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SURVEYING the CITY

400 YEARS of OXFORD PLANS & PANORAMAS Sanders of Oxford

Antique Prints & Maps


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Surveying the City 400 Years of Oxford Plans & Panoramas From Friday 25th January 2019.

Outside of London, Oxford is the most documented English city in antique print and map. Drawing on four hundred years of plans and panoramas, this catalogue plots the development of Oxford from renaissance city to post war tourist destination. Surveying the City, 400 years of Oxford plans and panoramas is a comprehensive collection of 70 scarce and iconic depictions of our famous University City, presented in chronological order and split into historical periods.

All works are available to purchase and will be on display in the gallery.

Sanders of Oxford. Antique Prints & Maps Salutation House 104 High Street Oxford OX1 4BW www.sandersofoxford.com - 01865 242590 - info@sandersofoxford.com Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm. Sundays 11am - 5pm.


Contents

Pg.

Introduction

06

01-05: Renaissance & Royalist

10

06-22: Restoration to Regency

18

23-31: Victorian

42

32-56: The Ordnance Survey

54

57-70: Modern Oxford

72

Biographies: Cartographers, Printmakers, & Publishers

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There is only one known surviving impression of the first printed map of the city of Oxford, the celebrated Agas map of 1578, which is held in the Bodleian Library. Alas, it is only included in this catalogue via a faithful nineteenth century copy published in Skelton’s Oxonia Antiqua Restaurata (23). However, the Elizabethan city is represented in two engraved views, Georg Hoefnagel’s panorama of 1575 (1) and Meisner’s reduced copy published c. 1623 (3). These early prints perfectly illustrate how the Oxford cityscape has always been dominated and defined by the University and its buildings. The University’s place as the oldest and most prestigious in the country is the primary reason that the City of Oxford is so well mapped. John Speed’s inset map of the city (2) was the first widely published plan of Oxford’s streets and buildings. The unusual orientation of the map, with south at the top, follows the precedent established by Agas. It is likely due to the broader publication of this map, rather than the small number of impressions of the Agas map, that this cartographic curiosity continued until the eighteenth century. Both David Loggan’s seminal city map (6) and William Williams’ ichnography (13) continued this tradition in their representations of the City.

Oxford’s position of historical importance grew rapidly in the mid seventeenth century, as the City became the royalist capital from the end of 1642. The printing of Hollar’s map in 1643 was intended to mark the arrival of the Royal Court in Oxford. An almost exact copy by Merian is included in the catalogue (4) along with a rather fanciful depiction of Oxford as a fortress-city during the English Civil War (5). The Restoration, and the subsequent period of the Jacobite risings, provides the backdrop for the heyday of Oxford’s grand panoramic prints and some of the most detailed and decorative maps of the City. Loggan’s 1675 map set the bar as the most beautiful map of the city, followed shortly after by Kip’s two sheet panorama (9) of the City as a Jacobite stronghold. It was also during this time that the mapping of the City began to conform to standardized compass orientation, with north to the top of the map. Barak Longmate’s detailed city plan (15) provides a scarce early example of this shift. By the Regency era Oxford was firmly established as a seat of learning, and the City was now a tourist attraction in its own right. It was during this time that the most ambitious survey of Oxfordshire was carried out, the result being the publication of Richard Davis’ epic map of the county (17) on a scale of 2 inches to 1 mile, which included a double sheet map of the city centre, from Folly Bridge to St.Giles and from Botley to St.Clements.

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At the beginning of the nineteenth century there was a discernible shift in the depiction of Oxford, with a new focus on the City’s surroundings rather than just the centre, perhaps best illustrated by Neele’s unusual circular ‘Map of the Country for Twenty five Miles round the university of Oxford’ (18) and JMW Turner’s ‘A View of Oxford from the Abingdon Road’ (20), the first separately published, largescale, ‘artistic’ panorama of the spires of Oxford nestled in the surrounding countryside. During Queen Victoria’s reign the proliferation of city histories and guides provided a mass of printed panoramas and maps, predominantly with a pictorial slant (24-28) rather than scientific survey. The prime exception is surely Robert Hoggar’s 1850 survey, the most important nineteenth-century plan of the city of Oxford, linking the developments of the Victorian era to the earlier surveys carried out by Isaac Taylor in 1751 and Richard Davis in 1797. The other great cartographic development of this era is perfectly exemplified by the largescale maps and plans of the Ordnance Survey, which surveyed Oxfordshire in 1876. Although traditionally perceived as common, large-scale nineteenth century Ordnance Survey maps are much scarcer than one might think. The collection presented in this catalogue also comes with a fine pedigree, originally hailing from the Oxford City Council archive, and it is the first time Sanders has had such a comprehensive collection (32 -51).

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Mapped on a scale of 1cm to 250m, they are the first maps of significant scale to depict areas such as Port Meadow, Iffley and Headington, illustrating the expanding boundary of the city, and incorporating the villages surrounding the medieval centre. The mapping of Modern Oxford, the last chapter of the catalogue, focuses on the decorative and infographic maps of post war tourism, and sees a return to depicting the city within the old city limits, as outlined in Agas’ sixteenth century plan. Maps of this period, such as Kerry Lee’s full colour pictorial plan (61) have become increasingly popular, due to a combination of their mid-century graphic style, their inclusion of the more recent colleges of the university, and their deliberate echoing of elements of the antiquarian city plans that preceded them. The collection is capped at the end of the twentieth century, with the largest map of Oxford we have ever encountered (65), as well as a select collection of smaller-scale Ordnance Survey maps produced for use by the National Grid, which neatly round off 400 years of mapping the City we call home.


RENAISSANCE & ROYALIST


01. Oxonium / Vindesorium Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg after Georg Hoefnagel Copper engraving Depingebat Georgius Hoefnagle. Cum Privilegio. [1575] Image and plate 175 x 477 mm, Sheet 392 x 527 mm mounted A good example of the earliest engraved view of Oxford along with a prospect of Windsor below, from Braun and Hogenberg’s ‘Civitates Orbis Terrarum’, Volume 2. The emergence of the ‘City of dreaming Spires’ is clearly documented with the major landmarks of early-modern Oxford accurately depicted. The panorama is taken from the east of the city, presumably present day South Park. The steeples of Christ Church Cathedral, All Saints and St. Mary’s Church project out from the cluster of rooftops. The towers of Merton College Chapel and Magdalen bell tower dominate the skyline. Georg Hoefnagel’s original ink and chalk study for this view of Oxford is held in the Royal Collection and is presumed to have been drawn from life during his visit to England in 1568.

‘Civitates Orbis Terrarum’ was a hugely successful publication and as such the plates appear to have been printed a number of times, at some point during the printing life of the Oxford and Windsor plate, the top left corner of the plate split and later issues of the panorama are printed without the top left corner of the border. This is an early printing prior to the loss in the top left corner. Condition: Central vertical fold as issued, with minor discolouration to fold. Light surface abrasion to top right of the view of Oxford. [41028] £900

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02. Oxfordshire described with ye Citie and the Armes of the Colledges of yt famous university A° 1605. Speed, John Copper engraved with hand colour Performed by John Speed and are to be sold in popes head alley against the Exchange by I.S & G. H cum privilegio [1627] 385 x 520 mm mounted An attractively hand coloured impression of John Speed’s map of Oxfordshire, from a 1627 edition of Speed’s ‘Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine’. A town plan of Oxford to top right with alphabetical key identifies the colleges and other buildings of note. The college coats-of-arms of the University along with those of King Alfred, traditionally (though erroneously) credited as the founder of University College, are incorporated into a decorative border. The inset plan of the city of Oxford in the upper right corner of this iconic map of Oxfordshire provides a miniature pictorial plan of the city closely copying the Ralph Agas plan of 1578, albeit on a much smaller scale and omitting some of the detail. However the street layout and the plotting of the major buildings remain the same, illustrating little development within the city walls at the turn of the 17th century.

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The unusual orientation of the map with south at the top, initiated by Agas, is replicated here. This cartographic curiosity continues until the 18th century, but is likely due to the broader publication of this map rather than the small number of impressions of the Agas map. Both Hollar and Loggan continued this tradition in their representations of the city. The map is embellished with the city crest to the top left and a lettered key outlining the colleges, churches and landmarks. Condition: Pressed vertical centre fold, as issued. Repair to bottom on centre fold. English text to verso. [44787] £2,000


03. Ochsenfuhrt in Engellandt Univers. [View of Oxford] Daniel Meisner Copper engraving 1623 - 1631 Image 72 x 140 mm, Plate 105 x 150 mm, Sheet 165 x 182 mm framed A fine, early view of Oxford from Meisner’s Thesaurus philo-politicus, with a drunken Bacchus riding a donkey in the foreground. This prospect of Oxford is a miniature copy of that by Braun & Hogenberg printed in 1575, providing a view of the city from what is now South Parks. The Towers of Magdalen and Merton College as well as the steeple of Christ Church Cathedral are depicted alongside a representation of Oxford’s Norman Castle.

The building to the right of Bacchus appears to be a bit of an anomaly however, but it is generally assumed that it represents Osney Abbey, albeit plotted incorrectly. Text below image, in Latin and German, embodies the moral message illustrated in the foreground, and reads: ‘Ebrius Arcadico Vehitur bene Bacchus Asello: Pigritiae Ebrietas uvida mater erit. Bachus auf einem Esel sitzt, Doll und Toll, daß er keucht und Schnitzt: ßferd und Keutter sind gleicher acht, Trunckenheit faule Bengel macht.’ Condition: Excellent rich impression. [42248] £500

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04. Oxforde Merian, Matthäus after Hollar, Wenceslaus Copper engraved [Frankfurt, c.1650-1677] 234 x 312 mm framed An excellent impression of a scarce, detailed aerial city plan of Oxford with a prospect of Oxford from the east in the upper left corner, and numbered legend of landmarks in the lower left and centre. This map is after Wenceslaus Hollar’s 1643 plan that was issued to mark the arrival of the Royal Court in Oxford during the English Civil War.

After Pennington 1055 Condition: Vertical centre fold as issued. Minor time toning to central fold. Small area of staining to top margin, not affecting plate or map. Gray inclusion in paper at top right of plate mark. [46556] £800

As a direct copy of the Hollar map this impressionistic, rather than scientifically accurate, plan depicts the city at the halfway stage in the great period of development between the late 16th and mid 18th century. It is believed that this plan was published in Matthaus Merian’s Theatrum Europaeum begun in 1633 and completed in 1738.

