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JULY 3-11, 2013 VOL. 27 ■ NO. 390

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27|COVER STORY

News, arts, and more every day at independent.com

volume 27, number 390, July 3-11, 2013

PAUL WELLMAN

Contents

Feature: Stow House Arboretum

4th annual BBQ Contest Winners! Things Get Hot and Smoky (George Yatchisin)

ON THE COVER: Illustration by Isaac Flahavin Welsh.

(Colin Rooney) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

History 101: Train Wreck of 1907

(Michael Redmon) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Gardening: Creating New Breeds of Flora

(Virginia Hayes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Starshine: Guest Writer: Starshine’s Teenager

(Stone Roshell) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

10 | NEWS

Sports: S.B. Soccer Heads to Kansas for Nationals (John Zant) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

19 | OPINIONS

55 | A&E

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Review W. Dibblee Hoyt: Far Reaches

News of the Week (Independent Staff) . . . . . 10

Food & Drink (Independent Staff) . . . . . . . . . . 51

Angry Poodle Barbecue (Nick Welsh) . . . . . . 19

Arts Life (Independent Staff) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

This Modern World (Tom Tomorrow) . . . . . . 23 In Memoriam: Ellen Louise Marcus

(Jeffrey Marcus Oshins) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

33 | THE WEEK Calendar of Events

(Jack Crosbie and Jake Blair) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Arts & Entertainment Listings

(Chelsea Lyon) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

39 | LIVING

Living (Independent Staff) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

(Charles Donelan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Classical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Review Music Academy of the West Festival Orchestra (Joseph Miller) . . . . . . 58 Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Reviews Damian and Stephen Marley

(Ethan Stewart) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Robert Plant & The Sensational Space Shifters (Caitlin Kelley) . . . . . . . . . . 61 Positively State Street (Aly Comingore) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

WILD MAN WITH A PEN: Isaac Welsh has been drawing up a storm almost since before he could crawl, perfecting — and insisting on — a style all his own. Stubbornly self-taught — notwithstanding obvious inspiration from the likes of Ed “Big Daddy” Roth, EC Comics, Dragon Ball Z, Calvin and Hobbes, and, of course, the perpetual cat-and-mouse game between Batman and the Joker — Welsh will soon be venturing forth to art school in San Francisco to hone his chops, expand his horizons, and further challenge himself creatively.

65 | FILM

Reviews 20 Feet from Stardom

(D.J. Palladino) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

The Heat

(Josef Woodard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Movie Guide (Aly Comingore) . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

24 | ODDS & ENDS

Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 69 Dining Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Restaurant Guy (John Dickson) . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

74 | CLASSIFIEDS

Legals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Crossword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Well-Being . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Tide Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

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News of the Week

JUNE 27 - JULY 3, 2013

by BRANDON FASTMAN, TYLER HAYDEN, MATT KETTMANN, ETHAN STEWART, and NICK WELSH, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

news briefs LAW & DISORDER PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

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Legal and Loving It

A steady stream of same-sex couples started showing up Monday morning at Santa Barbara’s storybook County Courthouse to apply for marriage licenses in response to last week’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. Pictured from right, Amanda Wilkerson and Laura McElhinney were not the first same-sex couple to sign on the dotted line, but the third. “It’s a very big deal for us,” said Wilkerson of the court ruling. “A little bit of validation goes a long way.” While the Supreme Court did not rule on gay marriage per se, it struck down Prop. 8 — the statewide initiative passed in 2008 — which changed the definition of marriage in California’s Constitution to exclude nontraditional marriages. A couple who identified themselves as Alex and Robert also filed the paperwork early Monday morning. “It’s a great victory,” said Alex. “We’ve been together eight years, and finally we’re seeing a light at the end of the tunnel. We are no different than anyone else.” Commenting on the experience of filling out the county application forms, he stated, “Actually doing it was very intense. It’s not like a dream; it’s actually happening, and we’re doing it.” County Clerk Joe Holland — whose offices dispenses marriage licenses — said it was both “fun” and “exciting” to be involved. And as to when, where, and how Wilkerson and McIlhenney will actually tie the knot, Wilkerson would say only — but with a big grin — “It’s a secret.” — Nick Welsh

High-profile defense attorney Darryl Genis (above) was found in contempt of court by Judge Jean Dandona for speaking disparagingly and disrespectfully of his opposing counsel and fined $1,000. Genis, who specializes in DUI cases, reportedly called prosecuting attorney Hannah Lucy “a little girl” as the two were leaving Dandona’s courtroom. Though the judge offered Genis an opportunity to explain himself — and to apologize — she ultimately deemed his apology “disingenuous and insincere.” Genis has locked horns a number of times with Santa Barbara judges over courthouse manners and conduct. Judges George Eskin and Frank Ochoa, for example, have declined to hear cases in which he’s involved. The size of Dandona’s fine will require Genis to report himself to the State Bar for review. Genis did not respond to multiple invitations for comment.

county

Grand Jury: Tax Oil New Revenues Needed, Advisory Body Insists

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BY N I C K W E L S H

ith the oil industry pumping nearly 3.4 million barrels out of the ground in Santa Barbara a year, the county Grand Jury concluded it makes no sense that Santa Barbara County isn’t getting a piece of the action. To that end, the Grand Jury — made up of citizen volunteers — urgently advised the Board of Supervisors to put an oil tax on the ballot as soon as possible to let the voters decide. If the county used the same tax formula adopted in Oklahoma, the Grand Jury estimated Santa Barbara could generate $22 million a year from onshore oil production. If instead the county imposed a more modest one-dollar-a-barrel tax — as recommended by county CEO Chandra Wallar early last year — it could reap $3.4 million a year in additional revenues. The Grand Jury concluded the county’s need for additional revenue sources is immediate and profound. The budget just approved three weeks ago by the Board of Supervisors had to paper over a $5 million shortfall between expenses and revenues. But the big picture is much bleaker, the advisory body opined, when spiraling pension costs, deferred road maintenance, and the expense of staffing the proposed new North County jail — $17 million extra a year — are included. The Grand Jury acknowledged that many of the environmental concerns surrounding oil 10

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production — spills, air pollution, and fracking — remain the subject of ongoing contention. On those matters, it took pains to take no position. But while such matters are debated, the Grand Jury noted that oil companies have expanded the amount of oil they’re pumping, the number of wells they’re pumping, and the number of acres they’ve brought into production. The only other tax the county collects from oil development, the Grand Jury observed, came from property taxes, roughly $12 million a year. As much as that is, it’s still 83 percent less than it would have been had Prop.  — designed to provide relief from rapidly escalating property taxes — not been passed by voters in 1978.“Losing 83.3 percent of the taxes once garnered from oil production was a significant decline in revenue for California counties,” the report stated. In contrast to onshore oil, the Grand Jury found that the county had managed to snag some financial benefit from the offshore oil development taking place in the channel — $20 million paid to the Coastal Resources Enhancement Fund since 1988. Last spring, the supervisors considered placing an oil tax on the ballot, but the initiative failed. During board deliberations, vehement opposition was expressed by North County business advocates who contended the measure would cost jobs, drive up the price of gas, and unfairly target a specific industry. The Grand Jury expressed unalloyed skepticism that any oil tax the county might

impose would — or could — have any impact on local jobs or gas prices. It noted that a new oil tax would not fall “on the general populace” as the sales tax does and would definitely increase much-needed revenues. As politically and financially irresistible as it might seem for the county to soak the oil companies — now reveling in record profits — to actually do so is much more complicated. Under state law, it would require four of the five supervisors to place an oil tax on the ballot if the revenues were to feed the general fund. (Given the makeup of the board, it’s exceedingly unlikely that would happen.) The good news is that such an initiative would require only a simple voter majority to pass. By contrast, only three supervisors need approve an oil tax initiative that detailed precisely how the money would be spent. But such a measure would need a two-thirds voter majority for passage. The last time county voters agreed to such a proposition was in 2008 when they approved Measure A, a sales tax increase that would fund freeway widening and road repairs. Another option would be for a citizens committee — separate from the supervisors — to collect enough signatures to place a general-fund oil-tax initiative on the ballot. The number of signatures might be daunting — 15 percent of the registered voters in the county — but for such a measure to pass, only 51 percent of the voters would have to vote yes.

A former Dos Pueblos High School football coach was arrested for felony stalking after he admitted to relentlessly calling, watching, and following a former student athlete. Police said Justin Sell, 27, started stalking the victim in mid-May, which included, “annoying phone calls, surveillance of the victim and the victim’s residence, confronting the victim in public, creating a fictitious Facebook account for the purpose of posting demeaning comments about the victim and befriending the victim’s contacts, and articulating the intent to move to the state where the victim will be attending college.” Sell was arrested without incident on 6/25 at his home in the 4600 block of Tajo Drive, and he reportedly admitted to the harassment because he was worried “his friendship with the victim was failing,” police said. A 20-year-old frequent flier of Santa Barbara’s criminal justice system was arrested 6/28 after he got into a violent confrontation with his mom. Felipe Barrera, said Sheriff’s Department spokesperson Lt. Kelly Moore, started arguing with his mother at around 9 a.m. in a home in the 7400 block of San Blanco Drive. During the fight, Barrera allegedly pushed his mother, grabbed and smashed her cell phone as she tried to call police, then hit her with a sports racket. The woman and Barrera’s 14-year-old sister fled the home and called the Sheriff’s Department from a nearby gas station. They told officials Barrera was still at the residence and might have access to firearms, Moore said. The Sheriff’s Department’s SWAT team was called in and


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Just a matter of days into the official 2013 summer season, shark sightings and related beach closures are once again plaguing the South Coast. According to California State Parks officials, a 12-foot great white shark had a run-in over the weekend with people fishing from kayaks offshore of Tajiguas Beach along the Gaviota Coast, and as a result, nearby Refugio and El Capitán state parks were closed as a precaution until at least July 2. The incident occurred Saturday afternoon along the edge of a kelp bed just a few miles up the coast from Refugio State Park. According to Ranger Iris King, the fishermen were approximately 600-800 feet offshore when they saw a dorsal fin, thinking at first that it must be a dolphin. However, after the owner of the fin circled closer and passed under their kayaks — actually bumping one of the boats and lifting it partially out of the water — it was clear to the veteran fishermen that it belonged to something else. “They were able to identify the colorings and shape enough that we are confident it was a white shark,” said King. As per Parks policy, warning signs were posted and the waters within a six-mile radius of the sighting were closed for 72 hours. In other shark news, Santa Barbara County officials confirmed this week that there were multiple reports of what witnesses believe was a large shark patrolling the waters of Jalama Beach County Park on June 22. The sightings, which occurred roughly 25 yards and 100 yards offshore of the popular North County park, prompted officials to close the waters for 24 hours and post warning signs. However, with no additional sightings — Ethan Stewart reported, the beaches were back open the next day.

tracked Barrera to a residence on San Milano Drive, where he had been arrested before. Barrera was taken into custody, and a search of the San Blanco Drive home turned up a modified and concealable .22-caliber rifle.

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Former Olympian and WWII hero Louis Zamperini (above) helped the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Barbara raise $58,000 this week by speaking at a packed event at the Earl Warren Showgrounds. The 96-year-old talked about how his life changed when, as a misdirected youth living in Torrance, he joined the high school track team, eventually competing in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Four years later he would fight in WWII and survive a harrowing stint as a Japanese prisoner of war. Zamperini, said Boys & Girls Club representatives, was an ideal choice for the luncheon fundraiser because the organization’s mission is “to inspire and enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.” After a couple of years of planning for an upgrade and expansion of its nearly 100-yearold facilities, the Board of Trustees for the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History announced last week that the controversial plan has been put on “indefinite hold.” The letter, dated June 26 and signed by the museum’s president and CEO Luke Swetland, explained that the museum had begun analyzing the first phase of the project and determined that “the timelines for fundraising and construction are not aligned with one another to the degree they need to be to enable us to proceed in the way we had envisioned.” Additionally, Swetland wrote, “Moreover, as we have carefully studied the first

phase of our project, the Museum has come to the conclusion that it does not showcase our scientific, programmatic and educational strengths as fully as it might.” Instead, the museum plans to study how to “better synchronize our fundraising efforts, our commitment to stewardship of our facilities, and our program goals in our near term activities.” Another update is expected in the fall. Mayor Helene Schneider weighed in on the debate over the exclusion of a Veterans for Peace float from the Independence Day parade. She wrote in a letter to parade organizer Paul Lamberton, “On a day when we are celebrating America’s independence and the Bill of Rights that includes our freedom of speech and freedom of peaceful assembly, I think it is quite unfortunate that a long-standing local veterans organization has been barred from participating.” Lamberton denied the Veterans for Peace application because he said the group had violated a parade rule by distributing handbills and flyers in years past.

COUNTY A massive high-pressure system sitting to the east brought some vintage summer weather to the Santa Barbara area. The mercury soared from Santa Ynez to Summerland late last week and over the weekend as the fog monster stayed away and sunshine reigned supreme all day long for much of the county. While no major records were set locally according to the National Weather Service, daytime highs on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday all came pretty darn close. Triple digits were the norm for the Santa Ynez Valley while Santa Barbara topped out at just a few ticks over 90 degrees on Saturday afternoon. Forecasters expect the hot stuff to stick around for much of this holiday week as the high-pressure system in question slowly starts to break down around the Fourth of July. The County Planning Commission took on one of the thorniest issues facing it in reviewing the first draft of the Gaviota Coast Plan: where to site the California Coastal Trail (CCT). Described as “dueling plans,” the options were laid out before the commissioners, with Plan A depicting GavPAC proposals for the alignment of the CCT and Plan B reflecting recommendations cont’d page 12  from county staff. GavPAC’s

Caruso Takes Over Paseo Nuevo Mall Magnate Will Manage Leases and Overall Operations

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BY N I C K W E L S H

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Shark Week Comes Early

city

anta Barbara city officials have confirmed that Rick Caruso, the billionaire mall developer from Los Angeles and owner of Montecito’s muchbedraggled Miramar Hotel, has taken over management of the downtown Paseo Nuevo shopping mall. While Caruso took control of the day-to-day leasing and management of the property about three weeks ago, the mall property remains “owned” by JPMorgan Chase, which holds a 50-year lease with the City of Santa Barbara. What difference, if any, Caruso’s management will make in tenant selection and the personality of the downtown mall remains to be seen, but Caruso has specialized in aggressively programming his retail centers, like the Americana at Brand, as premier destination TIME WILL TELL: If and how Paseo Nuevo will change under spots, mixing family-friendly Rick Caruso’s new leadership is anyone’s guess. outdoor enticements with high-end retailers. Caruso took over management of the mall Like redevelopment agencies throughout the from the Macerich real estate investment com- entire state, the city’s agency was forcibly put pany, which owns 57 regional malls throughout out of business two years ago by a combination the United States. Macerich also owns and oper- of legislative action coupled with adverse court ates La Cumbre Plaza mall on outer State Street. rulings. That has left the fate of the downtown Typically, Macerich only manages properties it mall — like all properties owned by the RDA owns, so the Paseo Nuevo was an anomaly. City — somewhat up for grabs. Many agency properties have been sold off officials say Macerich did a good job with the at forced auctions so that the proceeds could be mall and was responsive to city concerns. When the company installed a highly phallic split by all the government agencies that might decorative pole in the mall’s public common otherwise have enjoyed in their escalation of space, it was greeted with considerable public property tax values and revenues. Those governcomment. In response, the company capped the ment agencies have formed a special committee, column with a crown, making it, in the words and initially that committee was interested in of one high-ranking city official, “less fallacky.” forcing a sale of Paseo Nuevo on the theory that Macerich continues to own and operate the La the property was worth millions. But it turns out Cumbre center, which has struggled to establish that City Hall received only nominal rent for the or maintain much of a thriving identity during mall, deriving most of the value from increased sales taxes and the generalized boost in retail the recent recession. While City Hall has no financial investment traffic the mall creates. City officials are confiin La Cumbre — unlike Paseo Nuevo — city offi- dent — at least for the time being — that the mall cials have made no secret that they’d love to see property won’t be sold off anytime soon, though Target move there. For that to happen, however, the theoretical possibility does exist. While Caruso enjoys considerable cachet Sears would have to move out, and it has about 15 years left on its lease. And any effort to move throughout the state and the world of mall manTarget into La Cumbre would no doubt inflame agement, in Santa Barbara County, his profile relations between the City of Santa Barbara and remains decidedly mixed. There’s considerable the City of Goleta, which is currently hoping to resentment that he has yet to rebuild the Mirasee a Target open up at the intersection of Los mar Hotel, which he purchased from Ty Warner six years ago, and even more that he’s sought to Carneros Road and Hollister Avenue. Adding yet another wrinkle to the Caruso secure a major break on his property taxes as transaction is Paseo Nuevo’s genesis as a crea- a precondition for pursuing his development ture of the city’s Redevelopment Agency (RDA). rights. ■ july 3, 2013

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News of theWeek

news briefs cont’d from p. 11

Plan A depicted a coastal route more closely aligned with the freeway in some places and called for the addition of a trails overlay at Dos Pueblos Ranch and along the coastal strand from Refugio to Gaviota State Park. Staff’s Plan B laid out a more specific alignment for the Coastal Trail, in most cases with routing along the bluff top favored by trails and environmental groups. By the end of the daylong meeting, the commissioners agreed to adopt the staff recommendations with some slight revisions, including study of a possible route north of the freeway west of Refugio Beach to the Mariposa Reina overpass. The next Gaviota Plan meeting takes place 7/16.

Commissioner requested by North County supervisors Peter Adam and Steve Lavagnino. Members of the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Alliance urged the Board of Supervisors to keep an open mind about alternative pest control methods when dealing with billion-dollar crop killers like the Asian citrus psyllid. The psyllid doesn’t kill citrus trees directly, but the bacteria some carry do and are invariably lethal. Santa Barbara County was placed in a state of quarantine last year after a handful of psyllids were found, though none were carrying the deadly bacteria. The problem, say beekeepers, is the chemicals used to kill the psyllid — neonicotinoids — can be deadly to bees pollinating trees in bloom. Neonicotinoids were implicated in the recent die off of 25,000 bees in Oregon. Or, as a state pesticide agent involved in Goleta’s recent eradication effort obliquely put it, “There are some nontarget pests that get targeted in our application. We try to mitigate the secondary effects.” cont’d  J EF F M AHON EY

The county supervisors found themselves drawn into a discussion about bee colony collapse last week in response to a departmental show-and-tell report by the Agricultural

CONT’D

PEOPLE OF THE SEA: A group of Chumash gather at dawn at West Beach to celebrate the summer solstice.

Indigenous Watercraft Fest in the Works

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If all goes as planned, there could be more than 1,000 Native Americans from all over the West Coast and beyond coming to Santa Barbara for next year’s summer solstice weekend, bringing with them their peoples’ traditional boats in a collective effort to connect across tribal lines, educate the public, and inspire the next generation to respect living cultures and protect the health of the ocean. That’s the intent of the Voices of the Ocean: An Indigenous Watercraft Festival, a free event being scheduled for June 20-21, 2014, on the sand at West Beach. Spearheaded by longtime ocean advocate Edward Cassano as well as Chumash elders Reggie Pagaling and Marcus Lopez — who are part of the team that has built and paddled traditional tomols across the Santa Barbara Channel — the festival would be the first attempt to gather such a wide cross-section of cultures and their canoes, and it was recently boosted closer to reality with a $20,000 matching grant from the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. Cassano, who worked on marine reserves for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and helped start the S.B. Maritime Museum, among other ocean-related career moves, became enchanted with the indigenous watercraft world in 2001, when he was on Santa Cruz Island to witness the first-ever crossing of a traditional Chumash tomol in 135 years. “The power of that experience changed my life,” recalled Cassano, whose daughter, then 7 years old, was profoundly moved by the event, and is now, at age 19, studying ancient cultures at St. Andrews in Scotland. “How do you bring that out for everybody?” A much smaller, invite-only gathering was held this past summer solstice, when about 50 people gathered at West Beach to welcome the dawn with a Chumash ceremony. “The Chumash believe that their ancestors came to us from the ocean,” said Cassano of his motivations for starting the fest, explaining that he hopes to have a storytelling pavilion, discussions on various ocean issues, and chances for the public to try paddling themselves. “And we need to give the ocean a voice, too.” To learn — Matt Kettmann more and support the event, see inmer.org.

Everybody admires the brain, whether they have one or not.

— Dr. Ralph Greenspan, describing how a $100 million project to map the brain appeals to both ends of the political spectrum.


MONDAY thru FRIDAY

Endangered Fish Fry

LUNCH

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

At least 70 endangered steelhead trout were killed June 23 when backup generators failed to restart Lake Cachuma water pumps affected by a widespread PG&E power outage across the Central Coast. The two electric pumps operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation feed water into Hilton Creek — a tributary of the Santa Ynez River — when lake levels are low, as they are right now. They were HEAVILY PROTECTED: Much time, money, and energy activated for the first time has been devoted to boosting steelhead numbers in Santa last year when the creek Barbara County. was similarly dry. Of the 70 young fish that died, 60 were less than three inches long and 10 were between three and 12 inches. Adult steelhead reach up to 36 inches in length. One of six Pacific trout species, they spend most of their lives out at sea but return to fresh water to spawn. Their offspring typically remain in fresh water for about a year before heading to the ocean. Steelhead were listed as an endangered species in 1997 and have been the subject of many multimillion-dollar recovery efforts throughout Southern California in recent years. Before Bradbury Dam was built across the Santa Ynez River in 1953 to create Lake Cachuma, it wasn’t unusual to see some 20,000 mature fish running up and down the river to spawn. Nowadays, according to NOAA Fisheries officials, the number of observed steelhead has dropped to 0-20 adults per year. Power to the Hilton Creek pumps — and approximately 150,000 other PG&E customers — was cut at around 9:30 p.m. due to a “flash” at a Morro Bay substation. According to Lynnette Wirth with the Bureau of Reclamation, backup generators activated as expected, but the pumps failed to restart. Reclamation and Cachuma Operations and Maintenance Board (COMB) staff restored water to the creek around seven hours later and notified the appropriate agencies about the incident, Wirth said. Bureau spokesperson Pete Lucero said the pumps are designed to funnel 6-8 cubic feet of water into Hilton Creek every second. “When the pumps are running, they are greased, oiled, and adjusted weekly,” he said. “Otherwise, they are checked annually.” It’s not clear how long they had been on before the outage took place. For its part, the law enforcement arm of NOAA declined to offer any more information on the incident or how the agency is following up. A lead investigator was on vacation, officials said, and personnel changes made scheduling an interview near impossible. Its Sacramento office issued this statement through spokesperson John Thibodeau: “We appreciate [the Bureau of Reclamation] notifying us about the power interruption that caused a loss of fish. Our Fisheries enforcement office is investigating the incident which is normal protocol when threatened or endangered fish are taken,” — Tyler Hayden he said. “I can’t go into more detail at this time.”

news briefs cont’d Strapped to the belly of an L-1011 aircraft carrier that took off from Vandenberg Air Force Base, a Pegasus rocket deployed NASA’s new sun-observing satellite at around 7:30 p.m. on 6/27. The two-year IRIS (or Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) mission will help astrophysicists better understand the flow of energy and plasma throughout our solar system’s star. The launch was originally scheduled for the day before but was postponed after last week’s widespread power outage.

EDUCATION Following a common theme, Congress failed to cut a deal and then left for recess. Loan rates on Stafford Loans for college students will double from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. “This is a big deal for our students,” said Michael

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Miller, director of Financial Aid at UCSB. He said about 8,000 undergraduates receive these federally subsidized loans. Nationwide, the rate increase is expected to add $2,600 to a student’s debt burden. Congress could still pass a law that would retroactively reset rates. “When you are talking about student loan debt exceeding that of credit cards, it’s unfortunate,” said Miller. Providence Hall and Santa Barbara Christian School announced that effective 7/1 they are merging to become the first K-12 Christian school in town. The new entity will retain the campuses of the two exisitng institutions as a K-6 lower and 7-12 upper school. A new board will be formed and will include members from both of the former schools’ boards. The heads of the two schools, David O’Neill and Chris Rutz, have known each other since they both worked at Christian schools in Los Angeles. ■

Dark days. Dark days.

— Andrew Madsen, spokesperson for Los Padres National Forest, on the deaths of 19 hotshot firefighters in Arizona. A Los Padres crew of 20 has just been dispatched to fight that blaze.

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MIKE CLARK

News of theWeek

CONT’D

City College Bans Smoking A DRAG: Casey Mokicky (right) smokes a cigarette while his friend Valerie Martin does homework at a designated smoking area on City College’s West Campus. The Board of Trustees voted to eliminate the three current smoking areas, making the campus completely smoke-free by August 5.

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BY B R A N D O N FA S T M A N anta Barbara City College is now a butt-free zone after the Board of Trustees voted last week to ban tobacco on campus. President Lori Gaskin voiced her approval, saying, “As an academic institution, we have a responsibility to foster practices that address the education of the ‘whole’ student. Maintaining one’s health, fitness, and wellbeing are an important part of being a student, and becoming a completely nonsmoking campus communicates this message with great clarity and commitment.” According to an American Lung Association tally, only 10 other colleges or universities in the state have completely banned smoking on campus. Not counted is UCLA, which went tobacco-free in April. Last year, UC President Mark Yudof called for the whole system to follow suit by 2014. UCSB will do so on January 1. Currently, SBCC offers designated smoking areas on campus. As of August 5, smokers will be obliged to travel outside one of the college’s entrances. “It will take a little bit of a hike if people have to smoke, and I understand addiction,” said Board President Marty Blum,

adding, however,“The more we read about secondhand smoke — even outside — the more [a ban] makes sense.” Head of business services Joe Sullivan, who ushered in the new regulations — which also ban e-cigarettes because they contain nicotine and emit vapors — kicked a two-pack-a-day habit when he was 28 and now competes in triathlons. The issue popped up on his radar because his department is responsible for cleaning up the smoking areas. He also fields complaints from people with health issues who are worried about secondhand smoke and environmental groups concerned about butts washing into the ocean. The lone dissenting vote on the board was Craig Nielsen. (Trustee Veronica Gallardo was not present.) He said that he did not want to make a big deal of his disagreement and that the ban “is not a terrible thing in and of itself,” but he is concerned over the “erosion of individuals’ right to choose.” He added, “I just feel like there’s better things to spend campus money on than signs that say ‘No Smoking.’”

Building a Brain Trust

W

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hen, during his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama mentioned that every dollar spent on the Human Genome Project yielded $143 in business activity, he was sending a coded message. His budget would include funding — $100 million, he would later announce — for a project to build a map of the human brain that includes all 86 billion neurons.“Each of us in our own little offices fell off our chairs,” Dr. Ralph Greenspan told an audience of UCSB professors and students last week about the small group of scientists who pitched the White House on the project with a white paper that included a passage on the return of investment on the genome map. Associate director of the Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind at UC San Diego, Greenspan visited the South Coast recruiting disciples to his cause. The good news, he said, is that neuroscience is de rigueur among politicians left and right. “Everybody admires the brain, whether they have one or not,” he said. The

money would be administered by three federal agencies, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health. The reason an image of the entire brain is crucial to science, he explained with some level of technicality, is that human — and other animal — activity is not related to single cells but to groups or populations of cells. Furthermore, different regions of the brain are constantly communicating with each other. “The system level,” he said, “is where the pay dirt is.” Besides new knowledge, he argued, “Big Science” prompts new technologies, new medical therapies, and new businesses. Along with the genome map, he invoked the War on Cancer in the 1970s, which obviously did not eradicate cancer but did give birth to the biotechnology sector. With the likelihood of federal funding actually materializing, Greenspan is seeking the input of as many institutions as possible, including UCSB. “We want to form partner■ ships anywhere,” he said.


law & disorder

Intimidation or Tampering?

PAU L WELLM AN PHOTOS

Defense Attorney Claims Cop Threatened Him

NO LOVE LOST: (From left) Detective Jaycee Hunter, prosecutor Sandy Horowitz, and defense attorney Ron Bamieh leave the courthouse.

