’s easy to go solar with trusted, local expert Sandbar Solar.

You’ve seen our work. Sandbar Solar has installed the largest, high-profile systems in Santa Cruz County: Over 1,000+ homes • NHS • Wrigley Building • Safeway • Santa Cruz Surf Museum • Plantronics • City of Santa Cruz Water Treatment Plant New Bohemian Brewery • Soquel High School • Harbor High School • Santa Cruz High School • Westlake Elementary School • And more… Make the choice today: Call Sandbar Solar for a no-cost/no-hassle consultation. 3 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Sandbar Solar • 2119 Delaware Avenue, Santa Cruz • sandbarsc.com • (831) 469-8888 #santacruzsolar


FIRST LOOK

WORD ON THE STREET

Q:

Why do you love Santa Cruz?

Kaila Pearson, marine biologist/ lifeguard: “I love Santa Cruz because there is everything I could ever want here. There are great waves, redwood forests, great food, and the commonality of ocean lovers makes it extra special. I’ve lived here my whole life so it feels like home and it’s beautiful.”

Sam Forbes-Roberts, attorney: “I think it’s the connection to the outdoors that we have and the connection to the ocean. It’s primal, and the community that we have helps us to enjoy this blessing that’s right out our front door.”

Sele Nadel-Hayes, school administrator: “What comes to mind right now is my favorite burger at Steamer Lane Supply.”

William Winkler, chemistry and oceanography teacher: “The crisp air that comes off the Pacific. I like the mountains and their association to that massive air that makes for the incredible beauty here. And not just of the place, but of the people as well.”

Cole Deblock, hydrologic technician: “I love Santa Cruz because I grew up here, and then I left. At the end of the day it has everything that a person would want in terms of a solid lifestyle once they are set. Life goal is go create results and then come back here and watch waves and chill.”

Josh Hill, cannabis farmer: “The people and the surf. I am from up north so I travel three-and-a-half hours to get down here and hang out. It’s one of my favorite spots to visit, there is just something about it that makes me so drawn to it.”

d BY LESLIE MUIRHEAD

ASKED AT SANTA CRUZ PADDLEFEST

Shannon Gowan, nurse: “The surf culture is so magnetic and makes the surrounding beauty that much more enjoyable.”

Gretchen Bach, real estate agent: “There are the obvious ones, right? But for me it’s the community. It’s the surfing community and how they are there to support you if anything goes down. This is one small town that takes care of its own.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 7


PHOTO: COURTESY OF WEST CLIFF / MANOR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUP PHOTO: COURTESY OF WEST CLIFF / MANOR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUP

Neighborhood

Watch Can limiting parking time curb criminal activity at West Cliff Drive parking lots? By JOEL HERSCH

T

he view over Cowell’s Cove from West Cliff Drive is an iconic one. It’s a scene that includes the bustling Municipal Wharf, the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, the mountains beyond, and arguably one of the most popular surf breaks in the state— Cowell’s itself. All that makes it a very popular place to park, largely for coastal access—waves, ocean views, beaches—but also just for hanging out. This leaves room for all kinds of activity, mostly benign, but also occasionally problematic.

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One of those problematic incidences at the Cowell’s parking lot, right by the stairs down to the beach, in June of last year, led to a neighborhood group forming to take a closer look at the nature of parking time in the lot. To do that, group member Al Ramadan—a tech executive who lives near the lot in question—developed a plan to collect a year’s worth of data using a Verizon parking sensor device called the NetSense Solution. “We decided to find a way to collect data and establish a baseline for a fact-based conversation,” Ramadan says.


FIRST LOOK CAUSES

The incident in June of 2018 revolved around a man who, according to Ramadan, was terrorizing people in the parking lot in a “lecherous” manner for several days, resulting in an arrest, but a subsequent release. It culminated with the same man approaching two children walking by the parking lot, at which point Ramadan and another neighbor intervened. The man was arrested again and hit with a charge of felony manslaughter for a separate incident, to which he pleaded guilty. “There were other events including gang violence and drug dealing,” Ramadan says. “The neighborhood collectively felt under siege …” The community group, which is comprised of about 30 families and is called “The West Cliff / Manor Neighborhood Group,” raised funds for the sensor and had it mounted on a nearby street light. From July 6 to Sept. 14, 2018, the sensor, which uses stereoscopic cameras, tracked parking events, as well as pedestrian, bike and auto traffic—all based on movement—transferred the data to a Verizon data center specializing in parking and traffic analytics. The data generated informs the neighborhood group’s summer data report, covering things like dwell time, whether it’s day or night, turnover rate, and more. The report is being shared with the City of Santa Cruz. Calculations include: 13,277 parking events with an average of 48.7 minutes. Ninety-one percent of those parking events were for two hours at a time, with a max parking time recorded of 813 minutes, or 13.5 hours. According to the report, 50 percent of the people parking had a dwell time of less than 25 minutes, while less than 5 percent account for extended park times—a category identified as “blockers,” who limit access for normal users.

“There were other events including gang violence and drug dealing. The neighborhood collectively felt under siege …” —AL RAMADAN Leveraging records on Santa Cruz Police Department responses to the parking lot, the neighborhood group report shows that calls for service spike about 10 times after 9 p.m. Ramadan says that the group’s main vision is to introduce a curfew to the parking lot (10 p.m. to 5 a.m.), limit the parking stay to three hours, and potentially charge on an hourly basis with a kiosk. Proceeds could be directed to SCPD for additional support, as well as to repairs and upgrades along West Cliff Drive. The proposal is to conduct a two-year trial under these changes beginning this spring. Parking access along the coast falls under the purview of the California Coastal Commission (CCC), which can sometimes yield a tug-of-war between cities and the state agency. The City of Santa Cruz can issue parking alterations, permitting and hourly restrictions, but if the parking is within 300 feet of a coastal bluff, called the “Appealable Coastal Zone,” it can be overturned, says Michael Ferry, who works in Planning and Community Development with the city.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF WEST CLIFF / MANOR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUP

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


Thank you

TO ALL OUR SPONSORS

for making the 5th annual Swellie’s Party a hit with our local community

The event took place Thursday April, 18th at The Museum of Art & History in downtown Santa Cruz with live music from The Getaway Dogs and Soulwise

A special thanks to all our vendors for making it possible. PRIMAL SANTA CRUZ - PLEASURE PIZZA DOWNTOWN - OCEAN2TABLE BRADY’S YACHT CLUB - ELKHORN SLOUGH BREWERY - PACIFIC COOKIE CO. - SEAQUOIA - RAWA SPRING WATER A big thanks to POUR Taproom for supplying us with a last minute keg!

4 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FIRST LOOK CAUSES

PHOTO: COURTESY OF WEST CLIFF / MANOR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUP

“Bad shit started happening in the Cowell’s Overview Parking Lot … and we formed a neighborhood group to protect it.” —AL RAMADAN

A similar case occurred on Pelton Avenue many years ago near the surfer statue on West Cliff Drive. There was problematic behavior at night and the neighborhood wanted to restrict parking from, he believes, 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. After compiling a stack of police incident reports, the city, fueled by the Lighthouse Field neighborhood, made their case for restricted parking, which at the time was unlimited. “We came up with the justification for limiting the hours,” he says. “But then we scaled the 10 p.m. start back to midnight …Because,” he paraphrased what he had been told at the time by CCC, “Some people like to surf under a full moon, sometimes at midnight, and that parking [limitation] would prohibit coastal access. “So it was kind of a win for us, but also an educational thing,” Ferry continues. “Coastal access [to the CCC] is a statewide issue, not a city one. Access to the coast is for everyone, so we have to balance that.” Ferry says that paid parking is not a likely development for the lot. Chief of Police Andy Mills has been tuned in to The West Cliff / Manor Neighborhood Group’s initiative since its inception. “I do appreciate that they’ve approached this from a perspective of gathering information, and data, to determine what the real issues are,” Mills says, “rather than overreacting or painting with a broad brush.” Chief Mills states that extended parking should not be equated with criminality, but that extended parking

means more opportunity for criminal behavior. “If people are there for an extended period of time— drinking or smoking dope—that gives more opportunity to start acting out,” he says. “So the question becomes, ‘Can you reduce the opportunity for criminal activity by restricting the amount of time people are allowed to stay there?’ “Everybody wants access to the beach,” Mills continues, “and having a reasonable amount of time for people to be there seems appropriate to me.” He adds that this part of West Cliff Drive is an extraordinarily safe part of the city, but that occasional “spats” happen. “You get a person with a mental health problem that’s exacerbated by methamphetamine and begins to act out, and do things that are not only bizarre but criminal,” he says, referring to the incident that Ramadan responded to last year. “We’ll leverage anything we can to regulate that behavior.” Ramadan, who enjoys Cowell’s and West Cliff Drive on a daily basis, says the goal is to protect the space. “Cowell’s is our community center,” he says. “On any given Sunday, half the Westside is on the beach and in the water. … Bad shit started happening in the Cowell’s Overview Parking Lot … and we formed a neighborhood group to protect it.” The West Cliff / Manor Neighborhood Group is formulating a “winter data” analysis and plans to share new results this summer.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


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FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

REMEMBER

WHEN “KOOK CORDS” HIT THE LOCAL LINEUP? By NEAL KEARNEY

T

he first south swell of the year lights up Steamer Lane with clean, green overhead surf beneath a baby-blue sky. An epic sandbar stretches out down to Indicators, where a flock of hyper groms snatch up leftovers, chirping like swallows. A freak set wave washes through the lineup, forcing a first-time surfer to ditch his longboard perilously close to the preteen pack. Observers from the cliff gasp with horror, anticipating a nasty headwound or worse. Somehow, all parties pop through the soup unharmed. Thanks to the leash strapped to the inept surfer’s ankle, his heavy board stretches just short of his head, preventing injury— and possibly death. These days, lifesaving surfboard leashes are standard

surf accessories across the globe, yet it hasn’t always been that way. Santa Cruz surfers played a prominent role in the research and development of the bloodand board-saving invention, and were also at the center of the controversy surrounding their introduction in the ’70s. Master shaper Bob Pearson started surfing in 1964, and recalls the dangerous era of surfing without leashes, and the equally risky period of cord experimentation that followed. He remembers surfing 10-foot swells with 15-to-20-foot faces at the Lane alongside 30 other adrenaline junkies before leashes came around. During these dodgy days, massive cleanup sets would roll through Middle Peak, ripping surfers from their boards like a tsunami uprooting palm trees.