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05. Iconographia Oxonia una cum Propuganculis et Munimentis quibus cingebatur Anno 1648 Wood, Anthony Copper engraved Oxford, 1674 Image 450 x 585 mm framed An early plan of Oxford with title cartouche and engraved key to the left side and bottom, that purports to show the military defences as they existed in 1648. Published in Historia et Antiquitates Universitatis Oxoniensis by Anthony Wood in Oxford 1674. The fortifications illustrated in this map were intended to be built during the English Civil War. During the war the Royalists withdrew from London to Oxford. Charles I based himself and his military in the city from October 1642. The King was at Christ Church and the Queen at Merton. The map represents a pure flight of fancy on someone’s part and is typical of the graphical representations of fortified towns of the period. However whoever drew it certainly had some knowledge of the works constructed around the city, as there are sufficient similarities for it not to be dismissed out of hand. The fortifications of ditch, rampart, palisade and gates with drawbridges were built from St. Giles’ Church in the north to Folly Bridge in the south and from Magdalen Bridge in the east to St. Thomas’ Church in the west.

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Barriers were built in the Thames, whose waters, as well as those of the Cherwell were made to flood the surrounding meadows. To expedite these works, in the summer of 1643 all members of the University between the ages of 16 and 60 were recruited as labourers for one day a week or fined 1s. Women were also called upon to help and were liable to fines if they did not appear or send a substitute. Condition: Excellent impression; horizontal and vertical folds as issued; manuscript writing upper right corner “libi. 1. p. 364”; two short, repaired tears right and bottom centre; small loss to paper lower right corner. [43822] £700


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RESTORATION to REGENCY


06. Nova & Accuratissima Celeberrimae Universitatis Civitatisque Oxoniensis Scenographia [General Plan of the City of Oxford] Loggan, David Copper engraved Dav. Loggan Delin. et Sculp. cum Privil. S.R.M. [Oxford, 1675] 415 x 536 mm framed A superb bird’s-eye view of the City and the most detailed map of seventeenth century Oxford, from Loggan’s 1675 first edition of Oxonia Illustrata. Loggan’s plan is regarded as one of the most beautiful plans of the city and its detail remained unrivalled until the middle of the eighteenth century. Exquisitely engraved and clearly indicating all the streets, churches, colleges, and major landmarks, most of which are listed in numbered keys in the bottom corners of the map. The map shows the city at the limits of its expansion in the early modern period with virtually all the available space within the city walls depicted in Hollar’s map of 1643 now built upon.

The map is the first to show the recently completed Sheldonian Theatre (1669), the complete Great Quadrangle of Christ Church, albeit prior to the construction of Wren’s ‘Tom Tower’ and the castle without its keep, demolished by the Parliamentarians during the Civil war. The plan is oriented with South at top, following the precedent set by Radulph Aggas in his 1578 map of the city. A prospect of the city from the East is featured in a scrolled box in the top left corner of the plate. Condition: Trimmed to plate mark, as issued. Some infilling to top margin, and to bottom left corner of sheet. Manuscript repair in bottom left corner. Central vertical fold as issued. Repair to centre fold. Minor time toning to sheet. Repaired puncture to top centre. Printers creases to left and right sides of map. Professionally backed with archival tissue. [46559] £1,500

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07. Prospectus Oxoniae Orientalis / Prospectus Oxoniae Meridionalis [Double Prospect of Oxford] David Loggan Copper engraving [Oxford, 1675] Image 371 x 508 mm, Plate 403 x 513 mm, Sheet 425 x 555 mm framed Two fine prospects of the city, one from the East and the other ‘from the South near the Abbington Road’, from the first edition of David Loggan’s ‘Oxonia Illustrata’ published in 1675. Both prospects have gentle country scenes in the foreground and a numbered key to the major buildings of the city behind. St. Thomas’, St. Clement’s and St. Giles’ churches all appear to be part of the countryside in these beautifully engraved views of the city in the seventeenth century. Condition: Pressed vertical centre fold as issued. Water staining to corners of sheet, not affecting image. Framed in an antique style black and gold frame. [43064] £1,200 20


08. Oxfort, een vermaerde Stadt in Engeland, een on vergelyke aenqueeckster van Konsten ende Studien [Prospect of the City of Oxford] Pieter Schenk Copper engraving P. Schenk ex: Amstel: cum Privil: [1702] Image 188 x 249 mm, Plate 210 x 260 mm framed A rare, finely engraved prospect of Oxford, with the title inscribed below in Dutch and Latin. The view was featured in Schenk’s ‘Hecatompolis, sive Totius orbis Terrarum Oppida Nobiliora Centum; exquisite collecta atque eleganter depicta’. Issued in 1702, the publication featured 100 finely engraved views of trading cities from across the world. Of the cities depicted, 65 were western, 12 were eastern, 13 were African, and 10 were American.

Condition: Light time toning just outside plate mark from old mount. Adhesive marks and minor staining to edges and corners of sheet, not affecting plate or image. Toned on verso from old mount. [46557] £750

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09. Oxoniae Prospectis, a Prospect of the University and City of Oxford attributed to Johannes Kip Copper engraving Printed and Sold by Henry Overton at the White Horse without Newgate London. [c. 1705] Image 520 x 890 mm, Sheet 585 x 920 mm framed The largest eighteenth century view of Oxford, from Kip’s Britannia Illustrata. Although unsigned in the plate, this print has always been attributed to Kip. The view depicted is from the south, with the colleges and spires of churches, colleges, and other important buildings labelled in the inscription space below. Condition: Overall creasing, time toning, some soiling to edges, repairs to upper margins, whole sheet lined with Japanese tissue. Framed in an antique style frame. [44823] £2,000

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10. Oxoniensis Universitas, The South Prospect of the City of Oxford Sutton Nicholls after Johannes Kip Copper engraving Printed & Sold by J.Smith at the Sign of Exeter Change near the Fountain Tavern 1724 Image 435 x 665 mm framed A reduced version of Kip’s 1705 Oxford prospect, from the third volume of the 1724 edition of Joseph Smith’s Britannia Illustrata. A view of Oxford from south of the River Cherwell. Meadows are depicted in the foreground, with the River Cherwell and the River Isis intersecting. To the far right, Magdalen College, Magdalen Bridge, and St Clement’s are detailed, and to the far left, the castle and St Thomas’ Church. Spires and towers decorate the skyline, including a curiously positioned Sheldonian Theatre.

A scroll inscribed with ‘Oxoniensis Universitas. The South Prospect of the City of Oxford’ is set top centre, with putti either side. Beneath the image, a numbered key (1 - 32), names colleges, churches, and other points of interest Condition: Vertical folds as issued, and some time toning to sheet. Minor repair to left hand side. Framed in an antique frame. [44161] £1,750

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11. The South West Prospect of the University and City of Oxford Samuel and Nathaniel Buck Copper engraving Sam.l & Nath.l Buck delin. et Sculp. 1731 Image 275x 790 mm, Plate 300 x 795 mm framed A great example of this fine panorama of Oxford, showing the celebrated spires from the southwest. Christ Church occupies a prominent position close to the centre of the view, with Tom Tower prominent amongst the neighbouring spires of All Saint’s Church, Merton, Magdalen, and the Cathedral. Folly Bridge can be seen on the outskirts of the City, with the old tower of Friar Bacon’s Study. In 1727, Samuel Buck and his brother Nathaniel commenced sketching and engraving a series on the architectural remains of England and Wales. This series included 83 large prospects of the 70 principal towns in England and Wales. It took the Buck brothers 28 years to complete their venture and during this time changes to their style.

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The brothers began to use a less formal style in their later engravings by including figures in the foreground and using more subtle landscapes in the foreground. In 1774, Robert Sayer obtained the plates, added page numbers to them and published them as Buck’s Antiquities. Condition: Central vertical fold, as issued. Printer’s crease to top right of central fold. Repaired tear to bottom left of central fold. Otherwise a strong, dark impression. Framed in an antique style black and gold frame. [44247] £1,100


12. Prospectus Oxoniae Orientalis / Prospectus Oxoniae Meridionalis [Double Prospect of Oxford] William Williams Copper engraving [Oxford, c. 1733] Image 575 x 465 mm, Plate mounted A pair of views of the city of Oxford, from the surrounding countryside, updating the 1675 double prospect by David Loggan. From William Williams’ uncommon ‘Oxonia Depicta sive Collegiorum et Aularum in Inclyta Academia Oxoniensi Ichnographica & Scenographica Delineatio LXV Tabulis Aeneis expressa A Guilielmo Williams Cui accedit Uniuscujusque Collegij Aulaeque Notitia’. Condition: Two spots of foxing. Staining to both bottom corners. [11799] £750 26


13. Nova & Accuratissima Celeberrimae Universitatis Civitatisque Oxoniensis Ichnographia MDCCXXXIII Williams, William Copper engraved [Oxford, c.1733] 450 x 533 mm framed The last of the south-at-top orientated maps of the city of Oxford, providing a clear and detail depiction of the city’s growth in the 18th century. From William Williams’ ‘Oxonia Depicta sive Collegiorum et Aularum in Inclyta Academia Oxoniensi Ichnographica & Scenographica Delineatio LXV Tabulis Aeneis expressa A Guilielmo Williams Cui accedit Uniuscujusque Collegij Aulaeque Notitia’.

Condition: Small worm holes to the bottom margin, one just inside of plate, minor tear to the lower margin close to centre fold just affecting map border. Vertical printers crease close to the centre fold to the lower half of map. Diagonal crease to the left hand margin. [26878] £750

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14. [A General View of the City of Oxford | Vue Generale de La Ville d’Oxford.] John Green Copper engraving [London printed for Robert Sayer, Map & Printfeller, at No 53 in Fleet Street, as the act directs 10 August 1773.] Image 302 x 475 mm mounted An uncommon general view of Oxford from the South looking over Hinksey. This separately published prospect of the city is rather naive in comparison to its contemporaries with the Radcliffe Camera dominating the skyline and the panorama strangely balanced with the city centre to the left of the image. Condition: Excellent impression. Thread margins. [44264] £400

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15. New Map of the City of Oxford Longmate, Barak Copper engraved 1773 365 x 426 mm mounted A scarce town-plan of Oxford and the surrounding countryside likely to be from Anthony Wood’s ‘The ancient and present state of the city of Oxford...’. Three separate keys with 54 entries identify major town and gown buildings and places of interest. University buildings have been rendered darker to make them stand out against the rest of the city. Measurement comes in the form of a scale of chains, included at the lower right.