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BY N I C K W E L S H udge Jean Dandona rejected claims by criminal defense attorney Ron Bamieh that he and his investigator, Mark Volpei, had been physically threatened by Santa Barbara police detective Jaycee Hunter — the lead investigator in the vehicular manslaughter trial now unfolding against Bamieh’s client Francisco Rodriguez. The judge likewise rejected Bamieh’s demand that a mistrial be declared because of prosecutorial misconduct on Hunter’s part. In a sworn declaration submitted to Dandona last week, Bamieh had stated that threats made against him in court by Hunter made him feel compelled to take “precautions to ensure my safety,” adding, “I do not feel safe driving in the City of Santa Barbara, and I am apprehensive at any approaching police cars.” Judge Dandona flatly rejected Bamieh’s petition for a mistrial, stating, “I have not believed at any time that Mr. Bamieh has felt threatened.” In response to the judge’s ruling, Bamieh replied, “I move for a mistrial; the court has called me a liar.” Later, he would make a similar motion on the ground that the judge accused him of being “unethical.” The result would be the same. Bamieh, a former prosecutor from Ventura County who’s carved out a successful career as an effective, combative defense attorney, represents one of two men charged with manslaughter for causing the death of their mutual friend — Raul Ibarra — who died when the three were riding their motorcycles near the Santa Barbara Tennis Club this March. Prosecuting attorney Sandy Horowitz contends Rodriguez, Ibarra, and Jonathon Leon were racing one another — at speeds in excess of 70 miles an hour — when Ibarra crossed the double yellow lines and crashed into an oncoming Lexus. The Lexus was totaled, and two of its three occupants sustained minor injuries. Prosecutors explain that “but for” the act of racing, Ibarra would not have been killed; as a result, charges were filed against Rodriguez and Leon. Rodriguez insists he and his friends were not, in fact, racing and that he was about 150 feet away from them at the time of the accident. Before the trial, Bamieh suggested that had the defendants been white — they’re Latino — no charges would have been filed. Friction boiled over during the trial last week when Bamieh’s investigator, Volpei, sought to serve a

subpoena on Heidi Hullander — who had just testified — right outside Dandona’s courtroom. The subpoena was intended for Hullander’s 13-year-old son. Hullander, by all accounts distraught, desperately did not want her son dragged into the proceedings. According to Volpei, Hunter inserted himself into the discussion uninvited — red faced and raging — and grabbed the subpoena from Volpei’s hand as Volpei sought to serve Hullander. Hunter countered that Volpei had been hollering at Hullander, whose husband had asked him to intervene. Hunter claimed Volpei had been intimidating a witness and that the investigator had struck him with his arm when seeking to hand Hullander the document. Hunter termed that contact an “assault.” Volpei countered the Santa Barbara cop all but invited him to strike. When the two took their beef into the courtroom, things got worse. A pushingand-shoving incident with Hunter’s chair ensued, with the chair crashing into Volpei’s leg. Bamieh upbraided Hunter, calling him a bully, a disgrace to the department, and asserting that he was not afraid of him. “[Hunter] responded that I should be scared of him, as he was touching his gun,” Bamieh wrote. Prosecuting attorney Sandy Horowitz stated he had no recollection of hearing such a threat. Chad Nichols, who’d been observing the trial, submitted a declaration stating he’d heard Bamieh say he was not afraid of Hunter and Hunter reply,“You should be.” Hunter submitted a lengthy recital detailing his suspicions that Volpei had abused his position as investigator to plant misleading or false impressions — via his questions — in the minds of potential witnesses. But he was silent on the question of his alleged threat, neither denying, confirming, or even mentioning it. Hunter did acknowledge that Bamieh had told Judge Dandona he was afraid to sit next to Hunter — for fear of being assaulted. He also described how Horowitz agreed to swap places with Hunter so Hunter and Bamieh would no longer be sitting next to one another in front of the judge. The trial of Rodriguez and Leon will continue through the week. Bamieh contended — given the lack of credibility his sworn statements have with the judge — he cannot render effective counsel for his client. Dandona pointed out only that Bamieh’s client had received the benefit of many rulings on his behalf. ■

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education

CONT’D

A≤rmative Reaction 57

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bscured in the shadow of two bombshell civil-rights decisions by the Supreme Court last week was a third ruling on affirmative action in higher education that has reopened discussions on the wisdom of admissions policies that consider race. The court did not overturn the precedent it set when it ruled in 2003 that colleges and universities may implement such policies if they deem diversity among the student body is an asset to the campus, but it did send the case back to a lower court insisting that the defendant — the University of Texas — prove an affirmative action plan is necessary to reach that goal. Closer to home, in California, affirmative action has been verboten since 1996 when voters passed Proposition , a crippling blow to diversity at the state’s two highest-profile public universities, UCLA and UC Berkeley, from which they have not yet recovered, an analysis by the Los Angeles Times revealed. A similar look at numbers made available by the University of California Office of the President shows that minority acceptances at UCSB have not recovered to pre–Prop.  rates. This data is tempered by the fact, however, that as applications to UCSB have skyrocketed, the total acceptance rate between 1998 — the first year after Prop.  first took its toll — and 2012 dropped by 20 percent, and the acceptance rate for whites dropped 17 percent. During that same span, the acceptance rate for African Americans dropped from 54 percent to 27 percent. The Hispanic/Latino rate dipped from 58 percent to 32 percent. (The year before Prop.  took effect, 77 percent of Latinos were admitted.) On the other hand, the campus has continued to diversify as almost a quarter — 22 percent — of currently enrolled students are Latino. Associate Dean of Student Life and Activities Katya Armistead clearly remembers the day Prop.  passed. “Quite honestly, it was a sad day for me,” said Armistead, who was working in the admissions office as a campus visit coordinator at the time. “It was a tool for outreach to look for the best students, period.” Aside from acceptance rates, UCSB has historically had a hard time attracting minority students because of its location, which is not part of a major metropolitan area. The population of black students has held steady

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A UCSB Diversity Analysis Post–Supreme Court Ruling

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at 3 percent since 1997. “We are a bit more geographically isolated than some of the other campuses, which can be a challenge to recruiting students, especially those from lower-income families who must travel farther distances to visit,” said Lisa Przekop, associate director of admissions. “Once we get them exposed to UCSB, we do pretty well,” said Armistead. Retention efforts are centered around the Equal Opportunity Office, which automatically enrolls firstgeneration college students and those from low-income families. However, any student may join the program, which houses resource centers for Gauchos of various ethnicities. The MultiCultural Center also provides programming and a sense of community for minority students. The university — along with minority student groups — puts a great deal of effort into outreach programs. As for recruitment, Przekop said, “We visit over 500 high schools in California alone each year, as well as more than half of the community colleges. We target inner-city as well as college preparatory schools. We also spend considerable effort in developing a strong network of college counselors in the high schools and community colleges that we visit.” She added that the office employs Spanishspeaking staff to communicate with families and that Admissions will soon add a position specifically for recruiting underrepresented populations. That upcoming hire is a result of a list of demands the Black Student Union (BSU) submitted to Chancellor Henry Yang earlier this year, including the addition of two counseling psychologists who specialize in working with black students and a plan to recruit black faculty outside of the Black Studies department. They found that the head of the university was — somewhat surprisingly — extremely receptive to their concerns. A longtime advisor to the BSU, Armistead attended UCSB as an undergraduate affirmative-action admit and has gone on to earn a doctorate in Education. Specifying that she was not speaking as a representative of the university but as an individual “who works closely with students and cares about diversity,” she said, “People have the wrong idea of what [affirmative action] means. It’s not about admitting people that have achieved less than ■ others. It’s about opportunity.”


PAU L WELLM AN

county

NO BIGGIE: Mark Nation, Goleta West Sanitary District general manager, said there’s been little outcry over the increase because most customers understand the need to pay higher rates.

Rising Sanitary Rates

Goleta West’s First Increase in 20 Years; 70 Percent Hike by 2018

D

BY M AT T K E T T M A N N

ue to a twist of fortunate timing when the sweeping reform measure Proposition  was passed by California voters in 1978, the Goleta West Sanitary District receives a higher-thanaverage cut of Santa Barbara County’s property taxes every year, a locked-in boon that has grown its reserve coffers to more than $28 million just a few years ago. As such, the district’s customers — including Isla Vista and most Goleta residents and businesses west of Los Carneros Road — have paid the same rate to pump and treat their sewage since 1994. This August, however, those sunny days of enjoying the least-expensive rates in the county may start to slowly dim, as Goleta West recently alerted its 6,000 customers that costs are about to rise for each of the next six years, amounting to a more than 70 percent hike by 2018. Though the proposed increase — which will be voted on by the district’s boardmembers on July 16 — hasn’t yet generated widespread outrage, the news has been troubling for some customers who hope the district will reconsider. They initially had hung some hope on a state law passed in 1996 that enables citizens to block increases such as this if 50 percent plus one of a district’s customers wrote letters of complaint. But with less than 20 such letters on hand at the district so far, that possibility seems remote. The district’s general manager, Mark Nation, believes the lack of “backlash” is because most customers understand the need for the rate increases and are appreciative of the thirdparty studies done to show why they are happening now. For starters, the district is faced with a series of major improvement projects: more than $15 million for the Goleta Sanitary District’s treatment plant upgrade; $8.5 million to move the main pipeline out of the Goleta Slough and onto the UCSB campus next summer, which, Nation said, “the environmental

community has been asking us to do that for a long time”; another $5 million after that to improve pipelines on the Phelps Road corridor. Then there are the usual ongoing-improvement prices and an expected 10 percent jump in operations and maintenance costs once the new plant is up and running. Rates have stayed low because the “fiscally conservative” board put off these projects as long as they could. “It would be great if we could stay at that low rate,” said Nation. “But it’s finally time where we’ve got to do it.” Those reasonings aside, concerned customers exist, including physician Ingeborg Cox, who points to what she sees as numerous statistical discrepancies in the studies. “If they are running a good business, you have to project losses or what might happen in the future so that can be corrected before it happens,” she said. “I would have increased very slowly the rate of the people who are going to be impacted — not all of a sudden like this.” Citing a line that explains a onetime increase of 43 percent in 2014 would cover the costs, she wonders why the district wants to bump it up to 71 percent over six years instead.“The public should have a choice,” she explained. If the increase does go through as planned, Goleta West customers will still be sitting fairly pretty, as they would be paying the lowest rate in the county next year if it goes up from $168 a year to $181. Come 2018, when they may be paying $287 a year, they won’t be doing too shabbily either.“If no one else raised their rates, which is wishful thinking, we’d still have the fourth-lowest rate in the county,” said Nation of the $287. “When you look at the value you get for what we’re doing, it’s pretty good.” The public hearing on Goleta West Sanitary’s rate increase will be on July 16, 6:30 p.m., at the district boardroom on the UCSB campus, Lot . See goletawest.com for more info.

EARN A CSU MBA Thousand Oaks & Santa Barbara

TOGETHER WE GO FURTHER

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Opinions REMEMBERING NOT TO FORGET: Some-

times, we are told, a cigar is just a cigar. At the same time, we are reminded, there’s no such thing as a coincidence. I now find myself caught in the crossfire between these two opposing notions when it comes to City Hall’s “Wizard of Odd” float in this year’s Summer Solstice extravaganza. In it, Mayor Helene Schneider marched up State Street dressed as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz, lip-syncing the words to “Over the Rainbow,” as Judy Garland — the real Dorothy — sang the words over loudspeakers. Schneider and her fellow councilmembers — dressed as the Scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion, and the Tin Man — not to mention City Administrator Jim Armstrong as the Wizard himself — all marched under an archway of balloons arranged to resemble the pattern of a rainbow. Normally I don’t go looking for subliminal body language, but this poked me in the eye: the mayor “singing” the national anthem of the gay pride movement while marching under the flag of the gay pride movement. And all this just three days before the Supreme Court was set to issue two of the most important rulings on the subject of gay and lesbian rights ever. Wow, I thought, what a playfully bold statement from a council not known for being either. Naturally, I assumed Schneider was behind it all. She, after all, had been banging the gong for gay marriage since 2000 when she lead the charge in town against Proposition 22, which changed state law to ban same-sex marriages. When courts

angry poodle barbecue

Worked Like a Dog

quickly decreed Prop.  unconstitutional, marriage extremists set out to rewrite the constitution. To that end, they passed Prop. 8, which last week, the Supremes dispatched to the dustbin of history. Given S.B.’s long tradition of rigid discretion on matters of sexual orientation, I was thrilled by City Hall’s errant enthusiasm. I would be told afterward — by all parties concerned — that I was seeing things that just weren’t there. Maybe so. But maybe not. This is the same City Hall, after all, that former mayor Harriet Miller ran with an iron fist for six years. It’s worth remembering that Miller’s life partner of many decades, Elizabeth, happened to be a woman. They lived together; they moved from town to town together. And when Elizabeth became ill, Harriet nursed her, comforted her, and ultimately buried her. But Miller would insist to the very end she was not a lesbian. She and Elizabeth, she would insist to anyone with the temerity to intrude, were sisters. Local gay activists talked about “outing” Harriet, but quickly thought better of it. No one messed with Harriet. She was too tough. Now that the Supreme Court has legalized same-sex marriage in California, what seemed unthinkably impossible suddenly became inevitable. But it wasn’t always that way. And even in S.B., the closet can be a dark place, indeed. I remember getting called by Tom Roberts, then the first openly gay man to run for City Council, asking if I really had to mention he was openly

gay in an upcoming news article. I did. Roberts’ work as a gay rights advocate was not incidental to his political identity; it was essential to it. In spite of this, because of it, or both, Roberts won. When Texas billionaire Michael Huffington moved to S.B. to buy a Congressional seat in 1992 and then a Senate seat two years later, there was no shortage of reasons to recoil. He was a rich, spoiled carpetbagger. His still infamous wife, Arianna Huffington, was a harridan shape-shifter of the first order. And he was a total cipher. But fueling the hatred right-wing Republicans had for Huffington was their conviction he was gay. Because of this — at least in part — they actively conspired with Democrat movers and shakers to make sure Democrat Dianne Feinstein got reelected. He lost by the narrowest of margins and later came out, first as gay, and then later as bisexual. In 1996, when liberal Democrat Walter Capps was running for Congress, I was given strict instructions by his campaign manager not to broach the issue of gay rights with him. The issue was too hot, the outcome too close. If I did, I was told the interview would be over. Capps, to his credit, was never good at being handled and raised the issue himself. Somehow, in spite of his support for gay rights, he managed to win. Even a staunch liberal feminist like Hannah-Beth Jackson would encounter significant turbulence over the issue. Ten years ago, when still in the Assembly, Jackson abstained on a bill that would effectively extend full marriage rights to

couples already enrolled in domestic partnerships. Jackson — then a major advocate of such partnerships — balked, arguing it would set back the cause to pursue a bill doomed to failure and designed only to inflame the opposition. Many of Jackson’s supporters in the gay and lesbian community, however, felt betrayed and took to picketing outside of her Assembly offices. Those fences have since been mended. Perhaps the most tragic political victim of The Closet was Diana Hall, the former North County prosecutor and judge who was arrested on domesticviolence and drunk-driving charges after her life partner, Deidra Dykeman, threatened — for the umpteenth time — to out her. Hall and Dykeman owned a home together; they owned dogs together. But Hall desperately feared she’d be unseated as judge if North County voters knew she was lesbian. But even after winning reelection in 2002 — trouncing a North County prosecutor fired for having porn on his office computer — Hall still clung to the closet. This caused serious tension with her partner, out of which came the altercation, the 9-1-1 call, and the charges against Hall. The irony is that North County voters, so allegedly intolerant, had no trouble with judge “Bobby” Beck, a famously brusque, no-nonsense judge who everyone correctly assumed was a lesbian. Given this history, little wonder the Powers That Be would deny City Hall’s Solstice float signified anything but a fun frolic. In a don’t-ask, don’t-tell universe, that’s exactly what they’d have to say. If I were them, I’d say, “Ding-dong, the witch is dead.” And I’d celebrate by smoking — Nick Welsh a cigar.

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letters

Gone Tree

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he Lobero Theatre has defied public opinion and removed both olive trees in its foreground without any public forum. No indication was given that the tree was to be immediately removed. An arborist hired by the Lobero Theatre determined that the tree was “diseased,” but that just gave it character. What a venerable symbol of striving to overcome adversity. That tree was the largest olive tree that I have ever seen. When I read your article regarding its questionable future, I wrote the Lobero Foundation director to object to its removal. To me, it represented vitality in the face of adversity. To me, removal of the tree is a symbol of what is happening to Santa Barbara. Autocrats with selfish interests are coming to control the fabric of our city, and they are unilaterally changing it for their own biased perspective. I hope the Lobero is happy with its venue to sell more wine during events. I am very sad to see the tree go; I did not even get to say good-bye.

EVAN CONWAY

— James G. Rolfe, S.B.

an absolute disaster, and I have a photograph [at left] that I would like to share with you from last month when I was shooting a late-season west swell. … In this shot from the beach, you can see the rainbow coloration all over the face of this wave. I know it’s oil. I swam in it. — Evan Conway, S.B.

Worst Pedicure

Rainbow Blues

I

am a photographer and current student at Brooks Institute. I read the article on the mystery of the Summerland oil seepage (4/7/11, independent.com/seepmystery), and I’m glad somebody sees the problem the way I do. It is

I

s Santa Barbara interested in promoting animal welfare? Currently, Santa Barbara allows the inhumane declawing of cats. Declawing cats is not a “nail trim.” Declawing is a surgical procedure in which the animal’s toes are amputated at the last joint. Cities in California that have passed legislation

abolishing declawing are Los Angeles, Santa Monica, San Francisco, Culver City, Beverly Hills, West Hollywood, Burbank, and Berkeley. Doesn’t Santa Barbara need to pass a resolution against this practice? If this is an issue that concerns you, contact members of the City Council to end these inhumane amputations. — Elsa Lambert, S.B.

Voting Rights

T

oo little attention has been given to the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Voting Rights Act decision. In this case, Chief Justice Roberts continued the judicial activism that has characterized his tenure and given us absurd results such as “corporations are people.” Now we are told that the decision of Congress finding the need for continued vigilance to stop state laws threatening minority voters’ ability to participate in democracy is invalid. This “finding” is made by five members of the Supreme Court and ignores the specific work of hundreds of Congressional members and staff and the tons of evidence they considered just a few years ago. Worse, the decision attempts to rely on the th Amendment under the claim that it protects “States’ Rights” (a phrase used for decades to justify segregation and discrimination in the South). The fact is that even if the th Amendment protects some sort of states’ rights position, it was specifically modified in the area of voting

by the adoption of the th Amendment, which gives Congress the exact authority to adopt laws preventing states from interfering with the right to vote! Across the nation, we are witnessing a surge in legislative efforts to restrict voting rights of people of color. These include: • gerrymandering districts to compact racial groups and reduce their impact, • voter identification laws that put a burden on the poor (and thus directly on certain racial groups) to obtain documents that are costly and logistically difficult to locate, • reduced early voting that lowers participation by the same groups who cannot get off work to stand in lines for hours to cast a vote, • reduction in voting access in poor neighborhoods where inadequate numbers of polling places and machines are offered, • “purging” of voter rolls, which eliminates a much larger number of minorities due to their lower rate of home-ownership and general residential stability, and • such tactics as removing voters from the eligibility list based on “similarities” between the voters’ names and those of felons. The conservative agenda has been rejected by Americans, as evidenced by public opinion polls and elections in states where fair access to the ballot box is offered. Yet that agenda is being perpetuated by this activist court in blatant concont’d p. 23

july 3, 2013

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Opinions

CONT’D

letters cont’d from p. 21 trast to its promise to defer to the Legislature and abide by the Constitution. Attention must continue to be directed to such abuses, Congress must continue to intervene, the federal Department of Justice must be pushed to take proactive steps to act against such efforts, and we need to shed light on this campaign by the extreme right-wing to destroy our — Glen Mowrer, S.B. democracy.

The XXVIII Amendment

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ampaign donations must stop in order to save representational democracy. Not reform but an amendment is what we need that eliminates any form of gift to candidates for public office by any entity as well as a prohibition of any type of gift to elected officials or government employees. Finally, the amendment turns aside the moronic, anti-constitutional, Citizens United decision. Campaign financing is legal bribery. Bribery is the giving of some material value to get a certain word, action, or vote to promote a special interest, not the common interest of a healthy, happy, educated populace. It clearly has diminished the citizenry’s voice and made for an unhealthy democracy and economy as well as an unhealthy environment. I realize that a voice without money will, probably, not be heard in our present state of affairs. Nevertheless, here I have stated an obvious truth. It would be excellent on the part of the Democratic Party and the Obama administration to propose a grassroots movement to achieve the XXVIII Amendment to the Constitution as outlined here above. — Ken Cohen, S.B.

Direct Democracy

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he City of Vallejo, California, recently put to public vote the choices of city programs that could be paid for from available budget funds. Civic interest was high, voter turnout impressive, and the citizens got what they desired. This is a beautiful example of direct democracy,

where each citizen’s vote is used to build their society. Like an alcoholic who has to hit rock bottom before there can be improvement, Vallejo hit bottom with bankruptcy because of bad management, special-interest demands, and politics. A big upset of the apple cart. I would like to think that direct democracy can be expanded to more cities and even to the state. Our State Legislature already allows referendums, initiatives, and recalls, but I envision greater implementation of direct democracy — where state, county, and local “representatives” present proposed rules and laws to the general public for vote. In our modern world, we do not need to elect someone who will be heavily influenced by money, power, backroom deals, or having to make compromises. Historically, representatives were chosen by the local citizenry to work for them and their region. But that has been largely lost to politics. In order to be elected today, one first has to choose a political party to join. Right then the representation has been diluted. Switzerland and England are using direct democracy today. California has always been a trendsetter, and we have an opportunity to lead with this idea. Many of us have lost trust in our representatives and their bureaucracies. We have the technology. Do we have the will? — Dave Blunk, S.B.

For the Record

¶ Last week’s issue erroneously referred to the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent “6-5” vote striking down part of the Voting Rights Act. The court has nine members, and the vote was 5-4 [News Briefs, 6/27/13, independent.com /cappscondemns]. The Independent welcomes letters of less than  words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, The Independent,  W. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA ; or fax: -; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. july 3, 2013

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call () -

Edith Rodriguez

Joseph H. Pollock, M.D.

Edith Florence Barnes Rodriguez died peacefully at her home in Carlsbad, California. She devoted her life to taking care of her family, from her own mother, who died at , to her five great grandchildren. At her bedside in her last days were Robert Rodriguez, her loving husband of  years; her daughter Kathleen Rodriguez and son-in-law John Zant of Santa Barbara; and her grandchildren Adelle, Lisa, Rachel and Sam. Her daughter Roberta preceded her in death. Arrangements were made by Oceanside Mortuary oceansidemortuary.com Internment took place at Holy Cross Cemetery in San Diego.

Joseph H. Pollock, M.D. was an exceptional man. A noted surgeon, author and philosopher, he passed away on June  at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara. He was known throughout Beverly Hills, Montecito, Santa Barbara and Summerland for his perseverance, kindness, philanthropy, humor and endless positivity. Dr. Pollock was born in St. Louis, Missouri on November ,  to Sam and Rose Pollock, and was one of six siblings. He graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a Bachelor of Science degree. After earning his M.D. degree in  from Washington University, he specialized in abdominal surgery in Beverly Hills, California, serving

// – //

// – //

as chief of surgery at several hospitals, including Cedars of Lebanon. He practiced medicine for almost  years. During this time he also took over his late father-in-law’s company, Triangle Steel and Supply, and ran it for three years until its sale, opening branches of the business in San Diego, Ventura, Las Vegas and Phoenix. He and his wife Helene were Founders of the Music Center of Los Angeles and were active in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Mark Taper Forum. After moving to Montecito  years ago, he became chairman of the Santa Barbara Film Festival for five years in the s. Through the Joseph and Helene Pollock Foundation, he spearheaded the creation and construction of the Pollock Theater at UCSB, which opened in . He also became active in real estate in Santa Barbara, Montecito and Summerland. Dr. Pollock was an avid golf and tennis player, playing golf up until his late nineties. Additionally, he was interested in philosophy and ancient civilizations, and was the published author of six books, including two philosophical explorations and two medical texts. After retiring from medicine, he continued to

attend surgical meetings until the last weeks of his life. He also had a life-long dedication to technology and kept in close contact with his grandchildren and family via e-mail and Facebook. Dr. Pollock touched many lives during his almost  years. He was creative in business practices and medical diagnoses and was always there for his friends and family. Throughout his life he honored the memory of his parents. He will be dearly missed and forever loved by his wife of  years Helene (Zalk); his three children, Tom Pollock, Ken Pollock, Margo Sinclair (Pollock); his four grandchildren, Ali Gagerman (Pollock), Allegra Brandano (Pollock), Luke Pollock and Ariel Stern (Sinclair) and his five great-grandchildren, Haley, Benjamin, Amelia, Owen and Madeline. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory can be made to the UC Santa Barbara Foundation, Pollock Theatre in memory of Joe Pollock. Please mail to: Nicole Klanfer, Office of Development, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA . A memorial service is being planned in August at the Pollock Theater.

David Herrera

// – //

Happy Birthday, David. It has been  yrs since you have been gone. You were taken from us too soon, but we know you are now at peace. I thank everyone that has supported our family and continues to do so. We are blessed to have true friends. Until we meet again. Love your family and friends.