If you found yourself caught on the inside paddling back out, you’d better be ready not only for a set of bombs on the head, but for those bombs to be equipped with half the lineup’s 40-pound fibreglass missiles. “Now you realized that if one hit you, your head would cave in, so you let go of your own board and dove down,” remembers Pearson. “Now all of a sudden you and 16 guys are swimming into the rocks to peel [your] boards off the rock.” Surfers were using all types of crude methods and materials to anchor themselves to their boards, from Marine-surplus bungee to elastic. None of these were safe or sustainable. While Pat O’Neill, son of wetsuit pioneer Jack, is generally credited with the development of the first functional surf leash, Pearson was along for the first dicey test runs.

Pat O'Neill tests out one of his early leash prototypes, which was attached to the nose of the surfboard, at Steamer Lane circa 1966. PHOTO: COURTESY OF O'NEILL WETSUITS SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 3


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Simply paddling out while wearing a leash was grounds for dismissal from the lineup.

During an 8-to-10-foot day at Steamer Lane in 1974, O’Neill and Pearson used suction cups on the nose of their shortboards, with a length of surgical tubing attached to their wrists. “I was really nervous about losing my board,” Pearson admits. “After 10 to 15 waves, the suction cup would come off but it would hold it long enough so you were able to get to your board. I remember seeing [O’Neill] doing a few turns, pulling with his hand to pull the nose, pulling the nose around to do turns.”

That stretchy tubing was an issue. After a spill, the tubing would stretch in the spin cycle, building up tension like a bowstring and shooting back toward the surfer as weaponized fiberglass. One of O’Neill’s primitive prototypes was responsible for his father’s famous loss of an eye during a surfing accident. To go around the suction-cup issue, Pearson designed a “leash cup” composed of PVC pipe, resin, and a parachute cord loop. He began setting them on his own boards, along

with those belonging to his friends and customers. He traveled up and down the coast with his tail-fitted “leash-cups,” imploring shops and board builders to embrace the exciting accessory, yet most found the concept hard to grasp. “A lot of shops were like, ‘Leashes? You’re doing leashes?! Why are you doing leashes? They’re dangerous!'” says Pearson. “We found that not to be the case, that we could get away with it.” In the ’70s, the shortboard revolution caught fire and a young

PHOTO: COURTESY OF O'NEILL WETSUITS

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF O'NEILL WETSUITS

“It was a nice battle at the time, but to tell the truth, once you put that leash on, it sure felt good.” —DENNIS GODFREY

man named Dennis Godfrey was testing his surfing skills around Pleasure Point. Although companies like Block Enterprises were soon advertising their own leashes in magazines like Surfer, to Godfrey and others leashes were “kook cords” or “sissy strings.” This is a time in which simply paddling out while wearing a leash was grounds for dismissal from the lineup. If you wanted to earn your place, you’d have to pay for it.

“It became a platform to stand on: ‘Cord vs. No Cord,’” Godfrey remembers. In fact, the old guardrails lining the cliffs at the Point had stenciled graffiti reading “No Cords” up until the 2007 seawall face-lift. The anticord backlash, Godfrey explains, was a natural reaction from passionate surfers who were worried about something new changing the “purity” of their sport. As a staunch opponent to cords at the time,

Godfrey believed leashes spoke to a surfer’s skill—or lack thereof. “There was no need to search for a pecking order; it established itself based on one’s skill in the surf,” Godfrey states. “Without a leash, you really had to think things through. I just thought that the no-cord thing was such … an easy regulator in the water.” Surfing without a leash is costly. It costs you waves as you swim to shore. It puts others at risk,

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FIRST LOOK

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BOB PEARSON

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

The old guardrails lining the cliffs had stenciled graffiti reading “No Cords” up until the 2007 seawall face-lift. including yourself and surfboard. So, despite early resistance, by the ’80s, most surfers couldn’t imagine paddling out without them. Further tweaking traded surgical tubing for urethane cords, creating a stronger composition used dependably in waves of consequence. The fact is that the invention of the leash, no matter how you view

it, made surfing safer for surfers and their boards. “There was a whole negative thing about leashes coming on— how they allowed more people in the lineup, which is a bad thing if you are thinking [about it] from a selfish standpoint,” says Pearson. “Looking at [it in terms of] who’s having more fun, more people can

enjoy surfing because of the leash. I tend to think that majority rules— that it’s a good thing.” Even Godfrey has come around. “It was a nice battle at the time, but to tell the truth, once you put that leash on, it sure felt good,” he admits with a sly smile.

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k e e DROP IN LOCAL LEGEND

FROM PUNK-ROCK SKATEBOARDER TO GRAPHIC DESIGNER, KEITH "MEEKSTER" MEEK HAS SLASHED OUT A MEMORABLE PLACE IN SANTA CRUZ CULTURE By NEAL KEARNEY

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ith bloodshot eyes bulging out above sharp fangs and a slobbery tongue, the “Slasher” character—dreamt up by visionary Santa Cruz artist Jim Phillips—is one of the most memorable images from Santa Cruz Skateboards’ golden age of the mid-to-late-1980s. Launching into a huge rail-grab air on a skateboard/surfboard hybrid with a bloody machete in his free hand, the Slasher embodies a time when many skaters and surfers began embracing the non-conformist, socially alienated culture of punk-rock music. This iconic graphic captured the vibe of an era when the turbo-charged sound of punk fueled a new aggressive style of shortboard surfing and skateboarding. So, when it was time to debut the Slasher to the world, it was only fitting that he be emblazoned on Santa Cruz surf/skate punk-rocker Keith Meek’s first pro-skate model, which was released by Santa Cruz Skateboards in 1985. Known affectionately to his friends as Meekster, Meek was at the heart of the hardcore surf/skate punk-rock party that shook up what had been a quiet hippie town in the 1980s and gave it worldwide respect as a raw, exciting place full of over-the-top kids ready to rip pools, charge 20-foot surf, and rush raucous mosh-pits. Before he was a surfer, Meek cut his teeth as a skater, coming of age when major changes were taking place with the creation of large skateparks with vertical transitions and

 Travel Lodge carve. PHOTO: SCOTT FOSS SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 1


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 Campbell Skatepark 1978. PHOTO: GARY MEDEIROS

SANTA CRUZ WAS A VERY DIFFERENT PLACE DURING THE EARLY ’80S: THE SURF FASHION WAS PREPPY, AND THE HIPPIES RULED THE ROOST.

grindable edges, which leant itself to a new, radical and dangerous approach to skateboarding. To the energetic South San Jose teen, who had begun skateboarding in 1973 on a solid, fiberglass board he’d pieced together with SureGrip Trucks and Stoker wheels, the inherent risk and excitement involved with this style was a welcome change to the scene he was used to. “Before we got into the poolskating thing it was mostly banks and ditches, going down hills, nose

wheelies, handstands—that sort of thing,” Meek explains. “Once we started skating pools and pipes, all that other stuff was left behind for me.” Meek’s time skating the “Orange Bowl” in Los Altos was where his rise to skater stardom took place. The Orange Bowl was the proving ground for the who’s-who of Nor-Cal poolskating at the time, and it was there that the diminutive yet brave goofy-footer turned heads during heated sessions in ’77, with the

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likes of Rick Blackhart, Kevin Thatcher, the Buck Brothers, and many others. While the carving street-skate style that preceded it had its risks, this new world of vertical angles, breakneck speed and weightlessness threatened violent slams at any moment. Meek sums up these days in two words: “aggressive and raw.” It wasn’t long until Meek earned sponsorships with Systems Skateshop, Astral, Haut and, in 1979, with Santa Cruz Skateboards/Independent Trucks. The soundtrack provided by the hyperspeed, power-chord-heavy sound of early punk bands such as Black Flag and The Circle Jerks inspired young daredevils like Meek and his skater crew. “This was before the real hardcore scene had hit,” Meek remembers. “That scene, from 1980 until about ’83, was insane—an entirely different vibe than the ’70s scene.” Meek’s family moved to Santa Cruz in 1980, drawn by his mother’s love for the ocean. At first, he didn’t want to be in Santa Cruz, which was a very different place during the early ’80s. The surf fashion was preppy, and the hippies ruled the roost. The initial response to the misunderstood medium of punk aesthetics—with the short, bleached, spiky hair, and “fuck the world” attitude—was alienation. “Everyone looked the same,” he recalls. “I was coming from an entirely different world. Imagine a small punkrock kid that didn’t know how to surf yet showing up.”