‘Gunter’s Chain’ was a unit of measurement developed in 1620 by the clergyman Edmund Gunter. He posited the use of a 66 foot long chain as a way of measuring land accurately. Condition: Excellent condition. Folds, as issued, previously bound into an extra illustrated edition of Wood’s History of Oxford. [42071] £1,000

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16. Oxfordshire Bickham, George Copper engraved with hand colour [c.1796] 233 x 145 mm mounted A curious bird’s eye view map of Oxfordshire, from George Bickham’s ‘The British Monarchy or a Chorographical Description of all the Dominions Subject to the King of Great Britain’. The map shows a pictorial representation of the county, with the place names of principal towns superimposed, and is decorated with classical and rustic vignettes typifying the county. A mini prospect of the spires and towers of Oxford features in the centre with other towns included in the view: Wallingford, Abingdon, Bampton, Woodstock, Islip, Bicester, Banbury, Charlbury, and Chipping Norton.

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Bickham’s The British Monarchy was published between 1743 and 1754. The rather unconventional county atlas featured a series of maps which placed the viewer in a fictitious vantage point, often set within a rustic, pastoral setting, whilst looking over each county, with names of various towns and cities noted in the distance. The atlas was begun as a part-work publication with each plate dated when published, but was not offered complete until 1755. The first state of the maps has a date engraved whereas the second edition of 1796 lacks both this date and the text below. Condition: Strong clean impression. [43417] £450


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17. A New Map of the County of Oxford, From an Actual Survey on which are Delineated the Course of the Rivers and Roads, the Parks, Gentlemans Seats, Heaths, Woods, Forests, Commons &c. &c. By Richard Davis of Lewknor, Topographer to His Majesty. Davis, Richard Copper engraved London, Published by J.Cary for R.Davis, of Lewknor Oxfordshire. Aug.st 1 1797. Each sheet 640 x 460 mm Signed by Davis and numbered 38. A fine example of the most important map of Oxfordshire. Surveyed by Richard Davis and engraved by John Cary on 16 sheets on a scale of 2 inches to 1 mile, plus a single-sheet map of the whole county engraved by Cary on a scale of 3/4 inch to 1 mile to serve as a key to the large-scale map. Bound in marbled folio. Jefferys’ fine 32 panel folding map of Oxfordshire of 1767 was succeeded in 1797 by the first map of the County on a scale of 2 inches to 1 mile, engraved by Cary from a survey by Richard Davis, a land surveyor from Lewknor in Oxfordshire. Davis’s name had first appeared some years earlier in 1792 when he advertised in Jackson’s Oxford Journal offering services to survey or plan estates or assist in the selling or letting of houses. In the following years he was especially active in Oxfordshire and the city of Oxford where the University proved a rewarding source of commissions. In 1790 Davis advertised his intention to publish in 1792 a survey of Oxfordshire on a scale of 1 inches to 1 mile, this scale being specifically chosen to complement the 18-sheet map of Berkshire by John Rocque who had held the post of Topographer to His Majesty, a post to which Davis himself was appointed in1786. Subscriptions came slowly however, and it was not until 1797 that the Oxfordshire survey was finally published on 16 sheets at £3 10s 6d including full wash colour and a key map. All subscribers’ copies were numbered on the title sheet and individually signed by Davis himself; the highest recorded serial number of 159 suggesting a total printing of less than 200 copies, this particular impression is numbered 38.

Of particular interest is the plan of the University and City of Oxford, similar in scale and ichnographical detail to the plan of the city by Isaac Taylor in 1751 but with some updating, notably the intersection of the Oxford Canal, which opened in 1790. The cartographical detail is immense, well worthy of an estate surveyor of Davis’s reputation, and takes full advantage of the larger scale. In the villages and rural areas almost every house and farm is shown with its land, and even in the towns there is great effort made to make them ichnographically correct. The road system is extensive; from major roads with their distances from Oxford and London, and between the major towns, down to minor roads and bridle paths. Further detail includes hills and woods, heaths, parks and commons, and mills, churches and farms, whilst gentlemen’s seats and large houses are shown in profusion. The boundaries of the city of Oxford extend from Folly Bridge to St.Giles and from Botley to St.Clements with the emptiness of Cowley Common separating the village of Cowley from the City. John Cary, the engraver, was fast establishing a reputation as one of the foremost map-makers of his day, skilled in engraving, globe-making and publishing. He was described by the carto-bibliographer Sir George Frodham, as the most representative, able and prolific English cartographer. Davis continued as a land surveyor until his death in 1814, but the present survey, for which he received 50 guineas from the Society of Arts, was his only contribution to English county cartography. Condition: Excellent condition throughout. Original boards, new spine. [30220] £4,500

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18. A New and Accurate Map of the Country for Twenty five Miles round the university of Oxford [...] Neele, Samuel John after Pawley, George Copper engraved with hand colour Published as the Act directs by Slatter and Munday, Oxford, April 15, 1805 453 x 447 mm mounted A scarce, circular printed, folding map of Oxfordshire, centred on the City of Oxford. Full title reads: A New and Accurate Map of the Country for Twenty five Miles round the university of Oxford, Exhibiting all the direct and cross Roads, the Hills, Vales, Woods, Rivers, Canals, Towns, Villages, Hamlets, Parks and Seats of the Nobility & Gentry, from the latest surveys and observations.

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The map is addressed: To The Vice Chancellor and the Heads of Houses in the University of Oxford, and to the Nobility, Gentry and Clergy, resident within its limits, This Map Is most respectfully Inscribed by the Proprietor. Condition: Sheet dissected into 12 sheets and laid on linen, as issued. Slight overall time toning and minor dirt build-up. [43947] £975


19. New Map of the University and City of Oxford [after Longmate, Barak] Copper engraved with hand colour Engraved for the Walks in Oxford, published by R. Pearson, High Street, 1817 365 x 435 mm framed A detailed map of the City and University buildings, it features a numbered key depicting important landmarks and features of the city. This map appears to be a reworking of the Longmate map of 1773 with altered title and scale of yards rather than chains and extended Woodstock and Banbury Roads to the north. Condition: Repaired tears to right hand side of map, trimmed within plate, pressed folds as issued. [45773] ÂŁ650

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20. A View of Oxford from the Abingdon Road John Pye after J.M.W. Turner Copper engraving Published February 13th 1818. By James Wyatt Carver and Gilder, High Street, Oxford. as the Act directs. Image 406 x 606 mm framed Dedication below title states: ‘To the Right Honourable John Scott, Baron Eldon, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, High Steward of the University of Oxford. This Plate Engraved by John Pye after an original Picture by J.M.W.Turner Esq. R.A. Professor of Perspective to the Royal Academy. Is dedicated with Permission by his Lordship’s most obliged & very humble Servant, James Wyatt.’ One of the first largescale ‘artistic’ panoramas of the city, a companion print to Turner’s view of the High Street this fine view of the city beyond the village of South Hinksey gives a splendid portrait of tranquility compared with the hustle and bustle of the countryside round Oxford today. A landscape steeped in history is united with scenes of rural productivity by the diffusion of light and shadow caused by the sky.

Inspired by the landscape painters of the Dutch Golden Age, Turner’s work seems to adhere to the seventeenthcentury concept of houding. The idea of houding proffered the idea that spatial recession could be achieved through the layering of tone and object. Thus, depth and distance are attained in a painting through the juxtaposition of light and dark. This can be seen in Turner’s work as the light falls in sweeping fragments. Cows are eclipsed in shade but the chain of sheep are illuminated. Trees are dim but pastures beyond shimmer. On the horizon, the cityscape itself is divided into differing shards of tone. Condition: Pressed diagonal crease to upper left corner. Surface abrasion to right centre of image. Light creases to sky. Framed in an antique style gilt frame. [43468] £1,550

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21. Oxford in Epitome. Vincent, Joseph Copper engraved Published March 15, 1819 by J. Vincent, near Brasen Nose College. Image 201 x 215 mm, Plate 235 x 235 mm, Sheet 380 x 273 mm unmounted A very rare engraved map depicting Oxford as an island. Originally published with a separate sheet, describing each location. Inscription above image reads: ‘Fit ut omnis Votiva pateat veluti descripta tabella Vita’. A rewording of Horace’s quote (Satires, ii. 1, 33) meaning ‘the whole life of man may be laid out as upon a votive tablet’. This scarce and amusing map charts what may lie ahead for a nineteenth century undergraduate at Oxford. 40

The City has been divided into regions representing the stages and possible dangers that may be encountered during student life, for example the ‘Forest of Debt’ and the ‘Gulf of Despair’. These are plotted alongside actual Oxford landmarks such as Folly Bridge and Port Meadow. Condition: Full margins, single black ink mark on verso just visible at the bottom of the map. Comes with facsimile key plate. [30875] £850


22. Oxford in Epitome. Vincent, Joseph Copper engraved with early hand colour Published March 15, 1819 by J. Vincent, near Brasen Nose College. [Oxford: Published by J. Vincent, near Brasenose College. 1832. Second Edition] Image 201 x 215 mm, Plate 235 x 235 mm framed The second edition of this very rare engraved map depicting Oxford as an island, this particular example heightened with early outline colour.

Originally published with a separate sheet, in the second printing the accompanying key plate was appended below, giving a full description of the map’s features, as well as an additional key for those unfamiliar with the University itself. Condition: Key plate reattached at bottom, without loss to map. Tape marks at top from old mount. Minor foxing to sheet. [46563] £850 41


VICTORIAN


23. Skelton’s Reduced Engraving of the Original Plan of Oxford taken by Ralph Agas in the Year 1578 Skelton, Joseph after Agas, Ralph Copper engraved with hand colour Published as the Act directs Jany. 1st 1823 by J. Skelton Magdalen Bridge Oxford 315 x 465 mm mounted Skelton’s detailed and faithful Victorian re-engraving of Agass’ enormous 1578 plan of the City, from the Oxonia Antiqua Restaurata. Condition: Excellent impression. Vertical creases as issued. Trimmed within plate mark. Slight overall time toning. [44266] £650

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24. City and University of Oxford Moule, Thomas Steel engraved [c. 1836] 243 x 185 mm mounted An iconic map of the City and University of Oxford, featuring vignettes of Christ Church College and the spires of Oxford from the North, enclosed in a decorative English-gothic border. The colleges of the University are picked out in darker ink, and the map is further embellished by the inclusion of the crests of the university, city, and the colleges. From Thomas Moule’s ‘The English Counties Delineated: or a Topographical Description of England’.