Obituaries & Death Notices are available daily at www.independent.com & in print each Thursday

>> Send Your Best Regards Independent.com now allows comments on our Obituaies. Go to www.independent.com/obits and share your thoughts and wishes if you would like.

are

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In Memoriam

Ellen Louise Marcus 1925-2013

M

Washington Insider

BY J E F F R E Y M A R C U S O S H I N S

policy of dating as much as possible to keep the food bill down. One of her dates was with Robert Oshins, a special as a child when her family would come assistant to President Truman. With an invitation to the down from their home in Hillsborough White House for a state dinner where she and a classmate to stay at the Biltmore. She told a story from Stanford, Eunice Kennedy, were the “only young of riding horses, with Bill Clark, up to the San Ysidro girls there,” Bob wooed the staffer over to one of her boss’s Pharmacy where Ronald Coleman helped her dismount. most ardent political opponents. After a year and a half of being proposed to by my father, By the time Jack Kennedy, and other members of their she finally accepted because he was in Paris with Averell generation, arrived in Washington, Ellen was already conHarriman and she wanted to work on the Marshall Plan. nected with the political and social elite. Jack Kennedy They honeymooned in Santa Barbara, not to return often turned to her for advice, and relied on her to deliver until 1971 when my father retired to an oceanfront home the Virginia delegation at the Democratic National Conat Sea Ledge. When he died, in 1975, Ellen Oshins took vention in 1960. back her maiden name and returned to Washington. As the years went by, young men and women, parD.C., to resume her great love of politics and govern- ticularly Stanford grads, who would go on to be the next ment affairs. political leaders, Supreme Court justices, and press stars, Scottie Lanahan (née Fitzgerald) once wrote in the were mentored by Ellen in the ways of Washington. I Washington Post: often saw a practiced professional demeanor fall away at the sight of my mother. If you had to pick just one woman to illustrate the Ellen did not trade on her access to those in power for particular flavor of Washington life … I would personal gain. That she never attempted to profit from her pick Ellen Oshins, politician, suburbanite, bon unparalleled connections and knowledge in many ways vivante, behind-the-scenes worker at all Demogave her an almost ecclesiastical reputation among her cratic events, enthusiastic maker of friends and of contemporaries, who went on to found some of the most course, in the process, a few enemies. profitable law and lobbying firms in Washington. She was an indefatigable contributor and raiser of money for This memoriam might read like an exercise in name- Democratic candidates, particularly women. Her Rolodropping, and I would have to say that my mother dex was a legendary resource among the political class. delighted in people she found After Walter Capps lost his interesting and intelligent. That first bid for Congress, Ellen they were famous or successwent to his house to urge ful didn’t mean much to her if him to run again, promisthey were stupid or lacked class ing to raise money for his and sophistication. (She loved campaign. Lady Bird Johnson but could not When a cause interested stand Lyndon who “thought he her, Ellen would go over to the floor of the House or was God’s gift to women.”) Ellen had three qualities in Senate to see the legislator who could get the job done. particular that allowed her to When a staffer answering move in the highest circles of the phone would ask what power in Washington: discreher call was about, she tion, a photographic memory for names and details, and a tolwould say, “Just tell him to call me.” And they would erance for alcohol that allowed her to remain sober long after call. In this way, she was others who attempted to drink instrumental in passing the with the potentates were slurJapanese reparations bill ring their words and revealing (because people she knew the boring details of their lives. had been interned in the Ellen knew where the bodies camps during World War were buried, who was sleeping II) and the Americans with with whom, and who owed what WIELDING POWER HER OWN WAY: Ellen’s Disabilities Act (because to whom — secrets she took to behind-the-scenes maneuvering helped pass the Bob Dole, a neighbor at Americans with Disabilities Act and the Japanese her grave. For these reasons, she Watergate, asked her to help reparations bill. him). was the confidante and advisor to those who trusted few people. Another of her passions After graduating from Stanford in 1946 with a BA and was Stanford University, which raised much money by master’s degree in political science and economics, Ellen auctioning an insider’s tour of Washington conducted and four of her university friends moved to Washington, by Ellen Marcus. She and her classmates in Washington part of the post-war emergence of educated and confi- helped found and develop the Stanford in Washington dent women credited with breaking through so many program and campus. barriers. She quickly landed a job in the Senate working Long before it became apparent that the Washington for Robert Taft (R-Ohio), a prominent opponent of the she had known and loved was going to turn into the parNew Deal. Before Taft hired Ellen to work on housing tisan hazardous waste site it has become, Ellen decided to issues, there were no professional women on his staff return to Stanford. When she told her dear friend Lindy (and reportedly only one other woman in a professional Boggs that she was leaving Washington, Lindy said,“Why position in the whole U.S. Senate). Always demanding Ellen, you can’t leave. You are Washington.” that she be taken seriously, she used her beauty and intelNo more. ligence to quickly become a favorite of the old bulls of the Senate. See the online version of this article (independent.com The Stanford grads put most of their money into rent- /ellenmarcus) for a CNN interview and an oral history ing an elegant suite at the Fairfax Hotel, so they had a of Ellen Marcus. y mother’s love of Santa Barbara began

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july 3, 2013


C O V E R STO RY

OF THE GRILLING

UNIVERSE

MEET THE WINNERS OF OUR FOURTH ANNUAL SIZZLING SUMMER BBQ CONTEST

M

BY GEORGE YATCHISIN

. PHOTOS BY PAUL WELLMAN

ore than 100

food-loving folks gathered around the picnic benches of Oak Park last month to witness The Santa Barbara Independent’s fourth annual Sizzling Summer BBQ Contest, which was easily our most exciting and cutthroat cooking competition yet. The June 13 event featured 13 chefs, both professional and amateur, eager to impress with a wide range of 15 delectable dishes in the three official categories: Professional BBQ Plate, Amateur BBQ Plate, and Pro-Am Vegetarian BBQ Plate. So popular has the summertime kickoff contest become that we had to turn away more recipe submissions than ever before — and because we hate doing that, we even expanded the amateur category into two rounds of judging, just to accommodate even more backyard Bobby Flays. Perhaps even more promising is that our alumni are graduating to national stages: Last year’s amateur finalist, L.J. Washington, had to drop out of this year’s event at the last moment because she wound up on The Today Show for its Father’s Day burger broadcast (like NBC is a bigger deal than we are!), and George Levinthal, who

won our inaugural event and has entered every year since, recently excelled in a Los Angeles Times burger showdown. And then there’s Rodrigo Gimenez, who ditched his career as an architect to become a chef after winning last year’s amateur battle. (Spoiler alert: He took top crown this year as a pro!) The 2013 incarnation of the Sizzling Summer BBQ Contest also featured a

greater degree of energy and on-site involvement from the contestants and their support teams, with grills smoking as early as 2 p.m. that afternoon. But the grub remained king. Want Farmers’ Market Farro Burger on Grilled Flat Bread with Sriracha Aioli and a side of Skewered Grilled Strawberries? It was there. Something meatier? How’s Apple Smoked, Pancetta-Stuffed Brisket with Collard Greens and Black-Eyed Pea Succotash with Truffle Mac and Cheese sound? Need a defibrillator? Well, maybe we’ll put that on our list for next year. “This competition would make any Santa Barbaran proud,” said judge Melissa Fontaine, who works for the Orfalea Foundation’s School Food Initiative. “The food was great, the vibe was friendly, and people worked hard to show off some stellar food.” Here’s a look at those who rose to the top of Santa Barbara’s grilling peaks, as well as the judges and sponsors who made it happen.

VOTING AND VICTORY: More than 100 people came to watch the June 13 grilling showdown at Oak Park, where judges had a tough time determining the amateur winner (above right), and Rodrigo Gimenez (above left in orange) took home the pro crown.

CONTINUED >>> july 3, 2013

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VEG-TACULAR: Edie Robertson’s perfectly spiced “steaks” won perfect scores.

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PRO-AM VEGETARIAN PLATE

PROFESSIONAL BBQ PLATE

WINNER: EDIE ROBERTSON DISH: Flame-Grilled Seitan and Local Pistachio “Steaks” Since we started this showdown in 2010, there’s been only one year that Edie Robertson didn’t win something — and that’s because we invited her to be a judge in 2011. Otherwise, this private chef, who’s perhaps best known for her years at the Sojourner Café, has always wowed the judges. This time, she got nothing but perfect scores for her Flame-Grilled Seitan and Local Pistachio “Steaks,” which are injected with farmers’ market chimichurri and Drake Family Farms’ garlic chèvre, plus grilled seasonal veggies and avocado purée served stacked with gingered Hollister Brewing Company’s At Dawn Beer and balsamic tar, mango–passion fruit coulis, and micro greens. “Edie’s seitan burger was superb — a perfect balance of crunchy pistachios and meaty seitan,” raved judge Fontaine.“It didn’t even need a sauce because the creamy goat cheese melded all the flavors together into one euphoric patty. But the balsamic tar and mango–passion fruit coulis gave the dish acidity and sweetness to make you swoon. Her presentation was also superb, with fresh basil, lavender, sunflowers, and cloth napkins.” As a leader of Santa Barbara’s Slow Food Convivium and veteran of the Food Network’s series Extreme Chef, Robertson is fazed by very little, even grilling without meat. Indeed, vegetarian cuisine is “almost second nature” to her, as Robertson’s clients expect healthy foods without a loss of flavor. “I roast and grind my own spice blends, so that gives a big boost to the flavor, along with using fresh herbs and roasted nuts whenever possible,” said Robertson.“I have learned by trial and error how to create dishes that have a satisfying mouthfeel by manipulating the tofu or seitan so it has a pleasing texture that goes well with fresh vegetables, ground nuts, and fresh and roasted spices.” What’s her advice for home grillers? Practice makes perfect, but remember to clean your grills with heat and vegetable oil before cooking and don’t turn your meat too quickly. “Be brave,” said Robertson. “I think everything tastes better when it is licked by the fire.”

WINNER: RODRIGO GIMENEZ DISH: Picanha Cuadrada and Potato Pineapple Stack Last year’s Sizzling Summer BBQ Contest literally changed Rodrigo Gimenez’s life. Up to that point, he was an architect who liked to cook; after winning the amateur category in 2012 — with a mixed plate of lavender-wine beef, roast veggie chimichurri chicken, and lemon cream pork flanks — he became a fulltime chef. To claim this year’s pro crown, he pared down that trio to focus on the tender, succulent sirloin cap.“Last year, I barbecued as if I was cooking for friends,” explained Gimenez, who really entered in 2012 to have some fun.“This year, I did feel a bit more pressure. I definitely wanted to win more this year than last.” To do so, the native of Mendoza, Argentina, designed his Picanha Cuadrada and Potato Pineapple Stack around the picanha, a top-sirloin cap, one of his “most favorite things to eat — especially when topped with bacon!” To balance the heavier meat with lightness and freshness, he added grilled pineapple and potato, and then topped it with a port-brandy-red-wine sauce because, again, he loves drinking them. Said Rodrigo, “Developing a sauce that incorporates all of their flavors and allows you to taste all three in a single bite is just that much better.” The dish was actually more complicated than he’s letting on, though: The beef was topped with a thin layer of sage “paper,” the pork was actually a bacon vinaigrette, and the reduction sauce also featured carrots, vanilla, and sage. That’s the level of creativity now going into his new catering business, Rodrigo Gimenez Cocinero, under which he frequently fires up Argentinian asado for wine-country events, hosts pop-up dinners at the Goodland Kitchen, and sells handmade empanadas through the Artisans Market at WilliamsSonoma.“With each meal that I’ve cooked since last year’s competition, I gain confidence in my abilities,” said Gimenez.“Mostly, it makes me happy to know that people really enjoy eating my food.” His advice to backyard barbecuers: Enjoy the environment that grilling creates.“Being outside around the fire cooking is one of


C O V E R STO RY ARCHITECT CHEF: After winning last year’s amateur round, Rodrigo Gimenez ditched his career as an architect to become a chef, and this year he won the professional contest.

the places where I am most happy because I take in my surroundings, I listen to the meat grilling, I talk with friends and family,” said Gimenez.“In the end, the food becomes secondary, and it is the process of cooking that is the most memorable experience.”

this for next year’s participants: “Make more friends, talk to more people, make extra to serve to those in attendance — everyone wanted a bite. And, last: Just have fun!”

PAKISTANI POWER: Gabriel Ibarra Jr. used the traditional Pakistani spice blend Balti on his pork shoulder, which took home the amateur crown. PROUD FINALIST: Ila Hamilton beat her heat with tasty ribs but wound up second to Gabriel’s Ibarra Jr.’s pork shoulder.

AMATEUR BBQ PLATE

FINALIST: ILA HAMILTON DISH: Jack Daniel’s –Chile-Lime Pork Ribs, with Yukon Gold —Bacon Potatoes and Kale-Broccoli-Carrot Matchstick Salad With so many fine amateur entries this year, we expanded the Sizzling Summer BBQ Contest to include two semifinal heats, and then let the finalists battle it out for supremacy. Ila Hamilton, who is a member of the S.B. Culinary Arts Association and works at the Ferguson Design Center (which sells barbecues of all styles), came oh so close to winning it all. “It was a blast,” said Hamilton, though we may have to work on the format.“The first judges got the ribs at perfect temperature, but the second set of judges had drier ribs. Also, the potatoes for the second judges didn’t have enough of the bacon-onion-garlic mixture, which makes all the difference in taste and presentation.” Nonetheless, the cheery finalist remained a fan of the event, and she recommended

AMATEUR BBQ PLATE

WINNER: GABRIEL IBARRA JR. DISH: Smoked Balti Pork Shoulder with Chili Beans and Jalapeño Cheddar Corn Bread Though he’d never entered a cooking contest before, Santa Barbara native Gabriel Ibarra Jr. is serious about his grilling and recently completed his first semester of Santa Barbara City College’s culinary program. “Cooking is my passion, and I want to pursue a career in the culinary world,” he explained.“I like experimenting with all kinds of cuisine, different spices, and methods of cooking.” Those experimental elements coalesced in his Smoked Balti Pork Shoulder, which featured a blend of spices from northern Pakistan that he discovered in a Penzeys store while visiting his grandparents in Tucson last year.“I loved the way it smelled and tasted,” said Ibarra, whose magical ingredient is specifically a blend of coriander, garlic, ginger, cumin, dundicut chilies, Ceylon cinnamon, brown mustard seeds, cardamom, clove, fennel, fenugreek, charnushka (kalonji, black onion seed), ajwain, star anise, black cardamom, cilantro, anise seed, and bay leaf. So when wanting to add a pork shoulder to a pot of chili a couple of months ago, Ibarra CONTINUED >>> july 3, 2013

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made a Balti-based marinade and rub, and the result was so “awesome” that he knew the Balti pork shoulder had to be its own dish. As for the corn bread? “It was just a random recipe that I put together,” said Ibarra.“I had only made the corn bread once before the contest.” Judge Danny Douglas, also a former contestant, praised Ibarra’s “excellent balance of spices and deep layering of flavor,” while judge Bob Wesley said,“Gabriel’s corn bread was the best side we had, and between the actionpacked bowl of chili and the spicy pork on his plate, the trio was hard to resist.” Ibarra was pleased with the results.“Winning the contest felt awesome,” he said, and gave thanks to his wife, Donna, and two foster daughters, Alissa and Tiana, for their support in his quest to become “one of Santa Barbara’s best chefs.” And we can expect to see more of Ibarra, as he has three more semesters left at SBCC. He pledged,“I will be back next year for the competition.”

WHO GRILLED WHAT? PRO-AM VEGETARIAN BBQ PLATE EMILY FALKE: Farmers’ Market Farro Burger on Grilled Flatbread with Sriracha Aioli and Skewered Grilled Strawberries RODRIGO GIMENEZ: Squash and Portobello Cuadrada with Sage and Roasted Pecan Butter Sauce › EDIE ROBERTSON: Flame-Grilled Seitan and Local Pistachio “Steaks” MICHAEL STEINWAND: Beefsteak Tomatoes Stuffed with Veggies and Mango, Butternut Squash with Veggies and Fruit Michael Steinwand

8 0 5 .4 5 6 .1 4 5 7

PROFESSIONAL BBQ PLATE GABE CLARK FROM KILLER B’S BBQ: Apple Smoked, Pancetta-Stuffed Brisket with Collard Green and Black-Eyed Pea Succotash and Truffle Mac and Cheese MICHAEL FRENES FROM BLAZE N’ BLUES: Slow Smoked Sweet and Spicy Country Ribs with Three-Cheese Bacon Mac ’n’ Cheese and “Cali Slaw” › RODRIGO GIMENEZ: Picanha Cuadrada and Potato Pineapple Stack EDIE ROBERTSON: Apple Bacon–Barded Slow-Cooked Santa Barbara HerbRubbed Pork Ribs with Chef Edie’s Maple-Smoked Tomato and Hollister’s “Nano Brown” Beer BBQ Sauce

AMATEUR BBQ PLATE

Gabe Clark

Michael Frenes

PETER DORRANCE: Pasilla Pepper Stuffed with Jalapeño, Goat Cheese, Black Beans, and Santa Maria–Style Tri-Tip, with Watermelon Salad with Feta, Cilantro, and Jalapeños KEVIN HAEBERLE: “Southern Fire” of Honey/Maple Bacon–Wrapped Shrimp and “Tropical Heat” of Pineapple/Mango/Bacon-Wrapped Crab with TwiceBaked Potato and Hell-Fire Corn, Served with Orangina Cocktail ILA HAMILTON: Jack Daniel’s–Chile-Lime Pork Ribs, with Yukon Gold–Bacon Potatoes and Kale-Broccoli-Carrot Matchstick Salad (FINALIST) MATT HUNTER and PER PETTERSON: P&M’s Memphis-Style Perfect Pulled Pork Sammich with Santa Barbara Organic Strawberry Cole Slaw and Crispy Cajun Frickles with Chipotle Ranch › GABRIEL IBARRA JR.: Smoked Balti Pork Shoulder with Chili Beans and Jalapeño Cheddar Corn Bread GEORGE LEVINTHAL: Slow Smoked Chicken with Berry/Wine Sauce with Warm, Tri-Colored, Bacon-Herb Potato Salad in a Mustard Vinaigrette MICHAEL STEINWAND: BBQ Oysters with Smoked Gouda/Garlic Sauce, Asparagus, Anaheim Peppers Stuffed with Shrimp and Jack Cheese, Portobellos Stuffed with Italian Sausage and Jack Cheese, plus Garlic Bread and Pasta in Oyster Sauce

GAUGING THE GRILLERS:

OUR JUDGES

Mike Cohen, owner, Santa Barbara Adventure Company, sbadventureco.com Danny Douglas, chef, Danny Douglas Catering, danny douglascatering.com Melissa Fontaine, Orfalea Foundation’s School Food Initiative, orfaleafoundation.org Michael Graham, co-owner, C’est Cheese, cestcheese.com Krista Harris, publisher/editor, Edible Santa Barbara, ediblesantabarbara.com 30

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july 3, 2013

Alison Hensley, cofounder, SOL Food Festival, solfood festival.com Shannon Kelley, food editor, The Santa Barbara Independent, independent.com/food D.J. Palladino, arts writer, The Santa Barbara Independent, independent.com/news/arts David Moorman, supervisor, Whole Foods Market, wholefoodsmarket.com Aaron Walker, winemaker, Pali Wine Company, paliwineco.com Bob Wesley, general manager, The Winehound, thewinehound.com Chryss Yost, poet laureate, City of Santa Barbara, chryssyost.net


C O V E R STO RY

MANY THANKS TO

OUR SPONSORS!

Condor Express, condorexpress.com,  W. Cabrillo Blvd., 882-0088 Cutler’s Artisan Spirits, cutlersartisan .com,  Anacapa St., Ste. D Elings Park’s BSB Festival, July 20, noon-6pm, elingspark.org Hollister Brewing Company, hollisterbrewco.com,  Marketplace Dr., Goleta, 968-2810 Killer B’s BBQ, killerbbqandbar.com,  State St., 845-2254 Killofin Home Irish Products, killofinhome.com Kunin Wines, kuninwines.com,  Anacapa St., 963-9633 Rancho San Julian Beef, rsjbeef.com Santa Barbara Adventure Company, sbadventureco.com AVA Santa Barbara, avasantabarbara .com,  E. Yanonali St., 453-6768 Whole Foods Market, wholefoodsmarket.com,  State St., 837-6959

Matt Hunter

OUR NEXT SHOWDOWN:

FARM-TO-BAR

COCKTAIL CONTEST WHEN: Tuesday, July 23, 5 p.m. WHERE: The Wildcat Lounge,  West Ortega Street, wildcatlounge.com WHAT: Along with Farm-to-Bar series creator Patrick Reynolds, a bartender at the Wildcat and Anchor Woodfire Kitchen & Bar, we are cosponsoring a seasonally sensational mixology showdown of Santa Barbara’s top professional drink makers. They’ll arrive at the Wildcat Lounge to learn the secret alcohol, have an hour to gather their ingredients at the Farmers Market on State Street, and then make drinks in front of judges and the crowd.

Kevin Haeberle

George Levinthal

READ THEIR

RECIPES

To see how each of the winning BBQ contestants put together their succulent dishes, head to independent .com/bbqrecipes! And please submit your own recipes, barbecue or otherwise, to food@independent.com.

Buying Gold and Silver Highest Payout

Peter Dorrance

5850 Hollister Ave Downtown Goleta 683-6468 july 3, 2013

THE INDEPENDENT

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DIJO Productions Presents

FREUD’S LAST SESSION

By Mark St. Germain • Directed by Jerry Oshinsky

CENTRAL COAST DEBUT!

S

igmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and CS Lewis the scholar and author of The Chronicles of Narnia, never met. But in this fictionalized account the two great thinkers convene at the invitation of Freud and the sparks fly.

Fresh from New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, “Freud’s Last Session” is a delightful and witty exchange of ideas that explores belief, sex, faith, life, death, and philosophy in a “session” that is entertaining and insightful.

Starring Ed Giron as Sigmund Freud & Justin Stark as CS Lewis

CENTER STAGE THEATER upstairs at Paseo Nuevo Mall

Tickets

$20 General Admission

Dates

July 11-13 at 8pm July 14 at 2pm

Tickets & Information at: 805-963-0408 • www.centerstagetheater.org 32

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INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

the

/sbindependent

WEEK

by Jack Crosbie and Jake Blair

@SBIndpndnt

JULY

3–10

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, let us know about it by emailing listings@independent.com.

4

3&5

THURSDAY 7/4 / Spirit of ‘ Parade � Every Fourth of July celebration needs a parade! “America the Beautiful” is the given theme of S.B.’s st annual parade, which will showcase an array of beautiful antique cars and ornate floats. A fitting celebration of the U.S.A.! pm. Proceeds down State St. from Micheltorena St. to Cota St. Free. Call -. /: Old-Fashioned th of July Celebration � Turn back the clock to simpler times, and take in the old-fashioned American fun at this Independence Day shindig, which promises fun for the whole family. Leave your smartphones in the car! ampm. Rancho La Patera,  N Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. Free-$. Call -.

/, /: Vertigo � UCSB Arts & Lectures present Vertigo, kicking off this summer’s film series Alfred Hitchcock Nights. These screenings have become an S.B. summer favorite, each film being screened twice — first at UCSB in Campbell Hall on Wednesdays, and then (more famously) under the stars in the Courthouse Sunken Gardens on Friday evenings. Bring the whole family (and some snacks) and partake in Vertigo, starring the eternally affable James Stewart, who plays a retired San Francisco detective-turned-voyeur. Wed.: :pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Fri.: :pm. S.B. Courthouse Sunken Gardens, Anapamu St. (between Anacapa and Santa Barbara sts.). Free. Call -. Read more on p. .

WEDNESDAY 7/3 /: Brooklyn Rider � Brooklyn Rider’s performances have been called “the future of chamber music,” making this a rare opportunity to partake in a truly worldclass performance. This contemporary string quartet has toured the globe, drawing praise and admiration from classical music enthusiasts and rock critics alike. pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of

/: Washington on the Plaza This S.B. Pops production presents some of the events of  in a compelling story, featuring a cast of talented area thespians, as well as a sing-along, free Betsy Ross miniature flags and patriotic lollipops, and an opportunity to take photos with the colonially attired cast members. :am. De la Guerra Plaza, De la Guerra St. Free. Call -.

/: Fourth of July Fireworks Display � The highlight(s) of this year’s Fourth of July evening will once again be launched from West Beach, so put yourself in prime position relative to the waterfront in order to take in all  minutes of this glorious spectacle. Tune your radios to AM  for the simulcast of this year’s celebration. pm. West Beach, next to Cabrillo and Castillo sts. Free. Call -. Symphony Orchestra present a patriotic concert in one of our city’s most stunning settings. Christopher Story VI and Westmont’s Dr. Michael Shasberger will share the podium as the West Coast Symphony Orchestra performs a series of American classics. pm. S.B. Courthouse Sunken Gardens, Anapamu St. (between Anacapa and Santa Barbara sts.). Free. Call -.

3-6

the West,  Fairway Rd. $. Call -. /: Mariel Bildsten Quartet Treat yourself to an evening of jazz performed by a passionate group of musicians, hailing from both S.B. and New York City. And, for those who wish to stimulate multiple senses, dinner will be served during the show (though reservations are recommended). -pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club,  State St. $. Call -. �

/: The West Coast Symphony Orchestra Presents American Salute! � The Cielo Foundation for the Performing Arts and the West Coast

/-/: S.B. National MultiBreed Horse Show � Worldclass horses and ponies of six different breeds from all over the country will enthrall spectators, as riders ranging in experience compete for top honors in various competitions. am. Earl Warren Showgrounds,  Calle Real. Free. Call -.

/: th of July Valley Jamboree � The Santa Ynez Valley Master Chorale and the Jamboree Band celebrate Independence Day fit-

tingly, with a collection of patriotic songs and all-American classics. The concert immediately follows the Santa Ynez parade, in which the chorale can be found singing on one of the floats. For those interested, it’s recommended that you get there early and snag your seat. pm. Veterans Memorial Hall,  Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call -.

FRIDAY 7/5 /: Fairy Tale Dreams � The S.B. Ballet Center presents a highflying production of some of Disney’s classic childhood stories. The all-ages friendly show will twist and twirl in two separate matinee shows. am and :pm. Center Stage Theater,  Paseo Nuevo. $-$. Call -. /-/: One Love Festival � This innovative festival is the perfect excuse to spend an entire day — or the whole weekend — outside dancing, singing, and doing yoga. The festival’s exciting lineup includes a slew of deejays and yoga instructors eager to usher you into a higher state of mind at beautiful Ojai’s Libbey Bowl, as well as the Ojai Art Ctr. for a late-night deejay set on Saturday. Fri.: :-:pm; Sat.: am-pm; late-night deejay, pm-am; Sun.: am-pm. Libbey Bowl,  S. Signal St., Ojai, and Ojai Art Ctr.,  S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $-$. Call () -.

SATURDAY 7/6 /: Chamber on the Mountain � The Happy Valley Cultural Center kicks off the inaugural season of its freshly conceived Chamber on the Mountain chamber music series with this recital, featuring the world-class talents of harpist Heidi Lehwalder and flutists Carol Wincenc and Jill Felber. :pm. Beatrice Wood Ctr. for the Arts,  Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. $-$. Call -.

>>> july 3, 2013

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JULY

3 –10 /: Freakin’ on Speakers � New Noise S.B. presents the signature punk-rock stylings of area up-and-comers Freakin’ on Speakers, with special guest The Raven and the Writing Desk. pm. Muddy Waters Café,  E. Haley St. $. Call -. /: Meet Your Makers: A Sustainable Design and Artisan Market � Kicking off this weekend, these weekly events are the perfect opportunity to find that special something for that special someone (even if it’s yourself ), and support a group of people who are passionate about their crafts. am-pm. Plaza Vera Cruz,  E Cota St. Free. Call -. /: erry icket and Katsina

Horizon Opening Reception � Presented by the

Museum of Contemporary Art S.B. (formerly S.B. Contemporary Arts Forum) and on display until Sept. , these exhibitions of the works of the New York–based/Russianborn Dasha Shishkin and the Mexico City–born Edgar Orlaineta will undoubtedly offer a unique perspective on the human experience. -pm. S.B. Museum of Contemporary Art

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, let us know about it by emailing listings@independent.com. S.B.,  Paseo Nuevo. Free. Call -.

/: Trinity Gardens BBQ Potluck � Chow down on free

/: Cinderella & Special Selections � The Goleta School of Ballet continues the tutu-clad lineup at Center Stage, finishing out the summer Dance Camp! with performances from the student campers. They’ve worked for three weeks on the pieces, so don’t miss a minute of the fantasystory fun. pm. Center Stage Theater,  Paseo Nuevo. $. Call -.

hamburgers with Trinity Gardens, and peruse the plethora of potted plants and other flora on sale. Don’t come empty-handed, though! Last names A-M should bring along a dessert, and N-Z a salad or side dish. America’s birthday falls on a Thursday this year, so celebrate a little late at the gardens with the whole family. Oh yeah, get stoked for some live accordion tunes, as well. am-pm. Trinity Gardens,  N. La Cumbre Rd. Free. Call -.

SUNDAY 7/7

/: Crown the Town: Mimosa Edition � Last month’s Pint Night

/: The Tempest � Shakespeare’s classic returns to Center Stage for one night only. If you missed the show’s run in October of last year, now is the last chance to see Lit Moon’s production, which “brims over with humor, resistance, and love,” according to The Santa Barbara Independent’s own Charles Donelan. After Sun., the company is off to the Balkans for a European tour spanning a handful of countries and numerous theaters, including a thirdcentury-BCE open-air amphitheater. pm. Center Stage Theater,  Paseo Nuevo. $-$. Call -. Read more on p. .

9-10

was a resounding success, by all accounts, and Crown the Town is back at it for a Fourth of July recovery tour to sample the city’s best mimosas — because an afternoon of walking and imbibing might just be the best thing to cap off the Fourth’s festivities and another busy S.B. weekend of plays, shows, workshops, and art. :pm. Location TBA. $-$. Ages +. Call () -.

MONDAY 7/8 /: Kimberly Ford Quartet � Vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Kimberly Ford is bringing the whole crew — bass player Randy Tico, keys jockey George Friedenthal, and guitar and fiddle player Lee Rollag — into town for SOhO’s Monday-night show. Ford and the gang will perform their jazzy blend of tunes, starting the week off on a good note. pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club,  State St. $-$. Call -.

TUESDAY 7/9 /-/: Nifty Balloons: Reading is Delicious � Get ready for this one to blow up — worldclass balloon artists David and Shana Brenion will put on their elastic and ecstatic show that combines comedy, music, and plenty of inflatable art for all-ages audiences at the library. Tues.: :am; Goleta Library,  N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. :pm; Eastside Library,  Montecito St. Wed.: am; Solvang Library,  Mission Dr., Solvang. :pm; Central Library,  E. Anapamu St. Free. Call -.

Need more? Go to independent.com/events for your daily fix of weekly events. 34

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the

WEEK JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK /: Boxing: Fight for the Youth  The Primo Boxing Club has taken at-risk youths o��� the street and put them into the ring — where fighting by the rules helps them learn discipline and determination. This Saturday, they’ll show off their hard-earned skills in  sanctioned bouts. These kids have worked and fought hard to get to where they are, so don’t miss a single bob, weave, or jab. Proceeds will benefit the nonprofit club’s continuing mission. Doors: pm; first fight: pm. Page Youth Ctr.,  Hollister Ave. $-$. Call -. Read more on p. .

