Santa Barbara Independent 9/22/22

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Santa Barbara

SEPT. 22-29, 2022 VOL. 36 ✦ NO. 871

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Bank | Borrow | Insure | Invest THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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2022 - 2023 Opening Week! Charley Crockett

Sun, Oct 2 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre “Crockett is an old-school country music superstar in waiting.” Independent (U.K.)

From Ukraine

DakhaBrakha

Thu, Oct 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre “The group mixes everything from punk-pop to traditional Ukrainian songs in cool yet beguiling textures... utter brilliance.” NPR Presented in association with Direct Relief, UCSB Dept of Music and UCSB MultiCultural Center

SW!NG OUT

A Joyce Theater Production Directed by Caleb Teicher Sat, Oct 8 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre

“A sweeping ride through contemporary swing dance... Captivating... Extraordinary.” The New York Times

David Gergen

Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made Tue, Oct 11 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

“David Gergen knows power, and he understands leadership… An invaluable guide to making things – good things – happen.” – Jon Meacham

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune

Sacre by Circa Wed, Oct 12 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “Rock stars of the circus world.” The List (U.K.) Pulsating with tension and infused with dark humor, this distinctive production brings Stravinsky’s seminal Rite of Spring to the circus stage.

There’s still time to subscribe and save up to 25% www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org | Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY CO-PRESENTS

Carmina Burana

Song, Dance, & Symphony A COLLABORATION WITH THE SYMPHONY, STATE STREET BALLET & THE GRANADA THEATRE Saturday, October 15, 2022 | 7:30 PM Sunday, October 16, 2022 | 3 PM In a spectacular tour-de-force Season Opening, The Symphony continues its impactful tradition of performing arts collaboration to create new experiences for the community. More than 150 performers from State Street Ballet, Santa Barbara Choral Society, Quire of Voyces and Sing!, the Music Academy’s children’s chorus join The Symphony on stage. REPERTOIRE Gabriel Fauré | Pavane featuring State Street Ballet in a ballet choreographed by SSB Resident Choreographer, William Soleau Camille Saint-Saëns | Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah Carl Orff | Carmina Burana THE ARTISTS State Street Ballet, William Soleau, Choreographer SB Choral Society, Jo Anne Wasserman, Director Quire of Voyces, Nathan Kreitzer, Director Music Academy’s Sing! children’s chorus, Erin McKibben, Director Nir Kabaretti, Conductor PRINCIPAL CONCERT SPONSORS Signature Sponsor: Brooks & Kate Firestone

2022/23 SEASON SPONSORS 70th Anniversary Season Sponsor: Sarah & Roger Chrisman

Artist Sponsor: Duncan & Suzanne Mellichamp

70th Anniversary Season Corp. Sponsor:

Selection Sponsors: Chris Lancashire Ruth & John Matuszeski Wallin Studios Drs. Fred & Linda Wudl

70th Anniversary Grand Venue Sponsor:

YOUR SEATS ARE WAITING! Tickets start at $35 Order online at bit.ly/CBInd or scan the QR code OR call the Granada Box Office 805.899.2222

TheSymphony.org

2022/23 SEASON UP NEXT:

November 19, 2022 Wisdom of the Sky, Water, Earth 4

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

December 31, 2022 New Year’s Eve With The Symphony INDEPENDENT.COM

January 21, 2023 Plains, Trains & Violins

February 18, 2023 Transformation

March 18, 2023 John Williams: A Cinematic Celebration


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporter Ryan P. Cruz Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Callie Fausey, Koss Klobucher, Melea Maglalang Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

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volume 36, # 871, Sept. 22-29, 2022

COVER STORY

Burrito Week

Where to Enjoy Seven Days of $7 Burritos by Indy Staff

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 6

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

PADDLING FOR POTTER Our longtime senior editor Matt Kettmann stepped away from his laptop this past weekend to join the 20th anniversary of the Friendship Paddle, this time raising money and support for his close friend, the popular plein air artist Chris Potter, who is fighting a rare and aggressive cancer. It was Matt’s second time on the paddle—the first was in 2016, to support longtime Indy writer Ethan Stewart, who is doing well and was also out there this weekend.

MATT KETTMANN

TABLE of CONTENTS

How’d the day go? Sunday was like a dream, almost lake-like conditions and warm water, in between a rough Saturday swell and the weird rainbows and rains of Monday morning. That made paddling relatively easy and kept everyone in positive spirits. There was a brief shark situation that forced a few people out of the water, but then that was quickly forgotten.

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

How much money did the event raise? We raised more than $200,000 for the Potters to deal with the challenges to come.

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 37

How did Chris react? Chris was beaming the whole time. There’s a real magic with this event that seems to transcend our surface understanding of this world, and he was certainly tapped into that. He gave a heartfelt, moving, and genuine speech at the end. I had tears dripping on my chest.

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

ON THE COVER: Illustration by Ben Ciccati. Design by Ava Talehakimi.

SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS

PARALLEL STORIES A Cross-Disciplinary Conversation with Marshall Brown + Jonathan Lethem

SUNDAY | OCTOBER 2 | 2:30 PM Layering, fragments, appropriation, cutting, higher cribbing, collage, and what artist Marshall Brown has called “creative miscegenation,” are all part of the crucible in which familiar themes are recast in art and literature. Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Lethem joins artist, Urbanist, Princeton University Professor of Architecture, and criticalthinking futurist Marshall Brown in a conversation about what Lethem termed the “Ecstasy of Influence.” This event is part of the opening celebration of the exhibition The Architecture of Collage: Marshall Brown, on view October 2, 2022 – January 7, 2023. Book signing to follow.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

Location: Mary Craig Auditorium, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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Endorsements

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HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Goleta, it’s the much-reviled Revenue Neutrality Deal that voters effectively ratified back when they voted for cityhood. It actually mandated the County of Santa Barbara to eat up an outsized slice of Goleta city’s sales tax revenues. Right now, Goleta charges a sales tax of 7.75 percent. Of that, the county — and other special districts — collect the 7 percent, and Goleta gets the remaining .75. Measure B must pass if the City of Goleta is going to keep roads paved, build new bike paths, expand homeless services, and critically, build a much-needed new fire station on the west end of town.

Endorsements So far

City Council District 1: Luz Reyes-Martín

for considering our suggestions.

City Council District 2: James Kyriaco

COU RTESY

U.S. CONGRESS

the only councilmember to vote against the sales tax, and he actually wrote the ballot argument against it. If Goleta residents had to make do with less, he argued, so too should local government. We don’t agree.

COU RTESY

ver the next few weeks, the Santa Barbara Independent will be rolling out our endorsements for the November 2022 election. Check our daily website at Independent.com for continuing information on other candidate races, city measures, and state propositions. As always, the Independent only endorses in races that we have researched carefully. In this, our first installment, we are focusing on the Lompoc mayoral race and the City of Goleta.Thank you

24th Congressional District: Salud Carbajal STATE ASSEMBLY 37th District: Gregg Hart GOLETA

City Council, District 1: Luz Reyes-Martín City Council, District 2: James Kyriaco Measure B (One Cent Sales Tax Hike): YES

T

Measure C (Ban on Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products): YES LOMPOC Mayor: Jenelle Osborne

R

City of Goleta

ome, famously, was not built in a day. The City of Goleta has been at it for 20 years now, after years of languishing in the hands of Santa Barbara county government. Back then, such jokes as “What’s the difference between Goleta and a bowl of yogurt? Yogurt has culture” were plentiful. This joke, by the way, was told by a former county supervisor who actually represented part of the Goleta Valley. Since 2002, when Goleta voted to incorporate as a city, its government has effectively built a panoply of services residents would reasonably expect from any competent municipal entity. But more importantly, it has begun to offer the Goodland’s 55,000 residents an existential center of gravity where grievances can be heard and some semblance of collective self-determination can take place. This year’s ballot offers two highly competitive races between qualified candidates all richly steeped in government experience. With three Latinx candidates who are fluent in Spanish, it’s also the most diverse group Goleta has ever seen, thanks in great part to the city switching to district elections. Also on the ballot are two measures, one of which, Measure B, is the most critical decision Goleta voters will have to decide this year. The other is a no-brainer on the subject of flavored tobacco vapes. Of course, every origin story has a snake in the grass. In

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THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

his race is a classic matchup between a candidate from the old school and one from the new era. Incumbent Roger Aceves, a 16-year city councilman, a former Santa Barbara city cop, and the first Spanish-speaking Latino to hold elected office in Goleta, is running against the first Latina — Luz ReyesMartín, a young mom who served eight years on the Goleta Union School Board. Nominally, both are Democrats, though Aceves — whose family dates back to the founding of Santa Barbara — sometimes casts himself as the curmudgeonly voice of more conservative opposition. Both are dedicated to the communities they serve. Both are formidable. Ultimately, we concluded, Reyes-Martín brings more of what’s needed in the years ahead for the City of Goleta. A child of Mexican immigrants, she grew up in Downey, attended Stanford and USC, and earned two master’s degrees — one in land-use planning and public administration. She and her husband have lived in Goleta where they are raising their young child, for 10 years. During that time, Reyes-Martín spent three years with the City of Goleta working with emergency services and the parks, another six as communications director for City College, and now works in a leadership role at Planned Parenthood. Within the local Democratic Party, she’s long been regarded as a rising star. No surprise. She has an open, friendly manner and speaks her mind but strives for cooperation. On the school board, she radiated an ease and civility during stressful public events. Politically, she’s both book-smart and street-smart, a genuine policy wonk with a shrewd sense of opportunity and of strategy: a pragmatic progressive. Reyes-Martín opted to sit out Measure B, the proposed sales tax increase, deferring to the will of the voters rather than staking out any position. We wish she had been bolder. But Aceves — always refreshingly candid — was

INDEPENDENT.COM

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ncumbent James Kyriaco can honestly say he has moved the needle to expand child care opportunities in Goleta. Long before other politicians “discovered” that the lack of affordable quality childcare posed a palpable danger to mothers, children, families, and workplaces across America, James Kyriaco had been beating that drum ever since he was first elected four years ago . It was an effective political move, but so what? It is a desperately needed service and one that only he seems laser-focused on. Perhaps one of the wonkiest of elected officials on the South Coast, Kyriaco went über-granular, pushing obscure zoning ordinances that rewarded developers by including childcare facilities in their projects. He pushed legislation to relieve day care providers of some of the onerous development costs and mitigation fees that can price them — or their families — out of the market. When elected officials actually try to do what they say they’re going to do, and then deliver the goods, you endorse them. How could we not? Kyriaco qualifies as a progressive middle-of-the-roader. He grew up in Santa Barbara and cut his teeth working on the political campaigns of such elected officials as Brian Barnwell, Roger Horton and Susan Rose, also progressive middle-of-the-roaders. On the council, he’s been an ardent advocate for the one percent sales tax increase; as proponents point out, that’s a 50-cent surcharge on a $50 dinner. Running against Kyriaco is Sam Ramirez, whom Kyriaco appointed to the Goleta Planning Commission a year and a half ago. Both Kyriaco and Ramirez are card-carrying Democrats. Kyriaco snagged the endorsement of the local party. Having served eight years on the city council of his hometown, Delano, Ramirez clearly has political chops. But even with his time with SEIU Local 620 — and working at Santa Barbara City Hall for the City Clerk — his depth of Goleta experience doesn’t match that of Kyriaco’s. Ramirez opposes the proposed sales tax increase, saying Goleta has not exhausted all efforts to negotiate a new deal with the county. We don’t buy it. Goleta has, in fact, worked hard to strike a better deal. Given the overwhelming need for massively expensive infrastructure and capital improvement projects, now is the time to act, not some day over the rainbow.


Measure B: Yes

f approved, Measure B won’t take effect until 2024. Exempt from the new tax will be gas, prescription medications, grocery food, and rent. Without the $42 million worth of road maintenance work, road quality will continue to deteriorate to the point it will cost $78 million 10 years from now. Goleta’s sales tax rate is currently the lowest among Santa Barbara cities. It’s one percent lower than Santa Barbara’s and Santa Maria’s. Given the large influx of out-of-town shoppers who visit Goleta’s Calle Real Shopping Center — home to Costco and Home Depot — it’s estimated that 44 percent of the higher taxes will be paid from non-city residents. Four of the five Goleta City councilmembers are supporting Measure B. The one-cent bump in the city’s sales tax will allow the city to totally bypass the Revenue Sharing Deal with the county. The council has put together a wish list for the funds, should Measure B prevail. The biggest chunk — $3.3 million a year — would go to road maintenance, with $1.9 million going to childcare and affordable housing, $600,000 to homeless programs, and $800,000 to creek restoration and watershed. Without Measure B funds, it will be a cold day in hell before the community center gets the rehab it desperately needs.

I

Measure C: Yes

f Measure C is approved, Goleta would effectively ban the sale of flavored tobacco products in retail outlets. Those who sell vape products would be liable for administrative penalties up to $250. This measure mirrors a statewide ballot initiative — Prop. 31 — that seeks to do the same thing, though not quite as strictly. Despite protests by the tobacco industry that minors are already legally prohibited from buying such products, evidence abounds that flavored

tobacco products provide an inviting pathway to tobacco addiction. Tobacco manufacturers intentionally target minors with candy-flavored products. Anything that makes it more difficult to get tobacco products in anyone’s hands — and lungs — is a step in the right direction.

City of Lompoc Mayor: Jenelle Osborne C ITY OF LOMPO C

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Endorsements

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or those with a taste for self-destructive right-wing anarchism, the mayoral candidacy of Lompoc’s Jim Mosby will come as a welcome breath of fresh air. For everyone else, Mosby’s bull-in-a-china-shop, pokethe-bear style of government — all anti-taxes, anti-regulation, and let-the-free-market-run-amok — is not an exercise in nos-

talgia to be indulged in. While incumbent Jenelle Osborne — a Texas transplant who runs an accounting firm — is not nearly so colorful or confrontational, she has brought a degree of competence and collegiality to City Hall, seeking consensus out when possible. Since Mosby — a former city councilmember — lost to Osborne in his last mayoral bid four years ago, Lompoc has been able to creep back from the precipice of financial ruin on which it was so precariously perched. When Mosby served on the council, he held uncommon sway. During those years, new taxes were violently rebuffed even if it meant losing one-third of the sworn officers serving on Lompoc’s police department. Ironically, the Mosby regime was all about defunding the police — if from a right-wing perspective — long before any Minneapolis cops put their knees on George Floyd’s neck. Mosby’s idea of urban revitalization was to allow an unlimited number of cannabis dispensaries to open and then charge them absolutely no taxes for the privilege. The theory was to allow the cannabis industry to secure a toehold without government interference and then flourish. Currently, there are 14 dispensaries, more than the number of 7-Elevens. But in practice, this large number has helped to drive down the price of cannabis below the threshold required for economic survival. Residents of Lompoc had to overcome the passionate opposition of Mosby and his confederates on the council to finally get a cannabis tax on the ballot, where it passed overwhelmingly. Ron Fink, a moderate Republican and longtime Lompoc columnist, has written critically of Mosby’s approach. In response, Mosby had designed a custom-made bumper stinker featuring a pile of cow manure accompanied by the headline, “Fink Happens.” In the post-Mosby world, however, Lompoc is finding its way. New businesses are opening up and new industries being courted. A new wind is blowing through town. Please cast your vote for Jenelle Osborne. And lest you forget, “Mosby Happens.” n

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

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CLAIM DEADLINE: DEC 31, 2022

Attorney Advertising

Abused by Clergy in California? These individuals have been accused of child sexual abuse in California.

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Lawsuits were filed in California involving these alleged perpetrators. The vast majority of claims against these individuals have not been fully evaluated in a civil or criminal court. The allegations should not be considered proved or substantiated in a court of law. All individuals should be considered innocent until proven guilty. 8

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

AndersonAdvocates.com 12011 San Vicente Blvd, Suite 700 Los Angeles, CA 90049


SEPT. 15-22, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

SCIENCE

Expert Punches Holes in Cantin Debris Flow Report

SANTA BAR BAR A MTD

COURTS & CRIME

Three forensic expert sources have now disputed the claim made by a former UCSB anthropologist that she positively identified the remains of missing 17-year-old Montecito debris flow victim Jack Cantin.

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skeletonized, they can stay skeletonized for decades, centuries, or even much, much longer.” It was not clear from Kurin’s analysis how she determined the bones had been buried for only two to three years, Pilloud said. In addition, for an age-of-death estimate, Kurin used an unfused epiphysis — the expanded end of bones in animals that becomes fixed to the shaft when full growth is attained—to provide a range of 16-19 years. “However, typically, only a maximum age can be estimated with this information,” Pilloud said, “as individuals under 16 could also have an unfused epiphysis.” Moreover, Kurin fails to offer sound reasoning to explain how she knows the bones are of human origin, Pilloud said. The toe bone and unfused epiphysis could have hypothetically come from another mammal. “The report correctly describes how histological analysis can differentiate human from nonhuman bone,” Pilloud said of the method that studies the microscopic anatomy of biological tissues. “But it appears no histological analysis was done on these remains.” The earlier DNA testing, conducted by a genome sequencing laboratory in Santa Cruz, found no evidence to substantiate Kurin’s claim that the bone fragments were human. In fact, the lab said, it was more likely they came from a cow. Pilloud lastly wondered about Kurin’s qualifications to carry out such an investigation, given her professional background in bioarchaeology, the study of skeletal remains in historical contexts. Forensic anthropologists, meanwhile, work with modern cases that fall within the scope of law enforcement inquiries. “There are several ways to demonstrate expertise and qualifications within forensic anthropology—through publication record,

SANTA BAR BAR A SH ER I F F ’S OF F IC E

by Tyler Hayden ormer UCSB assistant professor Dr. Danielle Kurin was acting far beyond her expertise when she declared the remains of missing Montecito debris flow victim Jack Cantin had been found, and she conducted analyses “that did not seem to be based in scientific methods,” a leading forensic anthropologist opined this week. The techniques Kurin used to determine the remains’ antiquity and origin were often “confusing” and “unclear,” and portions of her published findings were outright “disingenuous,” said Dr. Marin Pilloud with the University of Reno, Nevada, who reviewed a report prepared by Kurin in the case at the request of the Independent, which obtained the 31-page document through a public records request. “The report does not broadly follow best practices within the field, and it is difficult to understand how these conclusions are being made,” Pilloud said. The comments by Pilloud, who regularly consults on forensic casework and coauthored the book Ethics and Professionalism in Forensic Anthropology, mark the third direct challenge to Kurin’s findings. DNA testing on the eight small bone fragments Kurin submitted last summer failed to confirm they belonged to 17-year-old Cantin, and a separate outside expert determined they had been in the ground far longer than the few years since the 2018 debris flow. Multiple attempts to reach Kurin directly were unsuccessful. Her attorney, Dave Scher, based in Washington, D.C., said Monday he would provide a written statement on Kurin’s behalf, but he did not do so by press time. Cantin’s mother, Kim, remains convinced of Kurin’s conclusions and is in a protracted dispute with the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office over possession of the bone fragments. She has claimed the department is unfairly denying her the ability to declare her son deceased and officially bury him. Kim’s attorney, Barry Cappello, did not return a request for comment for this story. Digging into the specifics of Kurin’s report, Pilloud noted that Kurin estimated the stature of the person the remains allegedly belonged to based on metatarsal (foot) measurements. “Yet no metatarsal bone was recovered,” Pilloud said. “Instead, a pedal phalanx (toe bone) is noted as being recovered, and as far as I know, there are no methods to estimate stature from a toe bone, and none are cited in the report.” “The antiquity of the remains is also slightly confusing,” Pilloud continued. “When remains are skeletonized, it can be difficult to provide a maximum age, as once bones are

board certification, or even membership in professional organizations,” said Pilloud. “I am unfamiliar with any such publications by Dr. Kurin. Further, she is not a board-certified forensic anthropologist, nor am I aware of her involvement in professional organizations such as the Society of Forensic Anthropologists or the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.” Concerns have been raised since the beginning of the case over how and when Kurin notified the Santa Barbara County Coroner’s Bureau of her discovery, as well as the manner in which she publicly announced through the media alongside a grieving Kim Cantin that the teen’s remains had finally been unearthed after three long years of searching. Email exchanges between Kurin and the Coroner’s Bureau obtained by the Independent also reveal Kurin falsely claimed to investigators that her work had been peerreviewed by a colleague with a doctorate and a professorship at Washington State University. In reality, that individual was a graduate student and adjunct instructor on whose PhD committee Kurin sat. At the time last summer, Kurin was applying for tenure at UCSB, which she was granted. However, in January, as pointed questions started being asked about her role in the Cantin investigation, she abruptly resigned her position. Kurin, the daughter of noted cultural anthropologist Richard Kurin, the Smithsonian Institution’s Distinguished Scholar and Ambassador-at-Large, has previously been accused of misconduct. In 2016, she was placed on a three-year administrative leave from UCSB after an investigation found she had retaliated against students who reported her partner at the time for sexual harassment.

