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LO C A L

N EWS

March 26-April 1, 2020 YO U

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INSIDE: Check Out Our Annual Summer Camp Guide SPECIAL SECTION VOLUME 15, ISSUE 13

Uncharted Waters City, County Take Steps to Reduce Attendance at Beaches amid Health Crisis E Y E O N S C / PAG E 3

sanclementetimes.com

A surfer charges into the waters at T-Street on Monday afternoon, March 23. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

First Death from Coronavirus Reported in County EYE ON SC/PAGE 3

Longtime Owner of Sam’s Shoes Remembered Fondly EYE ON SC/PAGE 4

A Night on the Town: The New Normal GETTING OUT/PAGE 8

GO TO SANCLEMENTETIMES.COM FOR THE LATEST NEWS, EVENTS AND SPORTS


SC EYE ON SC San Clemente

LOCAL NEWS & IN-DEPTH REPORTING

What’s Up With...

Five things San Clemente should know this week OC Health Reports First Death from Coronavirus in County THE LATEST: The Orange County Health Care Agency confirmed Tuesday, March 24, the first death of an Orange County resident in connection to the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. A press release issued just before 4 p.m. stated the individual was a male in his 70s with underlying health conditions who had been receiving treatment at a local hospital. “Additional details about the individual’s death, the name of the hospital, and the city of residence will not be disclosed,” the release said. Dr. Nichole Quick, the county health officer, said county officials extend their heartfelt sympathies to the patient’s family and friends. “This serves as a very unfortunate reminder to the community about the importance of staying at home and social distancing when leaving the household for essential activities, or to work at an essential business, in order to slow the spread of COVID-19 and help protect our most vulnerable neighbors,” Quick said. There is now epidemiological evidence of community transmission in Orange County, indicating that COVID-19 is spreading in the community, according to the county. People age 65 and older are advised to stay at home.—Lillian Boyd

City Closes Beach Parking Lots, Pier THE LATEST: The city of San Clemente on Tuesday, March 24, escalated its efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by announcing that it will be closing the pier to the public, as well as city-owned parking lots that provide access to the beaches. “All City-owned beachfront parking lots and the San Clemente Municipal Pier will close to the public until further notice,” the city said in a press release. “This action aligns with the most recent guidance from Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office to limit public gatherings and reduce the spread of COVID-19.” Beginning on Wednesday, March 25, San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

Local San Clemente surfers Jessea Wiedeman (left) and Shaw Kobayashi search for a spot to surf at T-Street on Monday, March 23. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

the parking lots at Linda Lane, Pier Bowl & Parque Del Mar and T-Street were closed. The North Beach Parking Lot also closed, with the exception of spots available for commuters using the Metrolink. The beaches and beach trail will remain open, the city said, before noting that “this is subject to change pending further guidance or directives from the County of Orange or the California Department of Public Health.” “Users must follow social distancing guidelines and maintain a six-foot separation from people that are not part of their households at all times,” the city said in its release. The latest directive came on the heels of the county leaders ordering staff to close the parking lots to several nearby beaches. San Clemente Times caught up with a pair of local surfers who were out catching waves at T-Street on Monday, March 23. Jessea Wiedeman and Shaw Kobayashi, both San Clemente residents, said they’ve been staying indoors, with the exception of surf sessions. “We are (practicing social distancing). We’ve been staying inside other than just coming out and surfing,” Wiedeman said. “We’ve been keeping our distance from the crowds. Like we’re not hanging

out around the beach or anything.” Besides continuing to surf, Wiedeman added that she and Kobayashi have been heeding the directives from local and state officials, and have worked to keep up with reports, “keeping an eye out for any of the beaches closing and stuff like that.” Questions regarding the closures due to the novel coronavirus can be directed to the city by email at covid19@ san-clemente.org. Additional information on the closures can also be found at san-clemente.org/coronavirus. —Shawn Raymundo

County-Owned Beach Parking Lots Closed THE LATEST: County leaders have directed their staff to close parking lots at Salt Creek Beach, Strands Beach and Capistrano Beach, as well as portions of the Dana Point Harbor parking lots—all property of the county. OC Health announced on Tuesday evening, March 24, that parking lots at all county beaches, regional parks and wilderness parks—and parking spaces at all county trailheads, as well as pedestrian access points at Thousand Steps, Table Rock, Camel Point and Treasure Page 3

Island beaches—would be closed effective Wednesday, March 25. Restrooms, playgrounds, exercise equipment, and shelters at all county parks are closed, but “passive walkthrough pedestrian, cycling and equestrian activity is permitted.” The direction was made after the Orange County Board of Supervisors met on Tuesday and discussed the latest updates on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, and pertinent policies. OC Parks Director Stacy Blackwood spoke before the supervisors, notifying the board that the cities of Laguna Beach and Dana Point had closed their city-owned beaches, Huntington Beach had closed its pier, and Newport Beach had closed its dog parks and playgrounds while leaving its city-owned beaches open. On Monday, March 23, the city of Dana Point announced the closure of the Dana Cove beach area—the only city-owned beach in Dana Point. When commenting on whether the county should proceed in closing county-owned beaches, Blackwood suggested consistency to prevent visitors from moving from a closed beach to find an open one and potentially overcrowding it despite social distancing measures. (Cont. on page 4) sanclementetimes.com


EYE ON SC (Cont. from page 3) “It could confuse members of the public and could create hotspots for gathering,” Blackwood said. “I recommend consistency for all jurisdictions.” Supervisor Lisa Bartlett expressed concerns that more visitors would congregate at Orange County beaches with warmer weather and both Los Angeles and San Diego counties closing their own beaches. Ultimately, Orange County CEO Frank Kim directed OC Parks to close the parking lots at Salt Creek, Strands Beach and at Capo Beach. Those county-owned beaches currently remain open to the public. Doheny State Beach remained open for day use as of Wednesday, March 25. Visitors are asked to download a Passport Parking app. According to the state parks website, campgrounds were closed. The City of Dana Point sent a letter on Tuesday, March 24, to state parks officials asking that the state beach be consistent with other parking lot closures. For a list of county beaches and parks, visit ocparks.com.—LB

Mission Hospital Grappling with Coronavirus Pandemic THE LATEST: Like other health care facilities throughout the world, Mission Hospital in South Orange County is facing a new world under the coronavirus pandemic. The facility says it’s prepared to deal with the coronavirus, but it realizes the unique challenges the pandemic poses. Mission Hospital said in a statement that while it routinely trains for emergencies, “the scope of this outbreak is an enormous challenge for health care.” Mission Hospital declined to comment on specific information regarding coronavirus testing or positive tests for patients, as patient privacy is a priority. Information will be reported to the appropriate health agency if patients test positive. “We are urging the public to heed Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay-at-home directive, as well as common-sense hygiene practices,” the Mission Hospital statement said. “We have set up temporary facilities outside our emergency departments to screen patients away from the general hospital population. We are urging people with mild symptoms to stay home and self-quarantine for two weeks.” Mission Hospital also recommends clients use its Providence Express Care Virtual system for an online visit with a nurse practitioner who can screen, assess, prescribe, chart and advise next steps. “We are working with our experts and other stakeholders to ensure supplies of personal protection equipment as well as equipment necessary for patient care,” the San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

chael’s Catholic School. • As the only child of a shoe repairman, he began learning and working in the trade at age 6. • He left high school to become a Navy medic, attached to the Marine Corps at Camp Pendleton. • With limited training but with “very skilled hands,” he delivered 37 babies and assisted with many surgeries, including a solo appendectomy when the doctor had a broken hand. • A doctor was so impressed with his surgical skills that he offered to help get Tiberi into medical school on the GI Bill, but the mentor was killed in the Korean War. • Returning to his roots—shoe-repair skills—he opened his first shop on Avenida Del Mar in 1953. Sam Tiberi, the longtime owner of Sam’s Shoes on Avenida Del Mar in Downtown San Clemente, died on March 13 after a lengthy illness. Photo: Courtesy of the Tiberi family