WEDNESDAY 7/10 /: Rear Window  The UCSB Arts & Lectures’ summer films continue with more Hitchcocky action. This week’s movie is Rear Window, the enthralling and suspenseful tale of a wheelchair-bound photojournalist who becomes convinced one of his neighbors has committed sinister deeds. The film will also run the following Fri., July , at the S.B. Courthouse Sunken Gardens. :pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Free. Call -.

8 /: Glory Lamb  Author and UCSB alum Glory Lamb will sign her newest book, a reminiscent journey through her time at UCSB and the decades that followed. The book, The Way We Were: A Photo Journal of UCSB’s Golden Years from -, presents iconic shots of campus and community life at the UC and in Isla Vista, warmly celebrating the traditions and activities of Gauchos past. pm. Chaucer’s Books,  State St. Free. Call -.

10 FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE Thursday Goleta and Carpinteria: Closed for the July th holiday

Friday Montecito:  and  blocks of Coast Village Rd., -:am

Saturday Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., :am-pm

Sunday Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, am-pm

Tuesday Old Town S.B.: - blocks of State St., -:pm

Wednesday Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and st St., :-:pm

july 3, 2013

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT LISTINGS

MCA NÉE CAF: “Soft and Entitled” by Dasha Shishkin will be on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (formerly the Contemporary Arts Forum) as part of the exhibit titled erry icket.

ART EXHIBITS MUSEUMS Casa Dolores – Multiple permanent installations.  Bath St., -. Karpeles Manuscript Library and Museum – Multiple permanent installations.  W. Anapamu St., -. Lompoc Museum – Multiple permanent installations.  S. H St., Lompoc, -. Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara – erry icket by Dasha Shishkin and Bloom Projects: Edgar Orlaineta, Katsina Horizon, July  - Sept. .  Paseo Nuevo, -. Rancho La Patera/Stow House – Multiple permanent exhibits hosted by the Goleta Valley Historical Society.  N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta, -. S.B. Historical Museum – De la Tierra — Art of the Adobe, through Oct. ; The Story of Santa Barbara, permanent exhibition. Free admission.  E. De la Guerra St., -. S.B. Maritime Museum – Lost Surf Art Posters of Santa Barbara by Rick Sharp, through April .  Harbor Wy., #, -. S.B. Museum of Art – Labour and Wait, through Sept. ; Un/Natural Color, July Sept. ; Degas to Chagall: Important Loans from The Armand Hammer Foundation and the Collection of Michael Armand Hammer and Martin Kersels’s Charm Series, ongoing exhibitions.  State St., -. Ty Warner Sea Ctr. – Multiple permanent installations.  Stearns Wharf, -.

GALLERIES

Santa Barbara’s Premium

Photography Studio Specializing in Ladies classy and romantic Glamour Portraits Over 25 sets and a full wardrobe room, makeup and dressing room

Lady McClintock Studios walk-ins welcome!

1221 State St Suite 6 Santa Barbara (805) 845-0030 Ladymcclintockstudios.com 36

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july 3, 2013

 Garden St. – th of July Santa Barbara Old Mission Art Alternative Site Show, July , am - pm. -. Architectural Foundation Gallery – The Rick & Paul Show: Recent Paintings by Rick Garcia and Paul Panossian, through July .  E. Victoria St., -. Art From Scrap Gallery – The Artists of Solstice, through July .  E. Cota St., -. Artamo Gallery – András Györfi: My Own Paradise, through July ; Summer Exhibition by gallery artists, July  - Sept. .  W. Anapamu St., -. The Arts Fund Gallery – Specimen, through Aug. . -C Santa Barbara St., -. Bronfman Family Jewish Community Ctr. – Pathways, through Aug. .  Chapala St., -. Brooks Institute Gallery  – The Dialect of Form: Body Language & Photography, through July .  E. Cota St., -. The C Gallery – Someday I’ll Make Art, through July .  Bell St., Los Alamos, -.

Cancer Ctr. of S.B. – Art Heals, a permanent exhibit.  Pueblo St., -. Channing Peake Gallery – W. Dibblee Hoyt: Far Reaches, through Sept. . S.B. County Administration Bldg.,  E. Anapamu St., -. Divine Inspiration Gallery of Fine Art – Summer Plein-Air Show, through July.  State St.,  - . Faulkner Gallery – Abstract Art Collection, through July . Central Library,  E. Anapamu St., -. Gallery  – Beneath the Surface by Karen Pendergrass, through July.  State St., Ste. , La Arcada Court, -. Gallery Los Olivos – California Impressions by Sheryl Knight and Linda Mutti, through July .  Grand Ave., Los Olivos, -. The Good Life Craft Beer & Wine Cellar – Gifts from Nature: Flowers and Wine by Ann Raleigh, through July .  Mission Dr., Solvang, -. Goleta Valley Library – Abstract Art Collective exhibition, through July .  N. Fairview Ave., Goleta, -. Hospice of S.B. – Permanent installations by painter Mary Heebner.  Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. , -. Hotel Indigo – Limuw: An Ode to the Sea, through Jan. , .  State St., -. Jane Deering Gallery – Unbuilt Santa Barbara presented by the Art, Design & Architecture Museum, through Sept. .  E. Canon Perdido St., -. Leigh Block Gallery – Along the Way: Nature’s Peace by McNeil MacLean, and works by Susan Savage, through July. Hospice of S.B.,  Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. , -. Los Olivos Café – Revered & Remembered by Laurel Sherrie, July  - Sept. .  Grand Ave., Los Olivos, -. Marcia Burtt Studio – Coastal Influence, through July .  Laguna St., -. Montecito Aesthetic Institute – Women of America, through July .  Coast Village Rd., Montecito, -. S.B. Tennis Club – Twins, through July .  Foothill Rd., -. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club – Rock music photography by Rob Shanahan, through Aug. .  State St., -. Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery – Angela Perko solo exhibition and Ray Strong: A Legacy in Landscape, through Sept. .  E. Anapamu St., -. Trowbridge Gallery – Caren Satterfield’s Wonderful Whimsical Paintings, through July .  E. Ojai Ave., Ste. , Ojai, -. wall space gallery – Revising History by Jennifer Greenburg, through July .  E. Yanonali St., C-, -.

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JULY 3–11 LIVE MUSIC CLASSICAL Beatrice Wood Ctr. for the Arts –  Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai, -. SAT: Happy Valley Cultural Ctr. presents Chamber On The Mountain (:pm) Hahn Hall – Music Academy of the West,  Fairway Rd., -. WED /: Brooklyn Rider (pm) S.B. Courthouse Sunken Gardens –  Anacapa St., visit cieloperformingarts.org. THU /: West Coast Symphony Orchestra presents American Salute! (pm) THU /: Music Academy of the West Concert (pm) S.B. Museum of Art –  State St., -.

POP, ROCK & JAZZ Adama –  Chapala St., -. THU: Greg Harrison (pm) Brewhouse –  W. Montecito St., -. THU-SAT, WED: Live Music (pm) Carr Winery Warehouse –  Numancia St., Ste. , Santa Ynez, -. SAT: Spencer and the Gardener and Surf Mariachi (pm) Chumash Casino Resort –  E. Hwy. , Santa Ynez, -. THU /: Happy Together (pm) Cold Spring Tavern –  Stagecoach Rd., -. FRI: Emily Wryn and the Lights Electric (-pm) SAT: Switchbak (-pm); Loomis and the Lust (-pm) SUN: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan (:-pm); Low Down Dudes (:-:pm) The Creekside –  Hollister Ave., -. WED: Country Night (pm) SUN: Karaoke with Jody (pm) MON: Karaoke with Dyno (pm) Dargan’s –  E. Ortega St., -. THU: Dannsair (:pm) SAT: Traditional Irish Music (:pm) TUE: Karaoke (pm) De la Guerra Plaza – State and De la Guerra sts., -. THU /: Washington on the Plaza (:am) Endless Summer Bar/Café –  Harbor Wy., -. FRI: Acoustic guitar and vocals (:-:pm) EOS Lounge –  Anacapa St., -. THU: Huge Thursday with Mackie and Bix King FRI: Live Music (-pm); DNA Presents SAT: DJ Calvin and Kohjay WED: Salsa Night Indochine –  State St., -. TUE: Indie Night (pm) WED: Karaoke (:pm) The James Joyce –  State St., -. THU: Alastair Greene Band (pm) FRI: Kinsella Brothers Band (pm) SAT: Ulysses (:-:pm) SUN, MON: Karaoke (pm) TUE: Ben Markham and Brian Cole WED: Open Mike Night Jill’s Place –  Santa Barbara St., -. FRI, SAT: Piano Bar with Al Reese (:pm) Marquee –  State St., -. WED: Open Mike Night (pm) THU: The Jazz Experiment (pm) WED: Open Mike Night (pm) Moby Dick Restaurant –  Stearns Wharf, -. WED-SAT: Jon Jeffers: Soft Latin Jazz and Songs from the American Songbook (-pm) Monty’s –  Hollister Ave., Goleta, -. THU: Karaoke Night (pm) Muddy Waters Café –  E. Haley St., -. SAT: Freakin’ on Speakers with The Raven and The Writing Desk (pm) O’Malleys and the Study Hall –  State St., -. THU: College Night with DJ Gavin

Old Town Tavern –  Orange Ave., Goleta, -. WED, FRI, SAT: College Karaoke Night (:pm) Palapa Restaurant –  State St., -. FRI: Live Mariachi Music (:-pm) Paradise Store and Grill –  Paradise Rd., -. SAT: Greatest Story (pm) Reds Tapas & Wine Bar –  Helena St., -. THU: Music Thursdays (pm) Roundin’ Third –  Calle Real, Goleta, -. THU, TUE: Locals Night (pm) S.B. Maritime Museum –  Harbor Wy., #, -. SAT: Ukulele music and singing (-:pm) Sandbar –  State St., -. TUE: ’s Night (pm) WED: Big Wednesday (pm) THU: College Night (pm) SOhO Restaurant & Music Club –  State St., -. WED: Mariel Bildsten Quartet (pm) MON: Kimberly Ford Quartet (pm) WED: Sean Callero, Jamey & Adele, Stolen Thunder, Fools and Sages, and The Caverns (pm) THU: David Loeppke Band, Erland, and Nyco (pm) Standing Sun Winery –  Second St., Unit D, Buellton, -. THU /: Little Brave, Roem Baur, and Steven Roth (pm) Statemynt –  State St., -. THU: DJ Akorn WED: Blues Night (pm) Tiburon Tavern –  State St., -. FRI: Karaoke Night (:pm) TonyRay’s –  De la Guerra Plaza, -. FRI: Karaoke (pm) SAT: Live Music (pm) SUN: Live Music (pm) Velvet Jones –  State St., -. WED: Lil Bams and Kidd Mixtape release party (pm) THU: DJ Ian da Butcha (pm) FRI: Mad Caddies (pm) SAT: Reggae Night with Cornerstone (pm) Whiskey Richard’s –  State St., -. MON: Open Mike Night (pm) WED: Punk on Vinyl (pm) Veterans Memorial Bldg. –  W. Cabrillo Blvd., -. THU /: Valley Jamboree (pm) Wildcat –  W. Ortega St., -. THU: DJs Hollywood and Patrick B SUN: Red Room with DJ Gavin Roy (pm) TUE: Local Band Night (pm) Zodo’s –  Calle Real, Goleta, -. THU: KJEE Thursday Night Strikes (:-:pm) MON: Service Industry Night (pm)

theater Circle Bar B – The Importance of Being Earnest.  Refugio Rd., Goleta, -. FRI, SAT: pm SUN: pm Center Stage Theater –  Paseo Nuevo, -. SUN: Lit Moon Theater Company: The Tempest (pm) THU: Dijo Productions: Freud’s Last Session (pm) Solvang Festival Theater – PCPA Theaterfest presents Fiddler on the Roof.  nd St., Solvang, -. WED, FRI, SAT: pm

dance Center Stage Theater –  Paseo Nuevo, -. FRI: Santa Barbara Ballet Center: Fairy Tale Dreams (am and :pm) SAT: Goleta School of Ballet: Cinderella & Special Selections (pm)

july 3, 2013

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living

{ SCENE IN S.B. }

PRIDE, PERFORMANCE, AND PARENTING chelle “I want to cry,” said Mi ng ldi ho Xanthia Crispin, g last aloft a pride flag durin S.B. Thursday’s rally at the ich wh g rin Courthouse, du ed rat eb cel y nit the commu urt’s Co me pre Su . U.S the against landmark decisions ge rria Ma of the Defense 08 20 a’s rni lifo Ca d Act an Proposition 8.

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What year did the French join U.S. forces in the American Revolution?

❏ 1776 ❏ 1777 ❏ 1778

Whose writings greatly influenced the American revolutionaries?

❏ John Locke ❏ Francis Bacon ❏ Voltaire

In 1777 the British controlled which U.S. cities?

❏ New York and Philadelphia ❏ Boston and New York ❏ Providence and Boston

Take Flight

F

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Boxing for

Charity On Saturday, July 6, the Primo Boxing Club will present the first-ever “Fight for the Youth” charity boxing matches. For almost 30 years, Primo has been working to provide at-risk youth with a safe, constructive, inspiring place to spend time; their “Fight for the Youth” program, which they hope to make into a community tradition, is simply the latest in their efforts to help children and teens during troubled times. The fundraising event — which has 12 fights slated — will give amateur boxers a chance to display the skills they have learned at Primo, and support the gym. Tickets cost $25 and up; all proceeds will help to fund Primo Boxing’s “Say Yes to Kids” program. The event takes place Saturday, July 6, 6 p.m., at Page Youth Center, 4540 Hollister Avenue. For more information, visit fightfortheyouth.org. — SS

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

JAC K CRO SBI E

Stars and Stripes

Young Eagles

BLUE SKY SOARING SOARING: Y Young EEagle l participants ti i t JJacob b (b (backk seat) t and Elijah (far right) pose for a picture with pilot Howard Wallace before heading out for their flying lesson.

d Augustine from left: Sienna an nevieve (not Ge d an n iso Kimbell, All Ca d rrie and Ryan pictured) Pollock, an te Street on a Sta Herrema take on The mom-squad n. oo ern warm S.B. aft ty is walking said their main activi sun in between the around enjoying d more. an ps, rou classes, playg nch Press,” Fre is ce pla te ori “Our fav Kimbell said.

{ QUIZ }

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JACK CROSB IE

from left: Shuba Brady, Jake Himovitz, and Skylar Rousseau sell tickets for Proximity Theatre Company’s production of Desire outside the entrance to The Barn, a backyard venue on Santa Barbara Street. Brady said Desire was a fresh style of performance for the group. “This is something they’ve never done before,” Brady said. “They’ve been working really hard on it; I’m excited to see it.”

FEATURE ATUR URE E • HI HIST HISTORY STOR ORY Y 10 101 • GARDENING • STARSHINE • SPORTS • FOOD JESSANY RODENAS

PAU L WE LLM AN

by Jack Crosbie

rom Peter Pan’s fairy dust to the broomsticks of Harry Potter, the ability to fly has inspired the imagination of young people for generations. Although obtaining magical superpowers is unlikely, area kids can get a taste of the thrill of soaring through the air thanks to the Santa Barbara chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA) Young Eagles program. Founded in 1952 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, by flying enthusiasts, the EAA began essentially as a flying club. Over the past 60 years, it has expanded its aviation advocacy vision to include 1,000 chapters worldwide and several aviation programs, including Young Eagles, which introduces youths ages 8-17 to the wonders of piloting an aircraft, free of charge. Since the program’s launch in 1992, more than 1.7 million Young Eagles have flown worldwide. The program accomplishes this by sending Young Eagle participants into the sky with a licensed pilot in a single-engine airplane. However, they do not merely sit in the copilot seat and watch the pilot at work; instead, the youths take the controls themselves as soon as the plane levels out over the Santa Ynez Valley, flying the craft under the careful supervision of the experts. After the flight, the youngsters receive a real pilot’s logbook with the details of their flight, a certificate, and a coupon code for a free online ground-school course from Sporty’s Pilot Shop, and their names are entered in the organization’s master logbook. Getting kids excited about flying is one of the program’s main goals. With the commercialization of airline travel and the everincreasing hassle associated with airports, flying in a plane has lost much of the sense of excitement, romance, and adventure it once possessed, according to Carl Hopkins, president of the Santa Barbara chapter. “There’s airline transportation, and then there’s flying,” he said. “The EAA wanted to

$37 million

bring together a bunch of people who recognized that difference and that love of flying and who wanted to share that love with kids. And hopefully by doing so at least some of them would go on to become pilots.” In addition to cultivating future aviators, the program is about inspiring youth and giving them a new perspective of themselves and the world around them. Many of the participants in the program come to the EAA through charities such as A Different Point of View, for at-risk children, and American Charities, which works with foster children. Many of them, Hopkins said, have never been in any kind of airplane before, much less flown one themselves. “They get up in the air and look down at the Earth, and that really is a different point of view. You really do see things differently from up there,” Hopkins said. “The first thing that they do is just, ‘Wow! Look how little that is and look at the road and look at this,’ and they’re just looking at all these things.” The program is certainly successful in opening young minds to the joys of flight. One recent participant, Jacob Grasson, is now enthusiastic about the possibilities of a career in piloting. “I would hope to be a pilot because it was such a fun experience,” he said. “It’s something that I’d be interested in doing every day, and it would be something that it wouldn’t be hard to go to work to, rather than sitting in a cubicle grueling through the day.” But the flight has an even more important effect on these Young Eagles. It alters their way of seeing not only the world but also themselves. As Hopkins pointed out, “It’s a huge boost in their self-esteem and their self-confidence. They went, ‘Wow, I did that. I flew that airplane!’” — Savannah Stelzer

4·1·1

For more information, visit youngeagles.org.

BY THE NUMBERS The amount of money spent on the American Revolution on a national level. Another $114 million was spent by the states. SOURCE:

wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolutionary_war.

july 3, 2013

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Answers: . ; . John Locke; . New York and Philadelphia.


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S

by Colin Rooney ome people say time travel is impossible. Well,

into their new home. Along with planting almonds and other crops, Sherman’s big financial break came in 1875 when 3,000 lemon trees were placed in the first commercial lemon orchard planting in California, a crop now inextricably linked with Goleta. Though the landscape was dominated by the orchards, closer to home, the Stows fervently experimented with interesting horticultural displays and experiments, inspired by the European model of “the picturesque,” or specimen, garden. Typical of the late 1800s, these gardens served as status symbols to show off to guests or meander through thoughtfully. The focus of the Stow garden was exotic and unusual plants from around the world, including the delightfully named bunya-bunya and the noble Moreton Bay chestnut, among many others. However, the most interesting tree in the collection is one of immense sentimental value. In 1874, Sherman gave Ida a single redwood seed in a coffee tin as a symbol “of the growth of their family.” He could not have picked a better gift; today it is one of the tallest — if not the tallest — trees on the property. Since 1967, the Goleta Valley Historical Society (GVHS) has kept the past present as stewards of the Goleta Valley and the Stow family. This involves recreating and preserving the property as faithfully to its past as possible, most recently restoring the parking shed in 2006. Now, after years of intense and meticulous planning, the GVHS has finally broken ground on the first phase of the Arboretum Restoration Project. The project is part of a 25-year plan to restore the ranch to its late-1800s state, according to Amanda De EVERYTHING’S COMING UP LEMONS: Almond orchards dotted Lucia, director and project manager. Needless to say, it Rancho La Patera’s acres, but it was the 3,000 lemon trees planted in is a massive undertaking. In 2007, several cultural and 1875 that secured the Stow family’s fortune. landscape historians and architects were contacted

COURTESY

those people have never been to Rancho La Patera. Not that you’ll be rubbing elbows with Sherman Stow, patriarch of the Stow House, as you stroll the grounds, but once the Arboretum Restoration project — which aims to return the gardens to their 1880s splendor — is complete, all that will be missing is Sherman himself. Rancho La Patera harks back to an era when only birds made tweets and an instant message was sent in Morse code. Purchased in the summer of 1871 by William Whitney Stow, the 1,042 acres of exceptionally fertile Goleta Valley land were given to his son, Sherman, to build a home and develop into farmland. Two years later, Sherman and his wife, Ida, moved

WHOSE GARDEN IS THIS? The Stow House (pictured present-day, above) was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. Thanks to its preservation, it looks nearly identical to when it was built in 1873 (left). If all goes as planned with the Arboretum Restoration project, when completed, the garden should be eligible for recognition as a historic cultural landscape.

COURTESY

A Labor of Love

to analyze a multitude of photographs and some written recordings, as well as the property itself, to take an inventory of all the plants on the property. As De Lucia put it,“There was no guesswork involved.” Once the plants were cataloged, phase one could begin. As the most intense part of the project, phase one involved getting the infrastructure for the garden in place, including reinstalling pathways that once traversed the original arboretum and replacing the decades-old sprinklers with a modern irrigation system. With regard to the plants themselves, professionals have been thoroughly scouring the fenced-in sections of the grounds, saving and reusing bulbs of the original gardens and taking out those that aren’t “historically accurate.” Phase two will expand the restoration beyond the fences, and phase three will effectively tie up all the loose ends, heralding the project’s completion. If all goes according to plan, the gardens will then be eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places for cultural landscape, an honor that Stow House received in 2000. The GVHS has taken it upon itself to “freeze it in time,” because, as De Lucia said,“If this wasn’t here … a piece of history would have been totally lost. Once it’s gone, you can’t get that back.” However, the project is about more than achieving national recognition as a historical place; it’s also about preserving a piece of living history. Like Sherman Stow planting the redwood seed, his symbol of love that withstood the test of time, the Goleta Valley Historical Society is doing the same with the Arboretum Restoration in the hope that its labor of love will help the ranch remain in perpetuity.

4·1·1

Rancho La Patera is located at

304 North Los Carneros Road, Goleta. For more information, call 681-7216 or visit stowhouse.com.

july 3, 2013

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omparatively unknown is this story of Santa Barbara County’s worst disaster in terms of lives lost — the 1907 train wreck, which killed 32 people. Early on the afternoon of May 11, 1907, an excursion train pulled out of Santa Barbara heading for San Francisco. The locomotive, with its tender, baggage, and dining cars and four sleepers, carried two groups of Shriners, one from Buffalo, New York, the other from Reading, Pennsylvania. The men, many traveling with their wives, had spent the morning sightseeing after arriving from Los Angeles, where they had attended a national conference. About 65 miles out from Santa Barbara, between Point Arguello and Surf, something went terribly wrong. The train was traveling around 35 miles an hour when the engineer, Charles Champlain, heard a loud metallic crack. A few seconds later, the locomotive left the tracks and plunged ahead about 100 yards before the cowcatcher caught the ground, flipping the engine on its side. Champlain was thrown from the cab and knocked unconscious, and suffered a broken arm. He was lucky. The brakeman had his spine snapped; the fireman was scalded when the boiler burst. These injuries would prove fatal. The train took on the aspect of a collapsing spyglass. The tender plowed into the engine followed by the baggage car and the diner. Two of the sleeper cars jumped the tracks. Somehow the two remaining cars remained upright on the rails. The baggage car and the diner were destroyed and became the scene of particular carnage. Passengers in the diner not killed by the impact died when the steam pipes, which ran through the car, broke. Trapped in the wreckage, these unfortunates were lit-

erally cooked alive. Only two people escaped. More passengers died in the two sleepers. Fire broke out in the diner, hampering rescue efforts by survivors. Fortunately there were two flatcars with water tanks at the nearby Honda siding, and the flames were eventually doused. The uninjured conductor telegraphed for help. A relief train was quickly put together in Santa Barbara with six doctors and seven nurses. Departure was delayed for two hours before an engineer could be found to man the train. It finally arrived at Honda around 6 p.m. The scene was chaotic. A cook was inconsolable when he could not find the chickens he was going to prepare for dinner. Another man walked around asking people if his tie was straight. A honeymooning couple, separated in the confusion, asked those treating them to assure the other that they were all right. They both died from their injuries. The wife of the flagman at Honda was cited for her efforts in bringing coffee and makeshift bandages fashioned from clothing to the injured. Twenty-seven died at the scene; five more succumbed in ensuing days. Officials in both San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties conducted investigations. The former blamed faulty equipment, without going into any further detail; the latter stated they “cannot determine any direct cause for said wreck.” There was some speculation in the press about a switch being bad or the possibility of sabotage, but nothing definitive ever came to light. The cause behind the tragedy remains a mystery.

The baggage car and the diner were destroyed and became the scene of particular carnage.

Michael Redmon, director of research at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, will answer your questions about Santa Barbara’s history. Write him c/o The Independent, 122 W. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

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THE X FACTOR: Humans have exploited plant adaptability for tens of thousands of years. above: A giant pumpkin sprouts. below: White marigolds display a hue nature never thought of.

he push is on to force growers to label into a dizzying array of varieties for all soil types and their plants with titles like organic, pesclimate zones. Ornamental plants, too, have been ticide-free, or genetically modified. selected and manipulated to provide a rainbow of Especially for food-producing plants, flower and foliage colors and shapes from the lowlithis may be the pathway to increased est groundcover to the loftiest tree. health and decreased damage to the environment. Some of the most spectacular cultivars began as The fact is that humans have been manipulating freak mutations. Take variegated foliage, for example. plants almost as long as they have been cultivating Leaves are usually some shade of green due to the them. These human inventors have often had a quite- presence of chlorophyll in the cells. Some leaves may willing partner, the plant itself. Plants have been rein- even have several layers of tissue that contain chloventing themselves for millions of years just to stay rophyll. If, by some chance, a genetic anomaly occurs alive. Whether they were adapting to changing clithat blocks the production of chlorophyll in one or mate, competing with other species of the flora for more of those zones, that part of the leaf is no lonnutrients and light, or evading predation by herbivoger green or may be a paler shade of green if it overrous fauna, they have lays another chlorocome up with some phyll-containing layer. amazing strategies. So it produces stripes The valuable or spots of white or yelessence of most herbs, low to catch the eye of both culinary and the plant hunter. Dig medicinal, was probup this plant, propaably created as a toxic gate it through cuttings, or at least unpalatgive it a fanciful name, able defense against and build a nursery rapacious insects, business. mollusks, or mamOther plant invenmals. The size, shape, tors painstakingly crossor texture of leaves pollinate species hoping (or even the lack of to produce something leaves altogether) out of the ordinary, so is an indication of new and interesting the environmenthat it deserves a place tal forces to which a in every garden. The It took years to produce a pure plant had to adapt in quest is never ending white marigold, a yellow clivia, for bigger (or smaller), its native habitat. The astonishing variety of brighter (or paler), juicand a 500-pound pumpkin, flower shapes, colors, ier, tastier flowers or and scents is purely but human ingenuity prevailed. fruits. In many cases, sexual in origin: all the new variety bears designed to attract little resemblance to its help in carrying pollen from one posy to another. wild ancestors. It took years to produce a pure white Luscious fruits of all kinds evolved from the need of marigold, a yellow clivia, and a 500-pound pumpa plant to disperse its seeds to favorable sites to main- kin, but human ingenuity prevailed. It’s not always tain the species. It would be quite hard to really folabout appearance, either. Much effort has been put low the new trendy paleo diet, as those plants didn’t into producing disease resistance and increased vigor stop evolving just as the humans that ate them didn’t (without direct manipulation of genes) by merely either. selecting and breeding the best of the best. Humans have exploited this adaptability now for tens of thousands of years to produce food and Virginia Hayes, curator of Ganna Walska Lotusland, medicine. The world of agriculture has been drastiwill answer your gardening questions. Address them cally enlarged by selecting and hybridizing a relative to Gardens, The Independent, 122 W. Figueroa St., S.B., handful of plant species that have been multiplied CA 93101. Send email to vahayes@lotusland.org.


living | Starshine

Guest Writer:

Starshine’s Teenager

I asked my 14-year-old son to write my column this week because he was “bored” and couldn’t think of anything to do with his summer besides parking himself in front of back-to-back episodes of Ancient Aliens on The History Channel. Yes, it’s really him, and not me pretending to be him. Kid has a sarcastic side; not sure where he gets it.