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A false alarm call that there was an active shooter on the loose at Bishop Diego High School in Santa Barbara was one of five hoax calls made 9/14 involving California schools. The FBI is investigating these calls as part of a possible coordinated action, but no such determination has been made. S.B. Police spokesperson Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale said nearly 100 law enforcement officers were immediately dispatched to Bishop Diego when the 9-1-1 call came in shortly before 1 p.m., alerting dispatchers that an active shooting was taking place. It took law enforcement about half an hour to inspect the school’s interior and exterior to determine that no active shooter was, in fact, present.

BUSINESS CA MPB ELL B R EWER

Calls Analysis ‘Confusing,’ ‘Unclear,’ and ‘Disingenuous’

In the latest, perhaps last, and certainly most shocking decision amid a career of traditionbucking moves, Yvon Chouinard (above) is donating his ownership of Patagonia to fund environmental causes. The decision to move his family’s estimated $3 billion in ownership value to the Patagonia Holding Trust and the Holdfast Collective was announced by the company to employees and in the New York Times on 9/14. The company itself will remain a for-profit entity, but each year’s dividends — estimated at $100 million annually — will further empower efforts to save the planet from climate change. Full story at independent.com/yvon.

CITY While not quite the Treasure of the Sierra Madre, the healthy spike in city revenues — bed taxes and sales taxes combined — have many in City Hall salivating on where the unexpected revenues might best be spent. Bed taxes collected in the month of August ($3.59 million) came in nearly 20 percent higher than budgeted, and sales tax revenues for the fiscal year 2022 ($28.5 million) are 22.7 higher than anticipated. The higher-than-expected bed taxes reflect the enduring strength of tourist demand for hotel beds and the high rates currently being charged. The real action at the City Council is now shifting to the Finance Committee, which is charge of allocating the unexpected inflow. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

by Ryan P. Cruz early three years after intentionally swerving his Chevy Camaro into oncoming traffic at nearly 120 miles per hour in October 2019— smashing head-on into another vehicle and killing 34-year-old Rebecca Vanessa Goss Bley and her two children — John Dungan was sentenced to three consecutive terms of 15 years to life by Judge Thomas Adams in Santa Barbara on Monday. Dungan was found guilty of three felony counts of second-degree murder on August 2, following an emotionally charged trial that recounted the events leading up to and following the fatal collision on October 25, 2019. The prosecution team — led by deputy district attorneys Megan Chanda and Stephen Wagner — originally sought three counts of first-degree murder and built a case that a suicidal and homicidal Dungan purposely plowed his car into Bley’s Chevy Volt, ejecting her from the vehicle and killing the two children trapped inside. Max Gleason, Bley’s husband and father to 2-year-old Lucienne Bley Gleason and 4-month-old Desmond Bley Gleason, was not present for the sentencing, but many family members were in the gallery. Several members of the Gleason family spoke to the court, providing tearful tributes to the three victims and asking that Judge Adams follow the Probation Department’s pre-sentencing report recommendation of three consecutive sentences. “In that single incident, my whole family was erased,” said Max Gleason, in comments read by family members. His mother, Niki Gleason, said the idea of “lumping their lives together” as a concurrent sentence would be hurtful, and his sister, Callie Gleason, said that Dungan’s actions were representative of “young men across the country killing without regard.” Kevin Gleason — Max’s father and grandfather to Lu and Des, as the family called them — fought through tears during

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his powerful testimony. “John Dungan is a coward,” he said. “A coward blames the world and everyone in it for their shortcomings. My hope is that he spends the rest of his life in prison.” The prosecution closed by reminding the court of the evidence brought forward during the seven-week trial: Dungan was by all accounts a mentally troubled individual, who was found guilty of stalking an ex-girlfriend months before the incident. After that, he was found in possession of numerous rifles and thousands of rounds of ammo, and he was placed on a GPS-monitoring program. Minutes before crashing on Highway 154, Dungan removed the ankle monitor and threw it into the bushes on the side of the road. Then, when approaching Cold Spring Canyon Bridge, he veered into the opposite lane— gas pedal to the floor — and removed his seatbelt, intent on killing himself and whoever he happened to hit. Deputy District Attorney Wagner said these actions displayed “aggravation and callous disregard,” and that Dungan “never once asked about the victims.” Dungan sat quietly through the comments, eyes locked on the judge’s bench. He spoke for the first time in the entire trial, reading from a folded handwritten note in a deep, hollow, and hoarse voice. He described “coming back from the brink of death” to a waking nightmare and said, “God gave me a second chance,” pausing several times to collect himself. “If there was anything I could do to bring them back, I would,” he said. Judge Adams read the pre-sentencing report, detailing its findings that Dungan’s actions were intentional and that he “posed a danger to the safety of the community” if released. His ruling followed the recommendations of the report, sentencing Dungan to 15 years to life for each of the three counts, to be served consecutively. He will n serve 45 years to life.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D PUBLIC SAFETY

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

Big Jump in Concealed Weapons Applications

104th Concert Season

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ince the Supreme Court opened up the rights of U.S. citizens to obtain concealed weapons permits on June 22, the Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s Office has received 125 new applications. Of those, three have been denied and the rest are still awaiting final determination. In June, the Supreme Court voted to abolish the “good cause” clause, used by local governments to limit concealed weapons permits only to those who show a good cause for such protection. Judges and jewelry store salespeople fit the profile. In Santa Barbara, Sheriff Bill Brown was notably stingy in issuing such permits; in other jurisdictions, they are more freely disseminated. To apply for a license in Santa Barbara, applicants must submit a Department of Justice background check, a three-page autobiography, and three personal references attesting to one’s good moral character, as well as undergo 16 hours of training and four hours of testing by a psychologist located in Ventura County.

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Music Director Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello Under the Supreme Court ruling, Sheriff Brown has 90 days to process application. Given the high volume of applications and staffing shortages, Brown’s department may struggle to meet the court-imposed deadlines. Applicants can also submit applications to the Lompoc and Santa Maria Police chiefs. Prior to June 22, the Sheriff ’s Office had issued 93 concealed weapons permits. —Nick Welsh

BUSINESS

E MM A SPENC ER

Mandated Makeover for Parklets

S

tate Street’s hodgepodge of parklets will soon get a more uniform look as Santa Barbara hammers out a permanent plan for the downtown promenade. The City Council voted Tuesday to enact design standards for the 44 outdoor spaces, mandating that—for the next two to five years of this “interim” period — new and existing structures must be stained or painted a dark hue that conforms with the historic district’s approved color palette. Prohibited will be enclosures or barriers that exceed 48 inches, and they must not be made of solid material, instead offering visibility through rails or slats. Also not allowed will be turf, carpet, or faux grass; neon or flashing lights; plastic, vinyl, or white-colored furniture; advertising, logos, or promotional materials; or mounted screens or projectors. The council also decreed as part of the interim ordinance that both new and existing parklets need to allow sufficient underside clearance for cleaning and stormwater flow. The 5-2 vote, with Mayor Randy Rowse and Councilmember Eric Friedman dissent-

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The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s great orchestras, is directed by Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, following her time with the Los Angeles Philharmonic as a Dudamel Fellow, Assistant Conductor, and Associate Conductor. British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason became a household name in 2018 after performing at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, watched by nearly two billion people globally. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, WEINBERG, DEBUSSY AND ELGAR’S CELLO CONCERTO Principal Sponsor: Bob & Val Montgomery Sponsor: CAMA Women’s Board Co-Sponsors: Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher • Beth & George Wood • Zegar Family Fund

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ing, enacted a rent structure for the parklets conducting commercial activity in the public right of way. The fees will be based on square-foot usage and is expected to generate around $800,000 a year in revenue, a little more than enough to cover the city’s cost of maintaining and cleaning associated areas. Until the State Street Master Plan is finalized, all parades will keep clear of State Street, the council said. Fire and police officials said the alternatives that have been used thus far—including Cabrillo, Anacapa, Santa Barbara, and Chapala streets—are, from a public safety perspective, actually preferable given their wider thoroughfares and better visibility. Representing opposite ends of the enthusiasm spectrum on the council were Kristen Sneddon and Randy Rowse, who cordially disagreed on the success of the State Street promenade thus far and where it ought to head. “What we’ve created so far is magic,” she said. “The community has made clear again and again that they want the promenade to continue.” Rowse, who fretted over parklet roofs potentially causing a safety hazard in a high-wind event, as well as amplified music blaring to and from individual frontages, accused the council of engaging in “circular conversations” over the interim plan. He suggested more discussion take place before the ordinance was passed and more thought should be given to reopening certain State Street blocks with few to no parklets to car traffic. “A lot of people want their Santa Barbara back,” he said. —Tyler Hayden

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SINGLE TICKETS TO ALL CAMA CONCERTS ON SALE NOW! SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS STILL ON SALE For more information visit camasb.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11


SEPT. 15-22, 2022

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COACH: Jack Trigueiro at courtside during his tennis team’s run of 10 CIF championships

record over 14 seasons, winning five Channel League championships. He coached three future NBA players — Victor Bartolome, Jamaal Keith Wilkes, and Don Ford. Wilkes and Ford played on the 1970 team that went undefeated until the CIF semifinals. Trigueiro’s tennis teams achieved unparalleled success from 1965-1995. They won 31 league titles, including 30 in a row, and 10 CIF championships, including a streak of eight from 1988-1995. Two Dons tennis players, his son Tim Trigueiro and Mike Falberg, won junior titles at the U.S. Open. “Tennis is not a team sport, but he had us playing for each other,” Tim Trigueiro said. “My father taught me how to be a man.” Bartolome was a skinny 6'11" center on the Dons basketball teams in 196466. “Coach Trigueiro made me believe in myself,” he said. “He did what was necessary to get the most out of us and build up the strength we’d need later in life.” Bartolome grew to seven feet at Oregon State and went on to play professionally for eight years with the Golden State Warriors and overseas. He worked as an account analyst at UCSB and stayed in touch with Trigueiro. “He’d finish our conversations by saying, ‘I love you, man.’ ” Trigueiro is survived by his wife, Sharon, and sons Tim and Rick. The family planned —John Zant to hold a private service.

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one has been awaiting transfer since December 2021. Chermak had reportedly been in county jail seven months awaiting treatment. In response to protracted treatment shortages in state psychiatric hospitals, jail officials had launched a competency restoration program of their own inside county jail. That program has 10 patients. Competency—not to be confused with sanity — indicates an ability to assist with one’s own defense. Those deemed IST cannot. The waiting list for IST inmates to get into the Jail Based Competency Treatment Program is typically two weeks to two months, said Zick. By contrast, it typically takes three months to a year to get placed in a state hospital. Zick added that the jail-based program gets faster results. Competency, she said, is typically restored in the jail-based program in 51 days. In state hospitals, she said, the average is 90 days. Santa Barbara judges like Brian Hill have noted in past interviews that many of the inmates found IST have been neither tried nor convicted, yet they have spent more time inside county jail awaiting restoration of their competency than they would have had they served out the sentence for the crimes for which they’d been charged. This, said Hill in a previous interview, constituted a significant civil rights issue. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

“We lost the weight for our kids.”

CITY

Chapala Street Project Scores High Marks

Minerva and Leonidas had tried everything to lose weight, but nothing worked. Their health was suffering, and it was impacting their daily activities, including playing with their children.

COU RTESY H ISTOR IC L AN DM AR KS COMMISSION

39-Rental-Unit Mixed-Use Project Praised for ‘Poetic’ Use of Space

by Ryan P. Cruz hile three- and four-story mixeduse developments in a Spanish Mediterranean style seem to dominate the most recent attempts at tackling housing in Santa Barbara, one project stands out as doing it “the right way” — at least according to the Historic Landmarks Commission, which gave a glowing review last Wednesday, September 14, to the proposed 39-unit adaptive reuse project on the corner of Chapala and Ortega streets. The project sits at the site of the former Volkswagen dealership, at a property with a deep family connection spanning more than 70 years. The Van Wyk family opened the dealership in the ’50s, and it was operated by family members well into the ’90s. The family still owns the property, and enlisted architect Tom Meaney to design a pedestrianfriendly development that would perfectly fit the character of downtown Santa Barbara. Tom Meaney is the grandson of founder A.C. Van Wyk and the son of Greta Van Wyk and Jack Meaney; the late Garry Van Wyk ran the dealership for decades. At first glance, the proposed design fits the mold of a string of similar mixed-use housing developments making their way through the city’s review boards: three to four stories tall, with the ever-present elements of white stucco, sandstone, and red-tile roofs. But Meaney — who has a background in both architecture and fine art and was driven even more by the fact that this project is a family operation — took it a step further, incorporating new ideas and details into a visually striking take on Santa Barbara’s classic architectural style. “I think it’s absolutely beautiful,” said Commissioner Cass Enberg, who praised Meaney’s team for addressing development priorities such as adaptive reuse of existing structures, creating four buildings spread throughout the space instead of one big mass, and adding walkable paseo and arcade spaces. “It’s just quintessential Santa Barbara,” she said. The words “romantic,” poetic,” and “artis-

W

tic” were used to describe the corner property’s proposed layout, which includes a reimagining of the existing service bay — a space Meaney said is unique to the property and will be reused as a “cool, industrial loftlike space” — and variations that break up the mass into several structures surrounding a central courtyard. “Mr. Meaney, I consider you to be a modern master, having a firm grasp on the language of Santa Barbara’s architecture, and this is a great example of that work,” said Commissioner Robert Ooley. Both Ensberg and Ooley went as far as to say the design had potential to become a “future historical landmark.” In a city that typically picks apart new developments in drawn-out back-and-forth battles, the Chapala Street project is an example of how planners and city boards can work together to achieve a common goal — even in the strict El Pueblo Viejo Landmark District. While the project received a height exemption, the designers chose to space out the units, offering 39 rentals spread over 30,000 square feet and an additional 5,000 square feet of commercial space. They were also able to provide 27 parking spaces, despite the zoning code not requiring residential parking in the area. Commission Chair Anthony Grumbine called the project “the best building” on Chapala Street. “And I do not take that lightly,” he said. “I just want to hold this up as an example of a building that got a height exception, broke the height limit, and did a great job getting straight through.” The project design was unanimously approved and will return for a final hearing, though the only directions given to Meaney were to address noise mitigation, balcony materials, and detailing on wrought-iron and tile design. Finally, the commission gave a rare green light on creative freedom and encouraged Meaney to feel free to add “even more of a personal touch” to the project. “Have your thumbprint on there, your personal impact,” Commissioner Ensberg said.

That’s when Minerva reached out to the Cottage Center for Weight Loss Surgery. Since bariatric surgery at Cottage in 2018, Minerva and Leonidas have lost a combined 250 pounds.

To learn more about weight-loss surgery, visit cottagehealth.org/weightloss

State Street

2022

JOB FAIR Find your next job opportunity!

Meet employers from a wide variety of organizations and industries who are seeking hardworking and enthusiastic employees to fill available positions. This unique job fair will be hosted on State Street and additional hiring businesses within the downtown area will be noted by balloons in their storefront window. Food and drinks will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis and attendees will have a chance to win a $25 gas card!

Wed, September 28, 2022 3 PM – 6 PM 700 and 800 blocks of State Street between Ortega and Canon Perdido Downtown, Santa Barbara

Join us!

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK

SEPT. 15-22, 2022

CONT’D COU RTESY DMHA A

BUSINESS

The Future of Linden Avenue Three Developments Set Stage for New Chapter on Carp’s Main Strip by Ryan P. Cruz arpinteria’s small-town identity may be going through some big changes soon, with three big-thinking developments slated to reshape the look and feel of the main strip on Linden Avenue. In a community typically resistant to change — full of residents not shy about voicing their displeasure with new developments — Carpinteria’s city leadership is learning how to adjust with the times and find ways to modernize the city in a way that keeps the sleepy-beach-town authenticity but doesn’t leave it lost in the past.

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THE SURFLINER INN

COU RTESY SU R FLI N ER I N N

In what seems to be the greatest example of the fervor against new developments in Carpinteria, the hotly contested Surfliner Inn has struggled for years to win over the city’s residents. The proposed hotel has gone through countless redesigns, proposals, and adjustments since it was first kicked around City Hall in 2016. The center of the controversy lies in the fact that the 30-to-39-room hotel would be built on city-owned land, on two parking lot parcels on the corner of Linden Avenue and the railroad tracks.

Rendering of the Surfliner Inn

Hearing that the hotel would be built on what is considered by city residents to be “community space” raised the eyebrows of many locals, who crowded public hearings and criticized the idea of public land being used for commercial purposes. In November 2020, a group called the Coalition Against the Railroad Hotel, led by locals Judy Mulford and Marla Daily, penned a letter to the city council, worrying that the project had “grown in size” to the point of overtaking the corridor south of the railroad tracks and a portion of a community garden adjacent to the property. “This is the people’s property,” Mulford said. The same letter alleges numerous “violations to Carpinteria’s General Plan,” citing that the land was acquired for public use and should remain that way. Since then, the opposition to the project has grown stronger, despite several attempts by the developers to work with the city’s residents, reduce the size of the project, and even adjust plans to keep the community garden untouched. The development team is headed by a group of local families — led by Andy Morris, Matt and Jim Taylor, Whit Hollis, and Jack and Jeff Theimer — who were handpicked because of their connection to the community and willingness to create something more than just a money grab. Each family has experience with hospitality and real estate, with the Theimer family being known for developing Storke Ranch in Goleta, Ennisbrook in Montecito, and Beaver Creek in Colorado. The Surfliner, they contend, is a local venture and will

be a step toward sustainable tourism, based around the community and walkable areas, as opposed to out-of-town developers dropping in and creating a big-city tourist trap. Despite attempts to extend an olive branch to the opposition to Rendering of 700 Linden Avenue no avail, the developers have won 64 spaces, then 48. Eventually, the final approved plans over city staff and leadership who say Carpinteria needs to included a 20-space parking lot. adjust to growing trends up and down the coast. “I cannot make those findings for a modification. I don’t “Things are changing quickly. You can’t say no to everysee this as a public benefit,” Benefield said. “Retail is nice; thing,” said Councilmember Gregg Carty, who was part retail is good, but it doesn’t measure up to being a public of the 4-1 vote approving a lease agreement with the propbenefit. I like this project, but we don’t let other people off erty developers in July 2021. The agreement allowing the the hook with a parking modification.” property owners to use the property could net the city an Other commissioners were excited about the prospect of estimated $621,000 in annual revenue. a new look for the former Austin’s Hardware location, and During the same July meeting, Carty encouraged they commended the development team — locals Terry those opposed to the hotel to take a step back, referring to Huggins and Matt LaBrie — for being open to changes and social media posts calling for the recall of city leaders over conditions placed on the project’s agreement. the issue. “I don’t appreciate that. I urge everybody to be Commissioner John Callender said the design goes respectful and take it from there,” he said. beyond expectations by reenvisioning the buildings instead Since then, more than 1,000 city residents signed a petiof tearing them down, and that the project “does a wondertion to put the matter to voters in this November’s election ful job figuring out how to change while preserving what in the form of a ballot initiawe value.” tive: Measure T. The initiative The latest renderings, designed by Santa Barbara–based was backed by the nonprofit DMHA Architecture, are far more modern than the rest YES! Save Our Downtown of Linden Avenue — with long lines and a second floor Open Space, and it places the that leans heavily on glass and wood panels — but embrace future of the two city lots to a downtown Carpinteria’s “eclectic nature,” according to vote — if Measure T passes, DMHA’s website. the two lots will be zoned as “We stripped buildings to their bones and revealed open space/recreation, which their original hardware and architectural foundations,” the could kill the future of the description reads. “We then enhanced these features with Surfliner. new architecture that echoes the shapes and geometrical Four members of the city designs of the original buildings.” council — including Mayor The space will be more of an “urban park,” intended Wade Nomura and counto draw people into “the heart of Carpinteria,” with sevcilmembers Carty, Natalia eral local businesses reportedly already showing interest in Alarcon, and Roy Lee — have leasing space, including owners of Santa Barbara hotspots since singed their own “ArguCorazón Cocina, Milk & Honey, and The Blue Owl. ment Against Measure T,” in which they say the measure is a Nick Bobroff, principal planner with the City of Car“misguided” attempt to sidestep the usual city review to stop pinteria, said the development is currently in the process of the hotel. “The Surfliner, like any other project, is required receiving permits, and the project’s developers are looking to go through public review,” the letter reads, “but that will to hold off on beginning construction until after the annual not happen if Measure T passes and your voice on the hotel Avocado Festival on October 1. The project could break project may not be heard.” ground by the end of this year. City residents will vote on Measure T in November. If it fails, the project returns to the regular city review process for approval.