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Moule first published his highly decorative series of county maps in separate issues for each county between 1830 and 1832. In 1836 these were brought together in one work, by George Virtue & Co. They continued to appear in Rev. Barclay’s Dictionary into the 1840’s. Condition: Good impression. Trimmed within the plate mark. [46293] £180


25. Oxford from North Hinksey Hill Edward Goodall after J.M.W. Turner Steel engraving Published Jan.y 1, 1841 by James Ryman, High Street, Oxford Image 317 x 465 mm mounted An uncommon separately published view of the city. Edward Goodall’s steel engraving is one of the most magnificent general views of Oxford accomplished after Turner. The sky is a brilliant medley of eddying clouds and arching rainbows. Such conditions enact a curious form of chiaroscuro on the cityscape below. Whilst the Radcliffe Camera and the spires of All Souls bathe in light, Tom Tower and Christ Church Cathedral are immersed in shadow. Rawlinson 651. Condition: Creasing, tears, and light staining to upper half of image. Repaired tears to edges. [41600] £500

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26. Oxfordshire Ramble, Reuben Lithograph with hand colour [London. Darton and Clark. c. 1845] 184 x 147 mm mounted A small scale map of the county from Reuben Ramble’s Travels through the Counties of England. With Maps and Historical Vignettes. The map fetaures a prospect of the city to the top of the sheet and is surrounded by hand coloured pictorial scenes of the city and county, including Christ Church - Radcliffe Library - Blenheim - St.Mary’s Church. Condition: Excellent clean impression. [46554] £220

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27. Oxford. Carl Rundt Lithograph Druck D. Konig. Lith. Instituts zu Berlin, c. 1846 Image 355 x 520, Sheet 420 x 555 mm mounted A rare large-scale view of the Oxford City skyline from Carl Rundt’s Views of the most picturesque Colleges in the University of Oxford. Published in Berlin in two parts with five lithographed plates and four pages of discriptive text in English and German to each part and with a note recommending Ingram’s Memorials of Oxford.

A blind stamp of the intials CR with an arrow surrounded by a wreath appears on each sheet. The fact that these prints were published in Berlin contributes to the prints scarcity and they are rarely seen. Condition: Laid to album paper. Crease along the upper edge of the image. Repaired tears lower, right hand corner of sheet and image. Repaired tear to bottom margin, not affecting image. [41609] £500

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28. The Key to the Bird’s-Eye View of the University and City of Oxford Nathaniel Whittock Etching Published as the Act directs by James Ryman, High St. Oxford [c. 1848] Image 205 x 424 mm, Plate 283 x 453 mm, Sheet 342 x 510 mm unmounted A rare key plate for one of the most detailed aerial plans of Oxford by the same artist. The view was taken from an improbable location above the Cherwell and Christ Church Meadow, and the key includes no less than 65 numbered and listed buildings. Condition: Slight dirt build up to surface. Small tear to top left edge, not affecting image. [46574] £200

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29. To the Chancellor, Master and Scholars of the University and the mayor, Aldermen, & citizens of the City of Oxford,... Hoggar, Robert Syer Copper engraved 1850 1440 x 1220 mm unmounted The most important nineteenth-century plan of the city of Oxford, forming a link between the earlier surveys carried out by Isaac Taylor in 1751 and Richard Davis in 1797 and the large-scale maps and plans of the Ordnance Survey which surveyed Oxfordshire in 1876. Such plans, together with their smaller-scale successors that appeared in countless oxford Guide-Books, have provided the definitive basis for most of the plans, street maps and tourist guides that proliferated throughout the nineteenth century. The map includes the new working-class suburbs of St.Ebbe’s, St.Thomas’ and Jericho, of which the first two were blighted by the building of the gasworks in 1818 following the passing of an Act in that year which allowed for the manufacture of “inflammable air” for heating. For over a century the area suffered from the acrid smell of the gasworks plus the intermittent flooding of the houses, which doubtless contributed to the disease and pestilence so rife in the area. A complete contrast to this and possibly the most interesting part of Hoggar’s survey was the beginning of the development of North Oxford, the area running from St. Giles’ Church to Marston Road, Frenchay Road and the Norham Gardens Estate (most of which was owned by St.John’s College) where the period from 1850 to 1910 saw enormous changes to the architectural landscape of the area. It is interesting to note that Woodstock Road and Banbury Road are designated respectively as St.Giles Road West and St.Giles Road East, whilst the area beyond Park End Street is completely underdeveloped but indicates an area earmarked for a “Proposed Station”.

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Like most nineteenth-century plans the decoration is limited to a fine calligraphic title piece enhanced by a “Representation and Explanation of Levels” from which may be deduced the difference in level between any two points on the map. The immense detail includes colleges, halls and houses, bridges, rivers and parks, chapels, churches and burial grounds, hospitals and institutions, the Radclife Observatory and the Botanical Gardens. large-scale city plans of this period were separately published in small numbers and thus have a low survival rate - it is unusual to find one in such good condition. Full title reads: ‘To the Chancellor, Master and Scholars of the University and the mayor, Aldermen, & citizens of the City of Oxford, This Plan from Actual Survey is most respectfully inscribed by Robert Syer Hoggar, Assoc. Inst. C.E. 1850’. Engraved by Thomas Jones on four sheets on a scale of 44 feet to one inch. Clary Undescribed, Rodger Undescribed. Condition: Engraved on four sheets, joined and mounted on linen, edged in green silk, on original rollers. Evenly time toned, occasional light staining. [46667] £2,750


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30. A Pictorial Plan of the University & City of Oxford Fisher, J after Delamotte, W.A Steel engraved Published by I & R Dewe, Oxford. & Charles Tilt, Fleet Street London. [c.1860] 354 x 324 mm mounted One of the first pictorial plans of the city, this attractive illustrated map of Oxford includes engraved views of all the College buildings and the inclusion of parks and gardens. Title and publication details in a decorative cartouche in the form of a Gothicised doorway. The map is plotted on an unusual projection with north to south running horizontally across the map. Condition: Very clean impression, small scuff to surface to left side of map. [44786] £200 52


31. Oxford [Anonymous] Woodcut Published Supplement to The London Illustrated News, 18th June 1870 Image 450 x 930 mm mounted One of the largest and most detailed views of the city ever printed, this large scale birds-eye panorama of Oxford, was published in the London Illustrated News. Dated June 18, 1870, it shows the University’s colleges, halls & libraries, and rowing regatta on the River Isis in the foreground. Condition: Vertical folds as issued. Repaired vertical tears to lower margin. Time toning and surface dirt to margins. [46011] £750 53


The ORDNANCE SURVEY


The Ordnance Survey or “OS” is the national mapping agency of Great Britain. The agency provides the most recent and accurate geographic data of Great Britain to the government, businesses and individuals. It was officially founded in 1791, but has even earlier roots.

During the 1850’s, there was a debate about the most efficient scale to use for ordnance maps, better known as the “Battle of the Scales”. The scale of 25 inches to the mile became the standard scale used to map urban as well as rural areas from 1855 onwards, and is still used today.

The government first ordered the department of Defence to map the Scottish Highlands after a rebellion took place there in 1745. When the French Revolution started, a survey of the English south coast was ordered. These first surveys were meant to support strategic military planning.

The less detailed scale of six inches to the mile were used only for some uncultivated rural areas, moorlands or mountainous areas.

William Roy (1726 - 1790), an engineer who worked for the government on these first surveys, became convinced that accurate mapping of Great Britain in its entirety was needed. His vision greatly influenced the foundation of the Ordnance Survey. Between 1842 and 1893, the entire country was surveyed, and would be revised every twenty years.

The Ordnance Survey maps on the following pages offer a fascinating, and, in many cases, singular, perspective on the growth of Oxford and its suburbs, from the mid-Victorian era to the early twentieth century.

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32. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII 15.7. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons, R.E.F.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General [1874] 664 x 955 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of central Oxford, centred on part of University Parks near the crossing of Keble Road and St Giles’ Road, now called Banbury Road, and depicting part of Parks Road. Featuring St Giles’ Church, Keble College, Clarendon Laboratory, and terrace housing which have now been replaced with Oxford University buildings. This map measures 26.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. [46614] £175

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33. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIX. 7. [Iffley, South Hinksey] [Anonymous] Zincograph with hand colour [Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General.] 1875 635 x 935 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of South Oxford, focusing on the part where the River Thames splits of into the Hinksey Stream and towards Iffley Meadows, covering Iffley village, Iffley Lock and the Isis Tavern now know as the Isis Farmhouse, as well as South Hinksey. This map measures 25 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1875 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Local Board. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Overall creasing, and tearing to centre fold and edges of sheet. Damage to bottom margin, inscription not entirely legible. [46657] £175


34. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. II. [Marston, Park Town, Summertown] [Anonymous] Zincograph with hand colour Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 640 x 955 mm unmounted

35. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 11. 21. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 640 x 965 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of North East Oxford, centred on part of the River Cherwell, with Summertown and Park Town on one side and Martson on the other, covering the village centres and the surrounding farmlands. This map measures 25 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, focused on part of Woodstock Road and its side streets, covering Canterbury Road and Rackham Road which is now called St Margaret’s Road where St. Hugh’s College was founded in 1886, and parts of Farndon Place, Warnborough Lane. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. [46654] £200

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark green edge binding. Binding damages in several places, mainly to bottom, and leaving binding holes to the sheet. Overall surface dirt built-up, mainly to edges. Slight overall creasing. Minor staining. [46650] £200 57


36. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 14. 15. [North West Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 63 x 963 mm unmounted

37. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 15. 12. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 640 x 960 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of North-West Oxford, centred on part of the railway, the Oxford Canal and the River Thames or Isis, covering Jericho from Canal Street with St Barnabas’s Church and Victor Street. This map measures 24.8 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, focused on the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, covering parts of St. John’s College, Blackhall Road and St Giles’ Street with The Eagle and Child, Wellington Place and what is now Pusey Street. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing, and tearing to edges of sheet and binding. The farmland next to the River Thames is touched with red hand colouring. [46655] £175

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Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council, City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing, as well as minor tearing to the centre and edges. [46648] £200


38. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 15. 2. [North Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 640 x 955 mm unmounted

39. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIX. 3. 10. [East Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed under the Superintendence of Lt. Col. Parsons R.F.F.R.S. at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. Lieut. General J. Cameron R.E. C.B. F.R.S. Director General. 1876 640 x 955 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of North Oxford, centred on part of the University Parks, covering terrace housing on streets on Banbury Road from North Parade Avenue to Bevington Road, Bradmore Road from Crick Road to Norham Gardens. This map measures 24.8 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of East Oxford, focused on the side roads and terrace housing between Iffley Road and Cowley Road, from Marston Street, St James Street and Bullingdon Road to Leopold Street, with Denmark Street, War Street which is now Hurst Street and St Mary’s Street. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1876 by Capt. L.J.G. Ferrier. R.E. Levelled by Capt. W. Wynne R.E. (...) made on Buildings, Walls &c.”

Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Local Board. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. The binding is damaged on several places, mainly to the right side. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing, and tearing to edges of sheet. [46656] £200

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Binding damages in several places and leaving binding holes to the sheet. Overall surface dirt builtup. Slight overall creasing. Touched in pencil and red, yellow and blue hand colouring, accentuating streets and certain buildings. [46649] £175

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40. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 15. 23. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1878. 645 x 960 mm unmounted

41. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 15. 6 [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1881 640 x 955 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, centred on part of the High Street, from the Botanic Garden, Rose Lane, Merton College and Merton Street, University College, Oriel and Corpus Christi College, to King Edward Street on one side, and Magdalen College School, St Edmund Hall, Queen’s College, Radcliffe Square and St Mary’s Church on the other end. Some old street names have since changed, such as Grove Street becoming Magpie Lane. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1874.”

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, focused on the Radcliffe Observatory and Infirmary, covering terrace housing on Walton Street from The Victoria on St Bernards Road to Cardigan Street, part of Cranham Terrace and St Giles. This map measures 25 x 37.5 inches, and uses a scale of 1:500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1876.”

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. Touched with hand colouring and pen, accentuating new building developments. [46651] £200

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Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council, City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing, as well as minor tearing to the edges. Touched in red pen adding new building blocks. [46647] £200


42. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIIL. 10. [Port Meadow, Binsey] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published on the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1878. [1887 impression] 640 x 960 mm unmounted

43. Oxfordshire. Sheet XXXIX [Iffley, Cowley, Littlemore] [Anonymous] Zincograph with hand colour Zincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. 1878. [1887 impression] 1055 x 720 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of North Oxford, and one of the very few antique maps focusing on Port Meadow. The map also covers parts of Binsey, the Trap Grounds, and St Edward’s School on Woodstock Road. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1876. Rezincographed and Printed in 1882. L.G.B. OrdersCorrections 1887”

Surveyed in 1876. Re-zincographed and printed in 1882. L.G.B. Orders-Corrections, 1887. An Ordnance Survey map of East Oxford, covering Iffley, Cowley, Temple Cowley and Littlemore. The map shows large parts of the city before major residential areas were introduced, including the space where Florence Park, Rose Hill are now situated and large parts of Cowley and Temple Cowley.

Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. [46645] £200

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council, Engineers Dept. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding, time toning to sheet, creases to centre and edges. Bears Oxford Corporation W.H. White Engineer stamp. [46589] £175

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44. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 14. [St. Thomas, Botley, Osney, Oxford Railway Station] [Anonymous] Zincograph with hand colour Znincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. 1894 640 x 960 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of West Oxford, focusing on Botley, Osney and Oxford Railway Station, covering part of Port Meadow and the Trap Allotments, and up to Kingston Road, as well as the area around St. Thomas Church. This map measures 25 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Surveyed in 1873 & 74. Published in 1878. Reprinted in 1894.” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Local Board. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Overall creasing, and tearing to centre fold and edges of sheet. Damage to bottom margin, inscription not entirely legible. [46658] £175

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45. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIX. 3. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph with hand colour Zincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. [1894 impression] 640 x 957 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, focusing on St. Aldate, St. Ebbe, St. Clements, and New Hinksey, covering Pembroke College, Folly Bridge, Christ Church Meadows, Abingdon Road and Marlborough Road to Sunningwell Road, Iffley Road from The Plain to Fairacres Road, and Cowley Road from The Plain to East Avenue. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1873, 74 & 75. Published in 1878. Reprinted in 1894” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Overall creasing, as well as tearing to the edges. Touched in red, yellow and black pen, adding streets. [46646] £200


46. Oxfordshire. XXXIII. 6 [Wolvercot] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1899. 640 x 967 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of North Oxford, focused on Wolvercot, and covering parts from the Duke’s Lock to the Trout inn at Godstow Brigde, to the Red Barn’s Farm, Davenant Road, Summertown House and Obserton Road. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1872 & 75. Revised in 1898.” Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. Touches in red pen, adding street names to bottom right. [46643] £175

47. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIV. 13. [Forest Hill with Shotover, Headington Quarry, Thornhill] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1899. 638 x 963 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting a part just outside Oxford to the East, centred on Forest Hill with Shotover, covering Headington Quarry now colloquially known as The Quarry, the adjoining area which is now Risinghurst, as well as Thorn Hill where the Thornhill Park & Ride can now be found, part of the London Road, and all the surrounding farmlands and woodlands. This map measures 25 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1878 & 79. Revised in 1898.” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Slight overall surface dirt built-up. Slight creasing and tearing mainly to centre fold and edges of sheet. Several stains to the sheet. [46661] £175

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48. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIX. 4. [South East Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Heliozincographed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1899. 640 x 958 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of South East Oxford, covering Cowley Road from East Avenue to Milton Road and Marsh Road, depicting the Cowley Marsh with Cricket Grounds, which has now been redeveloped, as well as Temple Cowley, the old barracks which are located by what is now known as Barracks Lane, part of Hollow Way, the farmland now replaced by the Oxford Golf Club, and allotments some of which are now turned into housing. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1872-75. Revised in 1898. Reprint 20/10.” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with dark blue edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Overall creasing Touched in black pen, adding new streets. [46663] £175 64

49. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIX. 3. [Central and South Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Zincographed and Published at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton. [1903 impression] 645 x 960 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of Central and South Oxford, focusing on St. Aldate, St. Ebbe, St. Clements, and New Hinksey, covering Pembroke College, Folly Bridge, Christ Church Meadows, Abingdon Road and Marlborough Road to Sunningwell Road, Iffley Road from The Plain to Fairacres Road and Howard Street with The Chester and Magdalen Arms indicated, and Cowley Road from The Plain to East Avenue. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Oxfordshire Surveyed in 1873-75. Berkshire Revised in 1898. Reprint 75/1903.” Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet. Overall surface dirt built-up. Overall creasing, as well as tearing to the edges and folds. Touched in red and green pen and hand colouring, adding new building developments. Faded print sellers stamp at bottom right corner. [46652] £175


50. Oxfordshire. Sheet XXXIII. II. S.W. [Central Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph Printed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1912. 640 x 965 mm unmounted

51. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 14. S.E. [St.Thomas, Osney, Oxford Railway Station] [Anonymous] Zincograph Printed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton 1913. 638 x 965 mm unmounted

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of Central Oxford, centred on part of the Woodstock Road from Farndon Road to Frenchay Road, and Banbury Road from Belbroughton Road to Norham Road, stretching to boat houses and bathing places by the River Cherwell. This map measures 25.5 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:1250 inches. Inscription to bottom left: “Enlarged from the edition of 1898. Partially Revised in 1911.”

An Ordnance Survey map depicting part of West Oxford, focusing Osney and Oxford Railway Station, covering parts of the Botley Road, as well as the area around St. Thomas Church. This map measures 25 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:1250 inches. Inscription to bottom centre: “Enlarged from the Revision from 1898. Partially Revised in 1912.”

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Overall surface dirt built-up. Slight overall creasing. Touched with blue hand colouring to accentuate the river. [46653] £175

Ex. Col.: Oxford Corporation W.H. White, Engineer. City’s Engineer Department. Condition: Laid to linen sheet with green edge binding. Slight overall surface dirt built-up. Slight creasing and tearing to edges of sheet. [46659] £175

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52. [North Oxford] [Anonymous] Heliozincograph [Heliozincographed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1899.] 1750 x 1935 mm unmounted A large scale map of North Oxford on a scale of 1:2500 inches. The map centres on Summertown and map features the area from Cutteslowe, Wolvercote and Port Meadow through Summertown as far as St. Giles and from Binsey in the west to Marston in the east. Printed on eight sheets and laid to linen, with original wooden rollers.

Detail of the University Parks, 1899*

Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Some over all surface dirt especially toward the top of the map. The printed Ordnance Survey information has been trimmed off each sheet before the map was laid to linen. [46665] £400 * NB: Map too large to be photographed in full.

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53. Oxfordshire Sheet XXXIII. 16. [Headington, South Park, Wood Farm, Temple Cowley ] [Anonymous] Zincograph with original hand colour Heliozincographed and Published by the Director General at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1899. 1270 x 960 mm unmounted Two nineteenth century Ordnance Survey maps joined, depicting the end of the Cowley Road from East Avenue out to Temple Cowley, and north to South Park, Headington Hill, Headington and New Headington. All buildings are picked out in red and laid roads in yellow hand colour. This map measures 50 x 38 inches, and uses a scale of 1:2500 inches.

Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1872-75. Revised in 1898. Reprint 20/10.” Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Printed on two sheets and laid to linen. Overall light surface dirt and occasional creasing. City of Oxford. W.H. White, City Engineer stamp in bottom right corner. [46666] £350 69


54. Oxfordshire. Sheet XXXIII. S.E. [North Oxford] [Anonymous] Zincograph [Ordnance Survey, c.1898 impression] 307 x 454 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of North Oxford, covering the city from Oxford Castle to Summertown, Martson, Headington and Barton, as well as the surrounding farmlands. This map measures 12 x 18 inches and uses the 6 inches to 1 mile scale. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1872-1876. Revised in 1898.” Ex. Col.: St. John’s College, Geography Dept. Condition: Folding map using a scale of six inch to the mile. Sheet laid on linen, folding into red cloth. Bottom margin with scale missing as issued. St. John’s College Geography Department Library Stamp on red cloth cover. [46605] £80

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55. Oxfordshire. Sheet XXXIII. S.W. [Binsey, Wytham, Seacourt, St. Thomas] [Anonymous] Zincograph [Ordnance Survey , 1903 impression] 307 x 454 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map of North Oxfordshire, covering Binsey, Wytham, Seacourt and St. Thomas in Osney. This map measures 12 x 18 inches and uses the 6 inches to 1 mile scale. Inscription to bottom left: “Oxfordshire. Surveyed in 1872. Berkshire. Surveyed in 1872-73. Revised in 1898. Reprint 100/1903.” Ex. Col.: St. John’s College, Geography Dept. Condition: Folding map using a scale of six inch to the mile. Sheet laid on linen, folding into red cloth. Bottom margin with scale missing as issued. St. John’s College Geography Department Library Stamp on red cloth cover. [46594] £60


56. Oxfordshire. Sheet XXXIX. N.E. [St. Aldate, Cowley, South Hinksey, Iffley, Littlemore] [Anonymous] Zincograph [Ordnance Survey, c.1898 impression ] 307 x 454 mm unmounted An Ordnance Survey map depicting parts of Central and East Oxford, covering Christ Church meadows in the north to Temple Cowley, Rose Hill and parts of Littlemore in the east, as well as South Hinksey to Spring Copse in the south west. This map measures 12 x 18 inches and uses the 6 inches to 1 mile scale. Inscription to bottom left: “Surveyed in 1872-1875. Revised in 1897-98.” Ex. Col.: St. John’s College, Geography Dept. Condition: Folding map using a scale of six inch to the mile. Sheet laid on linen, folding into red cloth. Bottom margin with scale missing as issued. St. John’s College Geography Department Library Stamp on red cloth cover. [46595] £70 71


MODERN OXFORD


57. Oxford [from Ferry Hinksey] Muirhead Bone Etching 1905 Image and plate 301 x 467 mm, Sheet 190 x 268 mm unmounted Signed in pencil Bone’s view of Oxford, drawn from Hinksey was executed in 1905, thirty five years before he came to live in Oxford. Featuring the distant spires and domes of Oxford rising above a belt of trees, this fine etching is one of only thirty eight impressions. “Distant Oxford” is a dry point, which wears very quickly under the pressure of printing, and like many of his other works makes Muirehead Bone’s etchings and dry points very difficult to acquire. Dodgson 195 Condition: Some surface rubbing to margins not affecting the image and the print has been backed. [45155] £800

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58. A Pictorial Key to the View from the Roof of the Bodleian Library (Radcliffe Camera) Oxford... Edmund Hort New Photogravure F. Maden & E.H. New inv. E.H. New del. AD 1917 240 x 239 mm framed A panoramic view of the Spires of Oxford as seen from the cupola of the Radcliffe Camera. The panorama is presented as a series of concentric circles. At the centre, the arms of the University decorate the central boss of a large compass rose. The next circle provides the cardinal points, divided by eight divisions reflecting the Camera’s buttresses. Beyond this, the spires of Oxford are depicted pictorially and labelled. The final two circles show the fields on the outskirts of town, and the sky, where the directions to nearby towns are plotted, including Woodstock, Islip, Cuddesdon, Iffley, Abingdon, and others. The whole is enclosed by an Arts & Crafts square border, containing the text of the title. In the corners, the distances to, and arms of, London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Cambridge are shown. 74

Full title reads: A Pictorial Key to the View from the Roof of the Bodleian Library (Radcliffe Camera) Oxford, Showing the Characteristic Features of the Principal Buildings & the Landscape as they appear from the Eight Divisions formed by the Buttresses that support the Dome. Condition: Clean crisp impression. Minor foxing to top margin. [46561] £300


59. Oxford Hoffman, George Spencer Offset lithograph Copyright by Spencer Hoffman. 3. West Hill Road. London. SW 18. [1929] 385 x 485 mm framed A deluxe colour printed example of Spencer Hoffman’s rare map of Oxford city centre, the second in a series of ‘Wayabout’ pictorial maps he produced in the 1920s and 1930s. The map shows the city from a bird’s-eye perspective, with colleges, public buildings, streets, and other points of interest labelled. Three keys to the map feature along the bottom, enclosed in box cartouches.

Colleges are labelled numerically, University and City buildings alphanumerically, and Churches with roman numerals. At the top of the map, to either side of the title cartouche, the arms of the City and University are enclosed in laurel wreaths. Condition: Excellent. Vertical and horizontal folds, as issued. Tipped to original card binding along edge of bottom right segment of map. [46562] £575

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60. A Plan of the City of Oxford, Showing the Colleges Taylor, A. E. Lithograph with hand colouring [1932 - 1936] 136 x 172 mm unmounted A scarce, small-scale, plan of the city and university building. One of a decorative series of road maps by artist A.E. Taylor which were first published by Pratt’s Motor Oil Company, as promotional posters in 1932. This attractive vintage map features a decorative cartouche and compass alongside pictographs of places of interest, and an inset map of the roads leading into the city.

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When Pratt’s was taken over by Esso in 1936, the maps were reissued in a bound volume titled Pictorial Britain and Ireland. The volume was split into eight chapters, with each being preceded by a pictorial plan. This particular example of Oxford has been coloured, where most appeared in black and white. Condition: Text on verso. [46641] £130


61. Oxford Lee, Kerry Chromolithograph Published by Pictorial Maps Ltd, for the Travel Association of Great Britain and N. Ireland, 1948 444 x 580 mm framed A decorative map depicting the centre of Oxford, with banderoles naming the colleges and interesting sites. The map is surrounded by 26 college emblems including portraits of the founders and the founding dates. Condition: Excellent, clean impression. [43953] ÂŁ550

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62. Witney [East Oxfordshire] [Anonymous] Chromolithograph Published in colour by the Director General, Ordnance Survey, at the Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1933. Reprinted 1949. 342 x 495 mm unmounted A geological map depicting East Oxfordshire from Chilton and Grafton to Oxford city centre, depicting Bampton, Stanton Harcourt, Stonesfield, Kidlington, Wolvercote, Port Meadow and parts of the surrounding areas and the river Thames.

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Ex. coll. University College Geological Department of Swansea. Condition: Minor overall time toning. Slight creasing to edges of the sheet. Collection stamp to top centre of sheet, not affecting image. The number “236” written in blue pen to bottom right corner. [46575] £80


63. Oxford Fred Taylor Lithograph Printed by Jordison & Co. Ltd. c.1950 Image 920 x 1160 mm framed A very rare, and possibly unique, uncoloured proof state of Taylor’s large bird’s eye view of Oxford City Centre. The view, taken from the south west, features Christ Church’s Tom Quad prominently in the bottom centre. The High runs diagonally across the top half of the view, with the Radcliffe Camera clearly distinguishable in the upper left. Below the city plan, the arms of the University are flanked by the crests of the constituent colleges of the University presented in chronological order of foundation. Of particular note are the crests of a number of the more recent colleges, including Benets, LMH, Somerville, Hugh’s, Hilda’s, and some that were yet to be granted crests, such as St Catherine’s, St Anthony’s, and Nuffield College.

The published version of this poster was issued by the British Railways Corporation as part of an advertising campaign to encourage intercity travel and tourism following the Second World War. The University cities of Oxford and Cambridge were popular subjects, as were sea-side towns within easy reach of London. Condition: Pristine proof impression, still with original registration lines in corners of sheet. [31845] £1,100

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64. Map of Oxford’s History: With some of her worthies Peele, Cecily Lithograph The Alley Workshops, Oxford, c. 1950 468 x 509 mm framed An uncommon uncoloured impression of this decorative mid-twentieth century caricature map of Oxford, with numerous notes and representations of the history of the City and University. On either side, the map is bordered by the crests of the Colleges, from Univ to the unusual chameleon crest of the Society of Home Students, the forerunner to St Anne’s College. Above and below, the map features a long procession of ‘Oxford Worthies,’ from a Stone Age Man in top left to Lord Nuffield at bottom right, and including a host of famous faces. 80

These include, among others, Roger Bacon, Henry VIII, Walter Raleigh, Christopher Wren, Wesley, Shelley, Lewis Carroll and Alice, William Morris, and Lawrence of Arabia. A boxed key in the bottom right lists the colleges, while events and objects of note are included around the city, including the snakes head fritillary, the ‘Oxford Dinosaur,’ a mammoth, Chaucer and his fellow pilgrims, sportsmen in the University Parks, and the enigmatic ‘Scholar Gypsy’ on the banks of the Isis. The map’s title is supported by Saint Frideswide and Saint Scholastica. Condition: Light time toning to sheet. [45201] £500


Detail of Compass Rose with Arms of the City of Oxford* 65. City of Oxford [Anonymous] Heliozincograph George Philip & Son, 32 Fleet St. E.C. 4n [c.1950] 2254 x 1750 mm unmounted An enormous, rare, map of the city of Oxford on a scale of 12 inches to a mile: 400 feet to an inch, the largest 20th century map of Oxford we have ever encountered. The surveying for the map was carried out by the Ordnance Survey and the printing was amended for the Oxford City Engineer J. Campbell Riddell, B.Sc., A.M.I.C.E.

Although produced for use by Oxford City Council this particular impression was never used, with a blank reference key box, decorative compass rose including the city seal and a boxed, plain text title at the top. Ex. Col.: Oxford City Council Condition: Laid to linen. Some staining to upper left margin not aecting the printed area, areas of light creasing. [46664] £750 * NB: Map too large to be photographed in full. 81


66. The City of Oxford, Motor Services, Ltd. George Philip & Son Ltd Lithograph Copyright 1954, George Philip & Son, Ltd. 265 x 280 mm unmounted

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A double sided map of the City of Oxford on one side and the greater Oxfordshire on the other. It shows the bus routes in red and the railways in black. Based upon the Ordnance Survey Map with the sanction of the Controller of H.M Stationery OďŹƒce.


Condition: Vertical and horizontal folds as issued, some minor tears to right margin. [46640] ÂŁ50

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67. Oxford. Plan SP 5305 [East Oxford] [Anonymous] Lithograph Printed and Published by the Director General of the Ordnance Survey, Chessington, Surrey, 1955. 443 x 440 mm unmounted

68. Oxford. Plan SP 5205 NE [East Oxford] [Anonymous] Lithograph Printed and Published by the Director General of the Ordnance Survey, Chessington, Surrey, 1957. 445 x 440 mm unmounted

A map depicting part of East Oxford, centred on the old Cowley Road Hospital, with houses on and around Divinity Road, part of Southfield Road and Morrell Avenue.