Mission Hospital statement said. “We will have great challenges in providing the level of care that will be needed in the coming weeks, and perhaps months, if the community does not cooperate with required and recommended safety measures.” To address the overflow of patients that hospitals have seen during the pandemic, the state of California has been considering utilizing unused facilities to care for those who have contracted the disease, according to Orange County Board Supervisor and Chairperson Lisa Bartlett. “As of right now, the State is looking at all options to care for COVID-19 patients,” Batlett said in an email to San Clemente Times. “While we have no information on exactly where the State will be deciding to isolate those patients, I will continue to work with the Governor’s office and our local elected officials to secure appropriate care and safety for our residents.” Asked whether the shuttered hospital in San Clemente was on the list of potential sites the state is considering, Bartlett’s office was unable to confirm or deny. San Clemente Mayor Dan Bane touched on that subject during a recent city council meeting, where he noted that several residents have asked if the city was considering reopening the site of the former Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. “We’ve been talking with county health, which is the lead regarding that,” Bane said at the March 17 meeting. “It’s not as though we can sort of snap our fingers as a city and sort of reopen the hospital. We’re working with the appropriate authorities to see if that’s a possibility.” As of press time, the city had not responded to a request seeking additional

comment on the matter.—Collin Breaux and SR

Longtime Owner of Sam’s Shoes Remembered Fondly THE LATEST: Sam Tiberi’s most surprising customer walked into his San Clemente shoe store looking to outfit his grandchild with baby shoes. “There were Secret Service men everywhere,” Tiberi recalled during a 2010 event at Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens. “I had the jitters.” “Do you know my dad?” asked the baby’s mother. “I said, ‘No, but I heard a lot about him!’” Tiberi said. “He shook my hand, and he said, ‘I heard a lot about you, too!’ ” Tiberi proceeded to show President Richard M. Nixon how Sam’s Shoes repaired shoes. That led to Tiberi repairing a pair of shoes for the nation’s 37th president, prompting the gift of an autographed book. San Clemente is remembering Sam Tiberi, who died March 13 at age 89, as the operator of one of the longest-standing businesses in town history. He established Sam’s Shoes in 1953. It’s still serving the community. He died at home following a lengthy illness, the family announced. His wife Carol recently shared some snippets about Sam: • Born in Pennsylvania to Italian immigrant parents, he didn’t speak English until learning in first grade at St. MiPage 4

• Camp Pendleton boot repairs for service members emerged as a major part of the business, leading Sam’s Shoes to outgrow multiple locations before settling into its present spacious store—in 1963— at 135 Del Mar. • He helped organize San Clemente’s first Fiesta La Cristianita Parade in 1954, established the city’s first Dollar Day promotion, became active in service clubs and championed the Downtown Business Association. • Having learned to play the trumpet as a boy, he returned to it in San Clemente, cultivating a new sidelight, the Royal Knights. • The eight-piece Big Band performed for 26 years around Southern California, including Disneyland, the Queen Mary, weddings and fraternal organizations’ events. • The band’s final gig, in 1988, entertained at San Clemente’s celebration of 60 years of cityhood. • In retirement, Sam and wife Carol traveled extensively. He remained a big supporter of charities and institutions from the Marines to Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church.  His advice to businesses? “Treat people personally . . . try to remember them . . . try to help them with what they want,” he once said in an Orange County Register interview. He is survived by wife Carol, five children, nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. “His enthusiasm for life, generosity of spirit and boundless love will be missed by all who knew him,” the family said. A celebration of life will be announced once the coronavirus pandemic subsides.—Fred Swegles sanclementetimes.com


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The YMCA of Orange County is providing child care at 28 of its locations across the county for both members and non-members who provide essential services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo: Courtesy of YMCAOC

NEWS BITES COMPILED BY STAFF

City Approves Mural for Pier Bathroom A new mural could soon adorn the utility door of the restroom facility at the end of the San Clemente Pier, as the city council this month approved the installation and design of the artwork that will be completed in conjunction with the capital improvement project to renovate the pier bathrooms. The mural, titled “Open Door Policy” and designed by Andriana “Andi” Goud, depicts an octopus walking onto the pier. It’s meant to represent the historic pier, “in that the octopus is native to this area, and the door is meant to be seamless with the building,” the city explained in an agenda report. The council voted on the mural installation as part of the consent calendar for the March 17 meeting. Items listed on the consent calendar can be voted on in one motion without discussion, unless a councilmember or citizen requests to pull an item for deliberation. Last fall, local nonprofit organization PierPride Foundation launched an art contest as part of its efforts to renovate and revitalize the San Clemente Pier restroom. To judge the submissions, it commissioned a committee comprising two of its members, the president of the San Clemente Art Association, one councilmember and the city’s recreation manager. “After review, the committee selected ‘Open Door Policy’ for its playful design and unique, eye-catching character,” the city said in its report. The renovation project was slated for completion by Memorial Day. It will include a new drinking fountain with a water bottle fill station and skylights, which is being paid for with funding donated by PierPride. San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

Woman’s Body Found in Ocean A woman’s body was found floating off the coast of San Clemente in the North Beach area on Wednesday morning, March 18, prompting authorities to launch a homicide investigation, according to the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. At around 8 a.m., surfers located the body of the woman, who appeared to be Caucasian and in her 40s, OCSD spokesperson Carrie Braun said. OCSD personnel recovered the decedent’s body and began to conduct an immediate investigation. “At this time, the woman’s death is considered suspicious,” she wrote in an email to San Clemente Times. “Homicide investigators will be attempting to identify the decedent and determine the circumstances surrounding her death.” OCSD is encouraging anyone who may have helpful information pertaining to the investigation to contact OCSD Dispatch at 714.647.7000 or Crime Stoppers at 1.855.847.6887.

CA Extends Deadline for State Tax Filings Amid the daily disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the deadline for California’s taxpayers to file their state 2019 tax returns and submit applicable payments has been pushed back to midJuly, the state’s Franchise Tax Board announced on Wednesday, March 18. The deadline for all individuals and businesses to file their returns and return payments for 2019 will now be July 15. The new deadline also covers first- and secondquarter estimate payments for 2020, 2020 LLC taxes and fees, and 2020 non-wage withholding payments. “The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting life for people and businesses statewide,” State Controller Betty T. Yee said in a press

release. Yee serves as chair of the FTB. “We are further extending tax filing deadlines for all Californians to July 15,” she said in the release. “Hopefully, this small measure of relief will help allow people to focus on their health and safety during these challenging times.” The FTB’s decision to postpone the deadlines for state taxes followed U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s announcement on Tuesday, March 17, that individuals and businesses would have an extra 90 days to file their federal income tax payments with the IRS.   Taxpayers, he specified, should still file their federal returns by the April 15 due date, if feasible, according to news reports. “We encourage those Americans who can file their taxes, to continue to file their taxes on April 15, because for many Americans, you will get tax refunds,” Mnunchin said Tuesday, according to a CNN report. “We don’t want you to lose out on those tax refunds.” On March 18, the Treasury Department and IRS issued additional guidance on the postponement, explaining that individuals could defer up to $1 million for the 90 days, or July 15, without penalties and interest. Corporations would be able to defer up to $10 million. The FTB in California had previously extended the filing deadline for those taxpayers impacted by the pandemic until June 15, per Gov. Gavin Newsom’s March 12 executive order. The latest announcement, the FTB explained, supersedes the previous extension. “If possible, taxpayers should continue to file tax returns on time to get their refunds timely, including claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit and Young Child Tax Credit,” the FTB said in its press release. “During this public health emergency, FTB continues to process tax returns, issue refunds, and provide phone and live chat service to taxpayers needing assistance.” More information on the tax relief effort can be found at ftb.ca.gov.

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YMCA Providing Child Care to First-Responders, Emergency Personnel YMCA of Orange County (YMCAOC) is providing child care at 28 of its locations across Orange County for both members and non-members who provide essential services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such essential services include first responders and emergency management personnel, the organization said in a press release. Locations will be open MondayFriday, 6:45 a.m.–6 p.m. Cost of services will vary depending on need, but financial assistance is available, and YMCA said it can work with companies to provide onsite child care as needed. “We are committed to strengthening our community, especially in times of need, and we have seen an overwhelming need for child care support with widespread school closures,” said Jeff McBride, CEO of YMCAOC. “As we all continue to adjust to this fluid and unpredictable situation, we want to offer as much support as possible to families that need us most right now.” YMCAOC stressed that its Child and Youth Development staff are following health protocols, including intensified cleaning protocols and increased frequency of cleanings. Staff will educate and supervise children about proper hygiene measures, including thorough and frequent handwashing, covering coughs and sneezes and avoiding touching eyes, noses or mouths with unwashed hands, the press release said. Children who shows any sign of illness throughout the day will be separated and sent home immediately. More information can be found at ymcaoc.org/covid. Have something interesting to submit to our News Bites section?