H

i. Judging by my one-word lead, you probably know that this is not Starshine. My name is Stone, and I am Ms. Roshell’s oldest son. This column will not, for a change, make fun of Christians, vegans, or any other thing my

mom is not. If that’s what you’re into, you’d best stop reading now and check back in a couple of weeks when my mom will probably write a column that straddles the line between raunchy humor and uncomfortableness, as usual. This column, however, will discuss a few things my mom doesn’t talk about and will not mention vaginas or flossing. Or vagina flossing, for that matter. You may be wondering, “Why is Starshine making her son do her work for her?” Well, I’m not sure either, but the reason I accepted her offer was because she told me the only way I could get a glimpse at a TV before 8 p.m. was to bang out a column for her. And of course, desperate times call for desperate measures. Why do parents feel so strongly about TV-watching anyway? Whenever I ask my parents about why “screen time” is so bad, they say “because it rots your brain,” and they laugh and walk away. If teenagers want to sit on their butts and do nothing all day, don’t stop ’em! What we do every day during the school year is equivalent to an adult work day, except worse. Adults get to eat lunch wherever they want, check Facebook when the boss isn’t looking, and chat with friends all the while. We receive minor versions of by Stone these luxuries (thanks to bros who’ll buy you lunch off-campus, smart phones hidden under your desk, and the invention of whispering), but email: starshine@roshell.com we don’t get paid for it. Plus, after the school day is over, we have to go home and continue working on homework. So when we finally get to summer, and we wake up that first morning and have an agenda of absolutely nothing for the day, LET US DO IT. In my opinion, summer should be one extended apology from the parents to the teenagers for all the crap they put their kids through during the rest of the year (room cleaning, studying, “family time,” etc.) They should be offering us rides downtown, encouraging us to play video games, and buying us actual Oreos — not the Trader Joe’s kind. However, my parents allowed me only two weeks of zoning out on the couch. I feel robbed of my nothingness, in a sense. I should get an even bigger apology, because my mom is absolutely crazy (wow, I hope she doesn’t edit this). Besides the fact that she has twice forced us to clap for her when she parallel-parked in a tight spot, she thinks that biking is a perfect alternative to riding in a car and that driving her son from point A to point B is spoiling him. Whenever I take longer than 12 hours to do my laundry, it suddenly becomes public property, and I wake up to find my dripping-wet clothes in a heap on the floor outside the washing machine. If I’m not careful about guarding my “nothing,” I’ll probably end up just biking around the world and doing laundry for the rest of my teen years. So there’s your column, Mom. See what you get for asking me to do your work for you? Now the world can hear my logical, well-thoughtout views on teenagers and their free time. And look, I even got a few hours of screen time out of it!

ROSHELL

Stone Roshell is a high school sophomore and the drummer in a killer rock band.

july 3, 2013

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living | Sports PHOTOS BY ALLISON HEIDUK

t

A Lofty Goal

S.B. Soccer Club Boys Team Heads to Kansas to Try for a Second National Championship by John Zant

T

he Miami Heat did it in the NBA Finals. The Santa Barbara Foresters did it in the National

they were in the U12 age group, they won the regional in New Mexico, and that was as far as they could go. Baseball Congress World Series. Their first bid to reach the nationals ended Spain could do it in the World in a defeat at the U13 regional finals at LanCup (but Brazil served notice that it will be an caster. Last year, Santa Barbara won the U14 exceedingly difficult task). Later this month, regional at Phoenix, Arizona, and took the the Boys U15 team of the Santa Barbara U.S. title at Rock Hill, South Carolina. Soccer Club will Even as their coach, ‘I’ve been coaching a long Rudy Ybarra, has try to do it — win seen the team grow in back-to-back championships at time, from youth to semipro its command of soccer skills and tactics, its the ultimate level teams, and this is a really, journey has become of competition. increasingly perilous. The penultireally special group.’ “You need to show mate step for the up every day,” Ybarra Santa Barbara — Coach Rudy Ybarra said. “All the other boys was their teams want to knock second consecuyou off the top. Getting out of the region was tive Far West Regional title. They finished as tough.” the best of 14 teams from eight states in the Santa Barbara had to win penalty-kick tournament last month at Honolulu, Hawai‘i. shootouts against two other California teams They will join five other regional champions — the Pateodores Academy of Orange at the U.S. Youth Soccer National ChampionCounty and FC Golden State of the Greater ship on July 22-28 at Overland Park, Kansas. Los Angeles area — after both the semifinals This is the fourth summer the same boys and finals at Honolulu ended in 1-1 deadlocks have stood out among their peers. When

BOUND FOR GLORY: “The majority of these young men will play in college,” Coach Rudy Ybarra said of his winning team members, pictured above after becoming 2013 regional champs.

at the end of regulation and overtime. Stepping up to make PKs in the stressdrenched shootouts (Santa Barbara won the semi 4-3 and the final 4-2) were Francisco Arroyo, Eric Contreras, Benji Garcia, Tim Heiduk, and Lucky Puengrod. Garcia and Contreras, a pair of Carpinteria youths, scored goals in regulation time. Key defenders included Gio Acosta, Carson Vom Steeg, and goalkeeper Edward “Lalo” Delgado. Other members of the team are Tony Andoyan, Juan Pablo Alvarez, Jacob Blacker, Shea Blackman, Sahid Conteh, Brian Finger, Raul Guerrero, Tanner Mees, Jules Pasco, and Brandon Sanchez. Most live on the Santa Barbara coast; a few are from Ventura, Santa Ynez, and the North County. “I’ve been coaching a long time, from youth to semipro teams, and this is a really, really special group,” Ybarra said. “They’ve developed good soccer minds, and they’ve learned to trust each other. We’re a small city in the region, but we’ve been getting calls and emails from D- college coaches. They want to see these kids play.” Vom Steeg, the son of UCSB soccer coach Tim Vom Steeg, was one of 36 players invited to the U national training camp in the fall. “The majority of these young men will play in college,” Ybarra said. The club is seeking financial support for its trip to Kansas. “The parents are paying so much, and they get some help from U.S. Soccer and Region , but it’s an expensive deal,” Ybarra said. Tax deductible donations can be made by mail, payable to: SBSC-BU White, Road to Kansas, P.O. Box , Santa Barbara, CA . OLD-SCHOOL MOTIVATION: During Game  of the NBA Finals, San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich was heard exhorting the Spurs not to be shy about shooting three-pointers. “You feel confident, let ’em fly,” he said.“Get your name in the paper.” ESPN’s Stan Verrett scoffed at that approach. “Who

HEAD SHOTS: Santa Barbara Soccer Club’s Boys U15 earned the title at the Far West Regional championships in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, last month. The team beat out 13 opponents from eight states. It was the second year in a row U15 came in first in the competition. S.B. players included (from left, in red) Eric Contreras, Juan Pablo Alvarez, Carson Vom Steeg, Edward “Lalo” Delgado (goalie in green), and Francisco Arroyo.

reads the paper anymore?” he said. Ouch. But there must have been some readers in the family of Danny Green. His long-distance shooting sparked the Spurs to a 113-77 blowout victory. FIRING UP THE FORESTERS: Joey Epperson’s debut week with the Santa Bar-

bara Foresters may not have been as dramatic as Yasiel Puig’s with the Dodgers, but it was still quite impressive. Epperson, an outfielder at SBCC and UCSB, hit for a .458 average with eight RBIs in six games. The Foresters will play a Fourth of July game at 4 p.m. against the MLB Academy Barons at Caesar Uyesaka Stadium. It’s the first game of the Rawlings California Cup tournament, which will continue through the weekend at the UCSB diamond. INTERNATIONAL SOCCER: Rudy Ybarra will send his semipro team, the Ventura County Fusion, against Puebla FC of Mexico’s La Liga on Tuesday, July 9, at the Ventura College Sportsplex. The Fusion, which plays in the Southwest Division of the nationwide Premier Development League, has several players from UCSB and Cal Poly. Puebla, a two-time Mexican champion, features an international roster including DaMarcus Beasley and Michael Orozco of the U.S. national team. Kickoff Tuesday is at 7 p.m. For more sports, including a weekly highlight schedule, see independent .com/sports.

july 3, 2013

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The Original

McConnell’s on Mission

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M¢ P. 51

lliving | Food & Drink + + + + + + + food@independent.com I SCREAM, YOU SCREAM

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ICE CREAM MAN: Sugar & Salt Creamery’s truck is worth chasing down.

ER

e’re sweeten something,” wearing only for Palmer to findorky ish,“You can hide things hairnets, with sugar.” Soon The standSpigot oozes Mint Chip, ing in a historic building that and after tasting, it’s once housed the Santa Barbara easy to feel like Charlie Live Oak Dairy, circa 1936. hanging with Willy The spoons just out of our Wonka. Still, Vierra mouths, we’re enjoying our points out, “You can first tastes of fresh Mint Chip come up with someice cream, straight from “The thing fresh — ice cream Spigot.” It’s America’s favorite out of our machine, family food. And what comes you’ll never have anyout of McConnell’s new owner thing like that — but I Michael Palmer’s mouth is a want it to be good in delightedly enthusiastic, una month. It’s certainly family-friendly “holy fuck!” challenging — ice cream His clear blue eyes light up has to be maintained as he says, “There are a lot of through its lifespan; it’s good ice creams but none as not cornflakes on the indulgent and consistent as shelf.” RAISE A SPOON: McConnell’s ultra-premium ice cream is the cure for this. When we first bought the Months after our hot summer days. company, I gained 15 pounds.” first discussions, Palmer That’s easy to believe with is meeting with me at my breath fresh with the Mint Chip, an ice cream with luscious what will be McConnell’s flagship store on State Street across creaminess but none of that tongue-coating weirdness you can from Paseo Nuevo, opening this July. Despite tile still being laid get with commercial brands. Then there are their “chips,” which and an electric saw driving us outside so we can hear each other, are more like shards, since, unlike your typical ice cream maker, he insists this “reinvention of the American ice cream parlor is they don’t buy precut chunkettes. Nope, they melt Guittard chocfurther along than it looks.” He’s also hometown proud, saying olate — a San Francisco company in business since 1868 — and let of the area,“It’s so many national stores now. A lot of the local that drop into and freeze with the ice cream as it’s made. Forget businesses that used to populate State Street are not around, so about snowflakes being unique; McConnell’s chocolate chips it’s great to have a local brand like us here. There’s room for a lot have them beat and taste better to boot. of growth in our backyard; not everyone in Santa Barbara knows “We like to call McConnell’s ‘California’s original and finest that they’ve got the best ice cream store at their doorstep.” artisanal ice cream company,’ ” Palmer claims, quickly adding, The new shop will be, Palmer claims,“the face of our brand but “but I hate that word ‘artisanal’ as everyone uses it now. We don’t also a skunk works where we can test out new flavors,” while selluse many ingredients here. McConnell’s always has been 100 ing the classics and the ever-expanding list of new flavors, too — percent natural and was a local, sustainable business before those this summer brings delights like Toasted Coconut Almond Chip were marketing terms — this isn’t new for this company; it’s deep and Dark Chocolate Paso Brittle suffused with Paso Almond in our DNA. Ours is a truly handmade product. Nobody is pasBrittle. “We want this to be a dessert destination, as we’ll be bakteurizing from cream and milk themselves.” ing here, too, with pastry chef Jordan Thomas.” (And the Mission It’s a company that’s had only three families own it since it Street and Ventura stores will continue; they are licensees, not shipped its first tub in 1949: founders Gordon “Mac” McConnell owned by McConnell’s.) and his wife, Ernesteen, then Jim and Jeney McCoy from 1963 to While much has changed in the months since our first conver2011, and now Palmer and his wife, Eva Ein (who also co-owns sation — from installing new production equipment in the facStella Mare’s and Le Café Stella and heads the current R&D). tory to bringing onboard Charley Price, who ran the $150 million “The lynchpin was when my house burned down in the Tea dairy operation Galliker’s in western Pennsylvania — McConFire,” Palmer says.“The fire was really a kick in the gut, a call as it nell’s handmade ways haven’t. That means the ice cream has were — I decided to leave my job [running the West Coast terriabout 18 percent butterfat, while other brands have 15 percent at tory for a branding and marketing agency] and find something best. The overrun — the amount of air in the product — is a mere that satisfied me in a different way. We decided instead of rebuild- 10 percent, compared to almost 30 percent in national brands. ing our house we’d rebuild this brand.” “Most other brands are made with a batch freezer, which stirs in Palmer is always quick to praise Mike Vierra, McConnell’s air,” Palmer explains.“With our own technology of the hybrid master ice cream maker since 1980. A fourth-generation dairyFrench pot [only one other company, Graeter’s in Cincinnati, man picked from Cal Poly by Jim McCoy, Vierra says,“I’ve been uses it in the U.S.], we can dial down every aspect of the air and working with milk and cream my whole life, starting with getting viscosity. milk out of cows in Merced city growing up.” He’s explaining the “We want to be the best ice cream in America,” Palmer states. process as we gather around The Spigot, the tube outside Gordon “It’s a nice goal to have. I think the product is better now than McConnell’s brilliantly reconceived modified French pot system ever and more consistent. We’re obsessive about the quality. We’d where the just-made, not-yet-chilled, fresh, and fantastically delirather throw out a batch than lower our standards.” cious ice cream pours out.“We want a lot of flavor but no stabilizers, no high-fructose corn syrup; we want the dairy flavor from cream and milk and the sweetness from sugar.” You will scream for the ice cream when Palmer interrupts,“We refer to our ice cream as ultraMcConnell’s Fine Ice Creams opens this premium and not super-premium, as a lot of those use a lot of month at 728 State Street. Visit mcconnells.com. sugar so are really sweet.” And then Vierra adds,“It’s easy to over-

M

PAUL WELLMAN

by George Yatchisin

G C O UR T E S Y S U

AR

AN

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C LT SA

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A

M

Here’s the Scoop ( Coast Village Rd.,

Montecito; 969-7020; scoopsb.com) If you hanker for gelato, it doesn’t get any better than this, unless you’ve got a plane ticket to Italy. Bob and Ellie Patterson, Independent Foodie Award winners in 2012, have a way with local fruit and develop amazing flavors like Maple Syrup with Bacon. That’s right, gelato plus bacon.

Rori’s Artisanal Creamery

(-D Coast Village Rd., Montecito; 770-2266; rorisartisanalcreamery.com) Since December, Rori Trovato has been serving up her organic, delightfully rich desserts from a shop in the Montecito Vons plaza, making it even easier to indulge in flavors like New York Strawberry Cheesecake (complete with graham-cracker crust, of course) and the divinely inspired Malted Milk Ball. Available at some area stores, too.

Spoon

( State St.; 962-1838) Yeah, the go-go boots on the scoopers are a bit sexist retro. But close your eyes and just taste the gelato, and all is forgiven. Spoon won a Downtown Organization Chocolate Dessert Taste-Off a couple of years back, so you might as well go for a classic like Gianduia, which is chocolate and hazelnut.

Sugar & Salt Creamery

(a cute little blue truck; sugarandsaltcreamery.com) Not only is this outfit mobile-only, but it also caters to those for whom dairy is a no-no: Its product is hand-crafted, raw, sprouted-almond-milk sorbet. Check out a flavor like Thai Tea or Organic Mango, and see — GY if you can tell the difference.


Huge International Wine Tasting at SOhO Saturday, July 20th, 2013 • 12-3pm

“Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.” -At least 60 wines from all over the planet, focused on France, Spain and Italy -Plenty of hot appetizers, cheese and charcuterie -Import experts manning each table to impart their knowledge of every terroir from the Rhône Valley to Tuscany -Special 15% off discount for six bottle purchases You’ll taste, you’ll eat and you’ll learn: this is my kind of #$% classroom! Tickets are $30.00 per person and must be purchased in advance. Please call us at (805) 845-5247 to reserve. We’ll be glad to mail the tickets to you, or if you prefer, have them available for pickup here at the store. Please do not contact SOhO: Tickets are not available through the restaurant. Please note that tickets are non-refundable, and must be presented at the door to gain entry.

The Winehound – Cheers, Bob Wesley & the Winehound Crew

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SEE P. 73

Dragonette Cellars Family-Focused Winery Moves to Buellton

W

O P 4t EN h til 2 JU

LY

[ independent.com ]

4·1·1

who. what. now.

hile studying geology in Italy during a summer in college in the late 1990s, Washington State native Brandon Sparks-Gillis found grapes more fascinating than rocks and started working in the production side of the wine industry upon returning to the West Coast. But it wasn’t until he ventured into retail — a strategic move, he said, to “calibrate my palate by tasting the best of the best”— that his winemaking vision came into PLAID, PINOT, AND MORE: Team Dragonette includes John full focus. (left) and Steve (right) Dragonette and Brandon Sparks-Gillis, On his first day at Wally’s plus about 10 bottlings per year of sauvignon blanc, pinot noir, Wine & Spirits in Westwood, syrah, and more. Sparks-Gillis met John Dragonette, an attorney who was also picking up shifts there for educational anyway,” explained Dragonette, who also gets purposes, and the two hit it off.“We had really some of the only syrah from the Fiddlestix similar ambitions,” said Sparks-Gillis. Both Vineyard in the Sta. Rita Hills. were interested in the same grape varietals Every year, Dragonette releases about and agreed that the most promising place to 4,000 to 5,000 total cases of 10 wines, usuplant their dreams was Santa Barbara County. ally featuring three to five pinots, two to three Sparks-Gillis explained,“There are few places sauv blancs, one to two rosés, and two to three in the world where you can grow sauvignon Rhône blends of syrah, grenache, and mourvèblanc, pinot noir, and syrah in a 20-mile radius dre, including the annual “Seven” blend and be world-class.” (named after the seven sourced vineyards As they dove deeper into winemaking and and the seven family members who toil on grape growing — Sparks-Gillis for Demetria the project) and “MJM” (a signature bottling and Sine Qua Non, Dragonette for Fiddlehead named after their wives’ first initials). Those and Coastal Vineyard Care — they launched latter wines reveal how tight-knit the project their own label with the help of John’s brother, really is, as Sparks-Gillis explained, “Our famiSteve, making their first barrel in a Hermosa lies are hands-on every step of the way.” Beach garage. By 2008, Dragonette Cellars was With their own vineyard a far-off goal, a full-time gig in a warehouse on the western Dragonette Cellars remains on the hunt for outskirts of Lompoc that they shared with new opportunities, as well, such as its recent Ampelos Cellars. But it wasn’t until earlier this deal for fruit atop the highest ridge of Radian year that the Dragonette team took their most Vineyard, a wind-battered patch of diatomacourageous leap yet: signing a lease on their ceous earth located next to Lompoc. “It looks very own winery, an 8,000-square-foot facility like the moon,” said Dragonette, and it only on a dead-end road in Buellton, next to a busyields about three-quarter ton an acre, about tling auto body shop and within the same thick half of many other high-quality pinot blocks concrete walls that once housed such historic in the region, making for just 50 cases. “It’s our efforts as Sanford Winery and Zaca Mesa. wine-geek wine.” “We’re right in the middle of it all,” said From such tiny bottlings to the barrel-aged John Dragonette, whose new location is censauv blancs, reliably fresh pinots, and tantaliztrally located from the various vineyards they ing Rhône blends, the Dragonette portfolio source for their wines. And those vineyards is as exciting, flavorful, and well-considered are the key to Dragonette’s soaring success, as as anything going on in the Santa Ynez Valley the team has slowly built strong relationships right now. So does the new spot mean that with properties of distinction, from Vogelzang they will be producing more wine in the future and Grassini in Happy Canyon (where they to keep up with the high demand? Said Sparksget a lot of sauv blanc) to Stolpman in Ballard Gillis,“Time will tell.” Canyon and Thompson in Los Alamos (syrah) to La Encantada, Sebastiano, and Zotovich in Dragonette Cellars is the the Sta. Rita Hills (pinot). The Dragonette team featured winery at the stays as intimately involved with the farming July 10 BYOB sauvignon blanc dinner at as with the winemaking, and the arrangements Max’s Cucina. See maxsrestaurant sb.com. Dragonette’s tasting room is tend to be handshake deals, said Dragonette, located at 2445 Alamo Pintado Avenue explaining that mutual trust and respect are in Los Olivos. Call 693-0077 or see what counts.“In reality, [vineyard contracts] dragonettecellars.com. are only as good as the relationship you have

PAUL WELLMAN

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HITCHCOCK

EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COMM

T WO PROFESSORS TALK

L I F E PAGE 55

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES KICKS OFF SUMMER FILM SERIES

T

IS BACK ! BASH

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

THE MICROPHONES

COMMUNITY DANCE SHOWCASE RETURNS THIS FALL

When the Santa Barbara Dance Alliance replaced long-running annual social dance showcase BASSH (Ballroom, Argentine Tango, Swing, Salsa and Hip-Hop) with the new-and-improved Synergy showcase earlier this year, some dancers weren’t so pleased. So, Santa Barbara’s community dancers are independently bringing BASH! back this fall — albeit with a slightly reworked name. The new showcase won’t take place until September 27-28, but the fundraising starts now. The organization will hold a benefit this Saturday, July 6, at 6 p.m. at the Santa Barbara Dance Center (-A W. Canon Perdido St.). Featuring performances, prizes, and silent auctions, the event will mark the dancers’ community participation coming full circle. “If you want to be a dancer and you want to perform, you can,” said BASH! production team member Derrick Curtis. Apparently, that approach also applies to preserving what you believe in. For more info, call — Caitlin Kelley 899-2901.

Phil Elverum’s light, out-of-tune singing on the opening track of The Microphones’ 2000 cult classic It Was Hot, We Stayed in the Water is initially distracting, but then it becomes obvious that it’s an artistic choice made in the name of playing with sound. The album gets progressively more experimental as it moves along, with the induction of police sirens, a recorder, and even the ambient noise of whirring wind. All of these unconventional sounds seem to come from left and right — literally, the panning techniques are a screwy delight. The tracks themselves are loosely woven together, as exemplified by the 11-minute epic “The Glow,” which enacts stream-of-consciousness meanderings in the forms of cultish harmonizing, the white noise of an organ note held for too long, and the muffled dissipation of the song’s protracted finish. Thirteen years later, it’s uncanny that It Was Hot still sounds so fresh. — CK

GLOBETROTTING: Stan Hoffman reprises his role as Prospero in Lit Moon’s The Tempest.

DAVID BAZEMORE

wo Al Als, l you might i h say, taught h us how h to love Hitchcock. That is, two men, both visiting professors and both named Al have consecutively held down a rather randomly conceived and unofficial post as summer instructors at UCSB’s film studies department, where they teach a deep appreciation for and hearty explication of the great English director, who did so much of his best work here. Both Als, who have never met, approve heartily of UCSB Arts & Lectures’ upcoming summer film series, Alfred Hitchcock Nights: Eight Classic Films of Obsession, Mystery and Suspense, which kicks off this week. They agree the lineup is great.“It’s a really good selection of the central films,” said Al LaValley, the original Al, who taught at UCSB from the mid-1970s though the late ’90s. “These really are the most psychologically rich of his films,” LOOKY-LOO: James Stewart stars in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window. he added, noting that Vertigo, the opening and possibly the most psychologically tortured of Hitchcock’s movies, “I wish they were showing The Trouble with Harry,” said Al the was often considered the director’s take on his own narcissistic Elder, who loves it when Hitch mixes humor with macabre. Neither moviemaking tendencies. is complaining loud, mind; they separately agreed that A&L’s picks A week later we see Rear Window, which offers us a voyeuristic are all audience-pleasers. feast on a variety of erotic and romantic psychologies, and then the “If I could be there,” said LaValley, now semi-retired in Oklahoma, show dips into Psycho, just to prove Al isn’t lying. We’ll also see The “I would love to introduce Rear Window. It’s great because it’s really Birds — which may be a little more apocalyptic than psychoanalytic. two movies; it’s a romantic-comedy movie when the blinds are The series also brings middle-period Hitch-in-Hollywood classics, drawn and another movie altogether whenever the blinds are up.” like the sexy American identity thriller North by Northwest, the one Arts & Lectures presents Alfred Hitchcock Nights: Eight Classic currently favored by Early Al. The other Al, Allan Langdale, leans Films of Obsession, Mystery and Suspense starting this Wednesday, toward the final film, Strangers on a Train, for revealing Hitchcock’s July 3, with Vertigo. darling trope — doubling. All films screen “I teach a class called Theory Through Hitchcock and Hitchcock Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. Through Theory because I love all that mirroring he does,” he said, at UCSB’s Campbell IT WAS HOT, WE STAYED IN THE WATER (RE-ISSUE) citing Stranger on a Train’s evil twins, tennis player (Farley Granger) Hall and Fridays at 8:30 and creep (Robert Walker) as crisscross murderers that reflect (so to p.m. at the Courthouse speak) Hitchcock’s view of the dark side always being near us. Sunken Gardens. Both Als wish the series had something from their favorites For a full list of films, list. “I wish there was something from the early British period,” call 893-3535 or visit said Langdale, who thinks films like The  Steps help inform our artsandlectures.sa.ucsb — D.J. Palladino understanding of Hitchcock’s later films. .edu.

HAVE

SHAKESPEARE,

WILL TRAVEL LIT MOON THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS THE TEMPEST

For John Blondell, 2012 was an extraordinary year. And midway through 2013, this globe-trotting scholar and director is showing no signs of slowing down. Last June, Blondell directed a Macedonian company, the National Theatre of Bitola, in Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part . The invitation came from Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London, and it involved becoming part of a world Shakespeare festival created to accompany the 2012 Summer Olympics. The three parts of the Henry VI cycle were each undertaken by a company from one of the Balkan states. Part  was performed in Serbian; Part  in Albanian; and Part , directed by Blondell, would be in Macedonian. When the dust cleared from this extraordinarily ambitious undertaking by the Globe, Blondell and the troupe from Bitola emerged triumphant. The Guardian proclaimed Blondell’s staging was “the first to capture the brutality of war … but also the nuances of the individual characters.” Undoubtedly this amazing feat reflects Blondell’s years of preparation, as he has devoted much of the last two decades to studying and performing Shakespeare on an international level. Back in Santa Barbara, Blondell is currently preparing a version of The Tempest with his own Lit Moon Theatre Company, with the goal of making something he can tour in the Balkans this summer. On Sunday, July 7, fans of the physical, fast-paced, and highly inventive Lit Moon approach can check out the fruits of Blondell’s labors at Center Stage Theater ( Paseo Nuevo) on Sunday, July 7, at 7 p.m. For more information, visit litmoon.com. For tickets, call 963-0408 or visit centerstagetheater.org. — Charles Donelan

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > >


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a&e | ART REVIEW

AMATEUR AND PROFESSIONAL BBQ GRILLERS WANTED! ENTER BBQ COOKOFF FOR 4BSB BBQ, BREWS, BIKES & BLUES

TRAVELIN’ MAN: Sherrie Chavez’s “The Traveler” is just one of many student works included in W. Dibblee Hoyt: Far Reaches, on display now at Channing Peake Gallery.

North County Moments W. Dibblee Hoyt: Far Reaches. At Channing Peake Gallery in the Santa Barbara County Administration Building. Shows through September 20. Reviewed by Charles Donelan

H

ow far do you have to travel to discover the romance of the Old West? If this show of wonderful photos by W. Dibblee Hoyt and his students from Allan Hancock College is any indication, the answer is no farther than Lompoc — if you know where to look. Hoyt began taking pictures on the San Julian Ranch he calls home several decades ago, riding out with the cowboys and sinking his camera deep into the life of the cattlemen as they herd, rope, and brand the animals that graze in the wilds of Gaviota. Like the land out of which it grew, Hoyt’s practice bore fruit, and the series of unforgettable, mostly black-and-white images that he created over the years became known throughout the North County. When he was approached by Allan Hancock College to teach, Hoyt accepted in the same humble spirit with which he followed his cattlemen, and the result was a full-on school of Dibblee, trained to get the shot even when the going was tough. In this innovative and satisfying exhibition, curator Brett Leigh Dicks has brought together the best of Hoyt’s work with representative samples of photos taken by his Allan Hancock students. The show’s title, Far Reaches, reflects not only the distances Hoyt traveled in pursuit of his art — one set of images comes from a 1988 trip to the former Soviet Union — but also the far reach of the man as a teacher. And although they are all distinct and idiosyncratic in their styles, his students each indicate in some way what has been passed down to them through their interaction with this master of the lens. In “The Traveler” from 2009, Sherrie Chavez uses heaps of negative space and a set of iconic elements to create a portrait that’s as genuine and deeply rooted as a Hank Williams song: It’s after dark, and a lone cowboy sits waiting on an empty train platform in the dark, with only his hat and his guitar to pick up the available light and give him shape in the gloom. It’s clear that Chavez learned something about how to isolate and inflect the essence of a man from Hoyt, who has a knack for discovering untold truths from unexpected angles. Any doubts about who knows cowboys best are laid to rest with Hoyt’s own iconic image of Rancho San Julian’s Jim Poett (also husband of Independent Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge) branding a calf. Before you go all soft with sympathy for this poor animal — I know, I know, it’s barbaric — consider for a moment that this 1997 shot captures, with its bold sculptural arrangement of diagonal forces, a practice that has been part of life in this area since before the Gold Rush and that continues to be upheld in an era when much more inhumane methods of raising cattle have become the norm. The picture has all the well-worn integrity of an old tool and provides a similar satisfaction to those who can see its fundamental worth. Elsewhere in the show, the craft that Hoyt teaches appears through kindred approaches to abstraction. Cathy Gregg’s landscapes crackle with the same energy as the action shots, and Phyllis Daniels’s “Eucalyptus Swirl” (2006) spins a fine country tale out of contrasting shades of wood. The command of diagonals so evident in Hoyt’s ranch shots even invades Debbie Fuller’s brilliantly cropped image of kayaks in the Santa Barbara harbor — a far reach indeed for the influence of this talented artist and mentor.