THE PALMS HOTEL PROJECT

700 LINDEN AVENUE (FORMERLY AUSTIN’S HARDWARE) Much further along the development pipeline, and by contrast more widely accepted than the Surfliner Inn, is the 700 Linden Avenue project — a full city block of adaptive reuse retail and commercial space that will house a hodgepodge of eateries, coffee shops, markets, and a rooftop bar. The project is fully approved through Carpinteria’s Planning Commission and Architectural Review Board, where it received near unanimous approval despite concerns over the size of the development and parking modifications granted due to the “public benefit” provided by the project. The only member of either board to vote against the project was Planning Commission Chair Jane Benefield, who was concerned that the board was being too generous with its concessions because they were all in favor of the development. The project was initially required to provide

Right across the street from 700 Linden is the former site of the Palms Restaurant. Originally built as an 18-room hotel when it was constructed in 1912, the current owners from the Miramar Group are looking to bring back the hospitality aspect with a proposed 17-room hotel/bar/restaurant. The project — which was designed by architect Kevin Moore, who serves as chair of Santa Barbara’s Architectural Board of Review — was scheduled for its first conceptual review with the Carpinteria Planning Commission earlier this month, but the hearing was postponed and will be rescheduled for a later date. Early designs show a ground-level lobby and reception area with a bar and restaurant, along with six rooms facing the surrounding street. The upper level would include the additional 11 rooms. For more information on the upcoming projects in Carpinteria, visit the “Hot Topics” section on carpinteriaca.gov.

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until September 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


PAT BAGLEY, THE SALT L AKE TRIBUNE

Letters

Military Aid Essential

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’m grateful to our Congressmember Salud Carbajal for supporting military and humanitarian aid to Ukraine. I urge him to continue to support both. I grew up in Santa Barbara but have spent the last six years living in Ukraine. Russia’s invasion forced my family to relocate — and we were the fortunate ones. My wife’s family is from Mariupol. While I grew up celebrating my childhood birthday parties at Goleta Beach, my wife spent her childhood enjoying the beaches around Mariupol. The difference is that while I can still return to bring my little son to Thousand Steps to explore the tidepools, the beaches in Mariupol are now a mined wasteland, my wife’s childhood home is a pile of rubble, and many of her friends and family are dead. The military aid that the United States provides is essential in preventing the mass death and war crimes that occurred in Mariupol and other cities from becoming the horrific reality for millions of other Ukrainians. Negotiations can only succeed when both sides are ready to come to the table. Sadly, Putin is not yet ready to negotiate. Pressing Ukraine to negotiate in lieu of providing military assistance is to ask them to make one-sided concessions to an evil dictator who is bent on their destruction. If Santa Barbara were being destroyed, would we really ask our military to stand back and tell our government to negotiate with Putin in the hopes that he would voluntarily withdraw?

— Christo Artusio, S.B.

Too Fast, Too Young

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s it a BIRD or a PLANE? NO, it’s a young kid on an e-bike traveling at a high speed, running red lights, wearing an unbuckled helmet, and carrying a passenger on the back. Their face is usually glued to their cell phone. Their e-bike is made of steel but their body is not. Motor vehicle drivers beware. — Mae Morris, S.B.

Fossil-Free Diablo Power

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overnor Gavin Newsom and the California Legislature deserve kudos for the decision to keep Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant operational for another five years past its originally scheduled closure in 2025. It is undoubtedly the case that, when the new closure date is closer in another five years or so, this vital, environmentally friendly component of California’s comprehensive energy delivery system

will again remain open. It is probable that Diablo Canyon will now keep providing fossil-free energy for decades. Anyone who considers himself or herself an environmentalist should support retention of Diablo Canyon Power Plant. As reported in the recent Independent article, it currently provides about 11 percent of the state’s total electricity. Moreover, Diablo Canyon currently provides about 17 percent of the state’s zero-carbon electricity. How it would be possible — now and for decades — to increase California’s zero-carbon electricity production fundamentally and simultaneously to eliminate 17 percent of existing zero-carbon electricity is an open question. Now is the time to expand, not diminish, use of nuclear energy. Retention of Diablo Canyon Power Plant is part of the answer to a reduced fossil-fuel future.

— Lanny Ebenstein, S.B.

Fighting Back with Votes

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uring the January 6 hearings, we’ve heard from former members of the Trump administration and Republican state officials about how Trump and his allies worked together to try and overthrow our democracy because the 2020 presidential election didn’t go their way. Now, they’re working to make sure all of our elections go their way in the future, whether we vote for them or not. Already, Trumpers in office have changed state laws to weaken our freedom to vote and threatened Republican election administrators who won’t go along with them. Now, they’re running candidates for key election administration offices, from secretary of state to county clerk. Should they win their elections this fall, these officials won’t hesitate to overturn future elections if they or their MAGA allies lose. This completely undermines the tenets of our democracy. The only way we’re going to protect our elections is to fight back and make our voices heard. We have to cast our ballots in the upcoming midterm elections. It’s up to us to hold election deniers accountable at the polls and elect democracy defenders up and down the ballot on November 8.

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For a limited time, earn a guaranteed interest rate with a CD (certificate of deposit). A $10,000 minimum balance is required. To get started, contact the Preferred Banking Office nearest you or scan the QR code to learn more.

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— Jessica Barene-Gutierrez, S.B. Santa Barbara, 1200 State Street, (805) 560-6883

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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obituaries Kenneth Orrin Minor 7/24/1938 - 9/6/2022

Kenneth O. Minor passed away peacefully, at home with his family on September 6, 2022. He lived a full life, following Jesus and loving others. He led by example and shared life lessons. In his last days, he told us this story: “Write the word ‘kitchen’,” Lloyd Orton said to 15 year old Ken Minor. And these four words changed the course of Ken’s life. “How many times in your life can you recollect four words having such impact?” Ken would ask his friends. Mr. Orton, a man from church, was so impressed by Ken’s block print, popular among architects, that he went on to ask Ken to draw up some plans for a house. And although Ken ultimately failed at this project, he later became a successful architect, designing for over 40 years, providing architectural and planning services in many different types of work, from small additions and remodels to major commercial projects. Orton later got Ken his very first job, as a draftsman. When one of Ken’s friends commented on the importance of seeing potential and investing in a teenager’s life, Ken nodded and said, “That’s my point.” Ken went on to marry the one love of his life, Loretta, and they had a gentle and kind marriage of 63 years. Together, they navigated through life, leaning on each other and trusting God. Loretta supported Ken while he attended Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo from 1959 to 1963. But over the years, his career was more than successful. This wasn’t how Ken measured the worth of a man, though. He believed in being kind to strangers, loving his family well, investing in the lives of others, often those that society had written off. He would see the potential in another, nurture and encourage it until that person would come to know and believe in their own strengths and worthiness. In turn, those friends would walk away a more complete person. After his career in architecture, Ken focused on his hobby of woodworking and boat making. As a boatwright, he was precise and exacting, turning humble pieces of wood into a beautiful masterpiece. He saw the potential. His beautiful wooden sailboat, Morning Song, started as an idea in 1989 and eventually launched at the Santa Barbara Harbor in 2016, surrounded by family and friends from all over the 18

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com world. Ken was known all over town and was loved and respected for his quiet, contemplative presence, thoughtfulness, and great kindness. As a young dad, his smile was often under wraps, closed mouth and quiet. When he became Gramps, his smile opened up and often ended with a laugh. Toward the end of his life, that big toothy smile and deep hearty chuckle had been given freely and easily to his family and many friends. After his diagnosis, Ken decided he wasn’t going to “fight cancer”. Anyone who knew his true character, knew he wasn’t one for a fight. Instead, he lived with cancer, savoring time with those he loved. And in the end he even learned to “two-step” to maneuver about. After 84 years of life, he finally learned to dance. Ken modeled godliness for his family, showing us that everyone is important and worthy of love, attention and care. He lived every aspect of his life unto the Lord and he was humble in his successes, giving glory to God the Father. He made sacrifices so his daughters, Donna and Teresa, could have music lessons and go to summer camp. He made time for his grandkids, Joshua, Jacob, Jessica, Harrison and Christine, and their projects. He always saved some bacon or turkey for his good dog, Charlie. He taught us to love God, love others and love nature. He is survived by his loving wife, Loretta and his two daughters and their families: Daughter Donna and son-in-law Gregory Venzor Grandson Joshua and his wife Colleen Venzor, baby due January 2023 (great grandbaby) Grandson Jacob and his wife Fatima Venzor Granddaughter Christine Venzor Daughter Teresa and son-in-law David Thornburgh Granddaughter Jessica and her husband Stephen Ramirez, son Riley Fox (great grandson) Grandson Harrison and his wife Linda Thornburgh, son Felix Luna (great grandson) We’ll be gathering at Coast Community Church on Saturday, September 24, for one last “Coffee at Renaud’s” followed by a brief service of praise and worship to the God who now holds our beloved. Coast Community Church 4973 Via Los Santos Santa Barbara, CA 93111 10:00 Coffee catered by Renaud’s 11:00 Service immediately following In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Ken’s honor to one of the following: Coast Community Church Student Ministry Santa Barbara Rescue Mission Texas Land Conservancy Westmont College Music Fund VNA Health

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

Max Leslie Chase Weiss 8/12/1933 - 8/22/2022

On August 22, 2022, Max Leslie Chase Weiss, retired mathematics professor at University of California Santa Barbara and former provost of the College of Creative Studies, died suddenly of natural causes in his home in Goleta. Prof. Weiss was born in Salt Lake City on August 12, 1933 to Simon and Clarissa (née Chase) Weiss. He grew up in Utah and was admitted to Yale University in 1951, receiving a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and philosophy in 1955. He earned a master’s degree in mathematics at Cornell University in 1958 and went on to teach mathematics at Reed College in Portland, Oregon for two years. The University of Washington awarded him a PhD degree in mathematics in 1962. After teaching a year at the university he received a National Science Fellowship which allowed him to do research for a year at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey. In 1964 he joined the mathematics faculty at UCSB. In 1967 he became a member of the founding faculty for the College of Creative Studies at the university. He served as associate provost of the college 197177 and 1983-84 and was provost from 1984 to 1989. He enriched the college and UCSB by developing projects like the Young Scholars Program and the Prize Competition for gifted high school students. Heart disease prompted him to take early retirement in 1991. Max was married to Patricia Friedmann in 1954 and they had three children, Karen, Karl, and Frieda. After this marriage ended, he married Karen Knudsen in 1971. To this union were born three children, Erik (died in infancy), Ellen, and Dan. Survivors are his wife Karen, Karen Miller (A.J.), Karl Weiss (Irene), Frieda Weiss (Dale White), Ellen Weiss, Dan Weiss, and his grandchildren: Andrew Miller, Brooke Miller, Alanna White, Marinda White, and Rowan Weiss. Max took great joy in teaching, especially in the College of Creative Studies, advising his PhD students, and mentoring young mathematically talented children. He enjoyed computer programming and, in his retirement, worked for Bartz Technology in that capacity. He loved word play, music, science, crossword puzzles, and his family. He is also known for running a marathon, composing for the piano, singing, developing a

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profound philosophy about reality, reading fun books aloud with his wife, and goofing around with his kids. He had a caring heart, a generous spirit, and a creative sense of humor. One of his many wise/Weiss sayings was, “I wanted to be somebody else, but I needed to be me.” Friends who wish to honor Max’s memory are invited to donate to Common Cause, ACLU, or the Southern Poverty Law Center. No services are planned.

Jagmohan Tulsidas Hiranandani 8/29/2022

On the evening of August 29, 2022, with family by his side, Jagmohan Tulsidas Hiranandani (aka Jack Hira), passed away peacefully at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital from complications of multiple myeloma cancer. Jack was 74 years old. He was preceded in death by his parents, Tulsidas and Devi Hiranandani, and a sister Mira Khilnani. Jack is survived by his beloved wife of 48 years Susan, son Daniel (fiancée Shaunah), daughter Jennifer (Justin), granddaughters Hailey, Laila, and Paisley Stuler, brothers Dhanraj, Shyam, Jagdish, sister Renu, their respective spouses, many nieces, nephews and extended family in the U.S. and India. Jack was born in Benares, India (Varanasi) the fourth child of six. At age five his family moved to Bombay (Mumbai) where he grew up and attended school. After studying commerce in college, he left India for Hong Kong in 1969 and joined a custom tailoring company, Taj Mahal. After working in Hong Kong for 10 months, Jack came to the U. S. and traveled throughout the country taking orders for men’s suits and shirts. Less than two years later (in 1972) he decided to open his own business with his best friend, Hiro Nasta, and Fashion Tailors was begun in Santa Barbara. Leading into a retail store, Fashion Tailors and Imports, opened downtown in December 1973. In 1973 Jack unexpectedly met Susan Bailey at a local grocery store. After becoming friends, they were inseparable. Married in 1974, they began an extraordinary journey together. He was a jack-of-all trades and an entrepreneur, and throughout life his curiosity led to many interests. A few achievements were opening several retail stores (including Me ‘n’ You), plus wholesale, manufacturing and import

businesses. Jack then went into real estate (licensed in 1987), construction, and property management. He was forever an optimist. To him there were no obstacles, only opportunities. Their daughter Jennifer Devi was born in 1982, and son Daniel Bailey completed the family in 1986. The children were Jack’s pride and joy. He never missed a chance to attend Jennifer’s musical performances or Daniel’s baseball games, or learn how to use a new tech device. In 2007 he welcomed Justin Stuler into the family as a new son-in-law, and was blessed over the years with three precious granddaughters. Last year he happily met his future daughter-in-law, Shaunah Stolaroff, and was looking forward to their wedding next year. Jack was a people person, taking a genuine interest in anyone he met. Family and food (it will bring us together) were very important. Taking time to connect—along with offering enough to eat—was his true generous nature. Encouraging others with Good Thoughts, Good Words, Good Deeds—plus Action—was a lifelong motto he excelled at. Since 2014, attending the Santa Barbara Vedanta Temple was an important connection to his upbringing. Traveling, hiking, taking long walks at Shoreline Park, studying economics and reading were a few of his other passions. The family gratefully thanks Dr. Alan Rosenblum for his considerate care of Jack, Dr. Robert Wright, Laura Cadwell, the incredible nurses at Cottage Hospital’s Infusion Suite—”Jack’s Angels”—and the doctors and nurses who attended to him during his final days. Jack will remain in our hearts forever. McDermott-Crockett Mortuary handled the cremation. A memorial service will begin at 2:30pm on Saturday, September 24th at the Vedanta Temple, 927 Ladera Ln, Montecito, CA 93108. A celebration of life will be held in October and details will be shared on www.jackhira.com. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to your favorite charity in Jack’s memory.

Danny Keith Pack

1/28/1947 - 7/23/2022

Danny lived in Goleta most of his adult life. He loved surfing and hiking the hills of Santa Barbara County. He will be missed greatly!


obituaries Ken Kuencer

1/22/1952 - 8/14/2022

Ken Kuencer passed away peacefully and suddenly on August 14, 2022 in Aspendell, CA. Family and friends are saddened by the loss of this kind and patient man who was loved by so many. He was born in Long Beach, CA in 1952 and spent over 20 years in Santa Barbara, CA before retiring to the small mountain community of Aspendell, west of Bishop in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. He loved the ocean and was an avid sailor during his years in Long Beach and Santa Barbara. Ken lived a simple life and followed his passion for the outdoors. The Eastern Sierras had been his refuge since childhood and there were many hiking, camping, backpacking and off-roading adventures that provided good memories for many. Ken leaves behind his 3 children Heather Flom (Brian), Chris Owen (Debbie) and Serenity Nichols (Nathan), 8 grandchildren Breanna Owen, Kevyn Crocker, Spencer Owen, Kayla Owen, Macy Graham (Hayden), Kirstyn Owen, Austyn Nichols and Deegan Nichols, greatgrandchild Isabella Owen, sister Jan Wagener (Bob), nephew Jeremy Bucko (Beth), niece Kristin McLean (John), father Walt Kuencer, dear cousins and many friends. His mother Lois Kuencer and grandson Cody Flom passed before him. As a licensed Land Surveyor at Penfield & Smith (P&S) in Santa Barbara, Ken was responsible for numerous topographic and boundary surveys throughout the county during his career. His work was essential for many construction projects at local ranches, estates and urban properties and although his work accomplishments were impressive, the impact he had on the lives around him was far more important. He provided mentorship and support to many colleagues and the number of lifelong friends Ken accumulated speaks to his legacy. Aspendell brought Ken 20 great years of “retirement” life and few outside his Eastern Sierra friends and neighbors were aware of his meaningful contributions to the community. He was a welcomed and respected voice of reason and humble community pillar. He served as the Fire Chief of Aspendell’s volunteer fire department for several years, performed water quality testing and record keeping for the Aspendell Mutual Water Company, and participated in the community fire committee that supported the reorganization of the fire department as its own nonprofit organization facilitating further funding, growth and capacity to serve neighboring subdivisions that previously had no fire protection. Subsequently, he effectively became an

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com ambassador between the community service groups and neighborhoods. Ken was also one’s ideal neighbor who on his daily walks kept an eye open for any problems that might arise like a downed tree, a broken water line or the mischief of a hungry bear. He was a welcome sight when walking his Weimaraner dogs and would always cheerfully wave and say hello with a friendly smile. Ken was genuinely loved and respected by those he encountered and will be deeply missed and remembered. *A memorial service will be held in Goleta, in January 2023. Location, date and time to be announced.

Barbara Jean Wollen-Sturtevant 5/16/1930 - 9/5/2022

Barbara Jean Sturtevant passed away peacefully at home in Arroyo Grande on September 5th, at 92 years old. She was born Barbara Wollen, May 16th, 1930, in Weeping Water Nebraska. The third of four children to Ray & Opal Wollen. The family moved to Nipomo in the summer of 1938. Barbara attended school there and graduated from Arroyo Grande High School. In 1948, she met Donald Sturtevant, and they were married in Pismo Beach in 1949 and moved to Santa Barbara, where Don was a Chef. Their son Don Jr. was born in 1953, followed by Danny in 1955 and daughter Darla in 1962. Through the years, Barbara worked for several local businesses. In the late 50’s, she worked the front desk at “The Plunge” and was well liked by all and was referred to as “Red” for her naturally curly bright red hair. In later years, she worked in the corporate office of Jordano’s. She was a devoted member of The First Presbyterian Church for many years. In 1995, she retired to Arroyo Grande and spent a decade volunteering at Arroyo Grande Hospital. She is survived by her 3 adult children, Don Jr of Idaho, Dan of NYC and Darla of Arroyo Grande. Five grandchildren, Ryan Sturtevant of Oakland, Monica Rodriguez and Benjamin Rodriguez of Goleta. Hannah Sturtevant of Las Vegas and Emma Zagelow of Hawaii. And six great grandchildren. Along with dozens of nieces and nephews. She was loved and will be missed by all.

Donna Allene Thomas 12/9/1926 - 9/11/2022

A loving, caring, compassionate and generous woman who lived a life of service, Donna Allene Thomas, age 95, of Santa Barbara, CA, passed away at home on September 11, 2022, surrounded by the love of her family. Donna, a California native, was born in Alameda, CA on December 9, 1926, to parents Houston Byron Thomas and Margaret (Dolly) Ramsay Thomas. She graduated from Polytechnic High School in Riverside, CA in 1944, and went on to study at Highland School of Nursing in Oakland, CA, graduating in August 1946. Having joined the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps in 1944, in 2003 she was designated a member of the Special Honor Roll by Women in Military Service for America Memorial Foundation, Inc. Donna met David A. Wright in Riverside, CA. After marrying in 1946, they lived in the Piedmont Pines district of Oakland, CA where they had three children: Cynthia Diane, Kathryn Elizabeth, and Lauren Michelle. After the marriage ended, Donna moved to Santa Barbara in 1967 where she worked as an RN at Cottage Hospital assisting surgeries, births, and emergencies. She went on to attend San Fernando Valley State College and graduated in 1972 with a B.S. in Health Science. Public health became her mission and she worked for Santa Barbara County making welfare checks on the indigent and homeless living on the streets. Upon retiring, Donna enjoyed a successful career as a real estate agent and investor in Santa Barbara. It was in the real estate office that she met her future husband John (Jack) A. Patterson. Growing up, Donna sang in the Presbyterian Church choir in Riverside, CA and was a member of the Highland Nursing School Chorus. She and Jack sang with the Santa Barbara Choral Society in many memorable concerts. They were also choir members of the First Congregational Church of Santa Barbara. Her homes were always filled with music, and she passed along her love of music to her children and grandchildren. A plant and nature lover, Donna grew wonderful gardens at her homes in Oakland and Santa Barbara. Donna and Jack belonged to the Audubon Society and loved bird watching, as well as hiking with the Sierra Club. They enjoyed many years traveling around the world and spending time with family at her homes in Santa Barbara, Donner

Lake and on Oahu. Leaving a legacy of love, in addition to her husband, Jack, and daughters, Cynthia Wright Aldous, Kathryn Yuma, and Lauren Breese, Donna is survived by five grandchildren: Kathryn Cunningham, Michael Cunningham, Michelle Clark, Christopher Pace, Ryan Pace, and eight great-grandchildren: Elijah, Zachary, Hannah, Levi, Victor, Rowan, Jonah, and Jacob. Learn more about Donna at www. mcdermottcrockett.com/obituaries. A memorial will be scheduled to honor Donna’s life. In lieu of flowers, the family encourages donations in Donna’s name to Alzheimer’s Association and Hospice.