Submissions are due by 10 a.m. the Monday of the week you’d like published. Email sraymundo@picketfencemedia.com. sanclementetimes.com


SC SOAPBOX San Clemente

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San Clemente Times, Vol. 15, Issue 13. The SC Times (sanclementetimes.com ) is published weekly by Picket Fence Media, publishers of the Dana Point Times (danapointtimes. com) and The Capistrano Dispatch (thecapistranodispatch. com). Copyright: No articles, illustrations, photographs or other editorial matter or advertisements herein may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, photos or negatives. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

Newspapers’ Role in the Time of Coronavirus ver the past two months, concern over the spreading COVID-19 virus has increasingly gripped our nation. In this public health crisis, people need access to accurate and authoritative information so that they can make decisions about their health and safety. Hearsay, half-truths and supposition don’t cut it when our lives may be at stake. That’s why this newspaper—and thousands of others in our state—are on the front lines of the pandemic. We are there to inquire, authenticate and report facts so you know what’s going on and what to do. At San Clemente Times, we take that responsibility very seriously. Our team of reporters is working around the clock to provide our readers with the latest information on how and where the virus is spreading and what health experts are recommending to protect the public. To ensure that information is accurate, a team of four editors reviews and fact-checks each element of every story. Further behind the scenes, the small team of dedicated em-

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ployees in production, subscriber and delivery services makes sure that our digital and print editions reach our readers with the information they need in these turbulent times. We live in an era when information is fingertip-accessible, but so is misinformation. Newspapers provide the relevant details on the COVID-19 outbreak and its impact on South Orange County hospitals and schools. Every day, we’re here focused on delivering critical information to you, our readers, about the things that matter most to you: business, the stock market, jobs, quality of life, elected officials, events, local schools, entertainment, crime, transportation, weather and more. We strive for complete accuracy—and when we err, we hold ourselves accountable and strive to do better in the future. In the face of this great responsibility, newspapers are operating under increasing financial pressure. Over the past 15 years, more than one in five papers in the United States has closed down, and the number of journalists has been cut in half, according to

the University of North Carolina’s School of Media and Journalism. So if you appreciate the hard work of our journalists during this crisis, please let them know by sending them an email. They are on the front lines, sharing the critical work being done by first responders, health care professionals, public health experts and many others. In times of challenges, we’re reminded that we’re all in this together, sharing acts of simple kindness and community cohesion: neighbors helping neighbors, young families making sure seniors have plenty of food, and businesses temporarily closing their doors but paying employees during the shutdown. Although it may be a frightening time, the worst trials can bring out the best in Americans. We’re proud to tell these stories of our times. The Sacramento-based California News Publishers Association works to protect the interests of newspapers throughout the state and promotes the general welfare of the California newspaper and news media industry. SC

GUEST OPINION: Bartlett Bulletin by OC Board Supervisor Lisa Bartlett

Federal government to prepare for staffing needs, greater agency coordination, and future reimbursement for County activities in the event of a COVID-19 surge in Orange County. Every person has a role to play in preventing the spread of COVID-19. Many of the same steps you take to protect yourself and others during the normal flu and cold season should be adhered to when it comes to preventing the spread of COVID 19.

be no visitation from nonessential medical persons allowed at senior facilities. Orange County is fortunate enough to have been approved to conduct testing for the virus at our Public Health Laboratory and will continue to test those who have been approved for testing by their health care provider. There has been an increase in testing abilities from private labs, and you may also request a test from your primary care doctor. Information on this issue is constantly changing, and we are doing more every day to better understand this virus and its possible effect on our communities. For the most up-to-date information on Orange County confirmed cases; local, state, and federal guidance; and related alerts, you can visit ochealthinfo.com/ novelcoronavirus, call the OC Health Care Agency’s Health Referral Line daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (800.564.8448) and monitor County social media sites. You can also sign up for my e-newsletter on my website, d5.ocgov.com, for weekly updates on the current COVID-19 situation and other district specific information. With your cooperation, we will tackle this virus. Stay informed, stay healthy! Lisa Bartlett is the District 5 representative of the Orange County Board of Supervisors. She was reelected in 2018. SC

COVID-19 Local Resources

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bviously, the topic on everyone’s mind right now is the coronavirus, referred to by health care professionals as COVID-19. While our public health officials tell us the risk for the general public remains low for all of us here in Orange County, it is important to know how you can prevent the spread of the virus, symptoms to look out for, and what to expect moving forward. The County of Orange Health Care Agency (HCA) has been working around the clock since the discovery of COVID-19 in the U.S. We take the health and safety of our Orange County THE BARTLETT residents seriously and are BULLETIN taking every precaution to By Lisa Bartlett be prepared, should a local outbreak occur. On February 26, the Board of Supervisors, along with our County Health Officer, Dr. Nichole Quick, declared a local emergency and a local health emergency to prepare for COVID-19. Luckily, both the state and federal government have done the same. This declaration assists the County to better leverage resources from both the State and

EXAMPLES INCLUDE: • Wash your hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds • Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands • Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward • Avoid close contact with people who are sick • Stay home from work, school or away from other people if you yourself are feeling sick with symptoms like fever or cough • Stay up to date on guidance from your local public health officials If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, which include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider or local public health department first before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms and have a serious chronic medical condition such as heart disease, diabetes, lung disease or are an older adult, please call your health care provider immediately. In order to protect our older adults, there will

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PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

Beachside Chat will be suspended for the remainder of the month. The SC Times will reevaluate the evolving situation in early April. sanclementetimes.com


SC GETTING OUT San Clemente

YOUR SEVEN-DAY EVENT PLANNER

GUEST OPINION: A Night on the Town by Randy Youngman

The New Normal Saturday was my wife Cathy’s birthday, so we celebrated with a night on the town in San Clemente. OK, to be accurate, it was an hour on the town. Because of the global COVID-19 pandemic, we had canceled our planned trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico weeks ago. And as those in an age group that has been designated as particularly vulnerable to the coronavirus, we have been staying at home in San Clemente ever since our governor made that safety-first recommendation more than a week ago. But I made an exception on Saturday to try to make it a special day for my better half. I ventured downtown to take advantage of curbside restaurant service being offered by Brick and other local eateries still providing take-out and delivery in accordance with local restrictions. It turned out to be a wonderful and seamless process, as well as a good way to support local business during this time of crisis. At 3:30 p.m., when Brick opened that day, I called the restaurant to place our order from the special delivery and take-out menu posted on its website (brickrestaurantgroup.com). An hour later, I took the scenic route, as I

Photo: Shawn Raymundo

call it, to drive downtown, passing the most people enjoying a walk I had ever seen in the area, as well as numerous bicyclists getting exercise and fresh air. All were practicing social distancing guidelines, except for couples walking together. Upon arriving at the restaurant on North El Camino Real, there was parking on the street in front of the entrance marked by orange- and white-striped construction sawhorses emblazoned with a city emblem and this description: “City of San Clemente Official Notice: 10 Minute Parking Only. This parking space is designated for take-out and food services only.” As directed to do while placing the order,

I called the restaurant when I pulled up in front and identified myself. Moments later, Samantha came out with a credit card slip to sign—as always, I brought my own pen and hand sanitizer—and popped my trunk so she could load our dinner containers. After I thanked her, Samantha smiled and said, “Thank you for your support. We really appreciate it.” And we appreciate local restaurants for staying open during this public health crisis. On the drive home, I encountered a group of eight young individuals in beach attire leaving Poche Beach together and crossing PCH at Camino Capistrano. Regrettably, they weren’t practicing social distancing. They were laughing

and seemed not to have a care in the world. I was also surprised to see the parking lot at Shorecliffs Golf Club was full. (As of Wednesday morning, March 25, the course was still open for play, “with safeguards in place to protect customers and staff,” according to the voice recording greeting phone calls.) Back at home, we plated the Brick specialties and opened a bottle of our best red wine from France. The appetizers (squash blossoms and prosciutto-wrapped Medjool dates stuffed with sausage) and entrees (Brick Meatballs and rigatoni, plus Buttermilk-Fried Mary’s Half Chicken) were outstanding. And the Molten Lava Chocolate Cake—I added and lit the candle—was worth every calorie. It wasn’t Santa Fe, but it was the next-best thing: “a night on the town” to celebrate my wife’s birthday in San Clemente, our incomparable Spanish Village by the Sea. Randy Youngman currently is a copy editor for Picket Fence Media and a freelance writer for several publications. He has worked in the newspaper, magazine and TV industries for more than 40 years, including 28 years at the Orange County Register. SC