W  inchester Ollie 1978.

PHOTO: GARY MEDEIROS

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Meekster takes his 4  frontside surf slash to the cement bowls of Huntington Beach. PHOTO: NELLY

“Their skate scene was kind of behind the times and I was all about parks like Winchester and pool skating, but I had no choice since I didn’t drive or have a job,” he goes on. “It was the best thing that ever happened to me, and I didn’t even know it at the time.” One of Meek’s first friends in town was Clifford Dinsmore. Dinsmore, who would go on to provide lead vocals for historic Santa Cruz punk acts like M.A.D. and BL’AST!, was just as obsessed with punk-rock music as Meek was, and this common connection made them click. “We would meet at the Hook, trade records and talk about punk rock. Soon after, we started going to every show within a 100-mile radius—bands like Black Flag, Minor Threat, Adolescents,

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and Circle Jerks,” says Dinsmore. “I also met the guys that I teamed up with to eventually form M.A.D. and BL’AST! through Keith.” Dinsmore was also instrumental in Meek’s development as a surfer, showing the boy with board balance how to take his act from the pools to the sea. “Clifford would take me down to the Southside and we would surf the sandbars a bit, until I figured it out,” Meek says. “Tony Roberts and Chris Heinen helped me out a lot with surfing also, we would hang out and surf daily.” Roberts—the ace cinematographer, photographer, skater and surfer—was impressed by Meek’s rapid progression as a surfer. “He learned to surf really fast, which is no surprise as he already was known as having some of the

best backyard pool lines of all time,” Roberts recalls. Roberts also bonded with Meek through music, with the latter playing punk rock for him for the first time (the classic Dead Kennedys' 45 The Man With the Dogs). Meek would later help Roberts by introducing the aspiring filmmaker to invaluable connections that opened up filming opportunities with highprofile skaters. Meek went on to find employment at NHS, Inc., the parent company of his sponsor Santa Cruz Skateboards, where he worked his way up to screen print manager. In 1985, Meek was finally awarded his first “pro” skate model, The Slasher. “[Founder Richard] Novak always had my back and I respect him for that,”


 911 Pool. Circa 1980. PHOTO: STEVE FERRO

THIS NEW WORLD OF VERTICAL ANGLES, BREAKNECK SPEED AND WEIGHTLESSNESS THREATENED VIOLENT SLAMS AT ANY MOMENT.

says Meek. “The Slasher graphic was a stroke of genius from Jim and I was really lucky to have Novak hand that to me. It is one of the most recognized graphics in the history of skateboarding—even if people have never heard of me, they know the graphic.” His big break came when Phillips recruited him and a handful

of other surf/skate rats (including Phillips’ son Jimbo) to work for his new art studio, Phillips Studios. “Phillips was instrumental in teaching me how [to] utilize my artistic eye for design and production,” says Meek. “Without Jim’s guidance and watchful eye, I wouldn’t be where I am today in design.”

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After Phillips Studios shut down, Meek dabbled with freelance work, then joined Sessions to do their artwork. Later, he left Sessions and was hired at O’Neill Wetsuits, where he worked his way up to Senior Designer. “O’Neill is where I really learned how things were supposed to be done as far as layout and design with computers and deadlines,” he says. “I would pay to go to Photoshop seminars with my own money just to learn more.” Years later, fellow Santa Cruz Skateboards team alumnus Rob Roskopp hired Meek at Santa Cruz Bikes, where they brought the skate attitude into the bike industry with their graphics and ad campaigns. After that Meek freelanced for more than 10 years until Cindi Busenhart approached him to be a partner at her local artist-focused company, Merge4 Socks, where he remains to this day. For Meek, the most important part about being a successful graphic designer is keeping busy. “If I am busy, the creative part of the job really flows, but if things are slow my creativity suffers,” he says. The hardest part? “Coming up with the ideas,” he says, but he relies upon his life experiences for inspiration, drawing from a deep well that hasn’t failed him yet.

 Shallow end pocket carve. Circa 1983. PHOTO: COURTESY OF KEITH MEEK

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LEFT BEHIND BY LEGALIZATION By JOEL HERSCH

More than a year after the legalization of recreational cannabis, counties like Santa Cruz are still struggling to bring growers from the black market into the new regulated industry.

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hen the state of California opened the doors to recreational cannabis under Proposition 64, in 2018, many people who represented the formerly clandestine market had fears about what regulation would bring. But along with those concerns came excitement and an invigorated energy to carve paths into the bright light of a legal economy. And while the industry has exploded with every kind of weed startup imaginable—like a thousand and one smartphone apps, various paraphernalia products, countless specialty brands, and even cannabis-centric law firms—one of those original misgivings is proving to be a serious roadblock for the market’s development into the regulated, safe, taxable industry many hope for. “The cannabis industry has changed immensely since the passing of Proposition 64,” says Brendan Ruh,

Father/son team Drew and Dwayne Carson chat logistics during a routine inspection at Wave Rider Nursery, one of the businesses participating in the legal cannabis industry. PHOTO: TYLER FOX SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 57


PHOTO: TYLER FOX

a Santa Cruz local who works in brand acquisition for Yerba Buena Distribution. “Sadly, Proposition 64 has driven out most of those [smallbusiness mom and pop] folks.” Under the previous state law, Proposition 215 (aka the Compassionate Use Act, which legalized medical marijuana), there

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were far fewer financial barriers to running a small company and selling products to medical dispensaries, Ruh explains. “The benefit of Prop. 64, in my eyes is that cannabis has gotten cleaner due to the lab testing requirements,” he says. “To sell a [legal] product … you must submit it

for rigorous lab tests for pesticides, potency, mold, and much more. [But] overall, I feel that Proposition 64 has hurt more people than it’s helped.” “The regulations are overwhelming and it pushes out anyone who doesn’t have the capital to start a brand,” Ruh continues. “Overall, I think recreational cannabis


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“PEOPLE HAVE A MISCONCEPTION THAT BECAUSE YOU’RE IN THE CANNABIS BUSINESS, YOU MUST MAKE A LOT OF MONEY. THAT’S NOT TRUE.” —DWAYNE CARSON, WAVE RIDER NURSERY

is a good idea, and there are parts of Proposition 64 I like, but I think that it’s been super poorly thought out and executed so far.” In the City of Santa Cruz, cannabis businesses must pay a Cannabis Business Tax (CBT) of 8 percent. The county has a 6-percent cultivation business tax in place. Combined with the state’s excise tax, cultivation taxes, and—in the case of the City of Santa Cruz—the normal sales tax, some local businesses have a tax rate of over 35 percent. “That’s a big problem,” says attorney Ben Rice, of the local cannabis-specialty law firm Rice, Luxon + Bolster-Grant. “It’s making it hard for people [in the legal cannabis industry] to succeed financially. The problem for a lot of the cultivators is, they were told by the county, ‘OK, you want to get out of the black market, sign up with us [for $500 per application].’ About 600 people did, [but only] about 100 will make it though because the regulations are so restrictive.” As an example of these restrictions, Rice points to the county’s land-size requirements: no less than five acres for outdoor commercial cultivation. “It doesn’t matter how perfect the site is, or if they’ve done nothing to harm their neighbors or the environment; they can’t be involved in commercial cultivation because of the county ordinance,” Rice says. “Many of those applicants are being

excluded and asking themselves, ‘What do I do? Do I stay in the black market? Or sell my place?’” Another example of a county restriction is fire lane access, Rice says. If a road leading to a potential commercial cultivation site is less than 20 feet wide, CalFire will likely deem it unsuitable. “We all agree it is enormously important to protect our neighbors and lands,” he reasons. “But they’re ignoring the fact that other counties

have said, ‘You don’t need 20-footwide roads if you’re growing without electricity,’ in which case there’s virtually no risk of a fire.” Rice says that the tight regulations and high taxes have driven many cannabis industry stakeholders to other, less-restrictive jurisdictions, such as Monterey County. One family from Santa Cruz County operates their business just south of Salinas, under Monterey County’s cannabis regulations: Wave

Workers prepare to turn the harvested cannabis plants into "buds" in a process called trimming. PHOTO: TYLER FOX

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Santa Cruz's former state assemblymember John Laird (left) has a laugh while visiting SCLabs president Josh Wurzer (right) and Santa Cruz attorney Ben Rice (center). PHOTO: ROBIN BOLSER-GRANT

Rider Nursery, owned by father-andson business partners Dwayne and Drew Carson. Staffed by lifelong Santa Cruz surfers, Waverider Nursery—a 10,000-square-foot greenhouse facility—is in the business of supplying growers statewide with healthy clones. Even in Monterey County, Dwayne says strict regulation reinforces the black market, which continues to thrive. “Because we’re cannabis, it’s punitive in a lot of ways,” says Dwayne. “We employ 25 people year round, and sometimes I feel like the county and the state think it’s a privilege for us to do that. People have a misconception that because you’re in the cannabis business, you must make a lot of money. That’s not true.” Cannabis licensing manager for the County of Santa Cruz Sam LoForti agrees that state and local regulations represent a problem for smaller businesses. “The high regulatory requirements have made cannabis ‘no fun’ for various cultivators,” LoForti

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writes in an email correspondence with Santa Cruz Waves. “Many people believe the regulations have made cannabis less about the small farmer and more about the large scale and (broadly) monetized companies. I think the state regulations are definitely geared toward larger or very profitable companies that can employ full-time compliance staff. Cannabis remains a federally listed Schedule 1 drug and, as such, regulations must be very stringent to avoid divergence and ensure compliance. This level of oversight has led to small farmers walking away from commercial cannabis.” According to data from the Treasurer-Tax Collector of Santa Cruz County, during fiscal year 2017-18, the county’s CBT on dispensaries generated $2,258,596. That was 40 percent less than anticipated. For the first half of the current fiscal year 2018-19, the CBT has generated $1,323,766, which represents a projected revenue growth over last year. “I think it’s safe to say we have seen an increase in taxes for the Cannabis Business Tax,” writes

LoForti. “The first six months [of this fiscal year] accounts for 58.6 percent of all taxes from the previous year.” One longtime cannabis entrepreneur who has skirted regulation and taxation, and whom we will call BK to protect his identity, sees government attempts at heavy taxation as a zero-sum game. BK says many in the black market can’t afford to join the legal market, which keeps them underground, and that the stakeholders who do have the capital to make the transition most likely acquired it from black-market sales—which could make them targets of the IRS. “You’re damned if you do, damned if you don’t,” BK says. “There are counties that are encouraging people to go big, like Monterey or San Bernardino, and then distribution starts developing, and then money starts running through the banks, and then the IRS is coming knocking, saying, one: ‘We’re going to audit you.’ Two: ‘Looks like tax evasion.’ And three: ‘Where did you get the money to start it?’”