A map depicting parts of East Oxford, centred on the area around Cowley Road with terrace housing from Alma Place and Temple Street to East Avenue.

Condition: Slight overall time toning. Old price stamp to lower left. [46566] £40

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Condition: Slight overall time toning. [46572] £40


69. Oxford. Plan SP 5407 SE [Headington] [Anonymous] Lithograph Made and Published by the Director General of the Ordnance Survey, Chessington, Surrey, 1963. 445 x 440 mm unmounted

70. Oxford. Plan SP 5407 SW [Headington] [Anonymous] Lithograph Made and Published by the Director General of the Ordnance Survey, Southampton, c. 1975. 445 x 440 mm unmounted

A map depicting parts of Headington centred on the area around Bury Knowle Park, with the Old High Street and Ash Grove in the north and St Leonard Road and Holly Crescent to the south.

A map depicting a part of Headington, centred on Osler Road with the old Oxford United Football Club, part of the John Radcliffe hospital and the London Road. This Ordnance Survey map was produced for the National Grid plotting the Electricity Transmission Lines.

Condition: Slight overall time toning and dirt build up. Slight creasing to bottom edge of sheet. [46570] £40

Condition: Slight overall time toning and minor dirt build up. [46568] £40

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Mapmakers, Printmakers, & Publishers

BIOGRAPHIES

George Bickham the Elder (1683/84 - 1758) was a British writer, draughtsman, ornamental engraver, illustrator and publisher, notably of ‘The Universal Penman’, issued in 52 parts from 1733 to 1748, a joint work with his son George and with John Bickham (perhaps his father, otherwise a son or brother). It contained examples of calligraphy by 25 writing-masters on 212 folio copperplates. His other famous work was the unusual county atlas, The British Monarchy, which contained 43 topographical maps of England and Wales. His work is often indistinguishable from his son, George Bickham the Younger. Between 1572 and 1617 Georg Braun (1541-1622) and Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590) published six volumes of their Civitates Orbis Terrarum, containing over 500 prospects, views, and maps of mostly European cities, envisioned as a companion to Ortelius’ atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Braun was the editor of the series, with Hogenberg as principle engraver. They relied mainly on existing cartography, but also on drawings made by the Antwerp artist Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who had travelled through most of Western Europe. After Joris Hoefnagel’s death his son Jakob continued the work for the Civitates. The son of a printer, Muirhead Bone was born in Glasgow and trained initially as an architect, later going on to study art at Glasgow School of Art. He began printmaking in 1898, and although his first known print was a lithograph, he is better known for his etchings and drypoints. His subject matter was principally related to landscapes, architecture (which often focussed on urban construction and demolition sites) and industry. In 1901 he moved to London, where he met William Strang, D.S. MacColl and Alphonse Legros, and later became a member of the New English Art Club. After the outbreak of the First World War, Charles Masterman, head of the British War Propaganda Bureau and acting on the advice of William Rothenstein, appointed Bone as Britain’s first official war artist in May 1916. 86

Commissioned as an honorary Second Lieutenant, he arrived in France during the Battle of the Somme, serving with the Allied forces on the Western Front and also with the Royal Navy for a time. He produced 150 drawings of the war, returning to England in October of that year. Over the next few months Bone returned to his earlier subject matter, drawing pictures of shipyards and battleships. He visited France again in 1917 where he took particular interest in the ruined towns and villages. After the Armistice, Bone returned to the type of works he produced before the war, and was influential in promoting fellow war artists William Orpen and Wyndham Lewis. He began to undertake extensive foreign travels which increasingly influenced his work. In 1923 he produced three portraits of the novelist Joseph Conrad during an Atlantic crossing. In the interwar period he exhibited extensively in London and New York, building up a considerable reputation. He received a knighthood in 1937, and served again as official war artist in the Second World War from 1940. Sir Muirhead Bone died in 1953 in Oxford. Samuel Buck (1696-1779) and Nathaniel Buck (fl. 1727-1774) were British engravers and publishers, best known for their famous series of English and Welsh views. In 1727, the brothers commenced sketching and engraving a series on the architectural remains of England and Wales. This series included 83 large prospects of the 70 principal towns in England and Wales. It took the Buck brothers 28 years to complete their venture and during this time changes to their style occurred. The brothers began to use a less formal style in their later engravings by including figures in the foreground and using more subtle landscapes in the foreground. In 1774, Robert Sayer obtained the plates, added page numbers to them and published them as Buck’s Antiquities.


William Alfred Delamotte (1775-1863) was a British draughtsman on wood and a water colourist. He entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1794 and trained under Benjamin West. Delamotte moved to Oxford where he did numerous works depicting the city. In 1803, Delamotte became the drawing master at the newly established Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst where he remained for 40 years. Delamotte was also known for publishing his own prints.

Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) left his native Prague in 1627. He spent several years travelling and working in Germany before his patron, the Earl of Arundel brought him to London in 1636. During the civil wars, Hollar fought on the Royalist side, after which he spent the years 1644-52 in Antwerp. Hollar’s views of London form an important record of the city before the Great Fire of 1666. He was prolific and engraved a wide range of subjects, producing nearly 2,800 prints, numerous watercolours and many drawings.

I. Green (fl.1756-1759) was a British engraver, known for his work on a number of Oxford Almanacks, and likely the John Green whose brother Benjamin was similarly involved in the engraving of a number of Oxford Almanacks in the 1760s. Another Green, James Green, was also involved in the production of copperplates for the Almanack, but more regularly signed his work ‘Js.’ or ‘Is.’ Green. According to Horace Walpole’s A Catalogue of Engravers...in England, 1754, John Green was employed by the University to engrave the almanacs for 1752 and 1754. Green was a pupil of the eldest Basire. He engraved landscapes, portraits and some plates in William Borlase’s The Natural History of Cornwall, 1758.

George Spencer Hoffman (1875-1950) was a British architect and artist, known principally for his series of bird’s-eye ‘Wayabout’ maps of British cities.

Edward Goodall (1795-1870) was a printmaker and draughtsman. Born in Leeds, Goodall was self-taught and owed his proficiency solely to his innate talent and perseverance. After exhibiting at the Royal Academy in 1822, Turner is said to have offered him a sequence of lucrative commissions. These include Dr Broadley’s Poems, Samuel Rogers’ Italy, Campbell’s Poetical Works and the Picturesque Views of England and Wales. Georgius Hoefnagle, more commonly known as Joris or Georg Hoefnagel (Antwerp, 1542 – Vienna, 24 July 1601) was a Flemish painter and engraver, the son of a diamond merchant. He is famous for his miniature work, especially on a missal in the imperial library at Vienna. He painted animals and plants to illustrate works on natural history, and his engravings (especially for Braun’s Civitates orbis terrarum, 1572, and Ortelius’s Theatrum orbis terrarum, 1570) earned him a seminal place amongst early topographical draftsmen.

Edmund Hort New (1871-1931), known as EH New, was an English artist and illustrator. He was born in Evesham, the son of an important lawyer, and attended the Birmingham Municipal School of Art. He began painting landscape and later devoted himself to illustration. Early in his career he worked with Ruskin and other associated Arts and Crafts artists. He later went on to work for William Morris’s Kelmscott Press. The influence of these experiences is evident in his prints, with their decorative borders, armourials, and elegant typefaces. In 1905, Edmund Hort New moved to Oxford, and over a period of years, produced a series of drawings of the Oxford Colleges, based on David Loggan’s 1675 aerial perspectives. New took Loggan’s format and enriched his prints with many fine details of and about the colleges. The series was printed and published by Emery Walker, who marketed them appropriately as ‘New Loggan Prints.’ New’s college views were attractive to collectors because of their high level of detail, and were in most cases a far closer representation of the colleges than the original Loggan views. These prints were made through photogravure, a relatively new process at the time. For a photogravure, the print was made by transferring a photo to a copper plate and then printing from it. With the EH New prints, a contact print of New’s pen and ink drawing was made and the large negative attached to a plate which was then exposed in an acid bath, the acid only biting where the negative was clear, creating an engraved plate of the drawing

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Johannes ‘Jan’ Kip (1653 - 1722) was a Dutch draughtsman, engraver, and print dealer who was active in England, after producing works for the court of William of Orange in Amsterdam. Following the Glorious Revolution of 1688, Kip accompanied the Court to England and settled in Westminster, where he conducted a thriving print selling business from his house in St. John’s Street. He also worked for various London publishers producing engravings, largely for book illustrations. His most important works were the execution of the illustrations for Britannia Illustrata, 1708; The Ancient and Present State of Gloucestershire, 1712, and Le Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne, 1715. Kerry Ernst Lee (1903-1988) was a British artist, born in Hackney, best known for a series of chromolithograph advertising posters issued by British railways, designed and used to help promote British tourism after the second world war. He attended Reading Schools of Arts and Science, the Slade, and the Sorbonne in Paris. Many of Kerry Lee’s maps depict the artist sitting sketching in the corner, with his dog beside him. David Loggan, artist and engraver, was born at Danzig in 1635. He may have learnt the art of engraving from Simon van den Passe in Denmark and from Hendrik Hondius in the Netherlands. Loggan followed Hondius’s sons to England in about 1653 and by 1665 he was residing at Nuffield, near Oxford, and had made the acquaintance of Anthony Wood. On 30 March 1669 he was appointed Engraver to the University of Oxford, with an annual salary of twenty shillings. He married a daughter of Robert Jordan, Esq., of Kencote Hall in Oxfordshire, in 1671 and in 1672 they had a son, John Loggan, who later graduated from Trinity College. The marriage probably produced another son, William Loggan, about whom little is known except that he was responsible for a satirical print of Father Peters and the Jesuits, published in 1681. David Loggan took up residence in Holywell in about 1671, prior to matriculating at the University. In 1675 he was naturalised as an Englishman.