Randy Youngman Copy Editor, San Clemente Times Dana Point Times The Capistrano Dispatch

Grocery Stores, Pharmacies Open in San Clemente SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

Per last week’s directives from the state and county, urging Californians to stay home and limit trips to essential services such as grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies, several local restaurants have begun utilizing take-out and delivery services to get food to the community. Continuing its mission of supporting local businesses and working to make sure residents can still have access to food, the San Clemente Chamber of Commerce has compiled lists of the city’s restaurants offering take-out and deliveries, as well as food-supply stores and pharmacies that are remaining open and offering special store hours for seniors, disabled individuals and pregnant women. Here is the list of grocery stores and pharmacies that the Chamber has put together. For the list of restaurants, head to sanclementetimes.com, click on the Coronavirus tab, and there you can find the online version of this write-up, which will contain a link to the take-out and delivery options. San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

GROCERY STORES Albertsons 804 Avenida Pico and 989 Avenida Pico Hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. *Senior Hours: 7-9 a.m. Costco 33961 Doheny Park Road Hours: Monday-Friday 9:45 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays 9:15 a.m.-6 p.m. *Seniors 60+ Hours: Tuesdays and Thursday from 8-9 a.m. Ralphs 903 S. El Camino Real, 811 Ave. Talega and 638 Camino De Los Mares. Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. *Senior Hours: 7-8 a.m.

Stater Bros. Market 616 Camino De Los Mares Hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. *Senior Hours: 7:45-9 a.m. Target 990 Avenida Vista Hermosa Hours: 8 a.m.-9 p.m.

days 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m.-5 p.m. CVS Pharmacy 602 N. El Camino Real Hours: Monday-Friday 8 am.-9 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sundays 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Trader Joe’s 638 Camino De Los Mares Hours: 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

CVS Pharmacy 638Camino De Los Mares Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-midnight; Saturdays and Sundays 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Walmart 951 Avenida Pico Hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. *Seniors 60+ Hours: 6-7 a.m.

Rite Aid 801 N. El Camino Real Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m-6 p.m.

PHARMACIES

Sea View Pharmacy 665 Camino De Los Mares, 101 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Delivery Hours: Monday-Saturday 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Smart & Final 34091 Doheny Park Road Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. *Seniors 65+, Disabled & Pregnant Hours: 7:30-8 a.m.

Albertsons Sav-On 804 Avenida Pico and 989 Avenida Pico Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Sprouts 550 Camino de Estrella Hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

CVS Pharmacy at Target 990 Avenida Vista Hermosa Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; SaturPage 8

Walmart Pharmacy 951 Avenida Pico Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sundays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. SC sanclementetimes.com


SC SC LIVING San Clemente

PROFILES OF OUR COMMUNITY

GUEST OPINION: Historical Happenings by Tom Marshall

How Ole Hanson Handled the Last Big Pandemic

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he last time our country faced a pandemic like the coronavirus, San Clemente didn’t even exist; but its founder did. During the 1918 Spanish Influenza outbreak, Ole Hanson was the mayor of Seattle, Washington. New research by Historical Society President Larry Culbertson reveals how Mayor Hanson handled it. The first cases of the flu in Seattle turned up in September 1918. Of first concern were the men working at the shipyards—a major part of Seattle’s economy at the time. Cargo and passengers arrived en masse from all over the Pacific Rim.  Though unable to test everyone arriving at the port, Mayor Hanson’s health officials proclaimed in a Sept. 24 Seattle newspaper account, “There is no cause for alarm as yet.” Ten days later, the Seattle Star reported the city’s first death among its nine cases. Hanson’s Department of Health advised that “men with temperaHISTORICAL tures of 103 degrees or HAPPENINGS more were of the greatBy Tom Marshall est risk.” Four days later, the paper reported 13 more had died in the area, including one at the shipyard. The Star also noted a scarcity of physicians in Seattle due to World War I. At that early point, the supply of masks was depleted. (Months later, it was determined those masks were ineffective, anyway.) Mayor Hanson then closed all schools

and places of amusement. Is this beginning to sound familiar? In a somewhat conflicted message, he urged all citizens, “Keep in the open. Sleep with the windows open. Avoid drafts.” By Oct. 26, the mayor released more restrictions on the populace. He ordered police to break up any gatherings of people and to stop street cars that didn’t have at least three windows open on each side.  Stores were allowed to open only between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays, except for grocery stores and pharmacies. Four days later, Mayor Hanson ordered what the Spokane Chronicle called “the most drastic quarantine ever enforced in Seattle.”  It also required “the wearing of gauze masks everywhere, except in open air, and to be enforced by the police.” Apparently, the supply of masks had been replenished. By Election Day, Nov. 4, the influenza cases were reported to be in decline. Mayor Hanson encouraged everyone to vote early to avoid crowds late in the day and promised, “All polling places will be well-ventilated, windows kept open and no crowds allowed to gather.”  But in December, the flu roared back. Inoculations began about the same time, and the pandemic was declared over in March 1919. In Seattle, 1,500 people had died from influenza. In August, declaring, “I am tired out and am going fishing,” Hanson resigned as Seattle mayor.  There were rumors he was ill, which he denied. He didn’t just take a leave of absence because a political foe would

Sudoku

Every week, the San Clemente Times will showcase a historical photo from around the city. If you have a photo you would like to submit for consideration, send the photo, your name for credit as well as the date and location of the photo to editorial@sanclementetimes.com.

have taken over as acting mayor. As Ole explained, “I would as soon have taken a man from the penitentiary and left him in the mayor’s chair.”  By resigning, the city council could appoint a new mayor. So, health scare over, Hanson embarked upon a nationwide speaking tour. The Spanish Flu returned to Seattle

that fall, but with far fewer cases. Tom Marshall is a member of the San Clemente Historical Society and a retired journalist. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

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Last week’s solution:

San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

FROM THE ARCHIVES Photographic portrait of a woman landing a calico bass from a fishing boat in San Clemente in 1930.

Adoptable Pet of the Week: Beau

BY MYLES MELLOR

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult. Level: Medium

Contributor: University of Southern California, Libraries, and California Historical Society

See the solution in next week’s issue.

eet Beau, a handsome, 5-yearold Bernese Mountain Dog Mix. Beau would be a great dog for an experienced dog owner who is looking for a walking buddy, as well as a big lap dog! Beau wants to be the center of attention, so he would be best as the only dog in the home. If you would like to know more about Beau, please call the San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter at 949.492.1617. Those interested in Beau can submit an application by emailing animalservices@san-clemente.org. The

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Beau. Photo: Courtesy of San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter

application can be downloaded on petprojectfoundation.org. SC sanclementetimes.com


Welcome to the

Summer Camp & Activities Guide

Our annual Summer Camp & Activities Guide is here, and while the end of the school year may be nearing, now is the time to plan for your child to make the most of summer. No matter the hobby or interest, there is a vast variety of local camps for youngsters to enjoy, such as sailing, acting, exploration, science, sports, surfing and much more. Our guide features a mix of half-day, full-day and some overnight activities in Dana Point, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano and surrounding cities. Utilize this information to plan for a fulfilling, challenging and fun summer your family won’t forget. While families are asked to self-isolate and refrain from congregating in groups, the community remains hopeful that by the time summer arrives, quarantine will be a figment of the past.