Dianne Florence Kimbrough

3/13/1945 - 9/13/2022

Dianne Kimbrough “Nana”, passed into Heaven peacefully, in her sleep, on the morning of September 13, 2022 at the age of 77. She was a selfless and loving sister, wife, aunt, mother and grandmother. Dianne was born in Winona, MN on March 13, 1945 to Eleanor and Chester Stark. She is predeceased by her children Darrin, Dena, Darla and her brother, Dennis. She is survived by her husband, Denny, son David, daughter in-law Shannon, three brothers Richard, Doug, Jim and numerous extended family. Dianne grew up in a strong Christian household and never wavered in her faith in Jesus Christ. She married her soulmate, Denny on her birthday, March 13, 1965 and was happily married to him for over 57 years. She loved traveling the world with her husband and family and loved the peacefulness of being on the water. Dianne and Denny owned many boats throughout her life and spent summers exploring islands and towns around their second home in Seattle. Although Dianne had an adventurous spirit, her true love was family. Her grandsons Joshua (18), Jeremiah (18), Greyson (10), Thomas (7) and Luke (4) meant everything to her and she showered them with the love and affection only a grandmother can give. Even through her many physical challenges, Dianne remained strong in body and strong in her faith. She will always be remembered as a kind, compassionate and loving woman who cared for others above herself. Her smile and kindness are reflected by everyone whose life she touched. A private graveside service will be held for Dianne on Tuesday, September 20th at Santa Barbara Cemetery. Her soul is joyously united with our Lord!

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Robert George Alexiades

5/6/1932 - 11/11/2021

George Alexiades, 89, of Santa Barbara CA, passed away on November 11, 2021 in the care of hospice while surrounded by his loving family. George was born on May 6, 1932, in Maroussi, a suburb of Athens, Greece to Theodore Constantine and Theodora (Christodoulu) Alexiades. George grew up in Greece with his sisters, Angeliki and Mary, during the Second World War before immigrating to the United States with his family in 1948 and settling in New York City. He was drafted into the Army in 1950, serving 2 years active duty in The Korean War. He was Honorably Discharged with the rank of Staff Sergeant. George then studied theater, attending The American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City. He eventually made his way to Los Angeles to pursue a career in acting. He then became a regular dancer at the Intersection Folk Dance Coffee House in Los Angeles, later joining the Hellenic Dancers and performing regularly at special events. With the encouragement from friends and family, George opened The Plaka in Santa Barbara in 1970. The Plaka quickly grew from a small Greek taverna where people would gather to folk dance, to becoming a culturally authentic Greek meeting place where you came to eat, drink, dance, and be entertained by belly dancers and George’s famous Table Dance. And sometimes plate breaking, OPA!! After 2 decades, George decided to close the Plaka and follow his passion for travel and adventure. He climbed Mount Whitney, Mount Everest base camp and Mount Kilimanjaro. He was a cycling enthusiast and would often ride his bicycle from Santa Barbara to Malibu. When he wasn’t adventuring, he loved to spend his days gardening, working out at the gym and enjoying time with his friends and family. He was a great friend, a loving father and an adoring grandfather. George is survived by his three children Theodore, Alexis and George II, and grandchildren, Abigail, Anna, Zoe & Weston. We miss you deeply. A celebration of George’s life will be held in October in Santa Barbara. If you were a friend of George’s and would like to attend, please email CelebrateGeorgeAlexiades@gmail.com for details.

Continued on p.21 SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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STUDENTS WANTED FOR CITY OF GOLETA COMMISSIONS Openings on Parks & Recreation and Public Engagement Commissions Local students may be wondering what extra-curricular activities they can participate in this school year. The City of Goleta has a special opportunity for two local students to gain experience by serving on a City Commission. The City is currently accepting applications for one Student representative position on the Parks and Recreation Commission and one Youth representative opening on the Public Engagement Commission. This is a unique opportunity to get involved in local government at a young age and make a difference. Applications are now being accepted at http://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. The deadline to apply is October 13, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.

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expiration date - 6/5/22

The Parks and Recreation Commission advises the City Council on all issues related to parks and recreational opportunities in Goleta, including the acquisition, development, maintenance, and improvement of the City’s public parks, recreational services, and open spaces. Members are compensated at the rate of $50 per meeting; the student commissioner may choose to waive their compensation to receive community service credit.

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In Memoriam

obituaries

Brian Ellis Daily 1957-2022

A Water Baby

BY M A R L A D A I LY rian Ellis Daily was born on June 26,

1957, in Allison Park, Pennsylvania, the third child behind his siblings, Marla and Gordon. Two years later, the family moved to Santa Barbara where his father, a research psychologist, had been transferred. Unbeknownst to the family, the house they rented sight unseen at 226 East Mountain Drive was the central hub of Bobby Hyde’s Mountain Drive Bohemian community. In 1963, the Daily family moved to a home they bought on Middle Road. Less than a year later, the Coyote Fire burned through the Mountain Drive community, and their Middle Road house served for weeks as the evacuation hub for the Mountain Drive–rs, with families, friends, children, and several dozen cats, dogs, and horses spread out over the property. At age 7, Brian delighted in being the morning doughnut passer-outer. With the move to Middle Road, Brian began surfing at Hammond’s and attended Montecito Union followed by Laguna Blanca. When it came time for high school—and with her elder daughter at UCSB—the now-divorced Natalie Daily decided her sons should be bicultural and bilingual, so in 1968 she packed her children and a AAA road map into her blue 1965 Mustang and drove to Guadalajara, Mexico, where she rented a house and enrolled the boys in summer school. This routine continued until the summer of 1973 when she kept on driving—to San Jose, Costa Rica. Natalie had learned of an incredible, private high school called Country Day, run by the finest teachers imported from the U.S. and financed by the American criminal financier Robert Vesco to educate his children. Gordon and Brian were enrolled as soon as they arrived. Two years later, Natalie and Gordon returned to Santa Barbara, but Brian chose to stay and live with a local family. At school he assembled and sold Italian submarine sandwiches to the students at lunchtime to finance his weekend bus tickets in search of surf spots. Costa Rica’s “pura vida” was infused into his veins. Water-baby through and through, after graduation from Country Day, Brian returned to Santa Barbara and built his first dive boat, Tamarindo. Tamarindo was lost in the Potato Patch between Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands when his heavy load of urchins shifted. By incredible circumstance, a UCSB researcher was at Fraser Point, saw the boat flip over, summoned help from Just Love anchored in Forney’s Cove, and Brian was rescued. Next came Brian’s Wilson dive boat Ysleña. After years of service, he towed the boat north to dive near Fort Bragg. With Brian underwater gathering urchins, the boat dragged anchor, his air hose wrapped around the propeller, and Ysleña went on the rocks. Brian swam to safety, and the vessel was salvaged. Brian moved on to purchase Deborah Ann, an aft-cabin Radon. He sold the vessel when an opportunity came up to buy his most recent dive boat, Jan Marie. In October 1987, a friend asked Brian if he would “sit in” for him on a dive to San Nicolas Island—his wife was expected to give birth. Always one to help a friend, Brian agreed. While returning from the island in heavy seas, Bounty’s load shifted and the vessel sank midway between San Nicolas and Santa Cruz islands with three divers aboard. One mayday went out at 6 p.m. It was picked up by the Vail & Vickers crew aboard Vaquero II while on a cattle run down

10/16/1952 - 9/18/2022 COURTESY

B

Ramon Zarate Angel Jr.

the back side of Santa Cruz Island—then silence. The crew relayed the mayday to the U.S. Coast Guard, who later informed the family it was dark and too late to initiate a search. The following Halloween morning, with private aircraft arranged by Brian’s siblings from Channel Islands Aviation, Aspen Helicopters, and fish-spotter pilot Johan Huelman, two of the three Bounty divers were spotted treading water in heavy seas just before noon the following day. Brian had tied a bright hotpink swordfish buoy on a long rope to his ankle, which led to their discovery. Green dye packets were thrown from the spotter plane, the location was relayed to a Coast Guard helicopter, and within the hour, the two survivors were lifted from the water. The third diver was never found. Through binoculars, Brian’s siblings anxiously watched from separate circling planes as the helicopter lifted two men out of the heavy seas in a hoist. When Brian’s blonde hair reflected in the midday sun, we knew—Brian had survived. The Coast Guard said it was an unprecedented rescue 16 hours after a mayday. It was in 1988 that Brian bought his first of several parcels on the Osa Peninsula in Cabo Mata Palo, Costa Rica, home to the premier surf spot Backwash Bay. Thus Encanta La Vida was born. Spanish for “enchanted life,” it literally translates to “loving life.” Brian began building his dream—a relaxed jungle adventure lodge that was home to monkeys and macaws, coatis and sloths, with a front yard expanse of exceptional surf. For more than 30 years, Brian shared his love of the jungle and his simple Costa Rican way of life—Pura Vida. Ten months after being diagnosed with metastasized spinal melanoma, Brian died on August 23, 2022, at his home in Carpinteria. He was predeceased in death by his son, Tyler (1995-2015). He leaves behind his siblings, Marla and Gordon, and an incredible community of best and beloved friends: Kirk, Katie, Yorleney, Steven, Timmy, Larry, Pat, Maire, Danny, Karen, Shane, Pierre, Carlos, Marco, Harry, Laura, Bill, Cory, and many others. A paddle-out and fishermen’s parade of boats, followed by a gathering at the n Carriage Museum, is being planned.

Born in Santa Barbara to Ramon Zarate and Teresa Angel, Ramon was the 3rd of 8 children. As a 2nd generation true native of Santa Barbara, he attended Franklin Elementary, Santa Barbara Junior High and graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1970. Shortly afterward he joined the Local Painters and Allied Trades Union where he was a loyal member of the union and served as president for a time. He was an active union painter for over 40 years. In 1973 he married Patricia Thompson and they had 2 daughters, Reyna and Tracy. Ramon (aka: Ray, Angel, Cardine, High Booty, and Poppy) was a dedicated family man, an avid fisherman and a lover of old cars. He spent much of his life fishing for the “Big One” in many destinations but loved Lake Cachuma (he rarely missed a trout derby) and the Santa Barbara Waterfront above all. Upon his retirement from the union in the 2000’s he fulfilled a lifelong dream of owning a bait shop on Stearns Wharf which he named ANGEL’S BAIT AND TACKLE and built his dream home in Mexico. Ramon was always restoring or buying and selling classic cars and rarely owned less than 5 vehicles at a time. He was a classic just like his cars; animated, funny and full of life. He loved life, people and was known by many. But the greatest joy in life were his loving daughters, 5 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. Sadly and surprisingly he was taken from us too soon due to health complications from a kidney transplant earlier this year. He passed away at the home of his sister Martha Angel surrounded by family and loved ones. A special thank you to Martha and her family for providing her home in those final days, Pueblo Del Rey for funeral arrangements, Visiting Nurses for assistance and most specially for round the clock care by his devoted daughters and eldest granddaughter. It was an amazing expression of love. Ramon was preceded in death by his parents; Ramon Zarate and Teresa Angel and brothers; Pantaleon and Alphonso. He is survived

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by his 2 daughters; Reyna Sorenson Angel (Bobby) and Tracy Alvaro Angel (Rudy), exwife Patricia Angel. Grandchildren; Ciela Angel (Marco), Paloma, Izabella, Santino & Serena. Great grandchildren; Amarina and Isaiah. Siblings; Clara, Luis, Robert, Jesus and Martha and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Santa Barbara will never be quite the same without you Ray! He was a legend and legends live on forever. Services will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows Church – 21 East Sola St. Rosary Service Tuesday, September 27, 2022 7:00 pm Funeral Mass Wednesday September 28, 2022 at 10:00 am Burial at Calvary Cemetery and Reception following at the Veteran’s Hall 112 W. Cabrillo Blvd. all are welcome! In lieu of flowers please make a donation to the Neal Taylor Center at Lake Cachuma

Richard J Avila Jr

6/30/1962 - 9/3/2022

Richard was born & raised in Santa Barbara, the eldest child of Richard Sr. & Barbara Avila. He attended SBHS, where he met his high school sweetheart and future wife Irma Gonzalez they were married on December 24th, 1988. He battled Leukemia for two long years. God decided he need not suffer anymore and took him home, he died peacefully at home in his son’s arms. He is survived by his wife Irma, children Jake and Jaqueline, grandson Eli, his mother Barbara, sister Michelle, and * His brother from another mother, Ray Richard loved all music. He could be found most every Friday night in “The Lab “with is closest friends & family, creating a new playlist to share with his friends. He also enjoyed camping, sportsGo Raiders, & his humming birds. Richard is at Peace now & will be missed by us all. There will be a dedicated mass for him at Our Lady of Guadalupe on Friday October the 7th at 12 noon, & a celebration of life reception to follow

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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21


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

The Arlington Theatre

ROUTINE.

­

NE VER

­

9/23: RAILWAY CHILDREN

9/23: CATHERINE CALLED BIRDIE

9/23: LIFEMARK

9/23: ON THE COME UP

9/23: CUNADO SEA JOVEN

9/23: AVATAR RE-RELEASE

Hitchcock

Hitchcock

Fairview

Fiesta 5

Fiesta 5

Metro 4 • Camino

TYLER HENRY OCTOBER 21 + 22 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 23-22, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

LYLE LOVETT + JOHN HIATT

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

NOVEMBER 12 | SATURDAY | 8PM

Lifemark* (PG): Fri-Thur: 5:10. Pearl (R): Fri-Thur: 5:00, 8:00. Bullet Train(R): Fri-Thu: 4:50, 7:45. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri-Thur: 7:30.

CAMINO REAL

DAUGHTRY NOVEMBER 18 | FRIDAY | 8PM

LOS TIGRES DEL NORTE DECEMBER 2 | FRIDAY | 8PM

7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

Don’t Worry Darling* (R): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 2:20, 5:25, 8:25. Moonage Daydream* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:10, 5:05, 8:15 Avatar Re-Release* 3D (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:40, 4:15, 7:55. The Woman King* (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:20, 4:25, 7:30. Thur: 1:20, 4:25. See How They Run (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:30, 5:15, 7:45. Thur: 2:30. Barbarian (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Mon-Wed: 3:05, 5:35, 8:05. Thur: 3:05, 5:35. Bros* (R): Thur: 5:15, 8:00. Smile* (R): Thur: 8:10. The Greatest Beer Run Ever* (R): Thur: 7:30.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Railway Children (PG): Fri-Thur: 4:30, 7:00. Catherine Called Birdie (PG13): Fri-Wed: 4:45, 7:30. Thur: 4:45. The Good House (R): Thur: 7:30.

ARLINGTON

Welcome to Freedom 22

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

The Woman King* (PG13): Tue/Wed: 3:45, 7:00.

METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Avatar Re-Release* 3D (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:10, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:10, 7:45. The Woman King* (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:45, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:45, 8:00. Confess Fletch (R): Fri-Thu: 5:00. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:05, 7:30. Bullet Train (R): Fri, Sun-Wed: 5:15, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:15, 8:15. Thur: 5:15. Smile* (R): Thur: 8:15.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

On the Come Up (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. Cuando Sea Joven* (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30. Pearl (R): Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:35, 8:05. Sat/Sun: 3:05, 5:35, 8:05. Running the Bases (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 7:00. Sat/Sun: 1:40. Minions: The Rise of Gru (PG): Fri: 4:35. Sat/Sun: 4:35, 7:00. Barbarian (R): Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 3:15, 5:45, 8:15. The Greatest Beer Run Ever* (R): Thur: 7:55.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Don’t Worry Darling* (R): Fri-Thur: 2:10, 5:10, 8:05. See How They Run (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Moonage Daydream* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:20, 4:40, 7:45. The Silent Twins (R): Fri-Wed: 8:15. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Fri-Wed: 1:55, 5:30. Thur: 1:55. Bros* (R): Thur: 5:30, 8:15.


K E E W

O T I R R ! K U C B BA IS

Our e t a r b e l e C o t How

L A U N N A SECOND H C T E R T S Y A SEVEN-D

S O T I R R U of $7 B

L

et's be honest: Every week is burrito week in Santa Barbara. But when can you find 11 different burritos — from traditional to breakfast to vegetarian—all for just $7 apiece? Ahorita, that’s when. Sí, mis amigos, Burrito Week is back! Our second annual edible affair, which runs from September 22-28, includes 10 restaurants from western Goleta to Santa Claus Lane, each stuffing burritos with homemade formulas featuring birria, sausage gravy, falafel, zucchini, pasilla chile, or, for purists, simply beans, rice, and meat. Here’s where to celebrate, what they’re making, and which restrictions apply, all compiled by our hungry team of burrito enthusiasts. Tell us what you think and tag photos of your Burrito Week victories at #sbindyburritoweek on Instagram. We’ll publish our favorite experiences in next week’s issue!

SNAP

SHARE

WIN

We're giving away $25 gift cards to participating Burrito Week restaurants all week!

TO ENTER: SNAP A PIC OF YOUR BURRITO WEEK BURRITO SHARE IT ON INSTAGRAM USING #SBINDYBURRITOWEEK There will be 10 winners total and all winners will be notified on Instagram. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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23


WEEK BURRITO

When I came in to try the delicious Super Cucas Week Burrito, it was during a wave of unusually high temps. The humidity was thick, rain was in the forecast, and a gray apocalyptic feeling hung in the air. Ducking into Super Cucas on Micheltorena with the familiar side porch teeming with locals fresh off work and in for their favorite Mexican fare, I was instantly comforted. Even more so when I took a bite of their massive burrito special filled with rice, beans, onions, cilantro, and carne asada. The tender carne asada is my favorite, but you can choose from any of their mouth-watering meat options, including pastor, pollo, or carnitas. Whatever you choose, I definitely recommend slathering this beautiful creation in their perfectly balanced salsa verde. As I continued to indulge, a tropical drizzle began to fall. Was the humidity breaking? Although I can’t predict the weather, of this I am certain: A Super Cucas burrito is sure to satisfy. The tasty taqueria opened in 1991 and now has three Santa Barbara locations. Winner of the Indy’s Best of Santa Barbara® Burrito year in and year out, Cucas remains a nourishing constant in a changing world. —Rebecca Horrigan

EL ZARAPE MEXICAN FOOD:

BREAKFAST PASILLA BURRITO (THE #7)

GEORGE YATCHISIN

Available during normal hours. 626 W. Micheltorena St., (805) 962-4028; and 2030 Cliff Drive, Ste. 1A, (805) 966-3863; supercucasrestaurant.com

Full disclosure: I have eaten more El Zarape breakfast burritos than any other to-go item in Santa Barbara, only partially because I live on the Westside. Usually, I opt for the straightforward egg, rice, and beans, so this Burrito Week variation is kind of like trading in your Hyundai for a Lexus. Gone are the plebeian — if deliciously filling — rice and beans, replaced by potatoes that would delight as home fries all on their own. But the #7 burrito has more than just starch ballast on its wellplancha-ed tortilla. It stars pasilla chiles, grilled, but still giving that good green crunch. Then there’s a heaping helping of avocado, offering lots of nutty creaminess, and a healthy melt of cheese guaranteed to goo into strings. Egg also gets grilled and woven into the mix; El Zarape always serves its burritos portioned so you get a bit of every ingredient in each pleasing bite. Owner Raul Gil and his team won a Foodie Award way back in 2016 and have been open for two decades, so their well-loved local joint isn’t the trendiest or prettiest spot. But if you want to kick off your day with a sigh of contentment, start here. And while all the salsas are stellar, the kicky green tomatillo matches the color and flavor profile of the #7 best. —George Yatchisin

Available Mon-Fri, 7-11 a.m. and Sat-Sun all day. 1435 San Andres St.; (805) 899-2711; elzarapesantabarbara.com

24

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

XAVIER PEREYRA

SANTA BARBARA FOOD CONNECTION: BIRRIA BURRITO

Santa Barbara Food Connection is now open where the old Dave’s Dogs was located near the top of Milpas Street’s commercial corridor. Joe Silva started the Connection as a food truck and ran it for six strong years before moving into a brick-and-mortar location this summer. He now serves authentic Mexican cuisine as well as bacon burgers and fully loaded fries. The Birria Burrito came with the stewed meat’s traditional partner of consommé — which is the birria broth — as well as freshly fried chips and salsa. Silva wraps up his deliciously tender birria with a hefty amount of fried cheese plus rice, beans, cilantro, and onion into a tortilla that’s crisped on the griddle. The key to pairing the burrito’s light crunchiness is dipping it into the warm consommé, squeezing fresh lime wedge, and dolloping on some salsa de aguacate. Enjoy it with one of the ice-cold aguas frescas that Santa Barbara Food Connection regularly sells. —Xavier Pereyra

Available 1 p.m.-close. 900 North Milpas; (805) 869-2007; santabarbarafoodconnection.com

HOME PLATE GRILL TRAINWRECK & G-TOWN BREAKFAST BURRITOS

MAT T KET TMANN PHOTOS

SUPER CUCAS:

REBECC A HORRIGAN

O T I R BUR

WEEK!