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57


DAVID BAZEMORE

a&e | CLASSICAL REVIEW

BEST OF THE FEST: The Music Academy of the West’s Academy fellows performed as part of the ongoing Summer Festival.

Old Music in New Bottles Music Academy of the West Festival Orchestra, featuring Bernard Labadie. At the Music Academy of the West’s Hahn Hall, Saturday, June 29. Review by Joseph Miller

B

ernard Labadie’s interest is, in his own words,“old music.” The Canadian conductor is founder and director of two renowned early-music ensembles, the chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy and its complementary choir La Chapelle de Québec. Saturday night, in a performance that completed the second week of the Music Academy of the West’s Summer Festival, Labadie directed 65 Academy fellows in a historically informed approach to 18thcentury music. In his opening remarks, Labadie made clear that changing style and relearning technique was often difficult for professional players, let alone young student musicians, but that the Academy fellows had met the challenge admirably. Early-music technique includes minimal use of vibrato and short, light phrasing. Straight tones render a less complex ensemble sound, and short phrases with slight sustain create openness of texture and enhanced rhythmic vitality that are ideal for dance music. And dance music there was. The first half of this concert consisted entirely of movements from the ballet score Don Juan (1761) by Christoph Willibald Gluck, a work that is played and recorded infrequently these days, but which served a pivotal historical role in the defining of ballet as an independent art form. Early opera combined voice and dance, but Don Juan proved the viability of drama performed with movement only, and thus the new genre took root. Don Juan was well known to Mozart, according to Labadie, and quoted in The Marriage of Figaro. And although the trombone at that time had been reserved for rites of the court and church, Gluck was bold to write prominent trombone lines into the climactic movement of Don Juan’s death and damnation, thus setting the instrument on a historical slide (so to speak) into the secular arts. Saturday’s performance by this select group of Academy fellows proved Gluck’s rich imagination and gifts for orchestration. The 45-minute suite of nearly 30 movements did give the feeling, at times, of an iTunes album sampler — rifling through very short movements, only a minute or so in length, and leaving the listener to survey rather than settle in. But the range of the survey was vast, from the lyric serenade of oboe accompanied by spare pizzicato strings, to the vigorous Vivaldi-like swirl of thick textures in the final movements. Maestro Labadie was at one with the mind of this music, guiding the orchestra through sudden dramatic contrasts in tempo and volume, and unisons that shattered into division. The second half of the concert began with Mozart’s short but brilliant “Overture to La clemenza di Tito” (1791). The master, at the peak of his powers, could cover a lot of territory in five minutes, and this performance enhanced the overture’s distinguishing features — woodwind dialogues, a passage in canon form, a dramatically thick development section, and the rocking timpani. The program’s final work, nearly contemporary with the “Overture,” was the Symphony No.  in D Major, “The Clock” (1793-94), by Mozart’s good friend and colleague Joseph Haydn. The extended exposition of the symphony gave a satisfying grounding to the program. Academy fellows seemed especially in sync with Labadie’s shaping of phrases and swelling dynamics. The folkinspired third movement was gilded by flutist Seungmin Oh’s fine solo. All stops were pulled out for the vivace, with its dizzying scales in the strings, its flirting with fugue, and its punctuated brass downbeats. The audience wasted no time ■ rising to their feet in applause.

58

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a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ REVIEWS

Smoking-Hot Nights Damian and Stephen Marley. At the Santa Barbara Bowl, Saturday, June 29. Reviewed by Ethan Stewart

S

PAUL WELLMAN

ome things are just meant to be. Ask virtually anyone who attended the Santa Barbara Bowl Saturday evening about their experience, and you can bet your last Sacagawea dollar that they will smile wide and offer something BROTHERLY LOVE: Damian (left) and along the lines of Stephen Marley carry on their father’s musical “Great show. Such legend. good vibes.” Saturday was a dictionary-definition hot summer day with an accordingly balmy night, and it provided a serendipitously sublime backdrop for reggae music to return to our beloved open-air amphitheater, providing a muchneeded dose of good times in what has thus far been a lackluster Bowl season. An almost sold-out and mostly stoned audience of familiar faces was on hand to soak in the scene and be transported by the sounds of Bob Marley’s children and grandchildren (almost all of them decked out in head-to-toe denim) as they took to the stage that their late, great family patriarch so famously performed upon decades ago. From surprise performer Julian Marley and headliners Damian “Jr. Gong” and Stephen Marley to less advertised guests like Chris Ellis (son of rock-steady legend Alton Ellis) and Wayne Marshall, it was a full-spectrum reggae celebration, from roots music to dancehall stylings and beyond. Really, the show had everything you would hope for from such a billing. There was the ever-present flag waver onstage; there were classically covered and impressively reimagined Bob tunes (see: Stephen’s soulful rendition of “Pimper’s Paradise” and the full-family jam-out of “Could You Be Loved”); there was a duo of female backup singers who brought soul and infectious energy; there were countless beautiful people in shockingly little clothing; and there was just the right amount of Stephen’s and Damian’s personal hits peppered throughout to ensure that the Marley family legacy continues to grow and live ■ on.

Shifting Visions Robert Plant & The Sensational Space Shifters. At the Santa Barbara Bowl, Friday, June 28. Reviewed by Caitlin Kelley

B

eholding a legend in person is the realization of fantasy into reality. It’s validation that the subject of your imagination is a real person who has cohabited the same planet throughout your exponentially less significant existence. As the frontman for Led Zeppelin, Robert Plant was the kind of legend both shrouded in mysticism and revered as a rock god archetype. Surely, that’s a tough act to follow, even if that act is his former self. Onstage Friday night with The Sensational Space Shifters, Plant was no longer the man with the exposed chest and embroidered bell-bottoms. Instead, he wore a sharp, black button-up, juxtaposing himself with his youthful counterpart on the poster overlooking the Bowl. Plant clearly did not directly follow in his own footsteps either. Drawing from a selection of Zeppelin classics and solo hits — as well as a sprinkling of new songs, like “Tin Pan Valley”— he reimagined well-worn tunes into something old, new, borrowed, and blues-y. This fraction of his musical catalogue became a marriage of sounds ranging from trance beats to Mississippi Delta blues to the riti (single-string fiddle) of Gambian musician Juldeh Camara. In one instance, the band eased into the traditional stylization of “Whole Lotta Love,” complete with the arena-piercing slide guitar and Plant’s characteristic high-pitched rasp, before mutating the song into a fiddle-centric jam spliced with fragments of Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love?” Later, Plant jokingly referred to the band as the “Easy Sensational Soft Rock Shifters,” displaying the kind of self-awareness that keeps his show and his sound fresh all these ■ years later.

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CARA ROBBINS

a&e | POSITIVELY STATE STREET

DIVE IN: Beat the summer heat with a poolside set from Pure Bathing Culture on July 3.

POOL-PARTY MONSTERS by Aly Comingore THE HEAT IS ON: This week marks the start of what I affectionately call “grillin’ and chillin’ season.” It’s that extra special stretch of summer when popsicles and pools are hot commodities, short shorts and sunnies are the uniform of choice, and almost everything becomes an outdoor activity. Fitting, then, that this week also marks the start of what just might be the best new addition to the summer music scene: the Ojai Rancho Inn Summer Concert Series. Since losing their lease on State Street’s Presidio Motel, Shelter Social Club proprietors Chris Sewell and Kenny Osehan have headed over the hill to Ojai, where they now run and manage the Ojai Rancho Inn. The property itself is a total score:  rooms, a pool, a sauna, BBQ pits, mulberry trees, and an expansive pool house and picnic zone. In short, the place is begging for a party. That’s where the fun comes in. Starting this Wednesday, July 3, Shelter Social Club is teaming up with a slew of music-philes — S.B.’s Cool Summer Records, Warbler Records & Goods, KCSB, and L.A.’s Origami Vinyl and KXLU — to present a show a month on-site at the Rancho. The performances are family-friendly and kick off with a picnic and pool party. The tickets are cheap at just $12 a head. Oh, and the lineup is a killer mix of young and divergent bands that pair nicely with hot summer nights. First up: Portland’s Pure Bathing Culture. If you’ve yet to hear these guys, this opportunity couldn’t be riper. Led by frontwoman Sarah Versprille and guitarist Daniel Hindman, the band offers up a breezy sound that’s part Fleetwood Mac dreaminess, part yacht-rock smooth grooves, and part hazy psychedelic pop. Currently, PBC only have a (glorious) four-song EP to their name, but they’re slated to drop their debut LP, fittingly titled Moon Tides, this August on Partisan Records. Add to that the warm-up act, a dancey side project from S.B.’s own Gardens & Villa called Monitor Blizzard, and you’ve got the makings for a pool party like no other. And the fun just keeps on coming. Next month, the Ojai Rancho will host dance pop artist Nite Jewel, and September brings Los Angeles hard-rock experimentalists No Age. All shows start at 8 p.m. Doors (and pool) open at 4 p.m. The Ojai Rancho Inn is located at  West Ojai Avenue, Ojai. Visit coolsummerpresents.com for tickets, or purchase by cash at Warbler Records & Goods ( E. De la Guerra St.).

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FIREWORK IT: Also this week, Seven Bar & Kitchen opens up its doors for two can’t-miss live-music events. On Thursday, July 4, they’ll host a postfireworks DJ set by Santa Barbara’s own Empty Priest. Then on Thursday, July 11, Seven welcomes back Portland electronic pop act Wild Ones, who will split the bill with Brooklynites My Body. Both shows are free and start at 9 p.m. Must be 21+ to attend. Seven Bar & Kitchen is located at  Helena Avenue. ■ For information on both events, call 845-0377.

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a&e | FILM REVIEWS

The View from Behind 20 Feet from Stardom. A documentary

written and directed by Morgan Neville.

Reviewed by D.J. Palladino

T

ouches of genius dot this delight-packed documentary concerning the fate of those nearly invisible indispensables, mostly African-American women who sing the “oohs” and “la las” behind the stars, often turning pop ditties into symphonic flights. Some of the fun is almost offhand: In one scene, while the narrator discusses the unsatisfying ultimate plight of backup singers trying out solo careers, the camera shows us a bough on which three birds sit, one apart from the others. The bird flies off, followed by a series of shots of giant wheeling flocks in the sky circling in weird combinations of random movement and cosmic order. It’s almost subliminal, but that’s how thoroughly considered this movie feels. Maybe it seems a trivial topic, but it turns into a complicated meditation on bliss and fame. The best part, of course, is the footage of singers like Merry Clayton, Darlene Love, and Tata Vega performing while chronicling the time and place where rock music — which one of the singers claims sets her free — rose from gospel and R&B revues like James Brown’s and Ike Turner’s. Complex, interesting testimony comes from the mouths of the stars these women supported — Bruce Springsteen, Sting, and Mick Jagger all give appreciative

UNSUNG HEROES: Turning the spotlight on backup singers like Merry Clayton (above), documentary 20 Feet from Stardom is a complicated meditation on bliss and fame. and surprisingly sober estimations of life behind the “talent.” Like an editor or a ghost writer, it’s a job that demands crazy skills, yet forbids recognition if done right. But the documentary’s most powerful moments include newsworthy revelations, like the story of Darlene Love recording “He’s a Rebel” only to lose credit to The Crystals. If it sounds like a bummer, it’s only momentary disharmonies. Several times these under-credited divas argue that a life of song, or, as one of them puts it, to have your days shaped by melody, is a kind of spiritual victory. And singing onstage with Jagger or David Byrne in Carnegie ■ Hall doesn’t seem completely tragic either.

Badass Good Cop The Heat. Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy star in a film written by Katie Dippold and directed by Paul Feig. Reviewed by Josef Woodard

I

n this surprisingly deft and laugh-fueled summer romp, the gags and genre tics are mostly the same, but the gender has changed, to deflect the presumed innocence of the fairer sex. Yes, it’s the old odd-coupling buddy yarn once again, with the fresh angle being the presence of two women, each kick-ass in her own special way. In one corner, we have the comic force of nature that is Melissa McCarthy, with her volatile and jumbo talent, in fine — which is to say “rough”— form. Here she is wicked funny as the foul-mouthed Boston PD detective with a refrigerator stocked with firearms and a mouth ever ready with killing insults or virtuosic obscenities. Sandra Bullock is the pantsuit-wearing Yale graduate seeking a promotion at the Bureau, slightly clumsy and by-the-bookish, who gets her man, dead or alive, and eventually learns the art of cussing thanks to her new partner. Female power, as well as empowerment, is woven into the film, including the work of its makers, first-time screenwriter Katie Dippold, of TV’s Parks and Recreation fame, and director Paul Feig, whose Bridesmaids was a sneaky, snarky feel-good hit of its season (also blessed with the McCarthy factor). The plot of The Heat? It’s something about an FBI agent and Boston cop’s search for a mysterious and especially brutal drug lord. But what matters more than storyboard or genre is the crackling — and occasionally warm and fuzzy — screen presence of the principals. There are multiple scenes worth bookmarking in our movie-brain databases, including the drunken evening in a squalid bar, an improvised emergency procedure in a Denny’s, and a wacky family dinner with a working-class Boston family, complete with translational difficulties and the pronunciation of “narc.”

FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH: Reassigned by Bridesmaids director Paul Feig, Melissa McCarthy (left) finds herself partnered up with Sandra Bullock for the buddy-cop comedy The Heat. Actually, one of the disappointments is the lack of goofball and gaffe-ish outtakes in the end credits. Throughout the film we get the feeling that McCarthy’s improvisational heat on-set is such that she routinely heads off-script and arouses laughter from her coworkers. Then again, outtakes would have pulled the fourth curtain and detracted from the sisterly love of these characters, who may be meeting in sequel land before long. This bloody funny pair is onto ■ something good and bad.

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a&e | FILM

FRENCH IMPRESSIONS: In Renoir, Michel Bouquet plays the artist, whose son returns home after being wounded in the war.

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Edited by Aly Comingore The following films are playing in Santa Barbara WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, THROUGH THURSDAY, JULY 11. Descriptions followed by initials — DJP (D.J. Palladino), JW (Josef Woodard) — have been taken from our critics’ reviews, which can be read in full at independent.com. The symbol ✯ indicates the film is recommended.

FIRST LOOKS ✯ 20 Feet from Stardom

(90 mins.; PG-13: some strong language, sexual material) Reviewed on page 65. Plaza de Oro

✯ The Heat (117 mins.; R: pervasive language, strong crude content, some violence) Reviewed on page 65. Camino Real/Fiesta 5/Metro 4

✯ White House Down (131 mins.; PG-13: prolonged sequences of action and violence, intense gunfire and explosions, some language, brief sexual image)

By now, Roland Emmerich’s obsession with destroying the White House probably ought to be investigated. And while you’re at it, NSA people, may I recommend finding out how his spies got this script to be so note-for-note similar to last spring’s D.C. debacle, Olympus Has Fallen — even the weirdly similar titles seem stolen. Both have plot reversals, secret-nemesis dudes, stolen daughters, nuclear launch codes, and helicopters. If our government could snoop like these screenwriters, we wouldn’t need Prism. Of the two movies, though, White House Down is the better funhouse, even if it’s slower getting off the ground. Emmerich, who is inarguably the greatest living genius at making clichés sing, gets in all the goods: bad guys as terrible marksmen, family is more important than anything, and any object in a pocket can always stop bullets. And then there’s Channing Tatum, our greatest acting dancer since Fred Astaire. All you really need to know about this movie, though, is that Jamie Foxx basically plays Barack Obama as a peacemaker who knows how to shoot an RPG from a moving Hummer. That and the car chase on the White House lawn is likely the most preposterously satisfying spectacle you will see all summer. (DJP) Arlington/Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

for our nd AnnuAl silver shAker competition this fA f ll!

.

Movie Guide

PREMIERES Despicable Me 2 (98 mins.; PG: rude humor, mild action)

Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) is recruited to help deal with a powerful new super criminal. Fairview (2-D and 3-D)/ Fiesta 5 (2-D and 3-D)/ Metro 4 (2-D)

Grown Ups 2 (101 mins.; PG-13: crude and suggestive content, language, some male nudity)

Lenny (Adam Sandler) moves back to his hometown to be closer with his friends and learns quickly that some things never change. Starts Thu., July 11, Camino Real/Metro 4

The Kings of Summer (95 mins.; R: language, some teen drinking)

Three teenage friends decide to spend their summer building a house in the woods. Starts Fri., July 5, Riviera The Lone Ranger (149 mins.; PG-13: sequences of intense action and violence, some suggestive material)

Tonto (Johnny Depp) recounts the story of legendary man of justice John Reid (Armie Hammer). Gore Verbinski directs. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Pacific Rim (131 mins.; PG-13: sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence throughout, brief language)

Following an alien attack on Earth, humans deploy giant robots to fight back. Starts Thu., July 11, Arlington (2-D)/ Camino Real (2- D)

SCREENINGS Renoir (111 mins.; R: sequences of artrelated nudity, brief language)

The son of the famed painter returns home after being wounded in World War I. The best part of this poky little film is its gratuitous beauty. It’s worth soaking in, though, even if it’s not equal to the figures in the portrait. (DJP) Sat.-Sun., July 6-7, 4:30pm, Ojai Playhouse, 145 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai

Happy Feet Two (100 mins.; PG: some rude humor, mild peril)

Dancing penguin Mumble can’t compete with his son’s new role model. But when mighty forces shake the penguin world, it’s Mumble who must rally the troops to set things right. George Miller’s second dancing-penguin flick is full of CGI beauty, but the characters are hard to take in long sittings, and the plot is watered down. Simply put, kids deserve more. (DJP) Tue., July 9, 10am, Paseo Nuevo

Rear Window (112 mins.; PG: themes, mild peril)

A wheelchair-bound photographer (James Stewart) spies on his neighbors, one of whom he believes to be a murderer.


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THRILLING

EVERYBODY, YEAH: Seth Rogen (with glasses) and friends face the ultimate disaster in This Is the End. Screens as part of UCSB Arts & Lectures’ Alfred Hitchcock Nights: Eight Classic Films of Obsession, Mystery and Suspense film series. Wed., July 10, 7:30pm, UCSB’s Campbell Hall

Vertigo (128 mins.; PG: some violence, sensuality, thematic elements)

A retired detective with acrophobia investigates the strange activities of his old friend’s younger wife. Screens as part of UCSB Arts & Lectures’ Alfred Hitchcock Nights: Eight Classic Films of Obsession, Mystery and Suspense film series. Wed., July 3, 7:30pm, UCSB’s Campbell Hall; Fri., July 5, 8:30pm, Santa Barbara Courthouse Sunken Gardens, 1100 Anacapa St.

NOW SHOWING

Monsters University (107 mins.; G) The Monsters, Inc. cast returns for this prequel, which looks at the relationship between Mike and Sulley before they were friends. This studio used to consistently wow us with sheer originality, but most of the plot of Monsters U feels vaguely animated by Animal House and Revenge of the Nerds. (DJP) Fairview (2-D)/Fiesta 5 (2-D)

✯ Much Ado About Nothing (107 mins.; PG-13: some sexuality, brief drug use)

Not only do the actors do justice to the text (a prose-y play dotted with witty exchanges); they actually commit it to brilliant black-and-white cinema. The whole experience is high-and-low delicious. (DJP) Ends Thu., July 4, Riviera Now You See Me (116 mins.; PG-13: lan-

✯ The Attack (102 mins.; R: some violent

guage, some action, sexual content)

images, language, brief sexuality)

An FBI agent and a detective team up to catch a group of magicians who use their skills to rob banks and then give their audiences the money. The problem with this gaudy, over-promoted film is that it misses the most important part of what magic really should provide: the payoff. (DJP) Fiesta 5

An Arab surgeon in Tel Aviv uncovers some dark secrets after his wife falls victim to a terrorist bombing. The Attack is carefully crafted to the point of manipulation, yet it sheds a strange new light on a struggle that is always in danger of becoming old news. (DJP)

The The Independent Independent is is now now on on

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Thu.-Sun., July 4-7, Plaza de Oro

✯ Before Midnight (109 mins.; R: sexual content/nudity, language)

✯ This Is the End (107 mins.; R: teen drug and alcohol use, language, including some brief sexual references)

It’s been almost two decades since Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) met on a train to Vienna. Here, we remeet them nine years into their stay in Greece. Midnight is a day in the life of a life-locked couple that magically blends a feeling of improvisation and structural parameters. (JW) Plaza de Oro

Seth Rogen, as cowriter, star, and project maker, takes the Apatow formula to a logical endgame, in a sometimes wickedly funny and sometimes creepy tale of self-absorbed Hollywood bad boys playing themselves faced with the day-ruining arrival of the Biblical End Times. (JW)

Man of Steel (143 mins.; PG-13: intense

✯ World War Z (116 mins.; PG-13: intense

sequences of sci-fi violence, action, destruction, some language)

frightening zombie sequences, violence, disturbing images)

A young wanderer must confront his secret alien heritage and superhuman powers when the Earth is invaded by extraterrestrials. It’s fun and actionpacked, but Man of Steel also feels a little crazy, jumpy, and surreal. (DJP)

A UN employee (Brad Pitt) races against time to stop a zombie army that’s overtaking the human race. An adrenaline-pumping and somehow fun-loving adventure, World War Z is a big-budget B movie with stunning action sequences and a high creep factor. (JW) Camino Real (2- D)/

Camino Real (2- D)/Metro 4 (2-D)

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

@sbindependent #sbindy #sceneinsb

Metro 4 (2-D)/Paseo Nuevo (2-D)

july 3, 2013

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a&e | ROB BREZSNY’S FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF JULY  ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21 - Apr. 19): In his book The Fisher King and the Handless Maiden, Robert Johnson says many of us are as much in debt with our psychic energy as we are with our financial life. We work too hard. We rarely refresh ourselves with silence and slowness and peace. We don’t get enough sleep or good food or exposure to nature. And so we’re routinely using up more of our reserves than we are able to replenish. We’re chronically running a deficit. “It is genius to store energy,” says Johnson. He recommends creating a plan to save it up so that you always have more than enough to draw on when an unexpected opportunity arrives. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make this a habit, Aries.

(June 21 - July 22): Thomas Gray was a renowned 18thcentury English poet best remembered for his “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.” It was a short poem — only 986 words, which is less than the length of this horoscope column. On the other hand, it took him seven years to write it, or an average of 12 words per month. I suspect that you are embarking on a labor of love that will evolve at a gradual pace, too, Cancerian. It might not occupy you for seven years, but it will probably take longer than you imagine. And yet, that’s exactly how long it should take. This is a character-building, life-defining project that can’t and shouldn’t be rushed.

(Sept. 23 - Oct. 22): Summing up his experiment in living at Walden Pond, naturalist Henry David Thoreau said this: “I learned that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws will be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings.” Given the astrological factors that will be impacting your life in the next 12 months, Libra, you might consider adopting this philosophy as your own.

TAURUS

(July 23 - Aug. 22): The 18th-century German philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg accepted the possibility that some humans have the power of clairvoyance.“The ‘second sight’ possessed by the Highlanders in Scotland is actually a foreknowledge of future events,” he wrote.“I believe they possess this gift because they don’t wear trousers. That is also why in all countries women are more prone to utter prophecies.” I bring this to your attention, Leo, because I believe that in the coming weeks you’re likely to catch accurate glimpses of what’s to come — especially when you’re not wearing pants.

(Apr. 20 - May 20): In the course of your long life, I estimate you will come up with approximately 60,000 really good ideas. Some of these are small, like those that help you decide how to spend your weekend. Some are big ones, like those that reveal the best place for you to live. As your destiny unfolds, you go through phases when you have fewer good ideas than average, and other phases when you’re overflowing with them. The period you’re in right now is one of the latter. You are a fountain of bright notions, intuitive insights, and fresh perspectives. Take advantage of the abundance, Taurus. Solve as many riddles and dilemmas as you can.

GEMINI (May 21 - June 20): No one knows the scientific reasons why long-distance runners sometimes get a “second wind.” Nonetheless, such a thing exists. It allows athletes to resume their peak efforts after seemingly having reached a point of exhaustion. According to my reading of the astrological omens, a metaphorical version of this happy event will occur for you sometime soon, Gemini. You made a good beginning but have been flagging a bit of late. Any minute now, though, I expect you will get your second wind. Homework: Where’s the place you’re half-afraid to travel to even though you know it would change your life for the better? Write Freewillastrology.com.

LEO

VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22): Were you nurtured well by caring adults in the first year of your life? If so, I bet you now have the capacity to fix whatever’s ailing your tribe or posse. You could offer some inspiration that will renew everyone’s motivation to work together. You might improve the group communication as you strengthen the foundation that supports you all. And what about if you were NOT given an abundance of tender love as a young child? I think you will still have the power to raise your crew’s mood, but you may end up kicking a few butts along the way.

SCORPIO

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19): It’s Grease Week — a time when you need to make sure everything is as well-oiled as possible. Does your car need a quart of Castrol? Is it time to bring more extra virgin olive oil into your kitchen? Do you have any K-Y Jelly in your nightstand, just in case? Are there creaky doors or stuck screws or squeaky wheels that could use some WD-? Be liberal with the lubrication, Capricorn — both literally and metaphorically. You need smooth procedures and natural transitions.

(Oct. 23 - Nov. 21): Thirteen thousand years ago, lions and mammoths and camels roamed parts of North America. But along with many other large beasts, they ultimately became extinct. Possible explanations for their demise include climate change and over-hunting by humans. In recent years a group of biologists has proposed a plan to repopulate the western part of the continent with similar species. They call their idea “rewilding.” In the coming months, Scorpio, I suggest you consider a re-wilding program of your own. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you reinvigorate your connection to the raw, primal aspects of both your own nature and the great outdoors.

AQUARIUS

SAGITTARIUS

(Feb. 19 - Mar. 20): Like the legendary Most Interesting Man in the World who shills for Dos Equis beer, you will never step in gum on the sidewalk or lose a sock in the coming weeks. Your cereal will never get soggy; it’ll sit there, staying crispy, just for you. The pheromones you secrete will affect people miles away. You’ll have the power to pop open a pinata with the blink of your eye. If you take a Rorschach test, you’ll ace it. Ghosts will sit around campfires telling stories about you. Cafés and restaurants may name sandwiches after you. If you so choose, you’ll be able to live vicariously through yourself. You will give your guardian angel a sense of security.

(Nov. 22 - Dec. 21): Who was Russia’s greatest poet? Many critics say it was Alexander Pushkin, who lived in the 19th century. His abundant creativity was undoubtedly related to his unruly libido. By the time he was 31 years old, he’d had 112 lovers. But then he met his ultimate muse, the lovely and intelligent Natalya Goncharova, to whom he remained faithful. “Without you,” he wrote to her,“I would have been unhappy all my life.” I half-expect something comparable to happen for you in the next 10 months, Sagittarius. You may either find an unparalleled

(Jan. 20 - Feb. 18): Two years into the War of 1812, British soldiers invaded Washington, D.C. They set fire to the White House and other government buildings. The flames raged out of control, spreading in all directions. The entire city was in danger of burning. In the nick of time, a fierce storm hit, producing a tornado and heavy rains. Most of the fires were extinguished. Battered by the weather, the British army retreated. America’s capital was saved. I predict that you, Aquarius, will soon be the beneficiary of a somewhat less dramatic example of this series of events. Give thanks for the “lucky storm.”