JUNIOR GUARDS EARN SENSE OF OCEAN SAFETY

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By Shawn Raymundo

ith summer quickly approaching and hordes of the community’s youth planning to hit the beaches in South Orange County during the break, one of the best things parents do to instill a sense of ocean safety in their children is enrolling them in junior lifeguard programs, says Greg Hulsizer of the San Clemente Lifeguard and Junior Guard Foundation. “The ocean is a hazardous place . . . one of the purposes of the junior guards is to get their kids comfortable, not only for their safety but to help their friends, too,” Hulsizer said, adding that it’s also “a good way to spend the summer.” In San Clemente, registration for the city’s 2020 Junior Lifeguard program opens on Wednesday, April 22, with the first three-week session slated to begin June 8, the second on June 29 and third session on July 20. The San Clemente program is for kids and teens between the ages of 9 and 17. The cost for enrollment per session is $235 for residents and $260 for non-residents. And in Dana Point, the California Junior Lifeguard Program at Salt Creek Beach also shares the same run dates as the San Clemente program. The cost per session is $545 and is geared toward those aged 8-17. Rod Mellot, the interim Marine Safety Chief for the city of San Clemente, explains that the junior guard program is focused on having the children recognize potential ocean hazards in a changing aquatic environment. Participants can get educated on topics such as ocean safety, first aid and lifeguard operations. The “emphasis is on safety, respect and physical fitness,” he says. Those enrolled will “participate in activities like ocean swims, pier jumps, body boarding and beach runs.” “The program has existed for over 50 years, and they’re taught by professional lifeguards,” Mellot said. “It’s a fun program. Generation after generation have gone through the program. It’s a great program for us to educate the kids who are coming down to the beach, so they know how to use the beach in a safe manner.” All new prospective students for the San Clemente program must first pass a swim test in order to become eligible to register, the city notes. The swim tests are held at the San Clemente Aquatics Center. A passing test is four laps, or 100 yards, in less than two San Clemente interim Marine Safety minutes. The test fee is $5. Chief Rod Mellot offers a few tips for The next test currently schedstaying safe at the beach this summer: uled is Saturday, April 4. Other test u Learn to swim dates include April 11, April 18, April u Swim near a lifeguard 19 and May 17. u Swim with a buddy For those who can’t afford to register for the San Clemente program, u Check in with the lifeguards the Junior Guard Foundation offers u Use sunscreen and drink water scholarships, as well as works to u Obey posted signs and flags provide equipment and supplies in u Keep the beach and water clean support of the program that the city u Learn what do in rip currents can’t otherwise afford in its budget. More information about the Juu And enter the water feet-first nior Guard Foundation can be found at the group’s website: scljgfoundation.com. The application for a scholarship can be found at the city’s webpage on the Junior Lifeguard Program.

Ocean Safety Tips

Editor’s note: This information is subject to change due to coronavirus concerns.


5

Ways to Connect Your Child with Nature By Zach Cavanagh

With so many people stuck inside these days, it may be more important now than ever to get outside and connect with the brilliant nature that Southern California and specifically South Orange County can offer. This may be even more vital for a generation of kids already glued to their portable devices. Here are a handful of local spots that are family- and kid-friendly to entertain and inform children through nature.

The Ecology Center This nonprofit organization in San Juan Capistrano has created a vibrant and lush garden in an attempt to inspire people to interact with our ecosystems and change their relationship with each other. The Ecology Center has created programs to highlight those environmental perspectives. There are workshops that show off different conservation and growing techniques. Be sure to check out the center’s strawberry festival, which has been postponed until May. 32701 Alipaz St., San Juan Capistrano, 949.443.4223, theecologycenter.org

Dana Point Nature Interpretive Center High up on the Dana Point Headlands, the Dana Point Nature Interpretive Center informs visitors on the history of our section of the Pacific coastline. Inside the facility, guests will find rotating exhibits that further explore the natural history and resources of the area, as well as panels explaining geological information, plants and animals. It’s the perfect place to learn about the nature you find on the surrounding trails before a beautiful day hike. 34588 Scenic Drive, Dana Point, danapoint.org

San Clemente Beach Trail Anyone who has grown up in our area, or resides here now, develops some sort of relationship with the ocean. One of the best ways to take advantage of that and soak it all in is the beach trail in San Clemente. The beach trail is 2.3 miles from North Beach all the way down to Calafia Beach. Visitors can access the trail from many spots and can get to popular points such as the pier and T-Street. A portion of the trail is closed from the El Portal Steps to the Mariposa access, but pedestrians can use an appropriate detour through local streets to get to each point. San Clemente, san-clemente.org

Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park Nature Center The Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park is the largest park in the Orange County Parks system. Nestled in among its 8,000 acres is the interpretive center. The center is open on weekends, and offers plenty for families to take in. There are taxidermy animals on display, with interactive displays so kids can get up close to local animals with much less danger. There’s usually a rangerled program to take in on the weekends. Make the most of it and set up a camping trip or hike. 33401 Ortega Highway, San Juan Capistrano, 949.923.2210, ocparks.com

ZOOMARS Petting Zoo ZOOMARS may be closed through the end of March, with hopes to reopen in April, but it’s never a bad idea to keep the popular spot in mind when normalcy returns. Kids can get up close with plenty of farm animals to have a memorable experience with a fluffy or feathered friend. ZOOMARS has farm staples such as bunnies, chickens, cows, goats, pigs, horses and sheep, but they also showcase guinea pigs, llamas and emus. 31791 Los Rios Street, San Juan Capistrano, 949.831.6550, zoomars.com


CAPISTRANO ACTING ACADEMY SUMMER THEATRE CAMP AT CAMINO REAL PLAYHOUSE

Fun While the Sun’s Out

SUMMER EVENT GUIDE CAPISTRANO ACTING ACADEMY SUMMER THEATRE CAMP

For all of the kids out there who love theatre and want to perform, the Capistrano Acting Academy at the Camino Real Playhouse in San Juan Capistrano can help them develop skills and confidence. The Summer Theatre Camp in June and July is geared for ages 6-16, with camp hours from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Different weeks will focus on different performances, including for Inspector Gadget and The Brady Bunch. Camino Real Playhouse, 31776 El Camino Real, San Juan Capistrano, 949.489.8082, capistranoactingacademy.org

WORLD OCEAN DAY AT PRETEND CITY CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Pretend City Children’s Museum is temporarily closed, as of press time. Looking down the road, though, a World Ocean Day is scheduled for June 8. Once this pandemic settles down, enjoy the beginning of their Sizzling Summer Series that has enlightening education and fun activities. Kids can learn about how marine pollution affects wildlife. Pretend City Children’s Museum, 29 Hubble, Irvine, 949.428.3900, pretendcity.org

LIL’ CHEF SCHOOL SUMMER CAMP

Children can put together meals and enjoy the fruits of their labor—perhaps literally—with this summer cooking camp. “Our camps are organized into three age groups, so all chefs team up with their peers,” the Lil’ Chef School website said. “Ages are: Tiny Chefs 4-6, Lil’ Chefs 7-9 and Teen Chefs

10-and-older.” Kids will get an apron and taste everything they prepare. They’re also welcome to take home uneaten tastings. Check the Lil’ Chef School website for various camp dates. Lil’ Chef School, 15435 Jeffrey Road, #132, Irvine, 949.679.8390, lilchefschool.com

MERMAID ACADEMY SUMMER CAMP

Strap on your fins and enjoy time on the beach during this unique summer camp. There will be crafts, makeovers and other activities. This event is scheduled for June 22. Once Upon An Island, 118 Agate Ave., Newport Beach, 949.791.2162, onceuponanisland.net

CAMP IZZA

From June to July, kids can enjoy a range of activities at Camp Izza, including movies, balloon shows, potato sack races and more. “We strive to provide an environment in which all children can thrive and be comfortable expressing themselves and meet new friends along the way,” the website said. New Horizon School, One Truman Street, Irvine, 949.422.8123, campizza.com

CAMP INVENTION: ELEVATE

Curious and scientifically minded kids can enjoy this STEM-focused camp, in which they’ll get to explore innovation, problemsolving and teamwork. Programs will be at schools throughout Orange County and the country. Various locations throughout Orange County, 800.968.4332, invent.org

Editor’s note: This information is subject to change with coronavirus concerns.