Hidden behind a 7-Eleven in the western Goleta neighborhood of El Encanto Heights, the Home Plate Grill is an elemental American diner. The kitchen’s sizzling griddle is not hidden from the smattering of tables and booths, nor are the extra napkin dispensers, shelves of condiments, and bulletin board of community flyers. There’s a sports twist too, with live games and/or highlight reels flickering on the TVs as ’90s rock music provides the soundtrack. The formula feels perfectly functional as the restaurant approaches its seventh year in business. A former construction professional, Ken Johnston opened the restaurant in 2016 to be close to his brother, Rusty Johnston. Back in 2008, Rusty and his wife, Amanda, renovated The Falls, a longtime dive bar in the same strip mall, into the Roundin’ Third Sports Bar. But then Rusty died right after Ken opened Home Plate, leaving Amanda to run the bar. Home Plate always participates in both Burger Week and Burrito Week, and this year’s two breakfast burritos are the Trainwreck — a peppery, creamy mix of eggs, bacon, sausage gravy, tater tots, and cheddar cheese that goes great with their orange salsa — and the G-Town, an avocado- and meat-forward combo of eggs, tri-tip, Italian sausage, Ortega chilis, grilled jalapeños, and cheddar cheese. “That one’s more for hangovers,” Ken told me, pointing to the Trainwreck, and then aimed at the G-Town. “And that one’s more spicy.” Loaded with proteins, carbs, big flavors, and complex textures, they’d both work for hangovers, or just for starting your day deliciously, with no need for lunch. —Matt Kettmann

Available 8 a.m.-2 p.m. daily. 7398 Calle Real, Ste. C, Goleta; (805) 845-3323; homeplategoleta.com


DON BRUBAKER

LOS AGAVES:

GARDEN BURRITO

(PLUS MEAT OPTIONS)

It isn’t every day you take a first bite that effectively arrests all of your senses at once — rarer still to indulge in a burrito that manages to capitalize on that first-bite feel with every subsequent offering. Enter: Los Agaves’ Garden Burrito. The beloved Santa Barbara establishment (with locations on De la Vina, Milpas, and in Goleta) has turned out another noteworthy, tortilla-wrapped delicacy that deserves the highest praise from herbivores like myself. As its name suggests, the Garden Burrito is full of veggies that walk the fine line between taste and texture. Grilled zucchini, green and red bell peppers, and carrots, all perfectly prepared, lend this burrito the utmost flavor with a subtle crunch to boot. Add pinto beans and Monterey Jack cheese to this melty medley and witness a burrito that is truly and transcendentally greater than the sum of its parts. For those who can’t be without meat, Los Agaves’ al pastor, chicken, or carnitas burritos should satisfy your carnivorous cravings. Pro tip: Pair your burrito with a bottled Coke and Los Agaves’ legendary salsa bar for a superior dining experience at a Santa Barbara restaurant that importantly prioritizes quality food and service. This Burrito Week, one thing is unmistakably clear: Los Agaves understood the assignment. —Don Brubaker

FOXTAIL KITCHEN & BAR: FALAFEL BURRITO

SARAH SINCLAIR

Available 11 a.m.-5 p.m. for dine-in only, at the 600 N. Milpas St., 2911 De la Vina St., and 7024 Market Place Dr. in Goleta locations; los-agaves.com

Nestled between the Palace Café and Rascal’s on Cota Street, Foxtail Kitchen sits on one of the hippest little side streets in Santa Barbara, just around the corner yet worlds away from the hustle and bustle of State Street. When you step into Foxtail Kitchen, you know you’re in a locals’ joint, with twinkling lights, wood-paneled walls, and friendly bartenders. While they specialize in Mediterranean fare, there’s something for everyone on the menu, from the Make N Bacon burger to a variety of vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free items. The only vegan selection on our roster of Burrito Week entries made my mouth water before I even arrived. I’ve had Foxtail’s falafels before, and knew I was in for a non-traditional treat. Savory falafel balls coalesce with tahini sauce (tahini, tomato, cucumber, and lemon juice), hummus, romaine lettuce, and cucumber, all wrapped up in a super-sized pita that’s grilled for a touch of extra crunch. Served with extra tahini and super-spicy habibi sauce on the side, the falafel burrito is a vegan delight that will satisfy the hungriest of palates. —Sarah Sinclair

Available 4-11 p.m., except Monday. 14 E. Cota St.; (805) 845-6226; foxtailsb.com

BURRITO WEEK

ONLY $7 THURS SEPT. 22 - WED SEPT. 28 AVAILABLE: 11-5PM (DINE IN ONLY)

CHOOSE FROM: GARDEN BURRITO AL PASTOR BURRITO CHICKEN BURRITO

Celebrating Santa Barbara TO

UR ’2 2

A self-guided in-person tour of nine exceptional projects showcasing outstanding design in Santa Barbara and Montecito.

AIA Santa Barbara presents the 13th annual

Architectours ‘22 Saturday October 1, 2022 For tickets & information:

aiasb.com 805.966.4198 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

25


s Concert Serie

WEDNESDAYS, 5:00-7:00 PM ACROSS THE STREET FROM CALI-FORNO PIZZERIA 905 STATE STREET

Famil y Fr iend ly!

STREET GAMES - PIZZA - HAPPY HOUR

A OB MA AC M RQUEZ SEP JAC 29 AND THE GOOD VIBES

W O T I BURR LOS ARROYOS:

RUNAWAY BURRITO

MAT T KET TMANN

DOWNTOWN OW LIVE

It’s no surprise that the chicken and al pastor burritos are the most popular specialties served at the original Los Arroyos Restaurant on Figueroa Street — so much so that they’re known simply as the Runaway. Chef/founder Tony Arroyo prepares the classical Mexican meal-in-one with a perfect mixture of grilled chicken or grilled pork, paired with brown beans, rice, Jack cheese, onions, cilantro, and guacamole. Be sure to accompany your burrito with at least one of the three salsas, made fresh daily: a mild pico gallo, the smooth avocado, or the spicier quemada. I would also recommend ordering one of their great salads. The Mama Ensalada is my favorite, full of seasonal veggies and refreshing flavors. It goes great with either of the burritos. It’s always a joy to eat at Los Arroyos. The staff is friendly and efficient, and the kitchen crew turns out an amazing variety of dishes quickly and beautifully presented. But this is Burrito Week, so take a friend, order one of each—chicken and al pastor — and share. Whether you eat inside the pleasant, tiled dining room, or al fresco at the outside parklet, you will leave happy and satisfied. —Marianne Partridge

Register at sbhra.org under Events Calendar! COME

JOIN

SBHRA

US

IN

SPEAKER

OCTOBER

PERSON! SERIES

20TH

11:30AM-1:00PM MARMONTE

PST

HOTEL

GUEST SPEAKER: CHARLES FELTMAN, AUTHOR OF ‘THIN BOOK OF TRUST: AN ESSENTIAL PRIMER FOR BUILDING TRUST AT WORK’ ‘A MUST READ THAT IS ACTIONABLE AND MEANINGFUL’ … GUEST SPEAKER ON BRENE BROWN’S PODCAST. WIN-WIN, ATTEND AND GIVE BACK TO SHRM FOUNDATION. LET’S MAKE A HR DIFFERENCE TOGETHER!

Members: $30 Non-members: $45

YONA REDZ:

BIRRIA BURRITO

At Yona Redz, the line goes out the door and down to the corner on busy nights.Expect no different during Burrito Week, when they’re serving an outstanding Birria des Res burrito from 5 p.m. until closing — or earlier, if they run out. The popular restaurant is on the State Street Promenade block anchored by Joe’s Café on one end and Hana Kitchen on the other. On a breezy September afternoon, the flowers and leaves from a tree overhead drifted down onto a savory example of what slowcooking can do for a cut of beef shoulder. In this secret family recipe from his mother’s mother, owner Jonathan Estrada would only admit to guajillo chiles, California chiles (aka Anaheim chiles), “and some spices” as making up the deep-red broth where the beef simmers for hours. Peruano beans, Spanish rice, melty cheese, leaves of cilantro, and crunchy onions are tucked into the burrito, all wrapped in a tortilla, saffron-colored from being dipped in the broth. If you order consommé on the side for another few bucks, you’ll get a helping of the broth the meat was braised in for dipping. Out of this world. The restaurant also has vegetarian options if you really must skip the brisket, as well as what looks to be a cheese-lovers’ menu of tacos, and even ramen. Only the Birria des Res is part of the Burrito Week deal, though they do serve Birria de Chivo on the weekend. —Jean Yamamura

Available 5 p.m.-close, or until supplies run out. 532 State St.; (805) 324-4039; yonaredz.com

26

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

JEAN YAMAMURA

Any time of the day, only available at 14 W. Figueroa St.; (805) 962-5541; losarroyos.net


! K E E W TAQUERIA SANTA BARBARA:

AL PASTOR BURRITO

RYAN P. CRUZ

o t i r r u B r o t s a P Al Sitting outside on Taqueria Santa Barbara’s curbside patio on State Street, watching people shuffle down the red-bricked sidewalk on a sunny afternoon, their signature marinated pork al pastor burrito somehow tastes even better than usual. Ever since the family-owned restaurant opened its doors across the street from The Granada Theatre in 2020, it’s been one of my go-to spots when my al pastor craving kicks into high gear. The spit-roasted, spicy bits of freshly sliced pork stuffed inside a warm tortilla alongside beans, rice, cheese, cilantro, and onions comes with your choice of homemade salsas, but the must-try is their smoky, sweet, and silky pineapple-based salsa. Its slightly sweet but subtly spicy bite and creamy texture is a perfect contrast to the deep all pastor marinade, and a testament to the fact that pineapple and pork belong together forever. Grab a burrito and a beverage — they serve beers, wine in a can, specialty cocktails, and aguas frescas — any day from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. —Ryan P. Cruz

Open Daily 10a -9p (805) 869-6618

1213 State St., Ste. A; (805) 869-6618; taqueriasb.com

1213 State Street taqueriasb.com

FINAL WEEKEND!

Planned Parenthood California Central Coast

NACHO BURRITO Eating Padaro Beach Grill’s Nacho Burrito, I was confused. Not by the burrito itself — as a tasty, tortilla-wrapped composition of homemade chili, crushed tortilla chips, sour cream, cheese, avocado, and cabbage, it made all the sense in the world. No, I was confused that the concept of a nacho burrito like the other categories of the handheld meal — breakfast, California, veggie, bean and cheese, etc. — hasn’t caught on as a more common menu item. The only other place that has one, at least that I can think of, is Taco Bell, and to say Padaro Beach Grill’s version is better is a criminal understatement. When asked if they would consider keeping it on their menu after Burrito Week ends (it’s that good), Padaro manager Javier said with a shrug and smile they’d see how popular it proved. So for all of us, go get one. Get two and save the other for dinner. Just don’t make us go to Taco Bell. —Tyler Hayden

3765 Santa Claus Ln., Carpinteria; (805) 566-9800; padarobeachgrill.com

SEPTEMBER 15 - 25, 2022

Earl Warren Exhibit Hall, Santa Barbara

HOURS

PADARO BEACH GRILL:

TYLER HAYDEN

48th Year

Thurs. 9/22 Fri. 9/23 Sat. 9/24 Sun. 9/25 (50 % OFF)

Noon - 6 pm Noon - 8 pp 10 am - 6 pm 10 am - 6 pm

For more information please visit ppcccbooksale.com or call 805.722.7870

*PLEASE pause ALL book donations until October 1.

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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27


Gateway Educational Services

Presents: Services Gateway Educational Presents: Gateway Educational Services Presents:

Town Hall Hall Webinar Webinar on on the the state state of of education education Town andHall African American students in Santa Santa and African American students Town Webinar on the state ofineducation Barbara County Barbara County and African American students in Santa

Dr. Dr. Sucari Sucari Epps Epps

Barbara County

Dr. Sucari Epps

Dr. Dr. Anna Anna Everett Everett

Dr. Anna Everett October October 17, 17, 2022 2022 ✦ ✦ 6:30-8:00 6:30-8:00 PM PM ZoomOctober Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB 17, 2022 ✦ 6:30-8:00 PM Zoom Pre-Registration Pre-Registration Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB

Zoom Pre-Registration Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB Moderator: Dr. Anna Everett, Emeritus Faculty UCSB and SBCC Trustee

Moderator: Dr. Anna Everett, Emeritus Faculty UCSB and SBCC Trustee

Speaker: Dr. Faculty Sucari Epps Moderator: Dr. AnnaGuest Everett, Emeritus UCSB and SBCC Trustee Guest Speaker: Dr. Sucari Epps Topic: Special Education Black Students Guest Speaker: Dr.and Sucari Epps

Topic: Special Education and Black Students

Topic: Special Education and Black Students Invited Panelists:

Invited Panelists:

Invited Panelists:

Dr. Hilda Maldonado SBUSD Dr. Dr. Hilda Hilda Maldonado Maldonado SBUSD

SBUSD

Dr. Darrin McDuffie Dr. Diana Roybal Dr. Ray Avila SMBSD GUSD SB County SELPA Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Darrin Darrin McDuffie McDuffie Dr. Diana Diana Roybal Roybal Dr. Ray Ray Avila Avila info@gatewayeducationalservices.org SMBSD GUSD SB County SELPA

SMBSD

GUSD

info@gatewayeducationalservices.org

SB County SELPA

info@gatewayeducationalservices.org

2 Lessons For $45 CALL 805.963.6658 TO SCHEDULE

Special for new students only * May only be used once *

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JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097

28

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


K E E W O T I BURR T

2-28 2 R E B M SEPTE

R O P S S A P

An Evening with

Laird Hamilton Sun, Oct 16 / 7:30 PM Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $20 $10 UCSB students and youth (18 & under) An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Explore the courage, ambition and talent that push a person to greatness in an evening with big-wave surfer, renowned innovator and American icon Laird Hamilton.

Documentary Screening Thu, Sep 29 / 7:30 PM Arlington Theatre / FREE Blending candid interviews with breathtaking action footage, Take Every Wave is a visceral, white-knuckle look at a life lived on the edge.

Presented in association with UCSB Athletics and UCSB Dept of Recreation’s Adventure Programs

(Rory Kennedy, 2017, 118 min.)

Part of A&L’s Thematic Learning Initiative Presented in association with the Arlington Theatre

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 | Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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29


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 A masterful storyteller who “observes the world with a clinically poetic eye.” - The NY Times

SEPT 28

SEPT 30

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

An Intimate Evening of Songs and Stories with

Suzanne Vega “Dylan was keen to restore The Wallflowers’ legacy and bring it full circle, bookending the original, unadulterated spirit with which he founded his band.”

OCT 7

Performing blues-soaked, groove-driven rock anthems with passion and fury, the band has amassed a strong national touring history.

Lobero Theatre Chamber Music Project

OCT 18

Artistic and Music Director, Heiichiro Ohyama Musical Advisor, Benjamin Beilman

– SPIN

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

This long-anticipated homecoming concert features local legend Heiichiro Ohyama and three handpicked classical music luminaries – Benjamin Beilman (violin), Lucille Chung (piano), and Edward Arron (cello) – performing selected works by Dvořák and Fauré.

PRESENT

The Wallflowers An Evening with

TRAP @ 25 SEPT 24

30

THE INDEPENDENT

BENISE -

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

OCT 1

Spanish Nights

INDEPENDENT.COM

AEG PRESENTS

OCT 13 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION

VIR DAS OCT 20


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT. 22-28

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event. RUBICON THEATRE COMPANY

2 THURSDAY 9/2

THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

SATURDAY Rubicon Theatre Presents Almost Maine This witty rom-com

with laughs and surprises, written by John Cariani, follows nine entwined stories where strangers become friends, friends become lovers, and lovers become strangers in an almost-town with a sky lit by the Northern Lights. Recommended for high-school age and up. Thu.: 7pm; Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 2 and 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. $30-$59.50. Call (805) 667-2900. rubicontheatre.org

9/22-9/25: Reopening: Casa de la Guerra Historic House Museum The S.B. Trust for Historic Preservation (SBTHP) invites the community to an upgraded experience that includes bilingual interpretive panels sharing information about hands-on furnished rooms of this adobe residence that was constructed between 1818 and 1828 for José de la Guerra, the fifth comandante of the Presidio. Noon4:30pm. Casa de la Guerra, 15 E. De la Guerra St. Free-$5. Call (805) 965-0093.

sbthp.org/casadelaguerra

9/22: 10th Annual Heroes of Hospice of S.B. Luncheon: What Matters Most Local heroes S.B. Neighborhood Clinics, S.B. High School, and Hospice of S.B. Bereavement Staff will be honored at this annual celebration with a reception, silent auction, lunch, and award presentation. Proceeds will benefit Hospice of S.B. 11am-1:30pm. Plaza del Sol, Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $175. hospiceofsb.org/heroes

9/22: Stories from the Wild / Historias de la Naturaleza Stories inspire awe, reflection, and connection in the programs at Wilderness Youth Project. Listen to S.B. locals tell their stories from nature that are geared toward adult audiences. Las historias inspiran asombro,

reflexión y conexión en las programas en Wilderness Youth Project. Escucha a S.B. los lugareños cuentan sus historias desde la naturaleza. Las historias que se contarán estarán dirigidas a un público adulto. 6-8pm. Third Window Brewing, 406 E. Haley St #3. Free.

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

sbcreekweek.com/

9pm. $24.72. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com

9/22-9/24: Maverick Saloon Thu.: Bear Redell, 8-11pm. Fri.: Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sat.: Adrian Galysh, 1-5pm; Pull the Trigger 8:30-11:30pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. maverick

9/22: S.B. Bowl Concert Bonnie Raitt, 7pm. $51-$125. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

Elliott, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 331-4363.

lostchordguitars.com

9/23-9/24: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Sat.: Ransom Note, 6-8pm. Sun.: Art of Funk, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com 9/23: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm; Everything’s Fine, 8pm-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 8458800.

uptownlounge805.com/events 9/24-9/25: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.:

John Lyle, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

Jon Cleary

“Tucson Sky” by Naomi Brown

9/22, 9/24-9/28: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Bundunkafunk, Spoonful, Gnarled Birch, 8pm. $10-$15. Ages 21+. Sat.: Which One’s Pink, 9pm. $18-$22. Ages 21+. Sun.: Sandy Cummings & Jazz Du Jour, 12:303:30pm. $10; Sudan Archives with Dirty Bird, 8pm. $20-$23. Ages 18+. Mon.: SBCC Monday Madness Jazz Band, 7pm. $15. Tue.: S.B. Records SingerSongwriter Showcase, 7pm. $5. Wed.: An Evening with Jon Cleary, 7:30pm. $20-$25. 1221 State St. Call (805) 9627776. sohosb.com/events

Madeleine Pizey will guide you through a restorative sequence and then take you through the active circular breathwork as Danielle Elese will support you in the ancient practice of sound healing to release stress, anxiety, or worries and to gain clarity. Bring an eye pillow or covering. 6:30-7:30pm. Physical Focus Training Ctr., 140 Hot Springs Rd., Montecito. $45.

watersheds, and the ocean through a series of fun and educational events such as Craft Night at the Crafter’s, Coffee at the Creek, Household Hazardous Waste Recycling Center Tour at UCSB, the Land Shark Tour, a falcon demonstration, a tour of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh, and more. Visit the website for the full schedule and locations. Some events require an RSVP. Free-$10. Call (805) 897-2606 or email LSmith@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

9/22-9/23: Eos Lounge Thu.: Jensen Interceptor. $6.18. Fri.: Mochakk.

FRIDAY 9/23

9/22: Breath & Sound Facilitator

9/22-9/24: 23rd Annual Creek Week Learn more about our local creeks,

backstagesb.com/dueling-pianos

9/23-9/25, 9/28: Lost Chord Guitars Fri.: Shawn Jones, 8-11:30pm. $15. Sat.: The Dales, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sun.: Disco Dance Night, 8-10:30pm. Free. Wed.: John

cfsb.info/sat

tinyurl.com/Stories-Historias

tinyurl.com/Sound-Breath

9/22-9/24: Backstage S.B. Dueling Pianos, 7:30-10pm. 409 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 957-4111 or email info@backstagesb.com.

saloon.com/event-calendar/

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

9/22-9/24:

Shows on Tap

9/24: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Goodlanders, 7-9pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

9/26: The Red Piano Church on Monday: Sugarmill Slim. 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com/

schedule

9/23-9/25:

9/23: Live Music: Last Decade Join on the patio for this unofficial Lemon Festival

ebrates the scenery, wildlife, ranch life, and history of the American West through painting, sculpture, and photography from artists across the country. California artist Michael Obermeyer will serve as the guest artist and jurist beginning with the opening-night artists’ reception. Fri.: 5:30-7:30pm; Sat.: 10am-5pm; Sun.: 10am-4pm. Flag Is Up Farms, 901 E. Hwy. 246, Solvang. $25. Call (805) 773-8057. Read more on p.41. the-slopoke.com

otcoffeeshop.com/events/list

12th Annual SLOPOKE Art of the West Exhibition This exhibition cel-

pre-party with music from California’s premier alt-tribute band (think Green Day and Weezer) the Last Decade. Food and drink will be available for purchase. 6-9pm. Old Town Coffee Goleta, 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Email otcarevents@gmail.com.