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“IT’S GOING TO BE A BUMPY ROAD, LIKE IT WAS AT THE END OF ALCOHOL PROHIBITION, AND IT’LL TAKE TIME FOR IT TO WORK ITS WAY OUT.” —BEN RICE, ATTORNEY Unfortunately, says BK, there is no good transition between medical and recreational, and they’re penalizing people who don’t have the bandwidth or money to get their permitting in order. Because compliance standards have prevented many from joining the legal market, and kept many working in the black market, BK has seen illicit cannabis sales skyrocket. “Black-market cannabis has doubled in price,” BK says. “One unit [pound] that I could sell for $600 in November last year, I can sell for $1,200 today. And closer to $1,800 for that same amount on the East Coast. This is the best time to be in the cannabis black market, ever.” The Carsons, at Wave Rider Nursery, are aware of that high price point on the black market. They hope that, with public education, the consumer market will begin to choose legal product from dispensaries, where they know their goods have been tested. “I would like to see the illegal operations that are currently thriving be slowed down, because that hurts our business,” Drew says. “One good thing we have going for us [is that] all our spray techniques and our ag techniques are really well-regulated,” Dwayne adds. “The products being sold on the black market—consumers don’t know what chemicals are being used. There are a lot of products out there that are potentially carcinogenic.” While there are cases of cannabis product being cultivated or manufactured with questionable

additives, BK believes that, on the whole, black-market cannabis from places like Humboldt is high quality and safe. However, with new entrepreneurs in the mix, and new-school capitalists who are willing to cut corners for profits, that testing could become increasingly important for public health. It is an exceedingly difficult space for compliant companies to be stuck in, says Ruh. “What you end up getting is [legal] cultivators making less money for growing, distributors making less money for getting the product to a shop, shops having to tax the sale of the product, which results in

pissed-off customers paying $75 for a top-shelf eighth of cannabis,” he says. “It is so easy to get that same quality cannabis for $40 on the black market. And it seems as if the state has allocated more funds going after licensed growers and retailers who are trying to do things right than going after blatantly illegal operators.” State and local lawmakers are working to develop more sustainable tax structures that support cannabis businesses. In January, Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Oakland) introduced a bill that would temporarily reduce the state’s cannabis excise tax from 15 percent to 11 percent and completely suspend

Wave riders and cannabis farmers Dwayne and Drew Carson.

PHOTO: TYLER FOX

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the cultivation tax ($9.25 per ounce of dried cannabis) for the next three years. This year, the City of Santa Cruz passed a motion to support lowering the state taxes and state fees on the cannabis industry. City staff is moving forward on a county-wide CBT study to inform new policy, which will be brought to the city council by September, according to city agenda reports. The city also affirmed a 12.5 percent allocation of the collected Cannabis Business Tax for the Children’s Fund, which supports programs for childhood development, drug prevention and vulnerable youth. Back at Wave Rider Nursery, Drew is hopeful that the industry will evolve in positive ways, and says that operating along the Monterey Bay area is prime business territory—right in the cradle of the county’s agricultural land, and between the state’s two largest cannabis markets, Los Angeles and San Francisco. “You know, we wanted to stay in the industry and do this legally,” Drew explains. "Even though we don’t make the money we could [in the black market], this is the path we chose and I think it’s the right one.” Rice is focused on how the new laws affect families who have worked in cannabis for generations. He wants to see viable pathways to above-ground business developed for them, and to help them become compliant so they can pay the taxes, get the products tested for consumers, and “get everyone taken care of.” "Now that we’ve been in this a year, nobody should have really expected anything different,” Rice says. “It’s going to be a bumpy road, like it was at the end of alcohol prohibition, and it’ll take time for it to work its way out.”

Field of green.

PHOTO: DREW CARSON

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When the northern gales lose steam and the sun sends its warm rays onto the Central Coast sandstone, it's hard to deny that we live in the best in best place in the world. PHOTO: BRYAN GARRISON

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p Ram age Tyler McCaul Takes On Mountains

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hen I ask professional mountain biker Tyler McCaul about the dangers of the Red Bull Rampage, he has this to say: "We have good years and bad years. In 2015 I ended up with a concussion and pulmonary contusion and was in the hospital for a few days and my close friend became paralyzed. That was a bad year.� Riders free-fall through five stories of air and hit dirt jumps the size of school buses. A

Santa Cruz native Tyler McCaul sends it off a massive jump at the 2017 Redbull Rampage in Virgin, Utah. PHOTO: BORIS BEYER SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 9


Big ol' tail whip at the 2018 Crankworx contest in Whistler.

rider will “dig” with their crew for 10 days prior to the event to carve out their own unique track down the mountain. Competitors are judged on their choice of lines down the course, their technical ability, and the complexity of tricks.

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PHOTO: BORIS BEYER

McCaul, a Santa Cruz native, has placed fifth in the Utah-based event twice. When I call him for the interview I can hear wind blowing through the speaker on his phone. He is on a ride around his new home in Toquerville, Utah. “What does it look

like where you are right now?” I ask. “The sun is going down and the whole desert landscape is red,” he tells me. “It’s crazy beautiful out here.” Rampage takes place in October just prior to contract signings, and if a rider places well at the event,


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OUTDOOR

THE POST OFFICE JUMPS WERE BULLDOZED TO MAKE WAY FOR AN APARTMENT COMPLEX AND MANY OF THE TOP RIDERS LEFT TOWN.

they can set themselves up for sponsorships. McCaul’s specialty is big-mountain riding, the kind Rampage is designed for, and his new home puts him in the heart of the action and will give him an advantage for Rampage 2019. Santa Cruz has bred worldclass mountain bikers such as Greg Watts, Andrew Taylor, Tyler McCaul, and his brother Cam McCaul. They cut their teeth at a

series of impressively large jumps in Aptos known as Post Office, across the street from the U.S. Post Office off of Trout Gulch Road. Four years ago, however, the jumps were bulldozed to make way for an apartment complex and virtually all of the top riders left town. When McCaul tells me about the loss I can hear a nostalgic sadness in his voice. “The biggest bummer is that there were a few young guys

The Aptos Post Office jumps were a mecca for top riders from all over the globe.

PHOTO: STERLING LORENCE

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Flying through the Santa Cruz woods. PHOTO: LONG NGUYEN

coming up who had the potential of going pro,” he says, “but after Post Office was gone a lot of them just stopped riding.” I can sense that talking about Post Office is starting to bum him out so I ask what scares him most about Rampage. “Wind is the major one,” he says. “When you hit a jump

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on a windy day, your wheels can turn into sails, [and] you basically lose all control.” In 2015, the year McCaul ended up in the hospital and his friend became paralyzed, Red Bull pushed to run the event in unsafe conditions because they didn’t want to pay for a delay of competition. In response the

following year, McCaul and other Rampage athletes threatened to boycott the event. Since the boycott, Red Bull has given more control to the riders to decide when conditions are safe enough. The event also now includes a mandatory rest day in the middle of the competition to reduce rider fatigue.


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OUTDOOR

THE LINE BETWEEN PUSHING THE LIMITS AND DOWNRIGHT STUPIDITY IS IMPOSSIBLE TO DELINEATE UNTIL THE WHEELS HIT THE DIRT.

As an outsider, it’s easy to gawk at the level of risk McCaul and other riders are willing to subject themselves to. Mountain biking at the highest level is a dangerous game, and the line between pushing the limits and downright stupidity

is impossible to delineate until the wheels hit the dirt. McCaul, however, seems calculated in his approach. Rather than remaining nestled in the bubble of Santa Cruz like so many semi-pro athletes who eventually slip into obscurity,

McCaul has relocated to the red desert to commit himself to one of the most jaw-dropping action sports events in the world. And because he believes he has many good years to come.

PHOTO: BORIS BEYER

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AWARD-WINNING NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER JODI FREDIANI SHARES STORIES OF UNDERWATER ADVENTURE By J.D. RAMEY

W

When Jodi Frediani says, “Whales have taken me around the world,” she’s not just spouting off. The Monterey Bay-based nature photographer has captured unforgettable images of these stunning creatures in regions like Africa, Thailand, Antarctica, Argentina, Brazil, Norway, the Caribbean and the South Pacific. While she has photographed other forms of wildlife, she specializes in marine species, with whales at the top of the list. Frediani, who holds a bachelor’s degree and graduate certificate in art and photography, also gathers photos of whale flukes

 A swimmer hustles to keep up with a North Atlantic humpback mother and calf.