STAYING ACTIVE

YOUR GUIDE TO MARTIAL ARTS STUDIOS

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ummertime can be a chance to enjoy relaxing picnics outdoors or play video games, but it’s also an opportunity for kids to learn martial arts. Martial arts allows kids to become more confident, meet new friends and pick up new skills. Whether they’re grappling on the ground in jiu-jitsu class or up on their feet practicing karate moves, gyms in South Orange County are ready to help kids develop into capable and respectful individuals. Here are some gyms around town:

ZEN DOJOS MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY

As stated on their website, Zen Dojos not only instructs kids on how to punch and kick, they also instill discipline, focus and listening skills. Children can learn how to compete or just practice for fun. The karate training will enable kids to deal with bullies or deal with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. 31888 Del Obispo Street, Suite C6, San Juan Capistrano, 949.240.6574, zendojos.com

GUILLOBEL BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU ACADEMY

Put on your gi and get rolling in this downtown San Clemente gym. Kids can pair up to learn and practice techniques, all under the watchful eye of their parents. Founder and owner Paulo Guillobel will make sure your children receive the best training possible, whether it’s defensive maneuvers or learning to be part of a group. 621 N El Camino Real, Suite A, San Clemente, 949.366.2107, guillobelbjj.com

GRACIE BARRA DANA POINT

Folks living in Dana Point can also get jiu-jitsu training. Gracie Barra emphasizes the mental benefits of mat grappling, in addition to the physical. Instructors supervise each student to make sure everyone taps into their fullest

potential. “Our Gracie Barra Kids Program is designed to teach children self-discipline, as well as providing a unique way to express themselves,” their website said. 34085 Pacific Coast Hwy, Suite 106, Dana Point, 949.388.8886, gbdanapoint.com

THE DRAGON INSTITUTE

Classes for beginners and various skill levels. Learn the art of Wing Chun, which incorporates lightning-fast strikes. Environments, though, will be safe and encouraging. The school is located on PCH, so enjoy a scenic drive while you drop the kids off for class. 34241 Pacific Coast Highway, Suite 105, Dana Point, 949.542.8470, ocwingchun.com

NATIONAL TAEKWONDO ACADEMY

This South Orange County martial arts studio is family-oriented and touts the cardio workouts you’ll get from their workouts. Their programs include Little Ninjas for ages 4-6, Junior TKD for ages 7-12 and cardio kickboxing. The Little Ninjas Program is a “detailed curriculum that focuses on improving preschool-age children’s basic motor and listening skills,” according to their website. 802 Ave. Talega, Suite 103, San Clemente, 949.361.2050, nationaltaekwondoacademy.com

GROUNDWORK JIU-JITSU

Located in the Lantern District of Dana Point, Groundwork Jiu-Jitsu offers classes for all skill levels. Founders and surfers Don Abadie and John Yerkovich look to bring a local feel to their boutique studio, a Checkmat affiliate. Groundwork teaches children bully defense and confidence building and to pay attention and be respectful. 24470 Del Prado Ave, Dana Point, 949.254.3465, groundworkjiujitsu.com

Editor’s note: This information is subject to change due to coronavirus concerns.


LOCAL CAMPS

ACTING ACADEMY Summer Performing Arts Camps serving ages 4 - 14. Campers are guided through a full theater immersion experience via four daily classes—music, acting, dance and fusion. The culminating event will be a Friday performance on one of our three main stage theaters! Children can participate for one week, the entire summer or anywhere in between. It’s time to watch your star shine at Cabrillo Playhouse, 202 Avenida Cabrillo, San Clemente; Z Playhouse, 24196 Alicia Pkwy,., Suite A., Mission Viejo; Lyceum Village, 14281 Chambers Rd., Tustin; 949.427.0072, actingacademyforkids.com.

CAPISTRANO ACTING ACADEMY Excitement and adventure await your kids with loads of Summer Fun! Camp begins June 15th and encompasses six separate weeks, each with a different theme. We accept ages 6 to 16. Each play is an original script with tons of laughter—for both the kids and the audience. Along with enjoying theatre games, these amazing kids learn their lines, blocking, timing and are costumed and made up to perform by Friday at 2 p.m. We offer sibling and return student discounts too! capistranoactingacademy.org.

& Resources

ENDLESS SUMMER SURF CAMP Learn to surf at San Clemente’s premier surf camp, where dreams have come true since 1992. Whether you have never surfed or if you want to take your surfing to the next level, we have surf instruction and coaching for you. We have day and overnight surf camps as well as private and group lessons for beginning, intermediate and advanced surfers. We also offer surf and turf camps at Talega Golf Club with PGA Teacher of the Year Randy Chang. 949.498.7862. endlesssummersurfcamp.com.

DANA WEST YOUTH SAILING Build a skill that can last a lifetime and promote a love for the ocean! Dana West Youth Sailing hosts 3 summer sailing camps in Dana Point Harbor: June 15th – June 26th, June 29th – July 10th, July 13th – July 24th. Camp runs Monday through Friday for children ages 7-18. Cost is $450 per session, with a 5% early bird discount for registration before April 30th. For more information and registration, visit dwyscamp.com/registration. The Dana West Yacht Club Junior Sailing Program is administered by Dana West Youth Sailing, Inc., a 501c3 Non-Profit corporation.

KGB BEACH CAMPS Come down to the Dana Point Harbor for a week of fun! There are activities from stand-up paddleboarding, sailing, kayaking and tide pool walks to games, crafts and much more. Join us for an adventure on a 60-foot catamaran while we look for whales and explore the open ocean. The little ones will join us for a different adventure every day; crab hunting, treasure hunts, water games and sand castles will fill their days at camp. 34451 Ensenada Place, Dana Point. 949.842.5211. kgbeachcamps.com.


Local Camps & Resources (Continued)

KIDCREATE STUDIO DANA POINT Get creative at the newest summer camps in town! Our energized art camps are designed to inspire and educate your young artist in an environment that encourages giggles and grins. Beginning June 1, camps are offered Tuesdays through Thursdays, with fun weekly themes sure to excite and engage children ages 3-6, 4-9 and 7-12. Create your family’s ideal schedule with our flexible registration: 3-day camps or daily rates, half- or full-day options. 34255 Pacfic Coast Highway, Suite 113, Dana Point, 949.545.7091, kidcreatestudio.com/dana-point

OCEAN INSTITUTE Dive into Summer Fun at Ocean Institute Camps June 22- August 14 located in Dana Point. ACA Accredited Camps focus on ocean education and experiences for campers of all ages! Give your child a new perspective as they explore, discover and thrive. Before and aftercare are available to provide flexibility and accommodate busy schedules. Registration starts on March 16 at oceaninstitute.org. Summer Camp Questions? Contact Guest Services at oi@oceaninstitute.org or call 949.492.2274.

TSTREET VOLLEYBALL CLUB

ST. MARGARET’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL Be inspired, explore interests and have fun this summer at St. Margaret’s Episcopal School. Summer camps at St. Margaret’s are open to all students preschool through grade 8. Weekly summer camps include outdoor and beach adventures, athletics, performing arts, academic exploration in science, engineering, computer science and humanities. Led by St. Margaret’s renowned teachers and coaches on our beautiful 22-acre campus in a nurturing and small-group environment. Some outdoor camps take place at local beaches and off-campus locations. 31641 La Novia, San Juan Capistrano, 949.661.0108, smes.org/ summer

Tstreet is ranked #1 in Southern California, and home of the 2015, 2017, and 2019 USAV Junior National Champions. Named after an iconic, family beach in San Clemente, Tstreet clinics range from position specific, age specific, general skills, sand-camps, and more throughout the summer. Training is open to boys and girls ages 8 to 18, and programs cater to introductory through advanced level athletes. Last summer, the improvement of day campers was phenomenal, leading to roster positions on school and club teams. Tstreet is owned and managed by two-time Olympic Gold Medalist (coach and player) Troy Tanner. Troy brings his philosophy of “achieving one’s highest potential” to the club. Proven mechanics, repetitions, feedback and fun are emphasized in Tstreet’s state-of-the-art gymnasium, located at the “El Toro Y” in Irvine. Sign up online at TstreetVolleyball.com.

THE JOHNSON ACADEMY Did you know that one out of every five children struggles

in reading? Children who receive intervention before third grade have a 90 percent chance of increasing their reading skills to meet their intellectual abilities. Due to the high demands of literacy, reading is more important than ever. At the Johnson Academy, located in San Juan Capistrano, they offer evidence-based reading and math intervention programs to improve phonemic awareness, comprehension, vocabulary knowledge and cognitive abilities. If your child struggles with keeping up in school, please contact the academy to find out more information. 27127 Calle Arroyo Ste. 1920, San Juan Capistrano. 949.487.5251, scheduling@ocsllcinc.com.

WESTWIND SAILING Welcome aboard! Westwind has been providing educational boating programs in our community since 1987. Our programs include sailing camps, SUP camps, and boating classes for all ages and skill levels. We are the 2019 ‘Best Camp for Kids’ Golden Lantern, People’s Choice winner in Dana Point and our school is a sanctioned US Sailing, Community Sailing Center. Our community is important to us – especially during these uncertain times. We’re waiving our cancellation / change policy and allowing payment plans for summer. And we have boating scholarships available too. We’re in this boat together! Find us at the OC Sailing & Events Center in DP Harbor. 949.492.3035.