9/23: Comedy Is a Drag Experience live comedy with comedians straight off of Netflix, Amazon Prime, NBC, and Comedy Central. Food will be available for purchase. 8-10pm. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St. $25-$35. Ages 21+. Email sambearcomedy@ gmail.com. tinyurl.com/comedyisadrag

9/23: Figtoberfest Roll out the barrel at this annual Oktoberfest celebration with games, food, and bier! Noon-11pm. Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co, 137 Anacapa St.

Free. Call (805) 324-4461 or email santabarbara@figmtnbrew.com. figmtnbrew.com/ events

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

31


T HE

SEPTEMBER 23 - 29 "BEGUILING. INTIMATE."

COURTESY

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

9/24-9/25: 29th Annual Goleta Lemon Festival

Come out for a weekend of family fun, food, entertainment, pie-eating contests, a classic car show, and the S.B. Airport Kids’ Zone with interactive and toddler courses, inflatable carousel, rock wall, laser tag, and more! Girsh Park, 7050 Phelps Rd., Goleta. Sat.: 10am6pm; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Free; Kids’ Zone wristbands: $30-$35. Call (805) 967-2500.

lemonfestival.com tinyurl.com/KidsZoneWristbands

SATURDAY 9/24 $9/24: Carpinteria Museum Marketplace

FRI: 5:00pm / SAT: 5:00pm / SUN: 3:00pm MON, WED: 7:30pm / THURS: 5:00pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

Shop antiques, collectibles, hand-crafted gifts, vintage jewelry, furniture, books, clothing, and more from more than 60 vendors. Proceeds will go toward the museum. 8am3pm. Carpinteria Valley Museum of History, 956 Maple Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 684-3112 or email david@ carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org. carpinteriahistorical

museum.org/events

9/24: Painting in the Vineyard at Kaena All levels of painters are invited to participate in a full-sensory paint and sip experience. 10am-1:30pm. Kaena at the Ranch, 800 E. Hwy. 246, Solvang. $85. Ages 21+. Email info@artspotonwheels.com.

artspotonwheels.com/events

Support the Zoo

9/24-9/25: Harvest of Colors Quilt Show Members Showcase Members of the Coastal Quilters Guild have produced traditional, modern, and art quilts, as well as fiber art pieces for this magnificent display. There will be quilting demonstrations, a youth exhibition, postcard mini-quilts for sale, and a quilt raffle with proceeds going toward the Guild. Sat.: 10am- 5pm; Sun.: 10am-4pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$12. Email showtickets@coastalquilters.org. coastalquilters.org/

quiltshow.html

9/24: The Rhythmic Arts Project Presents TRAP @ 25 This benefit event will support TRAP (The Rhythmic Arts Project) with a performance from Pockets, a band of studio players and vocalists who have been playing in support of TRAP for 25 years. S.B.’s own Leslie Lembo and Shawn Thies will join the band, and children from the Music Academy’s SING! Program will sing an original gospel song. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $25-56; VIP: $81. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

Donate today at sbzoo.org

9/23-9/25: New Beginnings Presents Every Brilliant Thing Don’t miss British comedian Jonny Donahoe in this award-winning one-man play about a boy growing up in the wake of his mother’s mental illness and the lengths people go to for those they love. Proceeds will go toward New Beginnings. Friday’s performance will be followed by a reception and Sunday’s will have a reception before the performance at 2pm. Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 3pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $99-$149.

We’ve got a lot of mouths to feed!

centerstagetheater.org/shows

9/24: Wallows American alt-rock band based in L.A. the

(805) 962-5339 • sbzoo.org Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach 32

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

Wallows, featuring band members Dylan Minnette, Braeden Lemasters, and Cole Preston, will be in S.B. on their Tell Me That It’s Over Tour in support of their sophomore album of the same name that was released in March of this year. 8pm. The Arlington Theatre,1317 State St. $33-$43. Call (805) 963-9580.

thearlingtontheatre.com

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9/24: Trail Volunteer Day: San Ysidro & McMenemy Trails Join for a day of trail maintenance on National Public Lands Day on San Ysidro and McMenemy Trails followed by a free lunch at Manning Park at 1pm. Bring water, sunscreen, snacks, gloves, a bike helmet, and a face covering. RSVP is required by phone or email. 8:15am-2pm. Manning Park, 449 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito. Free. (805) 564-5439 or email SBiddle@SantaBarbaraCA.gov. tinyurl.com/CleanTheTrails

SUNDAY 9/25 9/25: S.B. Blues Society Benefit Show Take in the sounds of the Paradise Kings, East Valley Road, and Rent Party Blues Band. All proceeds will benefit the families of Byl Carruthers of Cafe R&B and Tom Murray of Stiff Pickle Orchestra, two outstanding bluesmen who both passed this year. Food and drink will be available for purchase. 3-7pm. S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. $25. Call (805) 722-8155 or email info@sbblues.org. sbblues.org

MONDAY 9/26 9/26: Church on Monday: Sugarmill Slim Experience expert harmonica playing and the blues sound delivered with a little eyeliner and a lot of soul from Sugarmill Slim. 7:30pm-midnight. The Red Piano, 519 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439 or email colin@theredpiano. com. theredpiano.com/schedule

TUESDAY 9/27 9/27-9/29: Volunteer for Adult Literacy Tutor Training Make a difference in someone’s life at the S.B. Public Library. New volunteers will take a nine-hour training course and then be matched with an adult learner. Bilingual (English and Spanish) tutors are in demand. 6-9pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Wing, Eastside Library, 1102 E. Montecito St. Free. Call (805) 962-7653 or email Literacy@SantaBarbaraCA.gov. tinyurl.com/TrainingAdultLiteracy

WEDNESDAY 9/28 COURTESY

FRI: 7:30pm SAT: 3:00pm & 7:30pm / SUN: 5:30pm MON: 5:30pm / TUES: 3:45pm WED: 5:30pm / THURS: 7:30pm

9/28:

An Intimate Evening of Songs and Stories with Suzanne Vega Be prepared

for an amazing evening of a unique style of alt and folk from a leading figure of the folk-music revival of the early 1980s. Singer/ songwriter Suzanne Vega, with nine studio albums, three compilation albums, and seven live albums, is known for her songs and performances that convey deep emotion. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $42-$55; VIP: $106; sound-check experience: $201. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on


SEPT. 15-21

SAT, OCT 29 | 6:00–9:00 PM

9/28:

Experience a magical circus of surprises during the Museum’s debut adults-only (21+) Halloween celebration. Come in costume to crawl our creepy halls and spooky woods in a progressive party with a spectacular finale under the big top! Enjoy food and drink, performers, a live band, and dancing. Indy Book Club Virtual Discussion:September

Join to discuss Colson Whitehead’s Harlem Shuffle, a social novel about race and power and a family saga masquerading as a crime novel in 1960s New York City and Harlem. Register online. 6pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/BookClubSep

9/28: State Street Job Fair Meet prospective employers in a relaxed setting. Any business in the Downtown Business Improvement District (Chapala St. to Anacapa St. and Gutierrez St. up to Micheltorena St.) that displays balloons and signage will welcome applicants to come in and find out about possible employment. 3-6pm. 700 and 800 blocks of State St. Free. Email Tim@DowntownSB.org. tinyurl.com/

Get creepy for the community during this frightening fundraiser; all net proceeds support the Museum’s nature and science education programs.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

sbnature.org/tickets

StateStJobFair

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living

S.B. Birding

HUGH RANSON

Pishing for Fall Warblers

The Blackburnian warbler is a rare visitor from the east.

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T

he time has arrived that many birders anticipate for long months: fall migration. There are a number of reasons the season is regarded with such fondness. With so many birds on the move, the diversity of what can be seen is huge. It’s also a time to brush up on skills. Many of the vireos, sparrows, and warblers passing though are look-alikes, so you really have to be alert as to which features are crucial for identification, for views are often brief. Lastly, the odds of finding something truly rare are much greater than at any other time of year, and this possibility drives many a birder to check likely spots.

an irresistible snack to migrating birds. For one reason or another, most of these rows of trees have been removed in Santa Barbara County. A few years ago, another non-native, the Tipuana tree, widely planted as a shade tree in parking lots, was found to be attracting large numbers of birds because of a pest, the Tipu psyllid, which was infesting the leaves. Indeed, one of the local hotspots attracting birders is the parking lot of a Goleta business park. The reigning monarch of bird-attracting trees, however, is the red gum eucalyptus (that’s right, another non-native). Many of these trees are infested with a psyllid that exudes a protective white sugary substance known as a lerp. Birds go crazy for these lerps. Birders tend to have a by Hugh Ranson, Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society language all their own, and the phrase “lerpy euc” is a Finding a rarity is like looking for a needle recent addition to the lexicon. So once you’ve found a lerpy euc full of in a haystack, but over the years, birders have learned a few tricks that at least help warblers, tanagers, and vireos, how do you narrow down which corner of the haystack go about sorting through them to look for a to look in. The most important factor is to rarity? At this time of year, birders develop a find where the food is that the birds need specific ache known as warbler neck. Idento replenish themselves on their migration. tifying these birds is truly a challenge, for Birds will flock to the most readily available many of them are feeding in the topmost and nutritious food source. You might think limbs of the trees and are nothing but quickly that our local creeks would be the place to moving silhouettes. The birder has a potent look, and at one time this was true. In recent weapon in her arsenal: pishing. If you’ve years, however, birders have discovered other ever been around birders, you may well have places to search, and interestingly, these have observed this practice in action. Pishing is the sound made by blowing air through your changed over time. In the 1970s and ’80s, tamarisk trees, a teeth, sort of like the sound you might use to non-native often planted as windbreaks attract a cat, but as loudly and obnoxiously as in campgrounds and on farmland, would you possibly can. Indeed, on many occasions become infested with leafhoppers, which are while I have been pishing, I’ve been surprised

It’s the Time of Year for ‘Warbler Neck’


S.B. Birding HUGH RANSON

greatly swell during migration. Don’t expect to see an orange crown on these birds, though; the males only reveal this feature when very excited. The other two greenish-yellow warblers common in lerpy eucs are the Wilson’s and yellow warblers. It’s a good idea to learn the features of these three before making efforts to find the rarer birds. One place with a few productive lerpy eucs is at the south end of the grassy area at La Mesa Park. I’ve spent the last few mornings The orange-crowned warbler is one of the most common birding there. It’s still early in migrant warblers. the season for the chance to find the rare warblers from the east, but it’s fun to find a cat rubbing up against my legs. For some reason, the pishing sound going through the flock and brushing up on makes birds curious, and they will fly my warbler skills. If you were the woman down lower to investigate, often coming who stopped to ask if I was looking at “a within inches of the observer’s head. If you hawk? ... A peregrine?” and I answered try it—and you should give it a go—be “no” to both questions without elaborating mindful not to over-pish. It does distract in a seemingly curt way, I honestly wasn’t the birds and takes them away from their being rude or standoffish. I was so intently focused on keeping track of a tanager in the important job of building up fat reserves. The warbler that most readily comes treetops I hadn’t yet identified that I was in into pishing is the orange-crowned warbler, a world of my own. n a locally common bird whose numbers

Goleta History GOLETAHISTORY.COM

Dos Pueblos Chumash

Y

ou may have seen recent news about happenings at Dos Pueblos Ranch, but do you know how the ranch got its name? European explorers nicknamed this

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had different physical appearances. They tolerated each other, but villagers were not allowed to cross the creek without first getting the other tribe’s permission. Most modern California history books start with Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo cruising up the coast under the Spanish flag. In fact, Santa Barbara historian Walker Tompkins calls the day Cabrillo anchored off Los Dos Pueblos the “day history began” for the future rancho. But for the Chumash, it was really the beginning of the end. Learn a little more about the locals who called this unique location their home for generations before that fateful day. The story is titled “Dos Pueblos Chumash,” which can be read in full at independent .com/GoletaHistory and at GoletaHistory .com.

Two Distinct Populations at the Mouth of a Storied Creek by Tom Modugno area Dos Pueblos because there were two Chumash villages right next to each other. They were called Mikiw and Kuyamu, and they were here long before any Europeans came along and gave them a generic name. But the reality is that these two neighboring villages were anything but generic, and they were very different from each other. There was just a small stream between them, but despite their proximity, they spoke two different dialects, had different cultures, and the residents even

Author Tom Modugno has been dedicated to bringing Goleta’s past to life through an impressive collection of images since 2013, and his Goleta History column makes its debut this week, starting appropriately with the Chumash, who were the first to live along the South Coast. Area history buffs will already know Modugno’s work from GoletaHistory.com, where this and many more tales of the past can be found. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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Original Owners Selling the Brewhouse MARIA YAPUR/THE BREWHOUSE

Tiger restaurants, Clayton comes from a longtime orchid-growing family and now rents out his five acres of Carpinteria land as storage to fishermen and others. A part-time real estate agent, Danely worked in tile and stone construction prior to his job at the Coral Casino, but he started in restaurants when he was just 12 years old, working for Rick’s Pizza on the Mesa, Mesa Café, and Cliff & Co. “I’ve been in restaurants my whole life,” said Danely. “It’s something I feel really good about and love doing.” He dreamed of one day opening a taqueria in New Zealand, until he realized that the Brewhouse ownership seemed to be losing interest. He approached Johnson in December, and they started to negotiate. Danely and Clayton expect to take hold of the license soon, although escrow isn’t expected to close CHEERS TO PETE: Co-owner Pete Johnson (right) joined The Brewhouse as the brewmaster soon after it was opened in 1998. He’ll be toasting longtime customers and employees during Oktoberfest next month. until next month. They’d like to start cleaning fter nearly a quarter-century of brewing beers, servup the outdoor spaces right away ing burgers, and showcasing bands, the original and then may close briefly during January’s slow season owners of the Brewhouse are selling their beloved to do indoor renovations. But they won’t close during the restaurant and brewery on West Montecito Street in transition — in fact, they ordered the full NFL package Santa Barbara. The new owners — both longtime custom- for the season and may even bring back Monday Night ers raised on the Mesa, one a current employee — plan to Football specials. “We want to make hay while the sun bring renewed energy and much-needed investment to shines,” said Danely. the establishment, which is the oldest brewery in town.

A

A Goodbye Oktoberfest Being Planned as TRANSITION TIME Longtime manager Maria Yapur, who first worked Popular Brewpub Changes Hands there 19 years ago and has been there for 11 years by Matt Kettmann

“It’s going to be a different life suddenly to not be thinking about the Brewhouse constantly,” said current co-owner Pete Johnson, who joined as the restaurant’s brewmaster soon after Gary Jacobson and Barbara Long founded it in 1998. “I’m 67 and I’m the youngest of the three of us. The place could use a little more support. Hopefully the new guys are gonna keep it pretty much the same, keep it a cool place, and fix up a few things that have been neglected for a while.” Buying the brewpub are Grant Danely and Joal Clayton, who both grew up just miles away and have been going to the restaurant since it opened. “Our goal is just to refresh it and keep it going for another 24 years,” said Danely, who started working at the Brewhouse more than a year ago after being let go from his Coral Casino bartending job during COVID. “Hopefully we’ll be in our seventies then and just give it to somebody else.” The grandson of the founder of Santa Barbara’s Jolly

straight, said that the sale comes after a tumultuous period for the restaurant. The troubles began in April 2017 with a fire that shut down operations for a couple of months, then came the Thomas Fire that December, followed by the debris flow in January, and the pandemic in 2020. “It’s gotten to the point where we don’t really have money in the bank to fix things,” she said. “It’s getting harder and harder.” Yapur confirmed that the Brewhouse remains a busy place, even as the nearby Funk Zone and multiple breweries lure away some of the younger crowds. “We’re still the only brewery that has a full bar and kitchen,” she said. When asked why the Brewhouse became so popular years ago, Johnson couldn’t exactly say. “None of us really knew what we were doing — we were just having fun,” said the former rocket scientist for NASA whose home-brewing hobby turned into his second act. “Maybe that was part of it. We were having fun, and so was everyone else.” The food cooked by co-owner Jacobson, who developed the restaurant after being a chef at the Brewhouse Grill on State Street, was an early calling card. “That’s what

put us on the map: The food was really good,” said Johnson. “I didn’t have to figure out what kind of beer would draw people in. We already had a full house.” On a personal note, the first food and drink article that I ever wrote more than 20 years ago was about the Brewhouse. I was a regular in those post-college days, often feasting on macadamia-nut-crusted halibut and gorgonzola salad while others devoured filet mignon enchiladas and stroganoff. I interviewed Johnson soon after he started brewing beer and wrote about how co-owner “Barb” Long would hit the stage with her guitar to sing some tunes. “You called us ‘The Hub of Hip,’ ” recalled Johnson. He believes the transition to new ownership should be “fairly seamless,” especially on the brewing side, as Casey Smith, who’s handled the day-to-day brewing for years now, is staying on board. “There will be no drop-off in quality,” said Johnson. “It will probably get better if he gets me out of the way.” If anything, Danely wants to increase distribution of the Brewhouse’s beers to off-site locations, perhaps even the Santa Barbara Bowl.

AN OKTOBERFEST GOODBYE The original owners aren’t going out with a whimper. They’re hosting one last Oktoberfest on October 7 and 8, expecting numerous former employees to make appearances in a grand goodbye. “We’re going out on a high note and see if we can get some gemütlichkeit going,” said Johnson. “It’s a German word that doesn’t have any direct translation, but it means a feeling of happiness and good times and coziness. It’s a key part of Oktoberfest in Germany. Nobody here has any idea of that word, but they’re all experiencing gemütlichkeit.” The annual Oktoberfest celebration — complete with tuba bands, schnitzel, bratwurst, and lederhosen — is one of the restaurant’s crowning achievements, even though other establishments around Santa Barbara now host their own. “We were the original,” said Yapur of the tradition that started about 20 years ago. Aside from sprucing things up and focusing on expanding beer distribution, Danely, who spent recent days making chili as a prep cook in the kitchen, plans to keep everything the same, including the staff. He and Clayton have some money set aside for improvements, but not tons, and they’d welcome an equity partner. No matter what, they intend to reinvest the next four years of profits right back into the business. “It’s the oldest brewery in town,” he said. “We’re just breathing life into the place.” Regardless of how much stays the same, this sale represents real change for Yapur. “It’s the end of an era for all of us,” she said. “Let’s have one last big hooray for Oktoberfest and go out with a bang.” Johnson thinks he is ready for retirement. “Who knows?” he pondered with a tinge of reluctance. “I’ll probably wake up in the middle of the night after closing the deal and wish I still owned the Brewhouse.” At least he can still enjoy it as a customer, right? “I get free beer for life as part of the deal,” he replied with a chuckle. It didn’t sound like he was joking. Enjoy Oktoberfest at the Brewhouse (229 W. Montecito St.; [805] 884-4664; sbbrewhouse.com) on October 7 and 8, or just come say goodbye to the original owners while n enjoying specials all month.

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Montecito Mesa Burger Closes READER PRIMETIME

closed after a kitchen fire in December 2020, is planning to reopen in late October or early November. The family behind the business decided to use the unfortunate circumstance as an opportunity to do extensive renovations, which is the reason we all have suffered BURGER BUMMER: Mesa Burger, which opened at 1290 Coast Village so long in their absence. Road in 2020, the former home of Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Tutti’s, has closed and may become a patisserie.

C

hris Chiarappa, cofounder of Mesa

BEANS ON STATE TO CLOSE: Reader JP for-

warded me this message from Beans BBQ that says that the last day of their 1230 State Street restaurant, which opened last March, will be October 1, 2022. Their catering business will continue as usual. “It is with a heavy heart that we announce that Beans on State will be closing,” says the eatery. “Our final days of service will be Thursday-Saturday 9/22, 23, 24th and the following week Thursday-Saturday 9/29-10/1. We will be serving dinner from 4-9 p.m. on these last few days of service. We are looking into a smaller, less expensive space and hope to revamp and bring our delicious BBQ back to our wonderful community very soon! We want you all to know how much we appreciate your love and support during these last 7 months. It has been a dream come true for our family. Catering services will still continue and we are looking forward to serving you and your families as you celebrate the milestones in your lives. Thank you again for your kindness and love along the way.” PEPE’S TO REOPEN THIS FALL: Reader Mo

tells me that Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant at 254 Orange Avenue in Goleta, which

mann at this paper reports that after nearly a quarter-century of brewing beers, serving burgers, and showcasing bands, the original owners of the Brewhouse are selling their popular restaurant and brewery at 229 West Montecito Street. BIKE STOLEN: Reader Primetime tells me

that Jeannine’s Bakery near Stearns Wharf has had their beautifully decorated lilac bike stolen. Heartbroken owner Alison Hardy has offered a reward for its return. MARTY’S UPDATE: Reader David M. provides

more information about the recently closure of Marty’s: “Restaurant Guy, thanks for you continued reporting of the local food scene. In your column in the Indy, the ‘assumed’ closing of Marty’s Pizza was mentioned. I was a longtime customer of Marty’s and can confirm I was one of their last customer orders on July 6, 2022 when, in person, they confirmed it was their final night. RIP Marty’s!”