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The whale calf “lifted my camera up out of the water and then set it back down again.” and shares them with naturalists, scientists and hobbyists along the East Coast of the United States and Canada for the purpose of identifying individual humpback whales by the patterns on the underside of their tails. At the time of this interview, Frediani had just returned from Antarctica, where she took photos of whales, penguins, fur seals, crabeater seals and other species. She spoke with Santa Cruz Waves by phone from the Dominican Republic, where she has been swimming with humpbacks since 2002. How do you stay as safe as possible while you’re swimming with and photographing whales? In the water, I’m working with guides who know what behavior to look for. Humpback whales are not aggressive toward people; they’re large, they’re fast and if you don’t put

yourself in the right place—which we just saw the other day with this guy who ended up in the mouth of a whale—you run the risk of getting hurt or killed. I would say he was exceptionally lucky that he didn’t get smacked in the head by the feeding whale. Wherever I swim, whether it’s in Tonga, the [Dominican Republic’s] Silver Bank or in Norway, where I swam with killer whales, at this point I have enough of my own experience [so that] if I see something that whales are doing that I don’t think is safe, I will remove myself. I will say the reason I went to Tonga is that I really wanted to swim with a group of competitive whales, where a number of males are swimming together, vying for the right to escort the female in the group. The whales bash into each other, sometimes ride on top of each other, blow big bubbles. … It’s a very fast-paced, exciting activity. The boat driver and guide know what to look for. I have

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Their song “vibrates your chest cavity and actually shakes your bones.” had calves inadvertently hit me with their flukes. One time the calf hit me on my thigh. I remember asking the guide what I did wrong, and he said, “You didn’t get out of the way!” [Laughs] Is that kind of contact always inadvertent? Well, in the old days, the group of people I went out with would line up and hold hands, and I would tell people to hold my skin or my wetsuit so I’d have my hands free for my camera. I don’t quite know how the calf did it, but he suddenly swam around behind me, and the next thing, he was coming underneath me. I’m shooting with a wide-angle lens, right? This pec fin that makes a pass just misses my head. This calf’s eye is staring at me; then I see the

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ventral pleats, then I see the tail stalk, and the next thing is the calf taps my camera body. I remember thinking, “Oh! That was cool, but I don’t need to do that again. I’m going to go down to the end of the line.” Of course, the end of the line means nothing to the calf. Five minutes later, that calf found me, did the same move, and, as he finished it, he literally lifted my camera up out of the water and then set it back down again. What sorts of insights into whale behavior have you gained by swimming with whales? Swimming with a mother/calf pair is particularly interesting, because the mother will stay down 15 to 20 minutes before she


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A Pacific white-sided dolphin bow rides in flat, calm seas in the Monterey Bay.

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Pelagic red crabs: Usually found off of Baja, warm waters carried these squat lobsters, north where they invaded the Monterey Harbor.

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A transient killer whale breaches in celebration after a meal. These killer whales are mammal eaters, feeding on sea lions, dolphins, elephant seals or even gray whale calves.

“If you don’t put yourself in the right place—which we just saw the other day with this guy who ended up in the mouth of a whale—you run the risk of getting hurt or killed.”

needs to come up for air, but the calves will come up every three to five minutes. The calves often get curious, and they swim on by the swimmers. Sometimes if we’re lucky, we get to swim with what we call a courting pair or a pair of dancers: two adult whales, usually male/female, but sometimes the males will practice together. Those pairs seem to like to actually engage people. They will come close to us; they may turn on their sides; they may look at us closely. If we have the opportunity, we will try to find a singing whale. They’re always male, and they’re always by themselves in deeper water. The song is so powerful that when you’re in the

water with them, it vibrates your chest cavity and actually shakes your bones. We have the opportunity sometimes to see a calf opening its mouth, a mother nursing a calf, whales doing interesting things with bubbles—we don’t know what they’re doing, but one whale might blow bubbles underwater, and then its partner swims through them; I’ve seen a whale create a veil of bubbles by taking her fluke tip through the surface of the water and bringing a swirl of bubbles around her body. It’s always different. See more of Frediani’s photography at jodifrediani.com. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 8 5


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T O P T E N SANTA CRUZ WAVES FOUNDER TYLER FOX SHARES HIS TOP INSIGHTS FOR AN EXCITING, STRESS-FREE TRAVEL EXPERIENCE

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ADVENTURE

1

/ GET GOING:

A good travel destination doesn’t have to be some far-flung location halfway around the globe. All that matters is that you’re expanding your horizons by visiting cultures and scenery that are different from your own. Don’t let that long list of excuses get in the way from a life-changing experience.

The Croatian coastline is gorgeous with its crystal-clear water and an abundance of tranquil coves. PHOTO: TYLER FOX

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2

/ HAVE A PURPOSE:

On my most recent trip to Europe, this spring, my girlfriend Paige and I were drawn by the opportunity to visit our dream boat in La Grande-Motte, France. I find that anxiety starts to rear its head when I don’t have a tasty carrot being dangled in front of me. Once you have it, sprinkle in other fun things to do while moving toward that goal. The dream trimaran: A 51-foot NEEL.

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Paige soaking in some history at The Pula Arena in Croatia. It is the seventh oldest in Europe and hosts amazing musicians and concerts. PHOTO: TYLER FOX

3

/ DO YOUR RESEARCH:

4

/ BRING REUSABLE ITEMS:

Not knowing that the toll booth doesn’t take credit cards or being blindsided by an off-season snow storm can really suck if you’re not prepared. Online research and asking friends for tips can come in handy when you’re far away from home and don’t speak the language.

With a few small items you can drastically cut down on your single-use plastic waste in an industry that is a huge contributor to our evergrowing plastic epidemic. To cut down on our waste, we packed a variety of nuts and trail mixes for the plane ride, along with bamboo utensils and insulated water containers. Most places have water refill stations and, if you’re still worried about the water, there are many options for small portable waterfiltration systems.

We made a stop at the new Zero Shop in Capitola Village to pick up these nifty bamboo travel utensils, which were helpful during our travels. PHOTO: TYLER FOX SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9 1


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/ REACH OUT TO FRIENDS: This is a huge plus if you really want to experience the best a place has to offer. For example, friends of ours in France took us out to a new restaurant in Biarritz— owned by an ex-professional rugby player—that served only the finest local meats and wines. In Germany, we were privileged with a photoshoot in which we got to wear the authentic Bavarian attire with 9,000-foot mountains as the backdrop. People naturally want to show you the best from their home town and it will feel good to reciprocate when they come visit you someday.

6

/

BRING A WETSUIT & MASK:

This one may not pertain to everyone, but for oceanand-water lovers like myself it’s good to be prepared in case the opportunity to get in the water arises. Places in the Mediterranean like Croatia and Sicily have crystal-clear water, and being able to experience the life below the surface—which not everyone gets to see—is a real treat.

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Above: Exploring the Croatian coastline via scooter.

PHOTO: PAIGE MCQUILLAN

7

/ RENT A SCOOTER: Scooters are just plain fun! You feel like you’ve just entered the Moto Grand Prix when you buckle up the helmet, plus it allows you to get around town quickly and efficiently. No parking? No problem when you have a scooter. Add the insanely good gas mileage and it’s a no-brainer.

8

/ LIMIT YOUR DRIVE TIME: We learned the hard way on this one after trying to pack too many countries into too few days. When you’re the only one that knows how to drive a stick shift and your next stop is six hours away, the journeys can get tiring. When you finally arrive at your destination, the only thing on your mind will be getting horizontal on the hotel bed.

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Below: Rolling hard with our Smart Car.


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ADVENTURE

9

/ BRING A GOOD BOOK: I guess

you don’t really know if the book will be “good” until you read it, but having some sort of literature to dive into will help pass the time when you’re stuck in a cabin in the middle of the Bavarian Alps. I’ve also felt that I have my best ah-ha! moments when I’m completely disconnected from technology and the distractions of social media.

10

/ BE SILLY: There’s no better way to

break the ice than to be silly or tell a joke— some way to show that you are just a stupid human like everyone else. Very rarely will a stranger scoff at your silly antics; more often than not it will spark a smile and/or a conversation.

Above: Guy Kawasaki's newest book Wise Guy is full of all sorts of useful insights and helped pass the time nicely while stuck in this little mountain cabin. Below: Our German friends set up a lederhosen shoot, which spurred some uncontrolled bursts of laughter for all involved. PHOTO: MICHAEL HECKMAIR

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MIND AND BODY

All-natural Avasol Sunscreen—found at The Zero Shop in Capitola Village—is as safe for you as it is for the environment.

The

TRUTH ABOUT SUN SCRE E N S Why it’s important to choose a sunscreen that will save your skin and the planet By ERICA CIRINO

W

ith its endless sunshine and beautiful shoreline, Santa Cruz is the perfect city for dedicating lots of time to the beach and outdoors. If you’re spending all day in the sun, it’s a good idea to slather on sunscreen. Or, is it? Most health professionals recommend people wear sunscreen to protect themselves from the sun’s powerful rays, which can

trigger skin cancer and other health problems in some people. Yet, as a body of research on sunscreen safety grows, it calls into question the effects of commonly sold sunscreens on human and environmental health. Santa Cruz Waves dug through some of the latest research to bring you the truth about sunscreen ingredients and how to make healthy sun-smart choices.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Most sunscreens sold on today’s market contain chemicals called “filters” that help block some of the sun’s rays from hitting your skin directly. Protecting your skin from the sun can prevent skin cancer, premature aging and other types of damage. Yet there is some evidence that these chemicals may be causing some damage, too.