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OCEAN INSTITUTE

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SETTING SAIL FOR SUMMER

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YOUTH SAILING

With several sailing organizations in the harbor, there are plenty of options for your child to explore in terms of learning to sail. The Dana Point Harbor Youth Foundation is a nonprofit sailing organization that strives to improve the lives of young people by bringing that energy, enthusiasm and education to the next generation of sailors. The Foundation is one of South Orange County’s driving forces in youth sailing education and supports Dana Point Yacht Club Youth Sailing, Dana West Yacht Club Youth Sailing, Mariners936 Sea Scouts, South OC high school sailing programs, Westwind Sailing and Ocean Institute. “By participating in sailing activities, children and teens are exposed to a unique form of physical fitness,” says John Berry, the Foundation’s president. “Also, because sailing is a team activity, participants gain important communication, social and leadership skills and increased self-esteem—life skills that they will carry into adulthood.” The Foundation has a fleet of more than 25 boats that includes RS Teras, Lasers, CFJ’s and Naples Sabots. They are provided free for use at its summer camp, open sailing in the offseason, Wednesday evening harbor racing in the summer and local regattas throughout the year. “Dana Point and South Orange County have a variety of exceptional youth sailing programs,” said Berry. “By acting as a unifying force for other harbor organizations, DPHYF ensures that the next generation of sailors has the resources and equipment they need.” Dana Point Harbor Youth Foundation, PO BOX 3926, Dana Point. 949.229.0790. dphyf.org.

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MARINERS936

While there isn’t a summer program, Mariners is all about adventure for young men and women ages 14-18 during the spring and fall season. Members learn nautical skills and how to sail a variety of boats, from 14-foot Capris to 38-foot, fully equipped yachts, in addition to the 118-foot-tall ship Spirit of Dana Point. There’s plenty to choose from with day sails, weekend trips, an annual week-long summer cruise and exciting weekend competition events with other Seascout groups. Ann Webb handles youth recruitment for Mariners936 and has children who have experienced the program. “It’s more than just sailing; it’s also leadership opportunities, trips, volunteering, camping trips to learn life skills, but we go on sailing trips,” Webb said. “Instead of camping, we take our camp with us and sleep on the boats and cook in the galley.” The instructional part of the program is divided into a fall and spring session comprised of 12 weeks each, whereas the recreational sailing and racing run all year long. Instruction involves 12 weeks per session of Wednesday evening classes for 2 ½ hours each. There are eight separate classes ranging from beginning to advanced boat handling. On-the-water training takes place on weekend days during fall and spring seasons. The culmination of the training is the Quartermaster Cruise, where Mariners936 skippers one of the large boats to Catalina and back with their own hand-picked crew. The Mariners Junior program is for kids 12-13 years old. Informational meetings are held in February and September each year. To view more information on the program or see the program calendar, visit mariners936.com. 34451 Ensenada Place, Dana Point.

OCEAN INSTITUTE

Dive into summer fun at Ocean Institute Camps for its June 22- August 14 program. ACA-accredited camps focus on ocean education and experiences for campers of all ages. Your children will gain a new perspective as they explore, discover and thrive. “Our programs provide real-world learning experiences for thousands of students,” said Dr. Wendy Marshall, President of Education and Operations at Ocean Institute. “These experiences do not simply change a day in a child’s life, but rather change their perceptions of what life has to offer and the many possibilities that are open to them.” Before and aftercare are available to provide flexibility and accommodate busy schedules. Register today at oceaninstitute.org. u

For the child who is drawn to the ocean, whether it be for sailing or ocean science, the Dana Point Harbor offers a variety of summer programs to enrich your family’s life. The Dana Point Harbor provides an ideal, safe environment for getting comfortable out in the water, learning a new water sport, exploring marine life or developing skills as a young citizen scientist.

WESTWIND SAILING

Westwind Sailing has been providing educational programs since 1987. Programs include sailing camps, SUP camps, and boating classes for all ages and skill levels. Its school is a sanctioned US Sailing, Community Sailing Center. Westwind is waiving its cancellation/change policy and allowing for payment plans for summer. There are also boating scholarships available. Find Westwind Sailing at the OC Sailing & Events Center in DP Harbor. 34451 Ensenada Place, Dana Point. 949.492.3035. westwindsailing.com.

DANA WEST YACHT CLUB

Each year, Dana West Yacht Club sponsors a Youth Summer Sailing Camp in three 2-week sessions for $450 per session. Session 1 is held June 15-June 26, Session 2 is held June 29-July 10, and Session 3 is held July 13-July 24. The Dana West Yacht Club summer camp is open to children ages 8-18 (club members or not) and is held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Lunch is provided on Fridays. For more information, contact Mark Williams, Junior Sailing President, by emailing juniors@dwyc.org or calling 949.661.1185, ext. 5. 24601 Dana Drive, Dana Point. dwyc.org. u

DANA POINT YACHT CLUB

The Dana Point Yacht Club Sea Stars program is an introduction to the world of sailing .This course aims to equip the newest sailors with the skills and knowledge to operate a Tera with partner. Throughout this course, students will obtain the ability to identify wind direction, points of sail and right-ofway on the water. Sailors will also demonstrate the ability to tack and job, sail upwind and downwind and steer with a tiller extension. Weekly sessions run from June 10-August 15, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., for $400. Dana Point Yacht Club also has courses for introductions to single handing, double handing, intermediate and advanced sailing. 24399 Dana Drive, Dana Point. 949.496.2900. dpyc.org


SC LIVING CoastLines by Fred Swegles

EARLY LIFE IN SC

Part II: Growing up in San Clemente, Way Back When

FIRST HOME • The Hurlbuts purchased an early San Clemente Spanish-style cottage at 162 Avenida Serra in 1948, told it may have been the first home built in town. It no longer looks the same. SECOND HOME • In 1952, Max Sr. purchased an oceanview lot in San Clemente’s Shore Colony neighborhood, spending about $21,000 to build a home that still exists at 252 Vista Marina, overlooking a beach now called T-Street. The Hurlbuts’ lot purchase included a 10-footwide stretch of then-private beach that was fenced off from the public beach, just south of a pedestrian overpass that recently had been built.

G

rowing up in tiny San Clemente in the 1950s, an industrious kid named Max Kent Hurlbut went from hauling fishermen’s loads with his wagon on the pier to mowing the fairways at the city’s municipal golf course, to running the projectors at the San Clemente Theatre, to pumping gas at two Richfield stations operated by Max LeRoy Hurlbut, Kent’s dad. Meanwhile, the son, who went by “Kent” during his boyhood, explored San Clemente’s beaches, roamed San Clemente’s vast interior hinterlands, hunted for quail, doves and deer. Occasionally, he encountered Native American artifacts. He also dabbled at mining, securing two mining claims—one for scheelite (tungsten) on 160 acres off Ortega Highway, the other for gold in a canyon near Big Bear (too much hassle for the yield, it turned out). Through the 1950s, San Clemente grew, as Max Kent Hurlbut did—from a populaCOASTLINES By Fred Swegles tion of 2,000 in 1950 to 8,500 by 1960. By then, massive change had shaken the town. A freeway cut a swath right through the middle. At the time, young Hurlbut was attending Long Beach State, pursuing a degree in mining engineering. Driving an ambulance to support his studies, he was paid $7 for a 12-hour shift. An employment ad he saw—$489 a month for LAPD officers—convinced him to ditch driving the ambulance. If only he knew what a turn his life was about to take.

HE WAS GOING PLACES

BEACH NAME • “T-Street is a name used by later surfers,” Max the younger said. “It was originally called ‘E’ Street. Esplanade is the correct name of the street leading to the overpass.”

CELEBRITIES • He once pulled over actor Steve McQueen for speeding. Took a report from singer/actor Ricky Nelson for a burglary in which the teen idol lost several of his gold records. Guarded the Beatles during their 1964 appearance at the Hollywood Bowl. NEW HORIZONS • In 1961, he enlisted in the Army, a program that let him serve 30 to 90 days a year while keeping his LAPD job. LAPD wasn’t thrilled, having to replace him during those deployments, but couldn’t bar it. Hurlbut used vacation days whenever possible. SPECIAL FORCES • Overseas, he became parachute-qualified in 15 armies, performing some 300 jumps in places such as the Congo and Angola. Sometimes, behind enemy lines, he trained guerrillas.