C

FOOD & DRINK

Burger, let me know that the Coast Village Road location of the popular local chain is no more: “It is with an extremely heavy heart that we are announcing the permanent closure of our Montecito location. We will be forever grateful to all our wonderful guests and the entire Montecito community for their gracious support. We will miss you! To our amazing, dedicated and cherished staff, we are beyond thankful for all your hard work and dedication! As Mesa Burger looks to the future, we are very excited to see what lies ahead for our desired continued expansion. In the meantime, and always, we greatly appreciate your continued support of our Mesa and Goleta locations! THANK YOU, MONTECITO! Sincerely, Mesa Burger.” Reader James N. says that Lilac Patisserie may take over the space.

BREWHOUSE SOLD: Matt Kett-

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

KYLE’S TAP ROOM OPENS: Reader Sharon C.

says that she recently stopped by Kyle’s Kitchen at 7000 Hollister Avenue in Goleta and noticed that the neighboring space, previously occupied by Sup & Jus and Kyle’s Protein Grill, is now the home of “Kyle’s Tap Room.” FRESCO SET TO OPEN DOWNTOWN: Last June,

I announced that Fresco Café is leaving their longtime home in Five Points Shopping Center and eventually discovered that their new home will be next to the Lobero Theatre at 23 East Canon Perdido Street, the former home of Sevtap Winery. “Work in progress,” says the eatery in a recent Instagram update. “Opening on September 26. Please join us for our opening Celebration on Saturday the 24th from 12-3 p.m.! We will be providing food and drinks and a great time!” THREE LANES A CHARM: The Santa Barbara

Architectural Board has approved three drive-thru lanes for Chick-fil-A at 3707 State Street, where a line of cars backing up into traffic has been a problem for years.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara .com. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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On the Beat spotlights all-things music and music-adjacent newsletter/ column by music and arts journalist-critic Josef Woodard

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ISHI GLINSKY: UPON A JAGGED MAZE ISHI GLINSKY’S CONTEMPORARY-INDIGENOUS ART OPENS AD&A MUSEUM SEASON JOSEF WOODARD PHOTOS

F

Other series are colored by ulterior expressive motives, often craftily deploying found objects. Seemingly innocent baskets are made from oxidized rebar wire in chainlink loops (nodding to incarceration and being “fenced in”) and ceremonial necklaces made from shards of ceramic plates from thrift stores. Seemingly colorful and cheery wall-relief sculptures enlist cartoon figures we know and love—Snoopy, Bugs Bunny—in tragi-comic setups. Upon a Jagged Maze closes on an eyesoothing grace note, relatively speaking. The museum’s back gallery hosts three large, warmly painted and semi-abstract canvases, in which rippling and interlacing patterns pay homage to the ancient Native American arts of basketry and weaving. Glinsky mixes traditional painting methods with spray painting, adding a sheen of mystique and contemporary patina to the gestural palette. In effect, the back room conjures up a sensuous and congenial last impression, in a generally fascinating and thought-provocative exhibition. —Josef Woodard

SUZANNE VEGA Brings N.Y.C. Slices to the Lobero Her name is Suzanne. She lives on the ground floor of important singer-songwriters calling N.Y.C. home. Pardon the “Luka” paraphrase: Vega’s classic song remains one of the most instantly recognizable and quotable in her songbook. The song is also one of the calling cards, along with another legendary New York story song from the same album (1987’s Solitude Standing), “Tom’s Diner,” on veteran songstress Vega’s new album An Evening of New York Songs and Stories. Next Wednesday, September 28, Vega will steer her current tour through the Lobero Theatre for an evening of songs and stories—mostly about her hometown of New York—in the heart of Santa Barbara. Vega, who studied literature at Barnard and started out in folk clubs in Greenwich Village, had her dramatic rise into public consciousness and a wholly original niche of the singer-songwriter scene beginning with her debut album in 1985. A creatively restless soul, she ventured into more experimental territory on her 1992 album 99.9F°, gamely accepting the implicit songwriter challenge of turning a thermometer reading into a quirky hook. Vega’s newly released album was recorded in a landmark New York venue, Carlyle’s, in 2019, before the city infamously fell victim to one of the most perilous attacks of the

L I F E PAGE 41

Solvang’s SLOPOKE ART SHOW

“Raining Warriors” by Ishi Glinsky

COURTESY

irst impressions, subtle and otherwise, matter when it comes to the delicate art of museum exhibition design. In the case of Ishi Glinsky: Upon a Jagged Maze, the dynamic opening exhibition of the new season for UCSB’s Art, Architecture and Design Museum (museum.ucsb.edu), the immediate impact is multifold, subtle and otherwise. Entering the museum’s foyer gallery, we are greeted by the awesome sight of “Coral vs. King Snake,” a monumental, iconic sculpture towering just over 10 feet tall, takes the form of a punky black leather jacket, festooned with patches celebrating Native American issues and calls to radical action, including AIM (American Indian Movement) and the “Coral vs. King Snake” by Ishi Glinksy logo for the organization Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. On one forms coheres into a broad and persuasive set sleeve, the phrase “Yosemite means those of works and series-with-a-cause. The genwho kill”—an indictment of genocidal white erous expanse of a show consuming most expansionism—is prominently scrawled. of the museum’s galleries allows his work to This large, loaded sculpture boldly intro- breathe and reflect the significant diversity of duces us to the general milieu of Glinsky’s art, Glinsky’s artistic fruits. juxtaposing and mashing up references to his By nature, Glinsky’s art is multi-layered, Native American roots and a hybrid contem- inviting multiple points of entry and interporary aesthetic all his own. At age 40, this is pretation. In “Spitfire,” the reference point the Arizona-born and Los Angeles–based is Native American beadwork, transformed Glinsky’s first official museum exhibition, into a punk/skateboard culture framework and the result is enthralling and culturally (Spitfire is a brand of skateboard wheels). engaging. Smartly curated by museum direc- The largest representational (also allegoritor Gabriel Ritter, Upon a Jagged Maze, on cal) piece in the show is “Dead Weight,” a view through January 22, 2023, surveys more vibrant example of his “ledger art” works. In than a decade of the artist’s evolving work in this series, Glinsky imitates the resourceful multiple media, colored by his cultural heri- yet tragic tradition of reservation-era native tage as a Native American artist (he is part of people capturing aspects of their fading and the Tohono O’odham tribe). stolen past lives on lined ledger paper, a While the jacket epic is the most inten- symbol of the white invaders’ world. “Dead tionally scale-related statement in the show, Weight” is a vintage, pre–Manifest Destiny a selection of paintings, sculptures, weavings vision of buffalo hunting, in mythic, dream(fashioned from chain link metal), and other like terms.

COVID-19 virus in America. The city also proudly faced off the scourge and set a paradigm for recovery (for a time). Fittingly, Vega’s N.Y.C. songs — usually embedded with minimalist storytelling — address the romanticism, resiliency, paranoia, edginess, and complexities of life in the Big Apple. One of the lesser-known but special songs on the new album addresses the mythic phenom of Suzanne Vega an aspiring small-town-based artist going Gotham with big dreams, in the form of “New York Is My Destination.” The artist in question is Southern gothic novelist Carson McCullers, the subject of Vega’s 2016 one-woman play Beloved: Songs from an Evening with Carson McCullers. Full-circle timeline trivia: The first version of the play was created while Vega was a humble, aspiring student at Barnard. Without a doubt, Suzanne Vega—born in Santa Monica but a New Yorker from toddlerhood—has thoroughly celebrated and been celebrated in and far beyond her destination home. —JW

“Ridin’ Crawdad” by Glenda Stevens If the notion of a western-themed fine art show at a storied thoroughbred horse ranch makes you kick up your heels in delight, you won’t want to miss the uniquely charming SLOPOKE, September 23-25. Held at Flag Is Up Farms — the 100-acre Solvang horse ranch owned and operated by Monty “the real life horse whisper” Roberts and his equine sculptor and equestrian wife, Pat Roberts — in an open-sided but roofed 30,000-square-foot riding arena with white museum-like walls set up in an open floor plan with led lighting for the art , this museum-quality art show is the brainchild of Tom Burgher, a former Central Coast art gallery owner. “We’re going to spotlight 37 artists from all over the western half of the country,” said Burgher. “The furthest away is from Duluth, Minnesota.” Artists from Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Idaho, Minnesota, Louisiana, Montana, and California are featured in the juried show, judged by California artist Michael Obermeyer, who is also the featured guest artist. Obermeyer, whom Burgher described as “beloved by other art historians as perhaps the best plein air painter in the United States,” serves as the President of the prestigious California Art Club, and his paintings can be found in the U.S. Air Force Historical Art Collection at the Smithsonian Institute and the Pentagon. Additional featured artists include Art Alvarez, Henry Blond, Naomi Brown, Tom Burgher, Annie Cappelli, Alexi Fine, Lori Franklin, Melinda Gandy, Whitney Gardner, John Godkin, I. Errol Gordon, Jan Handtmann, Carol Hartman, Kelly Hine, Patty Hughes, Doreen Irwin, Eric John, Kasia Kaznocha, Sheryl Knight, T. Kurex, Pamela Larsson-Toscher, Joe A. Oakes, Vicki Pedersen, Elisabeth Pollinow, Irene Pomitchy, Amy Rattner, Sharlene Rayl, Pat Roberts, Lee Rue, Janice Schultz, Naomi Shachar, Chris Slatoff, Glenda Stevens, Tara Rose Toner, Ami Usrey, and Tom Wright. The event kicks off on Friday, September 23, with an Opening Night Artist Reception featuring the awards ceremony and live entertainment by the Silver Mountain String Band from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and continues through Sunday, September 25. SLOPOKE tickets are on sale now at the-slopoke.com. —Leslie Dinaberg

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22

ARIES

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME:

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

Discussion:

Wednesday, September 28, at 6pm on Zoom BOOK O F THE M O N TH :

Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Even when your courage has a touch of foolhardiness, even when your quest for adventure makes you a bit reckless, you can be resourceful enough to avoid dicey consequences. Maybe more than any other sign of the zodiac, you periodically outfox karma. But in the coming weeks, I will nevertheless counsel you not to barge into situations where rash boldness might lead to wrong moves. Please do not flirt with escapades that could turn into chancy gambles. At least for the foreseeable future, I hope you will be prudent and cagey in your quest for interesting and educational fun.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): In 1946, medical professionals in the U.K. established the Common Cold Unit. Its goal was to discover practical treatments for the familiar viral infection known as the cold. Over the next 43 years, until it was shut down, the agency produced just one useful innovation: zinc gluconate lozenges. This treatment reduces the severity and length of a cold if taken within 24 hours of onset. So the results of all that research were modest, but they were also much better than nothing. During the coming weeks, you may experience comparable phenomena, Taurus: less spectacular outcomes than you might wish, but still very worthwhile.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Here’s a scenario that could be both an invigorating metaphor and a literal event. Put on rollerblades. Get out onto a long flat surface. Build up a comfortable speed. Fill your lungs with the elixir of life. Praise the sun and the wind. Sing your favorite songs. Swing your arms all the way forward and all the way back. Forward: power. Backward: power. Glide and coast and flow with sheer joy. Cruise along with confidence in the instinctive skill of your beautiful body. Evaporate thoughts. Free yourself of every concern and every idea. Keep rambling until you feel spacious and vast.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): I’m getting a psychic vision of you cuddled up in your warm bed, surrounded by stuffed animals and wrapped in soft, thick blankets with images of bunnies and dolphins on them. Your headphones are on, and the songs pouring into your cozy awareness are silky-smooth tonics that rouse sweet memories of all the times you felt most wanted and most at home in the world. I think I see a cup of hot chocolate on your bedstand, too, and your favorite dessert. Got all that, fellow Cancerian? In the coming days and nights, I suggest you enjoy an abundance of experiences akin to what I’ve described here.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): For 15 years, Leo cartoonist Gary Larson created The Far Side, a hilarious comic strip featuring intelligent talking animals. It was syndicated in more than 1,900 newspapers. But like all of us, he has had failures, too. In one of his books, Larson describes the most disappointing event in his life. He was eating a meal in the same dining area as a famous cartoonist he admired, Charles Addams, creator of The Addams Family. Larson felt a strong urge to go over and introduce himself to Addams. But he was too shy and tongue-tied to do so. Don’t be like Larson in the coming weeks, dear Leo. Reach out and connect with receptive people you’d love to communicate with. Make the first move in contacting someone who could be important to you in the future. Be bold in seeking new links and affiliations. Always be respectful, of course.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Love your mistakes and foibles,” Virgo astrologer William Sebrans advises his fellow Virgos. “They aren’t going away. And it’s your calling in life — some would say a superpower — to home in on them and finesse them. Why? Because you may be able to fix them or at least improve them with panache — for

your benefit and the welfare of those you love.” While this counsel is always relevant for you, dear Virgo, it will be especially so in the coming weeks.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Tips for making the most of the next three weeks: (1) Be proud as you teeter charismatically on the fence. Relish the power that comes from being in between. (2) Act as vividly congenial and staunchly beautiful as you dare. (3) Experiment with making artful arrangements of pretty much everything you are part of. (4) Flatter others sincerely. Use praise as one of your secret powers. (5) Cultivate an open-minded skepticism that blends discernment and curiosity. (6) Plot and scheme in behalf of harmony, but never kiss ass.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Mary Oliver wrote, “There is within each of us a self that is neither a child, nor a servant of the hours. It is a third self, occasional in some of us, tyrant in others. This self is out of love with the ordinary; it is out of love with time. It has a hunger for eternity.” During the coming weeks, Scorpio, I will be cheering for the ascendancy of that self in you. More than usual, you need to commune with fantastic truths and transcendent joys. To be in maximum alignment with the good fortune that life has prepared for you, you must give your loving attention to the highest and noblest visions of your personal destiny that you can imagine.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: (1) Use your imagination to make everything seem fascinating and wonderful. (2) When you give advice to others, be sure to listen to it yourself. (3) Move away from having a rigid conception of yourself and move toward having a fluid fantasy about yourself. (4) Be the first to laugh at and correct your own mistakes. (It’ll give you the credibility to make even better mistakes in the future.) (5) Inspire other people to love being themselves and not want to be like you.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford wrote, “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk. Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” Those ideas are always true, of course, but I think it’s especially crucial that you heed them in the coming weeks. In my oracular opinion, you need to build your personal power right now. An important way to do that is by being discriminating about what you take in and put out. For best results, speak your truths as often and as clearly as possible. And do all you can to avoid exposing yourself to trivial and delusional “truths” that are really just opinions or misinformation.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You are an extra-authentic Aquarius if people say that you get yourself into the weirdest, most interesting trouble they’ve ever seen. You are an ultragenuine Aquarius if people follow the twists and pivots of your life as they would a soap opera. And I suspect you will fulfill these potentials to the max in the coming weeks. The upcoming chapter of your life story might be as entertaining as any you have had in years. Luckily, imminent events are also likely to bring you soulful lessons that make you wiser and wilder. I’m excited to see what happens!

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In a poem to a lover, Pablo Neruda wrote, “At night I dream that you and I are two plants that grew together, roots entwined.” I suspect you Pisceans could have similar deepening and interweaving experiences sometime soon — not only with a lover but with any treasured person or animal you long to be even closer to than you already are. Now is a time to seek more robust and resilient intimacy.

Homework: Fantasize about an adventure you would love to treat yourself to in the spring of 2023. Testify: Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 42

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CONSTRUCTION CDBG CONSTRUCTION EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Each year the City of Santa Barbara utilizes CDBG/HOME funds for local construction projects that benefit the community, including public facilities, infrastructure improvements and decent housing availability. Section 3 Business Concerns, Small and Minority Owned and Women Businesses are encouraged to submit bids for CDBG construction projects. Background: Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, as amended, (“Section 3”) requires that economic opportunities generated by certain U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) financial assistance for housing and community development programs are, to the greatest extent feasible, directed to low and very low‑income persons. The priority of assistance should be to those who are recipients of government assistance for housing, and business concerns which provide economic opportunities to low and very low‑income persons. The Section 3 program was created to ensure that persons living in communities where HUD assisted programs are funded could economically benefit from the resources being provided. This would improve the overall socioeconomic condition of not only the community, but also offer opportunities to the low and very low‑income residents who reside within the neighborhoods. Additionally, the City of Santa Barbara is required to take affirmative action to contract with small and minority‑owned firms and women business enterprises and utilize small and minority‑owned firms and women business enterprises for purchasing materials and supplies for CDBG construction projects. Inquire Today: If you would like to see if your business would qualify as a Section 3 Business Concern or you are a small and minority owned or women business who would like to be notified of upcoming CDBG/HOME contracting opportunities please send an email to ldrewes@santabarbaraca.gov to be added to the interest list or visit https://hudapps.hud.gov/

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PROFESSIONAL

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

CONFERENCE & HOSPITALITY SERVICES Serves as a key member of the Conference & Hospitality Services team sharing responsibilities for the overall program which includes the planning, organizing, directing and controlling of all summer activities in residence halls and single student undergraduate apartments as well as the year‑round activities. Manages systems and procedures for customer services, as well as for operational and fiscal efficiency. Primary responsibility is for the planning, development, management and administration of facilities and hospitality operations which include residence hall and apartment front desk services, safety and security services, assignment services. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area or equivalent experience / training. 4‑6 years supervision experience or equivalent experience / training. 4‑6 years background in customer service or equivalent experience / training. Proven ability to organize and manage multiple, concurrent tasks and projects with frequent interruptions. Strong communication, analytical, and problem solving skills. Detail‑orientated. Ability to anticipate impacts of decisions and actions on staff, clients, and stake holders. Ability to work autonomously. Ability to work with a high profile and diverse client base. Comfortable working with a variety of individuals and departments across campus. Proficient in Microsoft Office and Google Suite, particularly Excel and Google Sheets. Comfortable working with large amounts of data and using formulas in an intermediate to advanced level to manipulate data for compatibility with a database. Ability to supervise both professional and student staff, including recruitment and training of student staff. Ability to manage individual and group reservations. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. After hours work required May‑September. Ability to respond to after hours phone calls. Occasional travel. $68,700 ‑ $90,300/ yr.. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR‑ STUDENT LIFE

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING The Assistant Director (AD) is a full‑time, career staff member who serves as a member of the management team within Residential & Community Living. R&CL is responsible for the well‑being and development of over 11,000 residents and manages the placement services for all students and families who live in university housing. R&CL operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and has on‑call staff available every day of the year. The team is responsible for 330+ student staff, $7.3 million operating budget and an annual major maintenance budget of $100,000. Under the direction of the Associate Director, the AD utilizes an equity mindset as they serve as the primary supervisor for an area comprising of 2,000‑3,000 residents living in one of 4 campus neighborhoods. Directly supervise 3‑5 professional staff, and oversees an additional 3‑5 professional staff and 20‑40 RAs. Work with their staff to ensure effective management of a student conduct and students of concern case load consisting of students living within their community. Reqs: Master’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience. At least 5 years work experience in University Housing, or a combination of University Housing and Student Affairs. Experience supervising full‑time professional staff. Experience leading and modeling practices that foster equity and inclusion in a diverse community of residents, student staff, and professional staff. Experience managing high level conduct and mental health cases. Track record of infusing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion principles into daily work. Ability to work collaboratively with colleagues throughout a large, multifunctional department. Commitment to creating communities where residents feel a deep sense of belonging. Familiarity with or experience working within a Residential Curriculum model. Experience working with multiple types of student populations (grads, transfers, family, traditional). Demonstrated skills in formal assessment techniques & the ability to train and oversee assessment practices by staff. Experience working in a large public institution. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran

status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/28/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #42542

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience and within limits of the grant. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #41572

signature by manager or authorized institutional official. Maintains effective working relationships and coordinates closely with Principal Investigator, department staff, Office of Research, other campus central and academic departments. Is independently responsible for gift processing and projecting salary, benefits, tuition, and fees in GUS. Prepares subaward invoices for payment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or/and equivalent work experience. Ability to establish and maintain priorities, multi‑task and meet deadlines while balancing a high volume workload. Analytical and problem‑solving skills. Excellent attention to detail and communication skills. Ability to exercise independent judgment. Ability to perform financial analysis and customized reporting. Proficiency with Microsoft programs such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint, etc. Proficiency with Google software programs such as Sheets, Docs, Gmail, chat. Must be comfortable explaining guidelines and policies. Notes: This position is funded through June 30, 2024 pending further funding. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.68‑$30.45/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38663