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Oxonia Illustrata was the first illustrated book on Oxford and one of the major works of the 17th century. The book was the product of several years of devoted and conscientious effort in which Loggan was assisted by his pupil Robert White. David Loggan was born in Danzig in 1635 and came to England around 1653. By 1665 he was living in Nuffield near Oxford and in 1669 was appointed engraver to the University. In 1675 he married and became a naturalised citizen. His Oxonia Illustrata was intended as a companion work to Historia Antiquitates Universitatis Oxoniensis by Anthony Woods, with whom Loggan had become acquainted some years earlier. Barak Longmate (1738-1793) was a London engraver, particularly notable for his heraldic works. His son, also Barak, succeeded him in his profession. Longmate published the fifth edition of Collins Peerage, (8 vols., London, 1779), and a Supplement in 1784. He also edited the Pocket Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland, (London, 1788, 1790). For Sir Richard Sullivan’s Thoughts on the Early Ages of the Irish Nation and History, (1789), he engraved an elaborate genealogical plate, entitled A Genealogical History of the Family of O’Sullivan More from Duach Donn, monarch of Ireland. Anno Mundi 912 which he regarded as his masterpiece. William Sharp (1749-1824) and John Swaine (1775–1860) were both pupils of Longmate. Samuel John Neele (1758 1824) headed a family of engravers and publishers mainly working from 352 Strand, London. He worked on numerous publications throughout his lifetime trading with his younger brother George as “S. & G. Neele” from 1813 to 1814, and with his son, James as “Neele and Son” from 1816 to 1824. Sutton Nicholls (1668-1729) was a British engraver, printseller, draughtsman and globemaker. Although best known for his panoramic views of the cities of London and Westminster, Sutton also produced prospects of gentlemen’s seats, such as this example. A majority of his work was commissioned by publishers.


Daniel Meisner’s (1585-1625) emblem book, containing over 800 pictorial-poetic compositions, was enormously popular throughout Europe in the 17th century. The plan views were based on the work of De Bry, Braun & Hogenberg, Merian and others with the addition of emblematic figures or scenes in the foreground, juxtaposed with moralising and edifying verses beneath the image and a Latin motto at top. It was originally issued with 52 plates as the Thesaurus philo-politicus in 1623-24. After Meisner’s death in 1625, Eberhard Kieser, with assistance from Johann L. Gottfried, completed the work and published it until 1631. The plates then appeared in the eight parts of Sciographia Cosmica published by Paulus Furst between 1638-78. The plates for these editions were renumbered alpha-numerically in the upper right corners - A-H (identifying the 8 parts) and 1-100 (plate number). They were finally issued in 1700 and 1704 in Rudolf J. Helmer’s Politica-politica. This is an early impression prior to the addition of a letter before the pagination. Matthäus Merian the Elder (22 September 1593 - 19 June 1650) was a Swiss engraver born in Basel. Beginning his career in Zürich where he learned the art of copperplate engraving, Merian went on to study and work in various cities throughout France. In 1615, Merian returned to Basel. His return to Basel, however, was short lived, moving to Frankfurt the following year to work for the publisher Johann Theodor de Bry. Merian later married de Bry’s daughter. He was also the father of Maria Sibylla Merian, one of the greatest natural history artists of the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Originally a writer on heraldry and general antiquities, Thomas Moule (1784 - 1851) was born in Marylebone, London. From around 1816 to 1823 he was a Bookseller with a shop in Grosvenor Square, London. He then became an inspector of letters in the General Post Office, where his responsibilities included trying to ‘read’ illegible hand writing. George Pawley (fl.1805-1822) was a geographer and mapmaker based in London. He produced this map engraved by Samuel John Neele, as well as Pawley’s General Atlas (1819) and Pawley’s Minor Atlas (1822) both engraved by Samuel and George Neele.

John Pye (1782-1874) was a British printmaker, writer and publisher. Born in Birmingham, Pye relocated to London in 1801 where he took residence in Cirencester Place and worked for many book publishers. As an illustrator for popular art annuals, he executed plates for landscapes by J. M. W. Turner, Claude Lorrain, and Gaspard Poussin amongst others. Preceding his Oxfordian views, Pye collaborated with Turner on James Hakewill’s Italy as well as the History of Richmondshire. Pye grew more literary in his later years and in addition to his strong advocacy for the inclusion of engravers in the Royal Academy, he published a work entitled the Patronage of British Art. ‘Reuben Ramble’ was the pseudonym of the Reverend Samuel Clark, Rector of Eaton-Bishop. His ‘Travels...’ atlas was published as a children’s educational aid. Petrus Schenk, also known as Pieter or Peter (1660 - 1718/9) was a Dutch engraver and mezzotinter, and became a major publisher of both prints and maps. Mainly producing mezzotints, Schenk’s work was similar to that of Jacob Gole, and was mostly copies of portraits and topography. Joseph Skelton (1781 - 1850) was an English engraver of topographical and antiquarian subjects. He is bestknown for his plates in ‘Oxonia Antiqua Illustrata’ (1823); ‘Engraved Illustrations of Antiente Arms and Armour from the Collection at Goodrich Court from the Drawings, and with the Descriptions of Dr. Meyrick’ (1830) (2 vols); and Girault’s ‘Les Beautes de la France’ (1850). He settled in France in the latter part of his life and was elected FSA in 1844. His brother William Skelton was also an engraver. John Speed (1552-1629) is the most famous of all English cartographers primarily as a result of ‘The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine, the first atlas of the British Isles’. The maps from this atlas are the best known and most sought-after of all county maps. The maps were derived mainly from the earlier prototypes of Christopher Saxton and Robert Norden but with notable improvements including parish “Hundreds” and county boundaries, town plans and embellishments such as the coats of arms of local Earls, Dukes, and the Royal Household. The maps are famed for their borders consisting of local inhabitants in national costume and panoramic vignette views of major cities and towns. An added feature is that regular atlas copies have English text printed on the reverse, giving a charming description of life in the early seventeenth century of the region. The overall effect produced very decorative, attractive and informative maps. 89


Speed was born in 1552 at Farndon, Cheshire. Like his father before him he was a tailor by trade, but around 1582 he moved to London. During his spare time Speed pursued his interests of history and cartography and in 1595 his first map of Canaan was published in the “Biblical Times”. This raised his profile and he soon came to the attention of poet and dramatist Sir Fulke Greville a prominent figure in the court of Queen Elizabeth. Greville as Treasurer of the Royal Navy gave Speed an appointment in the Customs Service giving him a steady income and time to pursue cartography. Through his work he became a member of such learned societies as the Society of Antiquaries and associated with the likes of William Camden Robert Cotton and William Lambarde. He died in 1629 at the age of seventy-seven. Fred Taylor was born in London on March 22 1875, the son of William Taylor. Taylor studied briefly at Goldsmith’s College, London, where he won a gold medal for his posters, and a travelling scholarship to study in Italy. At some point working in the Waring and Gillow Studio, Taylor was a poster artist, illustrator, decorator and a watercolourist. Particularly noted as a poster artist from 1908 to the 1940s, and was regularly commissioned by the LNER, EMB and shipping companies. Taylor also exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy, and other provincial societies. Taylor’s designs frequently referred to architectural subjects. During the Second World War, Taylor was employed on naval camouflage. He also executed commissions for London Transport, including ‘Back Room Boys’, where the underlying concept and use of central image with a surrounding border were probably taken from A S Hartrick’s series of lithographs on war work called Playing the Game, 1918, although ‘their finely balanced colouring and their superb draughtsmanship are peculiar to Taylor at his best’. Married to Florence R Sarg, with a son and a daughter, Taylor is also remembered for his decorating work, most notably for ceilings for the former Underwriter’s Room at Lloyds of London, and murals for Austin Reed’s red laquer room in 1930. He was also the author of a number of publications.

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Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775 - 1851) was a painter and draughtsman who became one of the most celebrated artists Britain would ever produce. He was born near Covent Garden, London, and entered the Royal Academy Schools in December of 1789. The Academy, conscious of his prodigious talent, encouraged and supported Turner. He was elected as an Associate of the RA in 1799, and became a full Academician in 1802. His early oil painting flitted between Netherlandish works in the manner of Cuyp, Ruisdael and Van de Velde, classical landscapes like those of Claude and Richard Wilson, and, upon returning from his Parisian visit in 1802, grand historical compositions like those of Poussin and Titian. The development of his idiosyncratic style, commonly held to have been around 1803, led to critical condemnation. His preoccupation with light and colour produced abstract, near vorticistic works, which predated Impressionism, but were hugely controversial in the conformist context of late Georgian and early Victorian England. Whilst some critics accused Turner of extravagance and exaggeration, John Ruskin virulently thwarted these claims in Modern Painters, and championed the artist’s fidelity to nature. Ruskin became the main advocate of a new generation of Turner admirers, usually professional, middle class, or newly wealthy, who embraced his work for its modernity. An enormously prolific artist, Turner bequeathed over three hundred oils and close to twenty thousand drawings and prints to the nation. His style produced many imitators, but no rivals. Nathaniel Whittock (1791-1860) was lithographer to the University of Oxford. He was born in Oxford but moved to London in 1828. His nephew, Henry Hyde, was also an engraver.


William Williams (fl. 1720-4), often using the Latinate version of his name ‘Guilielmus Williams’, was an architectural draughtsman. This is reflected in the title page and in the formality of many of the engravings in his ‘Oxonia Depicta’. The contents of the work are similar to those in David Loggan’s ‘Oxonia Illustrata’, published over 50 years earlier, commencing with a double-prospect of the city of Oxford each containing a numbered key, and plan of the city after Agas’ plan of 1588. There is a double prospect of the interior of the Bodleian Library after Loggan and a number of architectural plans of the colleges. More importantly the work includes ten fine large engravings of the colleges of Magdalen, Corpus, Wadham, St. Johns, Queens, New, Oriel, Trinity, Pembroke and Brasenose, showing how they were at the beginning of the eighteenth century. They are in fact, in many instances, the only visual records of the buildings at this time in their history. The most impressive plate is the large folding-plate depicting a composite view of the Clarendon Building, the Schools Building and the Sheldonian Theatre, accompanied by figures in University dress and flanked by the front elevations of several other university buildings.

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Sanders of Oxford

Antique Prints & Maps 104 High Street, Oxford. OX1 4BW info@sandersofoxford.com - 01865 242590 - www.sandersofoxford.com

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Surveying the City. 400 Years of Oxford Plans & Panoramas  

Outside of London, Oxford is the most documented English city in antique print and map. Drawing on four hundred years of plans and panoramas...

Surveying the City. 400 Years of Oxford Plans & Panoramas  

Outside of London, Oxford is the most documented English city in antique print and map. Drawing on four hundred years of plans and panoramas...

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