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MIND AND BODY Sunscreen chemicals remain in the environment for a long time before degrading into harmless components. They are so pervasive in nature that it’s now possible to detect sunscreen chemicals in the blood, breast milk and urine of most people. Research on male animals such as fish and rats show that at least one sunscreen chemical—oxybenzone— can cause feminization and other signs of hormone disruption. Eighty percent of all chemical sunscreens on the market contain oxybenzone, according to the Environmental Working Group. American health experts have found that 96 percent of Americans

have oxybenzone in their blood. Yet scientists are not yet sure whether or not oxybenzone could cause endocrine disruption in people.

SUNSCREEN CHEMICALS AND COR AL REEFS Prominent coral scientists, such as Craig Downs, William Precht and the late Ruth Gates, have done extensive research into the effects of sunscreen chemicals on reefs. They have found that when you jump in the water to surf or swim, or rinse off at the beach, sunscreen comes off your skin and runs into the sea. From there, it

can harm corals in several ways. Healthy corals are coated with colorful algae. Coral helps the algae survive by giving it a protected environment and nutrients; and algae helps coral survive by producing oxygen and removing waste. If the coral and algae become stressed, the algae leave the coral bare (bleached), and vulnerable to further stress. Research suggests that sunscreen chemicals make corals more susceptible to stressors—like climate change and sediment deposition—that cause bleaching and disease. What’s more, oxybenzone causes a lethal genetic mutation

A diver inadvertently damaged this coral reef in Panama when she touched it with a hand covered in sunscreen. PHOTO: ©DR. WILLIAM PRECHT

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MIND AND BODY in young corals that causes their skeletons to grow outside their bodies. The stress and mutations caused by oxybenzone also appear to cause corals to reproduce less effectively and reduce baby corals’ chances of survival.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR The sunscreen chemical oxybenzone has been found to be so dangerous to coral reefs that it’s now banned in Hawaii; Key West, Florida; and the island nation of Palau. Yet all of the following sunscreen chemicals are also considered possible concerns. Check your labels for:

F OXYBENZONE F E THYLHEXYL METHOXYCINNAMATE F HOMOSALATE F 4 -METHYLBENZYLIDENE CAMPHOR F D IETHYLAMINO HYDROXYBENZOYL HEXYL BENZOATE Look, instead, for sunscreen without chemicals that has a mineral filter called zinc oxide. Zinc oxide sunscreens have been around a long time but fell out of favor because they tend not to rub in easily. But today’s zinc oxide sunscreens have come a long way and most blend in very well. Ultraviolet-protective clothing, such as rash guards, hats and athletic wear can be a good alternative to applying sunscreen to your skin. Be sure to check clothing labels for UPF, or ultraviolet protection factor. As with SPF, the higher the UPF, the more protective a piece of clothing will be from the sun.

PHOTO: ERIK LANDRY

HOW TO BE A SMART SUNSCREEN USER Wear sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 15 or above, or an SPF of at least 30 if you have fair skin. When applying sunscreen, slather an even amount over all your exposed skin about 30 minutes prior to when you first go into the sun. Reapply your sunscreen every few hours or more often if you are active and sweating, if you go into the water or if your skin burns easily and you need more protection.

BUYING LOCAL BurnOut Suncare’s line of zinc-oxide sunscreens is free of chemicals and therefore safe for both you and the reefs. The company was born in Santa Cruz after environmental scientist, surfer and UC Santa Cruz alumnus Kevin Dunn decided the world needed more effective and environmentally sensitive sun-care products at an affordable price. You can find his company’s products online at burnoutsun.com and in shops throughout Santa Cruz, including O’Neill Surf Shop, New Leaf Community Markets, Whole Foods, Shopper’s Corner, Staff of Life and The Herb Room.

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THE PLEASURE POINT STREET FAIR A beer garden in the heart of the Eastside? Yes, please! New Bohemia Brewing Co. will be pouring lagers, and there will be wine and mimosas for everyone old enough to enjoy at this beloved neighborhood event. On top of that, there will be local vendors, food, fun for the kids, music, and—our favorite part—the skateboarding contest. Benefiting the Live Oak Education Foundation. Saturday, June 22, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., free admission, Portola Drive between 41st and 38th avenues, pleasurepointstreetfair.com.

THE 10TH ANNUAL HOP N’ BARLEY BEER FESTIVAL One weekend will be stuffed with more than 60 breweries, six bands and 12 cider companies in a benefit for the Community Housing Land Trust of Santa Cruz County, Inc. Play beer games under the summer sun while drinking out of your complimentary commemorative beer-tasting glass. The whole family is welcome. July 13 & 14, Skypark, Tickets $5-$55, hopnbarley.com.

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SCOTTS VALLEY 20TH ANNUAL ART, WINE AND BEER FESTIVAL This two-day event brings entertainment for the whole family—even for the dog during Sunday's dog day festivities. Not only does the festival feature local art, live music, local eats, and drinks, but on Saturday there will be a Cops ‘n Rodders Car Show with more than 150 vintage cars on display.

TEQUILA & TACO MUSIC FESTIVAL Santa Cruz comes alive with tequila sampling, live music, local art and craft beer every summer at this event. If the name itself doesn’t get you excited, then try to imagine yourself drinking a cold margarita under the summer sun while listening to live music in the park with your friends. Cheers to that!

August 17 & 18, Skypark, free admission, svartfestival.com.

August 24 & 25, San Lorenzo Park, Tickets $10-$40, tequilaandtacomusicfestival.com.

37TH ANNUAL CAPITOLA ART & WINE FESTIVAL

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS HARVEST FESTIVAL

This gathering in the heart of Capitola serves up amazing views of the Monterey Bay all weekend long. Enjoy local handmade crafts, live music, 160 fine artists, artisanal foods, and more, all while sipping on your pick from more than 22 local wineries. There will be a kids’ art and music area dedicated for the little ones, making sure everyone in the family has fun.

This amazing festival works with local farms, artists, musicians, beer and wine companies to help raise money for nonprofits. Located in the heart of downtown Boulder Creek, it’s guaranteed to be a special day in the beautiful mountains exploring the neighborhood talent. There will be a petting zoo, bounce house, hayrides and arts and crafts for the kids.

Sept. 14, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. & Sept. 15, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Capitola Village, Esplanade Park, free admission, capitolaartandwine.com.

Sept. 28, 11 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., free admission, $15 for Harvest Festival glass and one drink, Downtown Boulder Creek, scmharvest.com.

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LOCAL EATS

Patrice Boyle poses at her downtown Santa Cruz restaurant and wine bar. Photo: RR Jones

A Toast to the Coast Soif and UC Santa Cruz team up for a dinner-and-discussion series focused on sustainable coastal communities By ARIC SLEEPER

W

hen she was still just a humble winemaker, years before she had an inkling that she would one day open a bar and restaurant, Soif owner Patrice Boyle was fascinated by sustainable farming and fishing practices. “I always liked the idea of wines and produce that are part of a place, and living in a way that reflects the bounty and idiosyncrasies of wherever you happen to be,” says Boyle. In 1996, during a wine-tasting

trip to New York City with her former colleagues at Bonny Doon Vineyards, Boyle and her fellow winemakers were invited by the “Godfather of Sustainability,” Chef Rick Moonen, to dine at his restaurant, Oceana. “The dinner completely blew me away,” says Boyle. “It was the first time I had ever heard anyone talking about sustainability, and it completely coincided with the way I felt about wine and how to eat. I thought that if I ever opened my own restaurant, what I served would be sustainable.”

Now that she has operated her own restaurant with a menu driven by local, organic ingredients, Boyle has found a deeper admiration for the practicality of sustainable fishing and farming, but she has also realized that the benefits and challenges to these practices are not always common knowledge. To educate the community about local fisherman, farmers, and scientists devoted to sustainability, she has teamed up with Anne Kapuscinski, director of the Coastal Science and

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FOOD&DRINK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF FOGLINE FARMS

LOCAL EATS

“FISHING USED TO BE MORE SUSTAINABLE BECAUSE PEOPLE WERE EATING SOME OF EVERYTHING AND NOT ALL OF ONE THING.” —PATRICE BOYLE

Policy Program at UC Santa Cruz, to create a four-part dinner and discussion series hosted at Soif. Because the conservation of our coastal ecosystem is a massive topic too big to consume in one sitting, each of the four dinners focus on smaller, more digestible portions. Each of the discussions feature an expert in the field as well as a local purveyor. The first dinner, now passed, focused on local fisheries, and brought a diverse group of diners in to listen and discuss the local scene with Charles Lambert of Ocean2table and fishery biologist Dr. John Field. “There were scientists and fisherman there, and it was a unique opportunity for a diverse cross-section of smart people to get together,” says Boyle. “The best part was that everyone who wanted to speak was able to participate in the discussion.”