FINANCIAL ANALYST

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Provides management, leadership, and expertise pertaining to fiscal functions to the Associate Directors, Director and Managers. These functions include fiscal management, income and recharge accounts, billing and administration, payroll expenses and development of accounting systems for a budget in excess of 18 million dollar. Monitors departmental S&E and Payroll budgets; prepares reports and cost analyses; reviews monthly financial statements and analyzes spending patterns; oversees department payroll expenses. General areas of responsibility include: Ensures compliance with UC payment and income accounting procedures. Creates, maintains and analyzes financial and historical trend reports. Monitor compliance to Terms and Conditions for vendor blanket agreements. Assists with developing financial content for agreements and documents pertaining to Operations to accurately reflect service/product value versus cost of product or service rendered. Reqs: Associate’s Degree in related area, or equivalent experience and training. 1‑3 Years experience in AP, AR, billing and collections, or equivalent combination of training and experience Demonstrated budgetary and fiscal management skills. Strong communication, analytical, spreadsheet, and computer skills. Excellent organizational skills and ability to prioritize work in order to meet continual deadlines while making allowances for interruptions. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Responsible for managing all financial transactions on departmental operating budgets. Maintains current knowledge of policies of the University; Accounting,

Travel, Purchasing and Business Services. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, and adapting new policies and procedures. Maintains effective communication and individual working relationships with the Associate Directors and other HDAE Units. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $34.16 ‑ $35.58/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #42133

FINANCIAL ANALYST

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Supports Transportation & Parking Services by performing investigative research and analysis of cash management practices, training requirements, and reconciliations. Assures that all PCI‑SS (Payment Card Industry Security Standards) are followed and adhered to for all transactional functions throughout the department in audit and reconciliation processes. Advises TPS management on implementing solutions and performing necessary training on cash management and policies/procedures. Performs research with the goal of identifying training

Continued on p. 44

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Works on proposals of moderate scope such as single investigator NSF proposals where analysis of financial information or reports require review of a variety of factors (e.g. budgets, salaries, expenses, etc.) Receives assignments and analyzes problems, gathers data and information, and recommends solutions. Completes transactions for

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SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 22, 22, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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EMPLOYMENT needs for services/systems within the Department including the units of Permit, Event, and TAP Sales as well as Citation payments. Works with the management team to establish appropriate internal financial audit processes and practices. Conducts ad hoc financial analysis and/or reporting for a wide variety of projects and systems. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area or equivalent experience and training. AP/AR and general ledger experience or equivalent experience and training. Experience with computer applications, such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and any other related financial software. Experience reviewing, processing, and approving standardized financial data and transactions. Strong analytical skills with experience in making and communicating data‑driven insights. Strong interpersonal skills, attention to detail, organizational skills, effective verbal and written communication skills, sound judgment and decision making. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39 ‑ $28.65/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/03/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42831

GRADUATE ACADEMIC APPOINTMENT & FELLOWSHIP ANALYST

GRADUATE DIVISION Independently oversees, coordinates, analyzes and supports graduate academic appointments and fellowships programs which combined total $70 million annually. Supports the administration and operations associated with fee remission payments for over 3,000 UCSB graduate student appointments and supports budget funding for academics departments and research units across campus. Oversees and analyzes operation of and payments made by the graduate Student Financial System for fee remission and fellowship fee and stipend payments to student BARC accounts and Accounts Payable transactions. Oversees and communicates policies governing graduate student appointments and fellowships, analyzes data and creation of reports regarding patterns and trends in graduate appointments made and fellowship. Trains staff in campus departments and research units about the appropriate procedures relating to graduate student appointments and fellowships support; reviews exception cases, processes central fee payment, advises Graduate Deans regarding individual case histories and relevant policies, and communicates exception decisions to departments. Reqs: Understanding of accounting principles and financial administration. Ability to understand, interpret and apply policy and regulations. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39‑$30.17/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/28/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42210

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CLASSIC CARS

(CONT.)

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ADVISOR

EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM UCEAP provides international education opportunities in over 45 countries to more than 5,000 UC students each year. This position in a UC system‑wide, international academic program, completes assignments that are initially routine in nature, working toward mastery of tasks of moderate scope and complexity, with guidance from Specialists. Exercises some judgment within defined procedures and policies to determine appropriate action. Coordinates and provides advising and administrative support in operational aspects of the work performed by the UC study abroad program teams. Communicates program information, both academic and operational, to Campus Study Abroad Advisors, students, and Study Center staff; communications with students usually take place remotely rather than in person. Supports both the pre‑departure application processes. Often independently determines work methods for operational record tasks. Establishes and monitors the workflow calendars to meet program‑specific tasks and project deadlines. Supports the Regional Team and provides backup support for the Program staff as requested. Reqs: Minimum of 2 years’ previous office/clerical experience. Associate’s Degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Eligible for remote, hybrid, or on‑site work arrangement. Work schedule to align with Pacific Time business hours. In accordance with UC policy, travel expenses for professional development activities are calculated and reimbursed up to the costs for travel to and from the UCEAP Systemwide Office location in Goleta, CA, regardless of the actual remote work location elected by employee. UCSB is a Tobacco‑Free environment. $24.61 ‑ $26.32/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/27/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42397

PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHER

POLICE DEPARTMENT Monitors/operates all equipment and accesses all resources within the Dispatch Center. The majority of each shift is at the console monitoring radios and alarms, radio dispatching personnel, answering phones, computer input/retrieval using specialized software, including CLETS, alarm software, and 911/telephone software in addition to common Microsoft Windows‑based programs. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent education and experience. 1‑3 years of law enforcement agency experience or equivalent education and experience. Read, write, speak and understand English fluently. Proficient typing data/entry, familiarity with computer operations, excellent communication and Customer Service skills, ability to deal well with stress and stressful situations. Meet all other requirements for public safety dispatcher as established by the law and the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Note: Ability to use vehicles, computer systems and other technologies and tools utilized by police agencies. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Ability to work in a confined work environment until relieved. Successful

completion of a pre‑employment psychological evaluation. Successful completion of a six month in‑house training program. Ability to work rotating shifts on days, nights, weekends and holidays. Successful completion of the POST Dispatcher test. 30.91‑39.45/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #40952

and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $22.07 ‑ $26.89/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu. Job #35853

SAFETY & WELLNESS MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Plans, develops, implements and manages programs and activities for all aspects related to staff health, wellness and safety programs for over 750 HDAE FTEs, and occasionally for campus staff and faculty. Responsibilities include the management of the HDAE Injury Prevention, Safety and Wellness programs. Collaborates with campus partners to ensure departmental compliance with State and Federal requirements and to enhance Safety and Wellness Program offerings. Supervises Health Advocate (assistant) and Student Health Advocate assistants. Creates, establishes and evaluates safety and wellness campaigns. Collaborates and participates with departments to share information and resources and to continually improve safety and wellness programs. Reqs: 3 years experience in the field of safety and/or wellness programs, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Bachelor’s degree or higher in Health Education, Biomechanics/Kinesiology, Environmental & Occupational Health, Public Health, PT, or Occupational Therapy, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent verbal & written communication skills. Demonstrated customer service experience. Proficient in Microsoft & Google Office Suite. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $32.56 ‑ $35.82/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job # 41742

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general supervision of the Residence Hall Manager; the Sr. BMW performs senior building maintenance tasks on a regular and continuing basis and performs custodial work for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Commons. May perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. May work shifts other than Monday through Friday in order for the department to cover operational needs. Reqs: Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers,

THE INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER22, 22,2022 2022

SR. CUSTODIAN‑ WEEKEND WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Promotes a customer service environment to residence and clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment which is conducive to meeting the mission of the organization and supports the EEP. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrates support for the Operations Team. Initiates communication directly with co‑workers and or supervisor to improve and clarify working relationship. Reqs: Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable (Will train on all equipment and chemicals used.) Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Experience in a custodial cleaning operation or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Ability to read, writing and follow oral and written instructions. Notes: Able to lift up to 50 pounds. May be required to work schedules other than the assigned weekend schedule to meet the operational needs of the unit. Two positions available. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. 20.74 ‑ $22.44/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job # 41761

STUDENT AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Provides academic and instructional support for all undergraduate and graduate programs in the department of Mechanical Engineering. Provides administrative support, including, but not limited to: planning department events, graduate recruitment, and other outreach activities; quarterly course coordination, course evaluation coordinating and processing, managing department articulation process, and ordering program and instructor supplies. Assists the Student Affairs Manager with advising

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enrolled and prospective students on all aspects of their academic experience. Responsible for the coordination of all Disabled Student Program accommodations, which requires substantive knowledge of University, College, and departmental policies and procedures and the ability to interpret from various academic and administrative offices. Assists with the preparation and maintenance of digital and print materials, assistance with social media platforms to connect with students, alumni, and community members to promote the department, and department website maintenance. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.81 ‑ $28.57/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/28/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42601

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COUNSELING & PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES Provide mental health and clinical services for students dealing with issues related to general trauma as well as trauma related to immigration and refugee status. Provide consultation on issues related to students’ success and engagement, collect and share campus and community resources, and provide referral services for students in need of local care and intervention. Manage student support and outreach programs focusing on students with challenges with immigration status and related trauma. Reqs: Ph.D. degree or equivalent in an APA Accredited Program in Counseling Psychology or Clinical Psychology. Must have a State of CA Board of Psychology License or appropriate exemption.3 years of experience as a Psychologist. Must have experience with the following: comprehensive counseling and psychological services in a university counseling center within an academic setting; providing mental health services among vulnerable and underserved student groups; determining mental health needs and providing culturally appropriate therapeutic interventions; conducting group therapy for students relating to trauma and immigration status; developing, coordinating, and delivering workshops to address issues and facilitating services related to trauma, immigration status, educational, familial, culture, intercultural, and interpersonal challenges unique to targeted populations; conducting psychological needs assessment; and training and providing supervision to doctoral trainees. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Mandated Child Abuse Reporter. Works in patient care environment. Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Occasional evening and weekend hours may be required (remote and/or onsite). Employment is contingent on successful completion of our credentialing, privileging, and background check processes. $85,655.59‑$145,070.59/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42011

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Sunrise 6:50 Sunset 7:48

Low

High

Low

Thu 22

2:41 am 0.3

9:20 am 4.2

2:23 pm 2.3

8:23 pm 5.5

Fri 23

3:06 am 0.2

9:37 am 4.5

2:54 pm 1.1

8:58 pm 5.5

Sat 24

3:31 pm 0.3

9:56 am 4.7

3:27 pm 1.7

9:33 pm 5.4

Sun 25

3:55 am 0.5

10:16 am 4.1

4:02 pm 1.3

10:09 pm 5.2

Mon 26

4:20 am 0.8

10:37 am 5.1

4:41 pm 0.1

10:49 pm 4.1

Tue 27

4:45 am 1.0

11:02 am 5.4

5:24 pm 0.8

11:33 pm 4.6

Wed 28 Thu 29

12:25 am 4.0

High

5:11 am 1.5

11:30 am 5.6

6:12 pm 0.6

5:38 am 1.1

12:03 pm 5.7

7:08 pm 0.5

25 D

2H

9D

17 source: tides.net

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s tt Jone By Ma

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GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

BIG SALE Saturday 9am‑2 Vintage items, collectables, coffee table, lamps, antiques, a Vespa, large Italian pottery, pinball machine, Christmas decor, books, polished sea shells, vintage teddy bears, dining room chairs, wall sconces, King brass headboard and lots more cool stuff. New items from last sale in April 638 Island View Dr off Carrillo on Mesa. Sale in back yard. PLEASE no EBs

66. Supernatural witch of Slavic folklore 68. Daughter of Pablo Picasso 1. Grand slam run count 69. Thumb drive port 5. Prince Buster’s genre 8. Candle-heavy occasions, for 70. Capital near Lillehammer short? 71. Positive quality 13. Quindlen with the 2022 best- 72. Rd. intersectors seller “Write for Your Life” 73. Bovary and Tussaud, for 14. Corn opener? example (abbr.) 15. Some cameras or copiers 17. Show biz parent, maybe 19. Generational separator 1. Adjective for many world20. Brick quantity record attempts 21. Aspiration for neither the 2. Not faked out by over- or under-achiever 3. Like some decisions 23. Roth offering 4. Disreputable newspaper (not 25. Salon worker like the one you’re reading!) 26. 180 degrees from NNE 5. Sport in which athletes crouch 27. Yerevan’s country 6. “Turn it up and rip the ___ off!” 31. Actor Morales whose 7. Directed a wad of paper into a Wikipedia bio mentions wastebasket his name frequency in 8. Truist Park team crosswords 9. Social media and computing 33. Getting your kicks? elite 34. ___-Magnon 10. Lenovo alternative 36. Toy truck maker 40. Bedsheets, tablecloths, etc. 11. Hatha and bikram, for two 44. “The Only Way Is ___” (U.K. 12. Catches, as fly balls reality soap since 2010) 16. Erupt 45. The day before 18. “The Bad Guys” screenwriter 46. Finishes, as cupcakes Cohen (not one of the 47. Word before rain or jazz filmmaking brothers!) 50. Done over, like school 22. “That it be, lad” pictures 24. Suez Canal’s outlet 52. Tuna steak choice 27. U.S. Open stadium 55. Part of CUNY or NYU 57. “Diners, Drive-___ and Dives” 28. Platonic P’s 29. “___ bin ein Berliner” (JFK 58. Slide whistle-playing quote) Simpsons character 30. Person who may not feel 62. Pro runner? romantic attraction, for short 65. Farthest orbital point

Across

Down

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32. ___ Sea (arm of the Mediterranean) 35. Cheer for AtlÈtico Madrid 37. Twinge that may need massaging 38. Worn-out jeans spot 39. PTA pt. 41. Burp follower 42. Cable recorder, perhaps 43. Majors who was “The Six Million Dollar Man” 48. Ready to breed 49. “Holy Diver” rocker Ronnie James 51. Tequila who originally gained fame on MySpace 52. “And hurry!” 53. Medical privacy law, initially 54. Huge celebs 56. Big ride to a Dead concert, maybe 59. Alter ___ 60. Ship feature 61. Declines slowly 63. It’s not a good look 64. Country next to Thailand 67. ___ Kippur ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1101

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 22, 22, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DAVID HERMAN PAYNE NO: 22PR00407 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DAVID HERMAN PAYNE. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Deena L. Lockhart in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Deena L. Lockhart be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 10/06/2022 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim

with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Deena L. Lockhart, J. Dan Lang & Associates, 5743 Corsa Avenue, Suite 213, Westlake Village, CA 91362; (818) 991‑7700, dan@jdlang.com. Published September 15, 22, 29 and October 6, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LUCILLE GENTRY LAFOND NO: 22PR00465 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LUCILLE LAFOND, LUCILLE G. LAFOND, LUCILLE GENTRY LAFOND. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Samuel W. Lafond in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Samuel W. Lafond be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before

taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 11/10/2022 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Connor C. Cote, Esq., 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146. (805) 966‑1204 Published September 22, 29, October 6, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT RYAN BAPTISTA NO: 22PR00431

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT RYAN BAPTISTA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Mary Kathleen Baptista in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Mary Kathleen Baptista be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: on 10/13/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: L. Donald Boden, Griffith & Thornburgh, LLP, 8 East Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑965‑5131. Published September 15, 22, 29 and October 6, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FEDERAL DRUG COMPANY, 3327 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alice F MacDonald (same address). This business is conducted by a Trust. SIGNED BY ALICE MACDONALD, OWNER/TRUSTEE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002017. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACIFICA MEDICAL SPA SANTA BARBARA, 1722 State Street, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; DGK Holdings Santa Barbara, Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DANIEL GENE KOLDER MD, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002138. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RANCHO SAN MARCOS GOLF COURSE, 4600 HWY 154, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; RSM Resort LLC, 17992 Cowan, Irvine, CA 92614, Rancho San Marcos Resort, RSM Golf Course, RSM Resort, San Marcos Golf Course, San Marcos Resort. This business

is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY RICHARD J. BATTAGLIA, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 04, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001952. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SKSB, 715 Ramming Way, #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Sensational Kids of Santa Barbara, Inc., (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY KATHERINE E. TROLL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001997. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA ALLIANCE FOR COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION, 624 W Carrillo St, Santa Barbara CA 93101, Uffizi Order, (same address), SB ACT, Alliance for Community Transformation, ACT. This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY RANDY GOETZ, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002164. Published: September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STUDIO DDK, 2023 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Deborah D Karpinski (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by Deborah D Karpinski, Owner/Operator. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002303. Published September 22, 29, October 6, 13, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PARK VIEW RENTAL, 410 Covington Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Sylvia E King (same address); Terence S Hurt (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY SYLVIA E KING. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002151. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRIGHTSTAR CARE SANTA BARBARA/SANTA YNEZ, 510 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sirena Del Mar, LLC (same address); This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY SHARON HOLLAND‑PEREZ, OWNER/ DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002064. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRIGHTWATER MEDIA, 402 Venado Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jon Manning (same address); Julie Livingston (same address).

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This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY JULIE LIVINGSTON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 8, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002232. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: JEAN MARIE KUJAN, 131 PALM TREE LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03072. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JEAN MARIE KUJAN TO: JEAN MARIE ZEIBAK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 AMENDED APPLICATION OF IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD, 721 CLIFF DR., SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD TO: CALCULUS LUCIFER GOLIATH YALE TESSY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 9/26/22, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated August 15, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CATERINA SANFILIPPO LEE, 804 MORENO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 AND CHI HOON LEE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02998. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change


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of name(s) FROM: SOPHIA SAGE LEE TO: SOPHIE SAGE LEE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: EVELYN SALM, 559 MOUNTAIN DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03133. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: EVELYN SALM TO: CODY CAMMBELL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 17, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN, 654 Mayrum Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. CASE NUMBER: 22CV02777 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN TO: AUTUMN LEIGH WEBB. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy

of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 17, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER, 1153 CHURCH LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03136 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER TO: LINDSEY PAIGE FLOWERS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 26, 2022, 10:00 AM, SB3. SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE AMENDED APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: HYON SOOK CHOUGH, 3090 HIDDEN VALLEY LN, MONTECITO, CA 93108. CASE NUMBER: 22CV01952 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: HYON SOOK CHOUGH TO: HYON CHOUGH SINGER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 10, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 22, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: MARIA FRANCISCA AMELITA PAZ LANTZ, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03215 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: MARIA

FRANCISCA AMELITA PAZ LANTZ TO: MARIA LANTZ LEVITT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 28, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 9/08/2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 22, 29, October 6 13, 2022. ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. 22CV03343 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara Petition of: Ourania Kalontoros AKA: Laraine, Kalonturos, Lurania K. Topakas, Ourania, K. Topakas, Ourania K. Topakas, Lurania Topakas, Lurania Kalonturos, Ourania Kalonturos for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Ourania Kalontoros filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Ourania Kalontoros to Ourania Lurania Kalonturos Topakas Ourania Kalontoros, aka, Laraine Kalonturos aka, Lurania K. Topakas aka, Ourania K. Topakas aka, Ourania Topakas aka, Lurania Kalonturos aka, Ourania Kalonturos to Ourania Lurania Kalonturos Topakas The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: October 28, 2022, Time: 10:00 am, Dept.: 4 The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Santa Barbara Independent Date: 09/08/2022 Donna D. Geck Judge of the Superior Court BSC222207 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20/22 CNS‑3624828# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TEASHA ANN BERMAN, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03183 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: TEASHA ANN BERMAN TO: TEASHA ANN ROSENFELD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the

hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 27, 2022, 8:30 AM, DEPT SM 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 312‑C East Cook Street, Santa Maria, CA 93454, Cook Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 8/29/2022, Jed Beebe, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CAMILLA MELDAHL AKA CAMILLA MEHDAHL, an individual; ED ST. GEORGE, an individual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 James M. Gelb Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual; MELENDEZ CONSTRUCTION, an Unknown business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individual; FRANCES CROTTY, an individual; BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION, as Trustee under that certain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑Through Certificates, Series 1992 CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an individual; BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust; ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING BY PLAINTIFF: (LO DEMANDANDO DEMANDANTE):

SUED ESTA EL

MARSHALL R. BERNES, an individual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, an individual; AND, ELINOR FISHER, an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your

wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Stephen Jamieson, SOLOMON SALTSMAN & JAMIESON; 426 Culver Blvd.; Playa Del Rey, CA 90293 Ph: (310) 822‑9848 DATE: (Fecha) 1/13/2020 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Sarah Sisto, Deputy (Adjunto) SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)

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CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 22CVO1717 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): FUNYAS MASIH; NSP TRANSPORTATION INC. (a business entity, form unknown); TORI ANNE THORNBURGH; and DOES 1 AND 25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING BY PLAINTIFF: (LO DEMANDANDO DEMANDANTE):

SUED ESTA EL

JOYCE DONALDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia.

lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); South County Court Division,‑ Santa Barbara Superior Court‑Civil, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Warren B. Treisman, Esq., 7183 Navajo Road, Suite I, San Diego, CA 92119; (619) 583‑1900 DATE: (FECHA) 5/4/2022 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/Johnny Aviles, Deputy (Adjunto) ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Warren B. Treisman 7183 Navajo Road. Suite i San Diego, CA 92119 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Plaintiff: Joyce Donaldson Defendant: Funyas Masih, et al. Moving Party Plaintiff, Joyce Donaldson filed their application for an order for publication on July 15, 2002. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Tori Anne Thornburgh by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara County, California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: 7/15/2022 Judge of the Superior Court Thomas P. Anderle

Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 22, 22, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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