PISCES

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at --- or ---.

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Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 july 3, 2013

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The Independent’s

After-School Activity Guide will publish August 15, 2013 FREE EDITORIAL LISTINGS! TO SUBMIT INFORMATION for a listing in the Independent’s 2013 After-School Guide, please complete the following questionnaire in an e-mail addressed to

backtoschool@independent.com by Friday, July 19th, at 2pm. IMPORTANT: Send all submissions to the “back to school” address above! Send completed questionnaires as text in the body of your email. No attachments. • • • • • • • •

Name of program or activity Host organization Description of activities (50 words max) Days, dates, times (& session info if applicable) Location & address Age range (or grade levels) of participants Cost Contact info (phone required, website optional)

IF YOUR ORGANIZATION HAS MULTIPLE CAMPS YOU WOULD LIKE LISTED, PLEASE COMPLETE A SEPARATE QUESTIONNAIRE FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL CAMP.

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To advertise, call 965-5205

or sales@Independent.com

Advertising deadline: Friday, August 9th


DINING GUIDE The Independent’s Dining Guide is a paid advertisement and is provided as a service to our readers. Restaurants are listed according to type of food served. Bon appétit! AVERAGE PRICE PER MEAL $  Up to $10 $$  $11-$15 $$$  $16-$25 $$$$  $26-Up

To advertise in   the Dining Guide, call 965-5208.

Californian

French

OPAL RESTAURANT & Bar 1325 State St. 966‑9676 $$.Open M‑S 11:‑ 30a & 7 nights 5p. V MC AE Local’s Favorite, Eclectic California Cuisine fuses creative influences from around the world with American Regional touches: Chile‑ Crusted Filet Mignon to Pan‑ Seared Fresh Fish & Seafood, Homemade Pastas, Gourmet Pizzas, Fresh baked Breads, Deliciously Imaginative Salads & Homemade Desserts. OPAL radiates a friendly, warm atmosphere graced by our fun efficient Service, Full bar, Martinis, Wine Spectator award‑winning wine list, private room. Lunches are affordable and equally delicious.

PACIFIC CREPES 705 Anacapa St. 882‑ 1123.OPEN Tues‑Fri 10a‑3p & 5:30p‑ 9p, Sat 9a‑9p, Sun 9a‑3p From the flags of Bretagne & France to the “Au revoir, a bientot”; experience an authentic French creperie. Delicious crepes, salads & soups for breakfast, lunch & dinner. Tasty Crepe Suzette or crepe flambee desserts. Specials incl. starter, entree & dessert. Homemade with the best fresh products. Relax, enjoy the ambience, the food & parler francais! Bon Appetit! pacificcrepe.com

PIERRE LAFOND Wine Bistro 516 State Street 962‑1455 $$ Open Every Day M‑F 11a‑9p Sat/ Sun 9a‑10p Brunch Sat/Sun 9a‑3p Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner. A local favorite since 1993. California cuisine showcasing the best local products. Steamed Mussels, Flatbreads, Grilled Duck Breast, Vegetarian dishes, Sherry Wine cake, Wines from around the world. Happy Hour Mon‑Sat 4:30‑6:30. Sidewalk patio. www.pierrelafond.com

Chinese American BEACHBREAK CAFE, 324 State St, 962‑2889. $ Open 7a‑2:30p 7 days a week. Covered outdoor patio on State. Great Breakfast & Lunch.

Bistro/Cafe JACK’S BISTRO & “FAMOUS BAGELS” 53 South Milpas (In Trader Joe’s Plaza) 564‑4331; 5050 Carpinteria Ave, Carpinteria 566‑1558. $ Extensive menu, beer & wine, on site catering ‑ Call Justen Alfama 805‑566‑1558 x4 Voted BEST BAGELS 16 years in a row! www.bagelnet.com

Cajun/Creole THE PALACE Grill, 8 E. Cota St., 963‑ 5000. $$$. Open 7 days, Lunch 11:30a‑ 3p, Dinner 5:30p, V MC AE. Contemporary American grill w/ a lively, high‑energy atmosphere & fun, spontaneous events. Featuring fine grilled steaks, fresh seafood, delicious pastas, select American Regional specialties, like Blackened Crawfish‑ stuffed Filet Mignon, Louisiana Bread Pudding Souffle. Cajun Martinis, unique beers & well selected wine list. Lunch starts early enough for a late breakfast & ends late enough for an early supper. Voted “Best Team Service” since 1988. Rave reviews in Gourmet Magazine, Gault‑Millau Travel Guide, Zagat & Sunset Magazine.

YEN CHING 2840 De La Vina St. 682‑ 7191 7 days/wk M‑Sun 11a‑9p, ALL YOU CAN EAT Buffet: Lunch M‑F 11‑2 Sat & Sun Lunch 11‑2:30, Dinner Buffet 5:10‑8:30 incl all you can eat steak, shrimp & crab legs‑ Discounts for kids. Owner /Chef Joe Tzeng‑ Master Chef 25+yrs serving traditional Mandarin & Szechuan delicacies. All day take out‑ FREE delivery after 5pm

Coffee Houses SB COFFEE Roasting Company 321 Motor Way SB 962‑5213– NOW WITH FREE WI‑FI! Santa Barbara’s premiere coffee roasting company since 1989. Come in for the freshest most delicious cup of coffee ever and watch us roast the best coffee in town at our historic Old Town location ‑ Corner of State & Gutierrez. Gift baskets, mail order & corporate gifts avail. sbcoffee.com.

Ethiopian AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN CUISINE Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805‑966‑0222. Open Sat‑Sun Lunch ONLY 11am‑2:‑ 30pm. Serkaddis Alemu offers in ever changing menu with choices of vegitarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Avaliable for parties of up to 40 people.

PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 STATE ST. #14, 805‑966‑0222. Open M‑F 11:30‑ 3pm (lunch). M‑Sat 5pm‑Close (dinner). Sun $24 four course prefix dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended. RENAUD’S PATISSERIE & Bistro, 3315 State St. in Loreto Plaza, 569‑2400 & 1324 State St. Ste N 892‑2800 $$ M ‑ Sat 7‑ 5, Sun 7‑3 & M‑Sun 7‑ 3 Wide selection of wholesome French pastries. Breakfast & lunch menu is composed of egg dishes, sandwiches & salads representing Renaud’s favorites. Our Brewed coffees & teas are proudly 100% Organic.

Indian FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682‑ 6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com VOTED BEST 17yrs. Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $8.95 M‑S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori‑ Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. 20yrs of Excellence!

1993 2013 -

Celebrating 20 years! 805-564-1985 1026 State Street www.palazzio.com #7404

WEEKLY SPECIALS Local Black Cod (small fillet) — $9.95 lb Pacific Yellowtail Fillet — $6.95 lb Seaweed Salad —$6.95 lb

With this coupon. Expires 7/10/13.

10% OFF

117 Harbor Way, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 | ph. 805.965.9564 | www.sbfish.com

INDIA CLUB ‑ New Goleta Restaurant, 5 Star Chef from India Krishna, lunch buffet 7 days a week, w/ special Dosa menu on Sat. & Sun. Beer & Wine. Open 7 days a week. 5701 Calle Real. 805‑967‑7171 INDIA HOUSE, 418 State St. Next to 99 Cent Store 805.962.5070. 7 days 11:30a‑ 3:30p ALL YOU CAN EAT Lunch Buffet $8.95. Dinner 5p‑9p. Tandori & North Indian Muglai specialties. World Class Indian Chefs at your service! Traditional floor seating. Sitar & Tabla Live Music Fri. & Sat. Eves. Indian & Draft Beers, Local Wines. www.indiahouseusa.com NAAN STOP ‑ Popular, Casual Dinining, Indian Restaurant w/ Boba drinks, chicken tikka masala, saag tofu, naan bread, and all other favorites! 966 Embarcadero del Mar 685‑4715.

WOOD-FIRED PIZZA FRESH LOCAL FISH • SEAFOOD ORGANIC VEGETABLES • SALADS GRILLED STEAKS • CHOPS OSSOBUCO • SAUSAGE PANINI • BURRATA • BRUSCHETTA GELATO • CANNOLI • TIRAMISÚ FULL-BAR • DOG FRIENDLY HALF-PORTIONS ON LUNCH SPECIALS OPEN EVERYDAY 11:30 AM TO CLOSE 436 STATE ST. 805.957.4177

AsianPersuasionCatering@gmail.com

www.bucatini.com july 3, 2013

805.280.1116 Anh-Thy Nguyen

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S um m er o n the Pat io

H a p py H o 3u r TUESDAY-SUNDAY -6

House Margarita

$4

50

Delicious Appetizers

$ 475 -$ 650

CLOSED

JULY 4TH

SPICE AVENUE, Authentic Indian Cuisine. Zagat Rated since 2006. 1027 State Street. 965‑6004. www.spiceavenuesb.com OPEN 7 DAYS “By Far the Best Place in Santa Barbara to Explore Indian Flavors... “Food and Home Magazine, SB. A family owned restaurant from London with 5 Star chef from India, Dinesh ‑ Our lavish all you can eat lunch buffet is 7 days a week! Heated Patio, beer, and wine.

Irish DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568‑0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a‑ Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub‑style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

Italian Lunch & Dinner Tuesday-Sunday 9 1 4 Santa Barbara Street • Santa Barbara • 9 66- 2 860 (Two blocks from State Street • Across from the Historic Presidro)

ALDO’S ITALIAN Restaurant 1031 State St. 963‑6687. $$ Open 7 days. Lunch & Dinner. V MC AE DC DV. Local SB favorite for over 25 years offers fast, friendly service in the heart of downtown. Dine outdoors in our heated courtyard. Enjoy new homestyle cuisine like Chicken Parmigiana or Fresh Fish specials in a comfortable, romantic atmosphere. Vegan & Gluten‑ Free Pasta and Salad Options available. Wine & Beer. Full menu at: www.sbaldos.com

Japanese KYOTO, 3232 State St, 687‑1252.$$. Open 7days M‑F 11:30a‑2p; Sat Noon‑ 2:30p Lunch; Sun‑Thur 5‑10p Dinner, Fri‑Sat 5p‑10:30p.Complete Sushi Bar. Steak & Seafood Specials! Sashimi, Teriyaki, original Japanese appetizers & Combination Boat Dinner. SB’s only TATAMI Rooms reservations suggested. Beer, Wine & Sake.Take Out. Birthday customers get FREE tempura ice cream & photo on our website! KyotoSB.com

Mexican

Steak

CIELITO RESTAURANT 1114 State St. 805‑965‑4770. Open Tue‑Sun, Lunch 11:30‑2:30, Happy Hour 4‑6, Dinner starts at 5. Mexican and Latin American inspired cuisine showcasing the best local ingredients from land and sea. Start with a fresh and flavorful selection from the Raw Bar and explore the bold and sophisticated flavors of Chef Ramon Velazquez’s ceviches, antojitos (small cravings) and entrées. Patio seating, a spectacular dining room, lunch, happy hour and dinner.

HOLDREN’S 512 State St. 965‑3363 Lunch & Dinner Daily. Featuring $20 Prime Rib Wednesdays‑ USDA 12 oz Prime MidWestern corn‑fed beef char‑ broiled over mesquite; or try from our selections of the freshest seafood. We offer extensive wine & martini lists & look forward to making your dining experience superb! Reservations avail.

PALAPA 4123 State 683‑3074 $$ Sat/ Sun Open 7a. M‑F 8:30a‑9p. Seafood enchiladas, ceviche, salads, tamales, chile rellenos. A mini vacation in Baja! Smoking deck.Lots of heated patios. Refrescos, flan, black beans, green rice, Mexican organic coffee.Cervesa y Vino. Breakfast * Lunch * Dinner daily. Live Mariachi music Fri’s 6p. Gift certificates. Private parties & catering. Nos vemos!

Natural NATURAL CAFE, 508 State St., 5 blocks from beach. 962‑9494 Goleta‑ 5892 Hollister 692‑2363. 361 Hitchcock Way 563‑1163 $. Open for lunch & dinner 7 days. A local favorite for dinner. Voted “Best Lunch in Santa Barbara” “Best Health Food Restaurant” “Best Veggie Burger” “Best Sidewalk Cafe Patio” “Best Fish Taco” all in the Independent Reader’s Poll. Daily Specials, Char‑Broiled Chicken, Fresh Fish, Homemade Soups, Hearty Salads, Healthy Sandwiches, Juice Bar, Microbrews, Local Wines, and the Best Patio on State St. 9 locations serving the Central Coast. www.thenaturalcafe.com SOJOURNER CAFÉ, 134 E. Canon Perdido 965‑7922. Open 11‑11 Th‑Sat; 11a‑10:30p Sun‑Wed. SB’s natural foods landmark since 1978 Daily soups & chef’s specials, hearty stews, fresh local fish, organic chicken dishes,salads & sandwiches & award winning dessert . Espresso bar, beer, wine, smoothies, shakes & fresh juices sojournercafe.com

RODNEY’S STEAKHOUSE, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard at Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort 805‑884‑8581 Open for dinner 5:30pm‑10pm. Reservations recommended. A classic steakhouse at the beach with bold & beautiful décor. Featuring USDA prime‑grade steaks, fresh seafood, baked lobster & nightly chef specials. Incredible desserts. Full cocktail bar specializes in 15 distinctive martinis.Wine cellar with Santa Barbara County & California best vintages by‑ the‑glass www.rodneyssteakhouse.com

Thai BANGKOK PALACE 2829 De la Vina St. 687‑1828 $$ Open M‑F 11a‑9p Sat 5‑9p Fine Thai Cuisine in an intimate authentic setting. $15min.+ $3 fee for deliveries. Beer/Wine/Sake.AX/Disc/ VC/ MC.WI‑FI www.BangkokPalace.co YOUR PLACE Restaurant, 22 N. Milpas St., 966‑5151, 965‑9397. $$. Open Mon 4‑9:45pm Tues‑Thurs & Sun 11:30a‑9:45p, Fri/Sat 11:30a‑10:30p. V MC AE. Your Place ‑ The One & Only. Voted “BEST THAI FOOD” for 26 years by Independent and The Weekly readers, making us a Living Legend! Lunch & dinner specials daily. Fresh seafood & tasty vegetarian dishes. Santa Barbara Restaurant Guide selected us as the Best Thai Restaurant for exceptional dining reflected by food quality, service & ambiance.

WINE GUIDE rooms. Off‑street parking. 2 blocks from State St. (2nd driveway @ 126 E. Haley) Monthly tastings & private tastings available. We ship wine. Keep in touch: Facebook, Google+, Twitter

Wine of the Week Refugio Ranch Barbareno 2008: This powerful blend of syrah and petite sirah from one of the region’s more ambitious new producers smells like vanilla ice cream melting over a warm blackberry pie fresh out of the oven. On the tongue are serious, chewy tannins (maybe too heavy for some?), revealing the rough and rugged side of winemaker Ryan Deovlet, whose personal label’s pinot noirs and chardonnays are opposite exercises in finesse. See refugioranch.com.

Wine Country Tours

Wine Shop/Bar

I BIKE SANTA BARBARA single‑day wine country bike tours. Includes transport, bike, guided tour, lunch, tasting at two wineries. TCP 29121 . 805‑705‑7998 www.ibikesantabarbara.com

RENEGADE WINES: 417 Santa Barbara St. Ste A‑6, 805‑568‑1961. Tues‑Fri 11a‑6p, Sat. 12‑6p. Sun‑Mon by appointment. SB’s oldest wine shop, over 23 years same location. We are Santa Barbara’s premier wine retailer, offering a wide variety of local and imported wines. Our diverse assortment of wine comes from the world’s finest vineyards with prices starting around $9. View our full inventory @ www. renegadewines.com. We store your wine. 3000sq feet of temp. controlled wine lockers; 8 case lockers‑300 case

SPENCER’S LIMOUSINE & Tours, 884‑ 9700 Thank You SB, Voted BEST 16yrs! Specializing in wine tours of all Central Cal Wineries. Gourmet picnic lunch or fine restaurants avail TCP16297 805‑884‑9700 www.spencerslimo.com 72

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Wineries/Tasting Rooms BABCOCK WINERY & VINEYARDS. 5175 HWY 246 Sta. Rita Hills. 805‑736‑ 1455 Open 10:30‑5 p.m. daily. For 30 years Bryan Babcock has been honing his craft. Venture into beautiful wine country and savor his extraordinary collection of highly expressive single‑vineyard Pinot Noirs rarely offered outside of the winery. Sample highly acclaimed Chardonnays, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Gris. Cabernet and Syrah sourced from warmer SB Co. locales are voluptuous. Taste wine and shop for eclectic gifts in a newly renovated, vintage inspired atmosphere. www.babcockwinery.com SANTA BARBARA Winery, 202 Anacapa St. 963‑3633. Open 7 days, 10a‑5p, small charge for extensive tasting list. 2 blocks from both State St & the beach. This venerable winery is the county’s oldest‑ est.1962, and offers many internationally acclaimed wines from their Lafond Vineyard in the Santa Rita Hills. Try some of Winemaker Bruce McGuire’s small production bottling.www.sbwinery.com WHITCRAFT WINERY, 36 S. Calle Cesar Chavez 730‑1680. Family owned & operated. Specialist in Pinot Noir .Est. 1985. In Sideways! 1 block from beach. Tastings Fri/Sat/Sun 12‑4 & by appt. www.whitcraftwinery.com


The Restaurant Guy

+++++++++++++++

by JOHN DICKSON

Santa Barbara French Festival

T

he Santa Barbara French Festival returns to Oak Park July 13 and 14 to celebrate Bastille Day and French cultural history. Admission is free, and the festival includes food, wine, mimosas, crêpes, delicious pastries, music, dance, and, of course, the Poodle Parade. Each day the fun starts at 11 a.m. when the entertainment kicks off on three different stages and continues until 7 p.m. The stages will be filled with dance and music from more than 30 different acts, including performances, audience participation, and instruction. The Eiffel Stage features Jessica Fichot, Santa Barbara Revels Solstice Singers, Jean-Pierre Tibbi, Lena Tufenkjian, Laura Weinbach, Montecito Jazz Project Django Shmango, Delilah Shank, and the Guilde de Ste. Marie. The Moulin Rouge Stage will concentrate on dance with performances by the West Coast Ballet, UCLA Historical Ballroom Dance Club, Tina’s C’EST LA VIE: You’ll get a kick out of next weekend’s Ports of Paradise Polynesian Dancers, Crystal Indigo, French Festival’s authentic food and entertainment. Santa Barbara Silver Follies, Balaton, Santa Barbara Revels Dancers and Solstice Singers, Brian Griffin, dedicated to serving organic, local, and fair-trade and the Femmes Fatales Drag Revue. ingredients. In addition to entertainment, the French Festival includes more than 50 booths offering everything from 805 UPDATE: I called  Deli at  East Carrillo French food to face painting and henna tattoos. For Street and was told that the business was bought by more information, visit frenchfestival.com, email french Presidio Market ( Santa Barbara St.) and that the festival@sbcoxmail.com, or call 963-8198. changeover will happen in about a month. I was told SHUCK ’N SWALLOW: On Sunday, July 28, that no changes are planned for the deli. Reader Bren1-4 p.m., Finch & Fork restaurant inside the Canary dan says Presidio Market also recently took over the Hotel ( W. Carrillo Street) hosts its first annual Shuck former Good Karma Market on Anapamu Street. ’n Swallow competition, sponsored by Santa Monica ISLAND BREWERY TOURS: Ever wondered how Seafood Company. Participants include Finch & Fork, beer is made? And what exactly is going on in all those Arlington Tavern, Blush, Brewhouse, Enterprise Fish Company, and Hungry Cat. Guests will be able to watch big, shiny tanks in the back of a brewery? Island Brewing Company in Carpinteria will be offering free, schedthe restaurants compete while enjoying bites from uled tours throughout the summer. Brewery tours will Finch & Fork and tastings of beer and sparkling wine. be held twice a day during weekends at 2 and 4 p.m. on Ticket price includes tastings of the special Shuck and Saturday and Sunday. The tour runs about 20 minutes Swallow Pilsner from Brewhouse, and tastings of sparand covers the history of Island Brewing Company, the kling wine from Laetitia. A cash bar will also be availbrewing process and ingredients, and offers a behindable. Additionally, Finch & Fork’s Chef James Siao will prepare a “Build Your Own Taco” station, and guests will the-scenes look at what’s happening at the brewery.“As more people discover craft beer, and the difference in also be able to taste oysters from Santa Monica Seafood Company. Tickets cost $30 and can be purchased online flavor that fresh, local beer brings with it, more people are interested in the brewing process and the history at shucknswallow-sb.nightout.com. A portion of the proof beer, and we’re happy to share that with them,” says ceeds benefit the Environmental Defense Center. For owner and brewer Paul Wright. Island Brewing Commore information, call 879-9100. pany is located at  th Street, Carpinteria. For more information, call 745-8272 or email paul@islandbrewing SANTA YNEZ UPDATE: Reader Glenn let me company.com. know about a few Santa Ynez eateries that until now STAR-BUCKS: The Seattle-based coffee company have been flying under my radar: says it’s hiking prices on average by one percent nationRanch & Reata at  Sagunto Street in Santa Ynez ally. Starbucks adds that the price for many drinks, such is a cowboy-themed restaurant, bar, and performance as medium and large brewed coffees and Frappuccinos, venue that offers “contemporary cowboy cuisine” won’t change. created. Roundup Market at  Edison Street in Santa Ynez NEW WINE TASTING ROOM: The Foley Food & is a grocery market and deli that also serves Wine Society Experience has opened at Bacara Resort, BBQ sandwiches.  Hollister Avenue, and allows locals and travelers The Baker’s Table at  to enjoy tastings of Santa Ynez Valley, as well as cookNumancia Street in Santa Ynez ing classes, flights from around the world, and special MORE is an artisan French bakery pairings. FOOD SEE P. 51

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

ROBERT BORNSTEIN

The 25th Annual

PIZZERIA

Now Open! 29 E. VICTORIA ST. • 805-957-2020

Super C uCaS =Now CelebratiNg 22 YearS iN buSiNeSS =

DAILY SPECIALS M O N D AY G U ACA M O L E B U R R I TO $ 4 . 9 9 FA J I TA S B U R R I T O $ 6 . 4 9 *

T U E S D AY B R E A K FA S T B U R R I T O $ 4 . 9 9 S U P E R T O R TA $ 6 . 4 9 *

W E D N E S D AY B R E A K FA S T B U R R I T O $ 4 . 9 9 VEGGIE BURRITO $6.49*

T H U R S D AY B R E A K FA S T B U R R I T O $ 4 . 9 9 M I L A N E S A TA M P I Q U E N A $ 6 . 4 9 *

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604 Santa Barbara St. • 805-965-3335 info@myhomerecipes.com myhomerecipes.com july 3, 2013

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independent classifieds

Legals Administer of Estate NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: Marjorie Coe Lehr CASE NO: 1417181 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Marjorie Coe Lehr A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: Arthur W. Lehr in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Arthur W. Lehr be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decendent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an Interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 07/18/2013 AT 9:00 am Dept: Five Room: SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121. Anacapa Division. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court an mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Arthur W. Lehr RR2 3972, Pahoa, HI 96778 808‑938‑8002 Published Jun 27, Jul 3, 11 2013. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOSEPH BURKE CASE NO: 1417548 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JOSEPH BURKE A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: DEBORAH MACKIE‑BURKE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DEBORAH MACKIE‑ BURKE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an Interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

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A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 07/25/2013 AT 9:00 am Dept: Five Room: Judge Sterne SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court an mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: DEBORAH MACKIE‑BURKE 6831 Silkberry Lane Goleta, Ca 93117; (805) 252‑1668. Published Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2013. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DIANA PAINE OSBORN aka DIANA P. OSBORN/DIANE OSBORN CASE NO: 1417651 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DIANA PAINE OSBORN aka DIANA P. OSBORN/ DIANE OSBORN A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: NIKIYA OSBORN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that NIKIYA OSBORN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an Interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 07/25/2013 AT 9:00 am Dept: Five Room: Judge Sterne SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court an mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in

july 3, 2013

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Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq. 319 East Carrillo Street, Suite 107 PO Box 20146 Santa Barbara, 93120‑ 0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Jul 3, 11, 18 2013.

FBN Abandonment STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Paris Street Boutique at 1221 State St Suite 7 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Alma Rose Middleton 640 Calle Rinconada Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Alma Rose Middleton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2010‑0002703. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 3 2013.