The next dinner in the series on Tuesday, June 25 will focus on “Farming in the Watershed,” and features Daniel Press of the UCSC Coastal Science and Policy program as well as representatives from Fogline Farm and Route 1 Farms, both regular contributors to Soif’s menu. “The purveyors we use for these dinners are the same purveyors that we use all the time,” says Boyle. “But we do hope to get a little something special from them for the dinners in the series.” An event this fall will focus on aquaculture, and the last dinner, in December, will feature a to-bedetermined fish specifically. As Boyle and her chef, Tom McNary, work with local fisherman on a regular basis, they know how much the industry has changed over the years. “Fishing used to be more

sustainable because people were eating some of everything and not all of one thing,” says Boyle. “If people are willing to enlarge their fish world, and find out what is available sustainably, and be informed, that’s huge. That’s part of why we are putting on the event.” Boyle points out that an overlooked aspect of sustainability is economic, and to maintain the supply of sustainably grown, local fare, the farmers and fisherman need to be able to sustain themselves and their families. “How can we support the local fisherman who are doing the right thing so that they can have a life and fish?” says Boyle. “That’s a real challenge. I think if more people understand what that means, more people would support local fisherman, and buy local fish that are in season.”

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CAFE CRUZ

DINING GUIDE Downtown 515 KITCHEN & COCKTAILS With a focus on inventive small plates and cocktails, 515 Kitchen & Cocktails has been offering a nuanced take on internationally influenced California cuisine in downtown Santa Cruz since 2006. 515 Cedar St., (831) 425-5051, www.515santacruz.com

ALDERWOOD Alderwood Santa Cruz is a seasonally

and aged beef in equal measure. 155 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, www. alderwoodsantacruz.com

AQUARIUS DREAM INN Spectacular oceanfront dining just off the beach in Santa Cruz. One of Santa Cruz's top dining destinations, Aquarius offers seafood and organic Californian cuisine. Open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as brunch on Sundays. 175 W. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, www.dreaminnsantacruz.com

driven restaurant by chef Jeffrey Wall serving coastal, wood-fired cuisine

BETTY'S EAT INN

with French undertones. Blending

Locally owned burger joint with a fun vibe. Features award-winning burgers, fries, salads, beer, wine and shakes. Soak up the sun on the outdoor patios at all three locations. Expanded menu and full bar at this location only. 1222 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7056, www. bettyburgers.com. Other locations: Midtown (505 Seabright Ave.) and Capitola (1000 41st Ave.).

sophistication and comfort with an unyielding passion for graceful hospitality, the menu reflects California’s abundant produce and the best regional purveyors. Inspired by the Central Coast region and its world-class growers and producers, Alderwood takes pride in featuring oysters, cocktails, wines,

112 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

EL PALOMAR Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-7575, www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

HULA'S ISLAND GRILL California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

IDEAL BAR & GRILL A Santa Cruz institution with amazing beach, boardwalk and wharf views. Open every day, featuring nightly specials and a full bar. 106 Beach St., Santa Cruz, (831) 4233827, www.idealbarandgrill.com

KIANTI’S PIZZA & PASTA BAR Located in the heart of Downtown, stands boldly amongst fellow businesses with it’s vibrant colors and welcoming atmosphere. The indoor lively and update vibe is a crowd pleaser, with weekend

performance. For those preferring a more relaxed experience, dine within the heated patio and cozy up to the fireplace. Kianti’s is as kid friendly as as they come. 1100 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz (831)469-4400 www.kiantis.com

LAILI Santa Cruz's answer to high-quality Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani / Afghan food. 101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-4545, www. lailirestaurant.com

PACIFIC THAI Authentic Thai cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

PONO HAWAIIAN GRILL AND THE REEF Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7666, www.ponohawaiiangrill.com


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FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE POUR TAPROOM Gastropub fare with vegan and gluten-free options. Sixty beers and eight wines on tap. 110 Cooper St., Ste. 100B, Santa Cruz, (831) 535-7007, pourtaproom.com/santa-cruz.

is a neighborhood restaurant that brings the soul of Italian cuisine into the heart of Seabright. Open Tuesday through Sunday from 5 p.m. 538 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 457-2782, lapostarestaurant.com.

SOIF RESTAURANT & WINE BAR

SEABRIGHT BREWERY

A comfortable place to drink great wine, eat food that is as good as the wine, and then—if the wine is to your liking—buy some and take it home. The restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., and until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 105 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2020, www.soifwine.com

STAGNARO BROS. SEAFOOD INC. Seaside eatery turning out fresh seafood staples on the Santa Cruz Wharf with views of the Pacific. 59 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz, (831) 423-2180

ZOCCOLI’S

C

Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711,www.zoccolis.com

M

Y

Harbor

CM

MY

THE CROW’S NEST

CY

Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

CMY

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Midtown AKIRA Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7093, www.akirasantacruz.com

CHARLIE HONG KONG Vegan-oriented menu. Southeast Asian fusion, organic noodle and rice bowls. Chicken, beef, pork and salmon offered. Family and dog friendly. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-5664, www.charliehongkong.com

EL JARDÍN RESTAURANT Delicious and authentic Mexican cuisine featuring locally grown, fresh ingredients. 655 Capitola Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 4779384, www.eljardinrestaurant.net

LA POSTA RESTAURANT With inventive Italian dishes crafted from local and seasonal ingredients, La Posta

114 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Rotating beer selection, with dog-friendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, www.seabrightbrewery.com

Westside/Scotts Valley BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

CASCADES BAR & GRILL AT COSTANOA California cuisine, local, organic, and handcrafted ingredients. 2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1, Pescadero, (650) 879-1100, www.costanoa.com

MISSION ST. BBQ Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com

PRIMAL SANTA CRUZ PRIMAL Santa Cruz is uncompromising about optimal quality, focusing on nutrient-dense, locally sourced and ancestrally inspired food. The menu contains zero gluten, grains, GMOs, refined sugar or seed oils. Serving Verve Coffee, ViDA Kombucha & dry-farm wines. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week. 1203 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 226-2328, www. primalsantacruz.com

SUSHI GARDEN Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls and hot entrées. Spacious dining area with live music performances every Friday and Saturday night. 5600 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, 831-438-9260, www.sushi-garden.com


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SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 11 5


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE

Eastside/Capitola AVENUE CAFÉ Serving traditional breakfast and lunch, along with some Mexican favorites. 427 Capitola Ave., Capitola (831) 515-7559, www.avenuecafecapitola.com

CHILL OUT CAFE Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

EAST SIDE EATERY, PLEASURE PIZZA Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

MARGARITAVILLE Waterfront restaurant offering a lively setting for casual Californian cuisine and cocktails. 231 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-2263, margaritavillecapitola.com

PARADISE BEACH GRILLE Fine dining in the Capitola Village. An award-winning beachside restaurant with spectacular ocean views. 215 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-4900, www.paradisebeachgrille.com

THE SAND BAR Capitola's new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola. (831) 462-1881

SHADOWBROOK Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 4751511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

SOTOLA California farmstead concept focusing on local farms, ranches and seafood. In convivial quarters with an outdoor patio. 231 Esplanade Ste. 102, Capitola, (831) 854- 2800

SUSHI GARDEN Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls and hot entrées. Relaxing atmosphere with a beautiful koi pond. Separate sake bar with extensive list of sake pairings and local wine/beer during dinner. 820 Bay Ave., 831-4649192, www.sushi-garden.com

ZAMEEN AT THE POINT Fresh, fast and healthy Mediterranean

11 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

cuisine. Made-to-order wraps, bowls and salads. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 851 41st Ave, Capitola, (831) 713-5520

ZELDA'S ON THE BEACH Indoor and outdoor dining with a beachfront deck, where American dishes, including seafood, are served. 203 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 4754900, www.zeldasonthebeach.com

Soquel CAFE CRUZ Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

SURF CITY SANDWICH Fast-casual dining with craft sandwiches, gourmet soups, salads, and a microtaproom. 4101 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 346-6952, www.surfcitysandwich.com

TORTILLA FLATS For more than 25 years, their Mexican food has blended the fieriness of Mexico with the sophistication of French sauces, and the earthiness of the Yucatan and complexity of Santa Fe with all the freshness and lightness that Californians expect. 4616 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 476-1754, tortillaflatsdining.com

Aptos/Watsonville AKIRA Now in Aptos, sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 105 Post Office Drive, Ste. D,  Aptos, (831) 7082154, akirasantacruz.com

APTOS ST. BBQ Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

BITTERSWEET BISTRO With its vast menu options from burgers to filet mignon, locally sourced produce, fresh fish and amazing desserts, the varied ambiance is perfect for an intimate dinner or casual gathering with family and friends. Enjoy a local beer on tap in the lounge while watching one of your favorite sports. Relax during happy hour with a handcrafted cocktail. The heated outdoor patio welcomes good dogowners and their furry friends. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com


seasonally-driven • coastal • wood-fired

illustrations © Laura Roy

831-588-3238

155 Walnut Avenue alderwoodsantacruz.com Santa Cruz, CA 95060

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 117


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FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www.burgeraptos.com

CAFE BITTERSWEET Breakfast and lunch served Tuesday through Sunday. Outdoor dog-friendly patio. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

CAFE RIO Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

CILANTROS Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood. 1934 Main St., Watsonville, (831) 761-2161, www.elpalomarcilantros.com

FLATS BISTRO Coffee, pastries and wood-fired pizzas. 113 Esplanade, Rio Del

MarBeach, Aptos, (831) 661-5763, www.flatsbistro.com

THE HIDEOUT Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service. 9051 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-5566, www.thehideoutaptos.com

MANUEL'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos, (831) 688-4848, www.manuelsrestaurant.com

PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive tequila selection. Happy Hour, and dinner specials. 21 Seascape Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9000,www. palapasrestaurant.com

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE Two full bars, rotating taps, delicious pub fare, patio seating and thirstquenching cocktails. 8017 Soquel Drive, (831) 688-4300, theparishpublick.com

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE BEACH RESORT Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-7120, www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients. 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 6888987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

SUSHI GARDEN Japanese cuisine specializing in fresh sushi, creative rolls, hot entrées and unique house specials. Casual and friendly atmosphere. 1441 Main St., Watsonville, 831-728-9192, www.sushi-garden.com

ZAMEEN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE Flavorful meals in a casual dining setting. 7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-4465, www.zameencuisine.com

San Lorenzo Valley COWBOY BAR AND GRILL Sandwiches, steaks and American fare served in a kid-friendly joint with a country-western theme. 5447 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 335-2330, www.feltoncowboy.com

THE CREMER HOUSE The perfect spot to enjoy a cold, handcrafted beer, a glass of local wine, or a homemade soda while trying dishes using local, organic, farm-raised sustainable ingredients, as well as vegetarian items. 6256 Hwy 9, Felton, (831) 335-3976, www.cremerhouse.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 11 9


t-shirs | hodi# | & ^R S8ACRuzalHA.C= 12 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


COOL OFF

SUSTAINABLE SWAPS

A Greener Way to Party

Five helpful tips from certified green event-planning company Paige Events | By J.D. RAMEY

PHOTO: WILLIWILDFLOWER.COM

N

ot to be a buzzkill, but on top of all the damage that plastic causes to our oceans, new research suggests that degrading plastic also emits gases that may contribute to climate change. With our summers getting steadily hotter, there’s no question that it’s time to start changing with the climate and making some more eco-friendly choices. But being more environmentally conscious doesn’t mean the party has to stop. Here are some tips from certified green-event planner Paige McQuillan on how to make your summer parties more sustainable.

1)

Encourage people to bring their own cups. Instead of buying single-use plastic water bottles, fill a pitcher or water dispenser with fruit-infused water for your guests to enjoy. Stick to cans or glass bottles instead of plastic. 

2)

No balloons. Often made from foil, rubber or plastic,

balloons frequently find their way to the ocean and can be extremely harmful to animals. Foil balloons and their nylon strings can take years to decompose, so avoid these at all costs. A few alternatives: flags, banners, streamers and paper pom-poms. 

3)

Buy organic, locally grown flowers. Sixty percent

of the flowers in the U.S. are imported. Since they are not edible, they are unregulated, so they are often doused in pesticides to prevent invasive species from being carried from one country to the next. Farmers markets and local floral shops are a great place to find organic alternatives—just be sure to ask where they get their flowers.

4)

Avoid pre-made party platters in plastic containers.

The problem with these platters is that they rarely consist of high-quality, organic ingredients, and, more often than not, their containers end up in the trash instead of being recycled. 

5)

Beware of greenwashing. The terms “green,” “eco,”

“eco-friendly,” “natural and sustainable” and “100% compostable” are not regulated, so any company can make this claim about its products. Corn-based utensils and straws are often labeled “100% compostable,” but proper composting of these items requires a special facility that is unavailable in Santa Cruz. Instead, use your own metal utensils, or buy bamboo utensils, paper straws (if needed) and paper plates. Rentals are always an option, as well.  

For more information on green event planning, contact Paige McQuillan at paige@paigeevents.com or find her on Instagram @paige.events. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 12 1


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COOL OFF

FIELD NOTES

PHOTO: ERIK LANDRY

Sit Down and Shut Up By KYLE THIERMANN

A

friend told me to shut the fuck up, so I did. For a week. Last March at Mount Madonna Center I meditated from 8 a.m9 p.m for a week straight, with breaks only for meals and exercise. After having listened to dozens of podcasts with successful artists, entrepreneurs, and athletes who talk about meditation like it’s the Ark of the Covenant, I figured it would be worth a try. Much like a beekeeper who becomes allergic to bees later in life, growing up in the miasma of charged crystals, reiki healers and unhygienic yogis (aka Santa Cruz), I have developed an auto-immune disorder to anything that seems like magical thinking. Admittedly, this tendency is unwise because my skepticism can easily become close-mindedness and I risk writing-off legit stuff like turmeric and breath-work. Luckily, about a year ago I found a very un-wooey app called Waking Up and have used it to meditate most mornings for 10 minutes before I start my day. Within the first 20 seconds of

attempting to meditate I usually have the insight that my mind is completely out of control. Like a dog chasing cars, my mind becomes possessed by the next thought that captures my attention, and it’s not until the teacher’s voice comes through my headphones that I am reminded that I am supposed to be meditating. The Ark of the Covenant that so many meditators allude to is the ability to train your dog to watch the cars drive by without leaving the porch. It has always struck me as odd that so few of us will spend even one full day of our life in silence. When I removed all stimuli from my life for a while, areas of my mind that typically remain dormant become available—most notably the ability to pay attention. Sam Harris, the meditation teacher in the Waking Up app, repeatedly says that boredom is just the inability to pay attention. I can attest that given the right amount of concentration, a task as simple as following your breath can become as captivating as bungee jumping. After all, bungee

jumping and following your breath are both just experiences that focus your mind. I could get all holier-than-thou and tell you about my spiritual journey and the insights I had on retreat (translation: I’m better than you) but then I would be no more enlightened than the magical thinkers I love to poke fun at. So I’ll close with this somewhat depressing thought instead: I have missed most of my life. For the majority of my waking hours, my attention has been hijacked by events that have happened or I believe are bound to happen. These thoughts include people who have wronged me, fantasies about women, the upcoming swell, and arbitrary comparisons to others. The most pernicious aspect of these stories is that I am generally unaware that they are robbing me of the present moment. Experienced meditators like Yoda and Adayashanti can cut through these stories and pay attention to the now, and if the act of sitting down and shutting up can help me miss less of my life, then sign me up.

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J COMPANY FEATURE

Eliminating single-use plastic waste while quenching thirst By ARIC SLEEPER

S

taying hydrated is important for many reasons, but for those who can’t trust the tap and also don’t want to contribute to the 2,000 plastic water bottles already used every second, drinking water can be a challenge. Rich Razgaitis, founder and CEO of FloWater, wanted to make drinking purified water and eliminating plastic waste easier and more convenient with an advanced water-purifying refill station. Here, he fills us in on his mission.

Tell us about the refill stations. FloWater’s refill station technology is unmatched by any other waterdelivery system, with a water purification process that removes up to 99.9 percent of all contaminants, including chlorine, fluoride, lead, heavy metals and other environmental toxins, delivering the ultimate experience. The stations also alkalize, oxygenate, and add minerals and electrolytes to the

purified water for better hydration. A coconut carbon filter finishes the water for a clean, crisp taste. FloWater refill stations are also self-sanitizing and feature an on-demand delivery system that provides perfectly chilled water in less than 10 seconds.

How have you seen FloWater benefit people and the environment at the ground level? Since our launch in 2013, we have saved more than 100 million single-use plastic water bottles from the environment and are on target to hit one billion by 2022. Beyond this positive impact on the environment, our survey outcomes show that where FloWater refill stations are integrated into the workplace, users report they’re substantially more hydrated, productive, energetic, and experience more restful sleep. Perhaps most importantly are the outcomes. When we deploy a FloWater unit into a hotel, school, corporation, gym, or retailer, depending upon the

audience, we’ll frequently see greater than an 80-percent reduction in singleuse plastics and a two- to five-time increase in daily water consumption in addition to a reduction in coffee and soda consumption.

What are your hopes for FloWater moving forward? I want us to be the company that sets the stage for a radical redefinition of how we view, consume, drink and treat water—a precious commodity. We are in the middle of a mega-trend moving away from plastic. We’re also facing growing concerns around tap water, some perceived, and others well founded. We all feel a deep responsibility to make an enduring imprint, and in the process to build a great company that delivers a product people love that compels them to drink more water while also eliminating single-use plastic bottle waste. Learn more at myflowater.com.

Rob Machado, pictured bottom left with his son, and other thirsty eco-conscious event-goers utilize FloWater’s water-purifying refill stations. PHOTOS COURTESY OF FLOWATER.

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Save The Waves hosted its annual Life Is A Wave Gala at The Dream Inn on May 23. The evening brought together environmental ambassadors and a handful of organizations striving to protect waves and coastal communities all over the globe. Special recognitions for the "Wave Saver of The Year" were awarded to Bianca Valenti (Athlete of the Year), Reece Pacheco (Environmentalist of the Year), and Klean Kanteen (Business of the Year). The event was made possible by the generous support of this year's sponsors: Ventana Surf and Supply, Klean Kanteen, Lighthouse Bank, Santa Cruz Waves, Lighthouse Realty, Bintang, Lumen Wines, Pela Phone Cases and Peak Design. 12 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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The fifth annual Santa Cruz Waves Swellies Awards brought the community together for an evening of great food, drinks and entertainment at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History in downtown Santa Cruz. Big shout-out to our food and drink vendors. Thank you to all of our sponsors (Santa Cruz Naturals, VICE Salon, Hot Yoga Aptos, Brady's, Kind Peoples, Sandbar Solar, and Bay Federal Credit Union) and to bands The Getaway Dogs and Soulwise for making the party a huge success: . 12 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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Santa Cruz Waves June/July 2019 Issue 6.1  

Santa Cruz Waves June/July 2019 Issue 6.1  

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