Fictitious Business Name Statement FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Twin Oak Ranch at 2667 Via de los Rancheros Road Buellton, CA 93427; Oak Investors, Inc at 6418 East Tanque Verde Rd, Ste 105 Tucson, AZ 85715 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Ryan M. Schoff, V.P. . This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 07, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Dionne Ruiz. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001896. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KJ Personal Training, SB Stroller Boot Camp at 4796 Amarosa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jason Fowle (same address) Kacie Fowle (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Kacie Fowle This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 06, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001506. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: The Human Effort at 2112 Emerson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Kevin Ponto (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Kevin Ponto This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001862. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Get Loud Music at 414‑B E. Haley Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ethan Graton 1081 Primavera Ln. Nipomo, CA 93444 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Ethan Graton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 04, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001848. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Avant‑Garde Design & Consulting at 854 Miramonte Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Chloee O’Hayon‑Crosby (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Chloee O’Hayon‑ Crosby This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑0001908. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: The Californian at 2225 De la Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; California Convalescent Hospital of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jason Campbell This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 30, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001787. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Santa Barbara Guitar Bar at 137 Anacapa Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Guitar Bar, LLC 120 Presidential Way Suite 300 Woburn, MA 01801 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: James Faletti This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001901. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Big Orange Bike, Santa Barbara Ads In Motion, Santa Barbara Pedicab, SB AIM at 309 W. Figueroa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Pacific Pedalers LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: James Heaton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 07, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001889. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: David Shor Productions at 4630 Via Vistosa Santa Barbara, CA 93110; The Shor Group, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: David Shor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 23, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Linda Rhoads. FBN Number: 2013‑0001720. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Nails Uptown at 20 South La Cumbre Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Quyen Nguyen 9122 Oasis Avenue Westminster, CA 92683 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Quyen Nguyen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 06, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑0001879. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Lovebird, Lovebird Boutique And Jewelry Bar, Lovebird Santa Barbara at 7 East De La Guerra Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Zia Jewelry, Inc 2330 Vista Madera Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jennifer Scarbrough This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001863. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Lovebird, Lovebird Boutique And Jewelry Bar, Lovebird Santa Barbara at 535 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Zia Jewelry, Inc 2330 Vista Madera Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jennifer Scarbrough This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001864. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: West Coast Pizza at 1137 N H Street Suite U Lompoc, CA 93436; Westside Pizza of Lompoc, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Glenys Archer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001867. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Gemini Photo at 5556 Camino Cerralvo Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Lorie Jean Morris (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Lorie Jean Morris This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 04, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon. FBN Number: 2013‑0001841. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Mystique Sonique, Paris Street Boutique at 1103 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Bogdan Lomonosoff 1317 East Wilson Ave #B Glendale, CA 91206; Saul Olivas (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Bogdan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001856. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SDMarketing at 1329 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sarah Duffy O’Connor (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Sarah O’Connor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 15, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001636. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Kacie Jean Photography at 4796 Amarosa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Kacie Jean Fowle (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Kacie Fowle This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 05, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon. FBN Number: 2013‑0001858. Published: June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Southbeech Rods & Restoration at 6246 Avenida Gorrion Goleta, CA 93117; Eric Beaumont Beecher (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Eric Beaumont Beecher This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 11, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001921. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Graphics Gal at 4376 Franklin Rd. Santa Maria, CA 93455; Denise Douglas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Denise Douglas This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 03, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Deborah Sanchez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001820. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Anvil Motor Sports at 716 Bond Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Daniel Knight Carter 1217 Bel Air Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Dan Carter This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 11, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑0001920. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 Market & Deli, Inc at 135 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 805 Market & Deli, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Simon Maida This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 13, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑0001939. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Bici Centro at 506 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Edward France This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 03, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑0001829. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Insights From Within at 2335 Sonora Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Peter Quay Wright (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Peter Quay Wright. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 13, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon. FBN Number: 2013‑0001974. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Mountain View Montessori School at 5070 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mountain View Montessori School Inc 4640 Granada Place Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Thushari M. Kandamby This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001913. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Fertile Grounds at 1092 Palmetto Way Unit G Carpinteria, CA 93013; Jon Anton 2259 Clearlake Dr Santa Maria, CA 93455; Cynthia Gutierrez 1092 Palmetto Way Unit G Carpinteria, CA 93013; Paulo Tomas 1066 Seaward Dr Santa Maria, CA 93454 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Cynthia Gutierrez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001907. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Real Maintenance & Construction at 30 Plumas Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Maria E Gutierrez (same address) and Josefina R Martinez (same address). This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Josefina R Martinez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 12, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001924. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: The Poetic Eye at 2745 El Prado Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Miriam Slater Carmean (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Miriam Slater This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 06, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001876. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: J M Bosc Sheet Metal at 1100 West Ocean Avenue Lompoc, CA 93436; Jeffrey Martin Boscutti 14 Santa Clara Drive Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeff M Boscutti This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 07, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑0001897. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Dubosoft at 3990 Primavera Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; David DuBois (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: David L DuBois. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 28, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001755. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Zoom Po’ Are Or at 427 West Islay Street #22 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mahdi Aquil Mubashshir (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Mahdi Aquil Mubashshir. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 17, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001993. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JK Woodworks And Construction at 1313 E. Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Josh Kaminski (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Josh Kaminski This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 12, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001923. Published: June 20, 27. July 03, 11 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: I Am Healing at 25 East De La Guerra Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Alan Anthony Avila 2441 Foothill Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Allyson Angelina Gomez (same address) Chelsea Sandoval (same address) This business is conducted by Copartners Signed: Alan Avila. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 04, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001846. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Allen Associates Construction at 201 N. Milpas Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Dennis Allen Associates (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 07, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Dionne Ruiz. FBN Number: 2013‑0001893. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013.


independent classifieds

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employment Computer/Tech

CLASSROOM SER­VICES TECHNICIAN

Instructional Development Performs a variety of duties involving the installation, repair and maintenance of audio, video, network and computer display equipment. Reqs: Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance and repair of digital and analog A/V and computer presentation systems. Experience

Legals

with electronics troubleshooting tools and procedures. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to read schematics, blueprints, and other technical documentation. Must be proficient with computer productivity tools. Ability to work independently and accomplish tasks as directed. Familiarity with industry standard workplace safety practices. Notes: Flexible schedule M ‑ F, 8am ‑ 5pm to start, with frequent night, weekend, and holiday work. Fingerprinting required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑ Notice Program. $20.98/ hr. For primary consideration apply by 7/15/13, thereafter open until filled. AA/ EOE Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb. edu Job #20130292

EARLY CARE AND ED­UCATION (ECE) TEACHER

CHILD CARE CENTER Works cooperatively with other staff to plan and implement a quality child care and education program. Works with families and administrators to create high quality program for children ages 3 mos. to 5 yrs. in a warm, professional, NAEYC accredited setting. Reqs: Hold (or in process) a CA Child Dev Permit. Must have 12 units in ECE/ Child Development + group care exp. Notes:

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Fingerprinting required, Statement of Health, negative TB required. CPR/ 1st Employment Services Aid req. within 1st month of hire. This is a 100% time, limited appointment; AD COPY: AIRLINE CAREERS begin here working up to 1000 hours with the – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation possibility of converting to career. Technician. Housing and Financial aid $16.56 ‑ $17.64/hr. plus full benefits. for qualified students. Job placement Open until filled. AA/EOE Apply online assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877‑492‑ 3059 (AAN at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20130159 CAN) Sr. Software Engineer based in Goleta, CA at Citrix Online, LLC. Design, develop, troubleshoot & debug complex SW applications. Req Bachelors or foreign equiv in CS, Comp Eng, Management Info Sys or related tech field & 6 yrs progressive, post‑ bacc exp in SW dev. Will accept Masters in stated field in lieu of 2 yrs of stated exp. Must pass co’s technical review. Send resumes to: V. Bixler, Job Ref #23, Citrix Online, LLC, 7414 Hollister Ave., Goleta, CA 93117.

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Independent

office will be closed

Thursday, July 4

Happy Birthday America

office will reopen

friday, july 5 8AM-5PM

(Continued)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Sea Sic at 1208 Mercedes Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Robert Martinez Jr. (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Robert Martinez Jr.. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 20, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0002021. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Hostel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Tourist Hostel, Santa Barbara Tourist Hostel‑Hotel, SB Tourist Hotel at 134 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 ; Lo‑Cost Lodging, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: . This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 04, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001849. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Las Granolas at 1027‑B E. De La Guerra Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Lori Anna Stern LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Lori Anna Stern. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 17, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001983. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Himelsein Diamonds Systems Industries, Himelsein Group, Himelsein, Inc. at 1129 State Street, Suite 6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; National Pacific Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Travis Ortega, Secretary. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 20, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0002029. Published: June 27, July 03, 11, 18 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Pawn Shop of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Loan & Jewelry at 136 East Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; National Pacific Corporation at 1129 State Street, Suite 6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Travis Ortega, Secretary. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 20, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑0002027. Published: June 27, July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Pete’s Cleaning Services 818 Orange Avenue #2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by Individual Signed: Pedro Valladares This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 28, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0001758. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Pacific Blue Micro, PBM, PBM, IT Solutions at 1600 Aston St. Ste 175 Irvine, CA 92606; Eplus Technology, Inc 13595 Dulles Technology Drive Herndon, VA 20171‑3413 This business is conducted by Corporation Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 13, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Deborah Sanchez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001941. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Le Sorelle 966 West Campus Lane Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by Corporation Signed: Anna C. Lopez‑ Carr This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 30, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001790. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Manning & Associates, Out of Scale Productions, The Business Sherpas 221 E. Haley St #C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Deborah C. T. Manning (same address) This business is conducted by Individual Signed: Deborah C.T. Manning This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 10, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑0001919. Published: June 27. July 03, 11, 18 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A Touch of Nirvana at 7243 Alameda Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Jocelyn Quick (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jocelyn Quick This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 25, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑0002065. Published: July 03, 11, 18, 25 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Simone Bijoux, Simonebijoux at 4117‑A Via Andorra Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Nicole S. Fini (same address) Paul T. Fini (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Paul Fini This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 20, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0002026. Published: July 03, 11, 18, 25 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Cava, Cava Restaurant & Bar, La Cavita at 1212 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Blue Serrano, LLC (same address) Carlos Lopez‑Hollis 3791 State Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Limited Partnership Signed: Carlos Lopez‑ Hollis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 25, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2013‑0002080. Published: July 03, 11, 18, 25 2013.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: The Rock at 510 E. Main St. Santa Maria, CA 93454; Mary T. Rivas 878 Dahlia Pl. Santa Maria, CA 93455 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Mary T Rivas This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 12, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Eva Chavez. FBN Number: 2013‑0001931. Published: July 03, 11, 18, 25 2013. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: Les Marchands at 131 Anacapa Street Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Acme Anacapa Wine Store LLC 201 W Montecito, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Eric Railsback This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 24, 2013. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez. FBN Number: 2013‑ 0002064. Published: July 03, 11, 18, 25 2013.

Name Change IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JULIE MARIE BALLESTEROS and DOUGAL ROBERT HOUSE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 1417327 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CARLY ANN HOUSE‑ BALLESTEROS TO: CARLYANN HOUSE BALLESTEROS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Aug 07, 2013 9:­ 30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St, Santa Barbara CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 31, 2013. by Narzralli Baksh; Deputy Clerk for James E. Herman, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SARAH ELLEN STRINGFELLOW ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 1416732 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SARAH ELLEN STRINGFELLOW TO: SHANE GERARD STRINGFELLOW THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 17, 2013 9:­30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St, Santa Barbara CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 31, 2013. by Narzralli Baksh; Deputy Clerk for James E. Herman, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. June 13, 20, 27. July 03 2013. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF Michael Alexander Maggio ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 1417210 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Michael Alexander Maggio TO: Michael Alexander Maggio Lopez THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING July 31, 2013 9:­30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93121. A copy of this order to show cause shall be published at least once each week for four consecutive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: May 31, 2013 by Narzralli Baksh, Deputy Clerk for James E. Herman, Judge of the Superior Court. Published June 20, 27, July 3, 11, 2013.

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THE INDEPENDENt

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independent classifieds

employment General Full-Time

Local provider of support services for adults w/disabilities. FT/PT Positions available: Life Skills Coach, working w/ individuals on living independently in the community; Job Coach, providing individuals access to social enrichment activities in our day program & in the community; Crew or Job Coach, supervising individuals in employment settings. Criminal/DMV background check req. Must pass drug screen/ physical. $10/hr. For information please contact 805‑566‑9000 Fax: 805‑566‑ 9070 Email: jobs@ucpworkinc.org

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AUDIT & ADVISORY SERVICES Provides a variety of analytical support for audit, investigative, and

special projects. Assists with analyses and special studies for audit risk assessment and planning, selected audit and advisory services projects, campus and system‑wide reporting requirements, and training initiatives. Performs analyses of low to moderate complexity. Assists in the development and maintenance of audit work programs, work paper documentation, audit follow‑up programs, and training and presentation materials. Performs selected audit quality assurance steps, including work paper and audit report finalization. Assists in maintaining data in information systems used for audit and investigative activities. Assists in planning and coordinating quarterly and other periodic meetings of the UCSB Audit Committee and

Investigations Workgroup. Reqs: Demonstrated knowledge and skill in word processing, spreadsheet, and calendaring. Experience with Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, web authoring tools. Knowledge of database development and/or maintenance. Demonstrated experience in budget planning and prioritization of projects, programs, and activities, using sound judgment while meeting organizational requirements. Notes: Fingerprinting required. This is a 75% time, limited position working up to 1,000 hours. $18.91 ‑ $23.63/hr. For primary consideration apply by 7/15/13, thereafter open until filled. AA/EOE Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20130291

DEVELOPMENT ANA­LYST, PROSPECT MGMT. & STEWARD­SHIP

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Serves as a key analyst for the Engineering and Sciences Development Office, supporting a complex and multifaceted fundraising program covering all departments, institutes and centers within the College of Engineering and the Division of Math, Life and Physical Sciences. Works very

closely with the Development Services Manager, as well as five Development Directors to track donor “moves” management, research individual and corporate prospects, make portfolio recommendations, and analyze stewardship activities and opportunities. Responsible for a high level of prospect and gift analysis, providing analytical reporting to the Manager, Assistant Dean of Development and Directors. Reqs: Four year college degree or equivalent combined experience. Ability to analyze and troubleshoot complex problems. Excellent customer service and communication skills. Ability to work independently under pressure of deadlines while exercising independent judgment. Organized and detail‑ oriented, able to track a problem

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THE INDEPENDENT

july 3, 2013

through many contexts to a final resolution. Knowledgeable, experienced, and enthusiastic computer user with significant expertise with MS Excel, experience with the use of a database, such as Access or comparable software and, PowerPoint. Experience with data analysis and presentation, and the basic uses of statistics for those purposes. Notes: Fingerprinting required. May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑ wide events. $20.80/hr. Apply by 7/10/13 AA/EOE Apply online at https:­//Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20130285

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

FACILITIES DEPARTMENT Responsible for the Construction Administration of Major Capital and Infrastructure projects valued over four million dollars each. Has broad authority to interpret contracts and agreements, independently negotiate changes in the work within constraints of University policy. This involves managing consultants, providing direction to assigned inspectors and support staff, and coordinating with campus entities such as Operations and Maintenance, Client organizations and third parties. Will balance the available resources of Planning and Construction staff with employment of outside consultants in the best interest of the University based on professional judgment. Will represent the University in litigation or arbitration of claims asserted by contractors or consultants. Will have primary responsibility for claims avoidance strategy and providing technical expertise to General Counsel should construction claims arise. Reqs: Minimum ten years of experience in design and/or construction of capital improvement projects. Experience with new construction and/or renovation of office, classroom, laboratory, infrastructure, housing or athletic facilities. Demonstrated ability to manage project scopes and budgets, prepare plans and specifications, coordinate with contractors. Excellent communication skills; computer literacy. Licensed architect or engineer. Notes: Fingerprinting required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑ Notice Program. This is an annually renewable contract position. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. $81,700 ‑ $105,286/yr. For primary consideration apply by 7/15/13, thereafter open until filled. AA/EOE Apply online at https:// Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20130290

Social Services PROGRAM INSTRUCTORS needed at Nuvelles Developmental Services Hollister Day Program. We seek creative, energetic applicants to work w/individuals with developmental disabilities. Duties include leading activities such as arts & crafts and games, leading community outings & providing personal care assistance. If you want a position which will make a difference in the lives of others, this is the job for you. What we offer: M‑F day shift, paid training, CPR cert., health ins. Apply in person at Novelles Developmental Services, 7300 Hollister Ave. Goleta, CA 93117. Please call 805‑ 968‑5360 for more info. Fax resumes to 805‑968‑8008.


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37 Follower 38 That boat 43 Film ___ 44 Immature, like some meat 49 One of the Munsters 51 Watson and Thompson 52 Take to the throne 1 Pitches a tent 53 Problem 2 Get grooming 54 You are, in the Yucatan 3 Insurer based in Hartford 56 River through Catalonia 4 Manhattan restaurateur 57 “___ Flux” (futuristic MTV Vincent cartoon) 5 Rank on a cereal box 58 Carnegie or Chihuly 6 Wide-eyed 59 ___ Berry (Jones Soda flavor) 7 Bad substance for a 22-across 60 Sch. near the US-Mexico border 8 Mideastern ruler 61 It’s un-PC 9 South Asian 62 Earth Day prefix 10 It’s rated with alarms 63 Wee boy 11 Pet name ©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords 12 Charter ___ (tree on (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) Connecticut’s state quarter) For answers to this puzzle, call: 13 Acne-fighting brand 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per 18 Fixed a squeak minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to 21 Bohemian your credit card, call: 1-800-65524 Word used with defibrillators 6548. Reference puzzle #0621 25 He wrote “Endymion” and “Hyperion” LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 27 Grammarian’s concern 28 Overzealous 29 Nostalgia-evoking 30 Take the helm 32 Suffix after Rock or Raisin 33 Provide freebies 34 Tinseltown, in old headlines 35 “Did ___ tell you about the time ...” 36 California-based semiconductor company founded in 1981 (hidden in FALSIFY)

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Down

july 3, 2013

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLassiFieds

Tide Guide Day

High

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Low

High

Thu 4

2:51am/-0.03

9:18am/3.40

1:39pm/2.28

8:02pm/5.69

Fri 5

3:26am/-0.24

9:57am/3.51

2:18pm/2.30

8:36pm/5.78

Sat 6

3:58am/-0.36

10:29am/3.60

2:54pm/2.29

9:09pm/5.84

Sun 7

4:28am/-0.43

10:59am/3.67

3:29pm/2.26

9:40pm/5.84

Mon 8

4:57am/-0.43

11:28am/3.75

4:04pm/2.24

10:12pm/5.77

Tue 9

5:26am/-0.38

11:59am/3.83

4:40pm/2.24

10:45pm/5.60

Wed 10

5:55am/-0.25

12:30pm/3.93

5:20pm/2.27

11:18pm/5.33

Thu 11

6:24am/-0.05

1:04pm/4.03

6:05pm/2.31

11:55pm/4.96

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THE INDEPENDENT

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Meet Juliet

Juliet is a 4 year old puggle. She was relinquished by her previous owners because they had no time for her, so she would love to be adopted by someone that wants her to be PART of their family. She is spayed and current on all shots.

Meet Daisy

Daisy is a corgi/terrier mix and around 2 yrs old. She loves to go on walks and is a funny little girl! She’s spayed, microchipped, has all shots and is potty trained.

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These dogs would be ever so thankful if you could give them their forever home

29

The The Independent Independent is is now now on on

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Sunrise 5:53 Sunset 8:14

High

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E M A I L a d s @ i n d e p e n d e n t. C o m

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PHONE 965-5208

Meet Miley

Miley is a 5 year old puggle. She was relinquished with her friend Juliet because their previous owners had no time for them. She loves kids and is housebroken. She is spayed and current on all shots.

Meet Tosca

Tosca is a fun girl looking for her fun family! She’s about 3-4 yr old cairn terrier mix and is spayed, microchipped and has all shots. If you are looking for a hiking buddy, she’s the one for you!

Cold Noses Warm Hearts (805) 964-2446 • (805) 895-1728 • www.coldnoses.org 5758 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117

These dogs would be ever so thankful if you could give them their forever home

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WONDERFUL TEACHER

Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. Exciting new approach to a full musical experience. Read, memorize, compose or improvise any music w/ ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

“NEW” DELUxE DODGER CAP (one size fist all) Orig. $40, now $25. Call Fred 957‑4636.

noW plAying

1 YR OLD ‑ Motorola/Verizon cell phone, purple color, video & camera. Orig. $100, now $40. Fred 957‑4636.

FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, Concerts, Parties, Churches, Recording Studios. Classical, pop, folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, BM, MM www.sbHarpist.com 969‑6698

AM‑FM RADIO (transistor) Large size, with mucis disc. ‑ great sound. Orig $200, now $30. Call Fred 957‑4636

HARPIST VIRTUOSO

Rainbow Bridge Ranch

PALM GROWERS • Carpinteria Over 20 varieties of Coastal Climatized Grown Palm Trees, Tropicals & Bananas. Plant Locating • Wholesale to the Public

805 684 7976 • WE DELIVER

domestic services

home services

personAl services

CLEANING SERVICE

Ace Handyman Service

55 Yrs or Older?

ELECTRICIAN-$AVE!

repAir services

15+ yrs exp. Res/sm business. Refs avail. English speaking cple. 448‑5790

Are you looking to spruce up your home? Or maybe you just need a few things fixed. Whatever the case may be, we can do it. From fixing that leaky sink to remodeling your entire home and everything in between. Contact Steve von Brandt at 805‑696‑3626 or vonbrandtconstruction@yahoo.com for a free consultation/quote. No job too small.

pets/AnimAls

musiC aLLey

SILVIA’S CLEANING

If you want to see your house really clean call 682‑6141;385‑9526 SBs Best

generAl services

HAULING 450-1053

Pick‑up truck & trailer. Trailer is 5’W x 10’L x 4’H.Lic959664.Handy Man Collin

LANGUAGE SERVICE COMPANY PROFESSIONAL TRANSLATION & INTERPRETING SERVICES (805) 845-0449 EXPAND YOUR MARKET BY TRANSLATING YOUR PRODUCTS INTO OTHER LANGUAGES

Your one stop source! Lic.#824718 & Ins. Best of SB 2010. David 569‑9188 $55/hr. Panel Upgrades.Rewiring,Small/ Big Jobs! Lic707833 ‑ 805‑698‑8357 GARDENING LANDSCAPING: Comm/ Res.FREE Estimate.Yard clean‑up,maint, garbage, lawns, hauling & sprinklers.15 +yrs.Juan Jimenez 452‑5220, 968‑0041

Rio Verde Landscape Maintenance

Res./Comm./Property Management *Irrigation *Fertilizers *Planting *Decks‑ Patios‑Fences * Flag Stones* Cleanup & Hauling. Rafael Torres 252‑8785; 733‑1992

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

APPLIANCE HELPLINE No service call fee!

ADVICE‑ REPAIR‑ PARTS 24hr FREE Phone Free Estimates 570‑6501

technicAl services

COMPUTER MEDIC

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

VIDEO TO DVD

TRANSFERS‑ Only $10! Quick before your tapes fade! Transfer VHS, 8mm, Hi8 etc. Scott 969‑6500


INDEPENDENT CLassiFieds

|

PHONE 965-5208

|

E M A I L a d s @ i n d e p e n d e n t. C o m

are santa barbara®

July 11-Aug 1

l l o P ’ s r e Read ReaL estate

auto

for sale

rentals

MODERN TRAVEL trailer 5th wheel (22ft). Quiet, must have car. N/S, Pet OK. Off 154 $750 / mo. 805‑692‑9258

Set among beautiful oak trees across the strert from Oak Park. NP. $1020. Call Cristina 687‑0915

reAl estAte for sAle

rentAl properties

vAcAtion property & timeshAres for sAle

ApArtments & condos for rent

SPRING MOVE‑IN $1020 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑ Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610

SUMMER MOVE‑IN SPECIALS:1BD near SBCC & beach @Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1020 Rosa 965‑3200

180° OCEAN VIEW VILLA

1 BDRM Townhouse Near Beach FREE Parking $1175/mo. 968‑2011. VISIT MODEL, ENTER DRAWING. www.silverwoodtownhouses.com.

2BD/2BA Near UCSB

Tropical setting, pool, on‑site laundry, vending machines, FREE underground parking. NO Pets. Garden Court Apartments, 968‑9664.

ng. . .

Will Publish

2o13

Hilltop, 3 houses, 2 pools, 200 yards to beach, gated, Costa Rica Pacific Coast, 011‑506‑8351‑8881 $1,250,000 www.mermaidview.com

comi

SUMMER MOVE‑In Specials‑Studios $1020+ & 1BDs $1120+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614 SUMMER MOVE‑IN Specials. 2BDs $1410+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2080. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector or Ricky 968‑2549 SUMMER MOVE‑IN SPECIALS: 1BD Near Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar.

rooms for rent

LARGE ROOM

in Goleat home. Nice yard and gardens. Great deal for the right person $585/ mon + 1/3 util. NS/ND/NP. Rich 805‑685‑0611 7a‑7p. LOOKING FOR Room & bathroom to rent. NP, NS, ND, no partying. Perfer 1 other adult only, female. Can pay $650‑ 700 a month. 805‑403‑2565.

WAnt to rent

domestic cArs

Single PHD Profnl

FOR SALE by owner $3500 - 2001 Chevrolet Camaro

F seeking granny flat/cottage. N/S, N/P annual rental. Begin Aug/Sept 2013. 239‑472‑8384.

open houses 724 CALLE De Los Amigos‑ Santa Barbara, $779,000‑Open Thurs. 10‑1 Will Stonecipher (805) 450‑4821, Goodwin Thyne Properties.

(Original‑owner) in great condition. 3.8L V6, Loaded with options: Power windows/ locks/ steering/ brakes, keyless entry, cruise control, removeable T‑tops (with original covers & safe storage), Leather interior in perfect condition, Monsoon factory CD/stereo 6‑speaker system, aluminum alloys wheels. 129k dealer serviced miles. No issues or accidents. Call/Text/Email 805.717.4430

july 3, 2013

THE INDEPENDENT

79


FEATURED PROPERTY

FEATURED PROPERTY

210 LAS ONDAS

1111 CHAPALA STREET

NEW LISTING

COMMERCIAL

Professional Real Estate Services BUYING OR SELLING...

PENDING

Goodwin & Thyne Properties provides national marketing reach coupled with the highest level of local real estate expertise. • • • •

Exceptional Personal Service Top Producing Realtors® Custom Marketing Plans Effective Selling Strategies

• • • •

Unique Team Approach In-house Attorneys Lower Commission Outstanding Results

We intentionally take lower profits and pass the savings on to our clients through lower commissions. Goodwin & Thyne Properties delivers the highest value in professional real estate services available. Take the first step in your next successful real estate transaction. Call us today!

(805) 899-1100

National Reach, Local Experts, Outstanding Results 415 ALAMEDA PADRE SERRA

998 W. MOUNTAIN DRIVE

435 EAST VALERIO STREET

NEW LISTING

SANTA BARBARA This well

SANTA BARBARA 7,449 square

located Mesa property offers 3BD/1BA. Gracious living room and an excellent opportunity to update. Large front and back yard, single story. Close to downtown!

feet of Class A penthouse offices with 13 reserved parking spaces, 3 conference rooms, balconies, views, kitchen, ADA baths and more! Great opportunity!

$775,000 www.GTprop.com/210LasOndas

$2.84 NNN www.GTProp.com/1111Chapala

1119 ALSTON ROAD

524 VIA SINUOSA

READY TO BE BUILT MONTECITO Luxurious 5BD/6BA home ready to be built. Views of the ocean & islands. (PRICE WHEN COMPLETE)

HOPE RANCH This 5BD/4.5BA hidden gem sits on 1.33 acres. Enjoy your own tennis court, pool & Jacuzzi!

$4,800,000 GTprop.com/1119Alston

$2,995,000 GTprop.com/524ViaSinuosa

361 RAVENSCROFT DRIVE

1390 SYCAMORE CANYON RD.

AMAZING VIEWS!

READY TO BE BUILT

NEW PRICE tion, this 5BD/2.5BA Upper East home is 3,179 sq. ft. Close to downtown!

GOLETA The remaining Ravenscroft Ranch Estate is 1.09 acres in a great Goleta neighborhood. Potentially split into 5 lots.

SANTA BARBARA 2BD/1BA

$1,675,000 GTprop.com/998WMountain

$1,295,000 GTprop.com/435EValerio

$995,000 GTprop.com/361Ravenscroft

$949,000 GTprop.com/1390SycamoreCanyon

724 CALLE DE LOS AMIGOS

7508 PADOVA DRIVE

1325 MORRISON AVENUE

1275 VALLECITO ROAD

SANTA BARBARA Lower Riviera

SANTA BARBARA 6 acre parcel

Tuscan Villa duplex on a R2 lot. 6BD/4BA. Ocean/city/riviera views.

w/ approved plans for 4,500 sq. ft. home. Next to Parma Park & trails.

$1,695,000 GTprop.com/415APS

1723 SANTA BARBARA ST.

SANTA BARBARA Incredible loca-

canyon retreat. Quality updated, private, yet near downtown.

OPEN THUR 10-1pm

PENDING SANTA BARBARA 4BD/2BA Upper East home. Plenty of natural light, secluded yard in the heart of SB.

PENDING SANTA BARBARA 3BD/2.5BA home located near La Cumbre Country Club. Updated kitchen, baths & more!

GOLETA 5BD/3BA home, attached studio w/ private entrance. Backs up to a park, feels like an extra back yard!

SANTA BARBARA 2BD/1BA cottage

PENDING

near downtown SB. Quiet cul-de-sac location in great neighborhood.

CARPINTERIA Stylish 3BD/2BA home w/ bamboo flrs, modern kitchen & baths, Jacuzzi tub, private patio.

$949,000 GTprop.com/1723SantaBarbara

$779,000 GTprop.com/724CalleDeLosAmigos

$779,000 GTprop.com/7508Padova

$735,000 GTprop.com/1325Morrison

$625,000 GTprop.com/1275Vallecito

4662 MALAGA CIRCLE

0000 BEGA WAY

615 MULBERRY AVENUE

829 N. SALSIPUEDES ST. #D

340 OLD MILL LANE #257

DUPLEX

PENDING SANTA BARBARA 3BD/2BA townhouse. Corian counters, cathedral ceilings, 2-car garage, wine cellar & more.

$625,000 GTprop.com/4662Malaga

30 WINCHESTER CANYON RD

BUILDABLE LOT

PENDING

PENDING

CARPINTERIA 3+ acres, biking distance to beach. Avocado trees w/ income history. Oaks, mtn views.

SANTA BARBARA Duplex,

SANTA BARBARA 1BD/1BA downtown

SANTA BARBARA Custom up-

1BD/1BA per unit with laundry hookups in each. Shared 2-car garage.

urban oasis. Unique interior courtyard w/ gourmet kitchen, jacuzzi tub and more!

dated 3BD/2BA mfd home. Amazing open kitchen, baths, details, value.

$579,000 GTprop.com/Bega

$524,900 GTprop.com/615Mulberry

$479,000 GTprop.com/829SalsipuedesD

$329,000 GTprop.com/340OldMill257

133 POR LA MAR CIRCLE

NEW PRICE GOLETA #81 Quality updated 2BD/2BA MFD home. Roomy kitchen, skylights and garden.

SANTA BARBARA 2nd floor unit

$169,000 GTprop.com/30WinchesterCyn

Upon Request GTprop.com/133PorLaMar

DRE# 01477382

PENDING

Santa Barbara’s best value in real estate.

w/ mountain views. Comes furnished. Close to tennis courts & picnic area.

www.GTprop.com

2000 State Street, Santa Barbara

805.899.1100


Santa Barbara Independent, 07-03-13