He graduated from Long Beach State in police science and later would earn a master’s degree in police administration. Here is where his Police Academy graduation led him:

PROMOTIONS • Rising from private to lieutenant colonel, he served at one point as an advisor to the Royal Thai Border Patrol, decorated by the king as “Commander of the Most Exalted Order of the White Elephant.”

NEW NAME • From then on, he went by his professional name, Max K. Hurlbut.

ASIA • As a military adviser to Taiwan, he was awarded keys to the cities of Taipei, Tainan and Kaohsiung.

LAPD • Worked 25 years, was a team leader on LAPD’s first SWAT team, captured “The Alphabet Bomber,” led an award-winning motorcycle drill team and escorted the torch bearer into the Coliseum to launch the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games.

MARRIAGE • He was wed to the Taiwanese colonel’s daughter, Hueih-Hueih, with whom he remains happily married today. Army retirement, 1992.

HOLLYWOOD DIVISION • His LAPD assignments included Hollywood Vice; later, Watch Commander.

SWITCHING GEARS • Retiring from the LAPD in 1985 as a lieutenant, honored with “Lieutenant’s Badge No. 1,” Hurlbut switched careers, combining his police/military skills to carve out a niche as a police troubleshooter.

NEWSPAPER JOB • Young Max worked as a printer’s devil (apprentice) in the San Clemente Sun office at 122 Avenida Del Mar. The Sun’s reporter, Harry Lawton, wrote a 1954 article about young Max. In 1960, Lawton wrote a novel titled Willie Boy: A Desert Manhunt. It became a 1969 movie starring Robert Redford, Tell Them Willie Boy is Here.

FAR FROM HOMETOWN SC HIGHLIGHTS • Police chief of Kodiak, Alaska. Director of police, fire and search and rescue in Whittier, Alaska. Drove an ambulance on rails through the snow. Drove a dog team. FINAL CHAPTER • Concluded in Arizona, hired by a reform mayor to clean up what Hurlbut described as “a Marshal’s Office run amok.” “Hurlbut worked as Marshal of Tombstone, the Wild West abode that made Wyatt Earp and Boot Hill famous,” a 2004 Sun Post News interview stated. “The new marshal learned that lawlessness, shady deals and sudden death for those who tried to do right were not just the fantasy of Hollywood movie scripts.” Reform Marshal Hurlbut didn’t meet his demise there— well, not mortally. The reform mayor wasn’t reelected. “I finally realized it was time to get out of the business for good,” Hurlbut said. He and Hueih-Hueih retired to a lakeside home on the Canadian border. Fred Swegles is a longtime San Clemente resident with nearly five decades of reporting experience in the city. Fred can be reached at fswegles@picketfencemedia.com. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

Clockwise from top: Max Hurlbut on the Thai-Cambodian border with British uniform, French TAP 661-2 parachute and French MAT-49 submachine gun. Max Hurlbut and wife Hueih-Hueih in Alaska. Max Hurlbut and wife Hueih-Hueih with dog team in Alaska. Max Hurlbut and wife Hueih-Hueih in 1992, with rail ambulance at Whittier Tunnel in Alaska. Photos: Courtesy of Max Hurlbut San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

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SC LIVING

Photo: Pexels

GUEST OPINION: Wellness & Prevention by Clay Cranford

Smartphone Addiction’s Effects on Youth

T

wo large Apple shareholders with a $2 billion stake have written an open letter to Apple. They are questioning the smartphone maker, saying it needs to respond to what’s seen as a “growing public health crisis” of smartphone addiction in young people. As a School Resource Officer and as a Behavioral Threat Assessment Investigator, I have been witnessing a growing number of children struggling with depression and anxiety in our communities. In a peer-reviewed study that appeared in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, after 2010, teens who spent more time on new media (screens) were more likely to report mental health issues than those who spent time on non-screen activities. The study found kids who spent three hours or more a day on smartphones or other electronic devices were 34% more likely to suffer at least one suicideWELLNESS AND related outcome—including PREVENTION By Clay Cranford feeling hopeless or seriously considering suicide—than kids who used devices two hours a day or less. Among kids who used electronic devices five or more hours a day, 48% had at least one suicide-related outcome. We cannot make the Internet and mobile devices go away, but we can limit our children’s use and filter the content they are consuming.

Here is how we are going to do it: 1. SET PRIORITIES When your child gets home from school, set priorities on the tasks they need to get done first, such as homework and possibly chores; then entertainment screens (e.g., TV, Xbox, etc.) get turned on. 2. SET LIMITS Setting limits on screen time may be the San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

most challenging thing parents have to contend with. Screen time is defined as time spent using digital media for entertainment purposes. Other uses of media, such as online homework, don’t count as screen time. How much screen time is too much? Today, in a world surrounded by digital media 24/7, defining screen-time limits is difficult. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends infants to 18-month-olds should not be exposed to any digital media. Children aged between 2 and 5 should be limited to one hour per day. For children 6 and older, research shows that two hours or less a day is ideal. 3. FAMILY DINNER AND SCREEN FREE ZONES Establish and enforce screen-free zones in your home. The dinner table is a great place to start when carving out screen-free zones in your home. In fact, there is a lot of research to show that screen-free family dinner has important psychological benefits for your children. Shared family time presents teaching opportunities for parents. The time together allows adolescents to express concerns and feel valued. 4. ENGAGE MORE It seems our “digital natives” are not as good as filling their non-structured time with physical activities as we were at their age. They may need a little help and direction. Naturally, the younger we start with our children doing this, the easier it will be. 5. CHARGE YOUR TEEN’S MOBILE DEVICES IN YOUR ROOM AT NIGHT When your children go to bed, take their mobile devices out of their rooms and charge them in your room. Electronic devices in a bedroom after lights out is a distraction from getting a good night’s sleep. The guidelines laid out here are not difficult to follow. They do, however, require intentionality. If this seems overwhelming, then take on the guidelines, one at a time. Clayton Cranford is the author of ‘Parenting in the Digital World,’ which is available on amazon. com. He speaks at schools throughout the United States. Free cyber safety seminars for parents can be found at cybersafetycop.com. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

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SC SPORTS & OUTDOORS San Clemente

STORIES, SCORES, SCHEDULES AND MORE

Holes at One

Shorecliffs Golf Club is the only golf course still open in the area BY ZACH CAVANAGH, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

While a large number of businesses and nearly every sports league and facility has closed due to precautions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, golf courses fought through the first week of major closures. However, as more businesses paused their operations voluntarily or by government order, nearly all of the golf courses in the tri-city San Clemente, Dana Point and San Juan Capistrano area followed suit, except one. As of Wednesday, March 25, and per the club’s Facebook post on March 20, Shorecliffs Golf Club in San Clemente remained open. “As golf is a natural social distancing sport,” the post said, “Shorecliffs and many other courses are staying open to support the mental health of the community. We are monitoring the recommendations of local and state officials

and will remain open unless we are advised otherwise.” The post continued by encouraging booking a tee time as a safe and fun way to take in fresh air while exercising social distancing. That was the argument initially for many golf courses and even those on the PGA Tour. Golf is an activity that practically invented social distancing, with small groups staying far apart from each other. However, like nearly every professional sports league around the globe, even the PGA Tour suspended its operations, and many local clubs have followed suit. As the only city-run course in the tri-cities, the San Clemente Municipal Golf Course was the first to close in the area as the City of San Clemente closed public facilities on March 16. On March 23, the city extended the closures indefinitely. Monarch Beach Golf Links in Dana Point was next, as the entire Monarch Beach resort paused operations on the afternoon of March 19. The golf course officially announced its closure on March 20, the first day of California’s stay-athome order made by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“As your and our team members’ safety is our number one priority,” general manager Eric Lohman said in a Monarch Beach Golf Links Facebook post, “Monarch Beach Golf Links will temporarily close its golf course, practice area, Golf & Lifestyle retail store and Monarch Café to comply with the recommendations of our government leaders and health officials to do our civic duty in helping reduce the spread of COVID-19. We appreciate your patronage, loyalty and understanding and apologize for any inconvenience.” San Juan Hills Golf Club in San Juan Capistrano followed suit on March 20. “Our thoughts and best wishes go out to all those affected by the coronavirus,” the club said on its website. “Our property will be closed to the public until we receive the appropriate permissions to resume our regular operations. We look forward to that time and will continue to keep our website and communication distribution up to date over the coming days and weeks.” Marbella Country Club in San Juan Capistrano also closed due to orders of precaution related to COVID-19. The decision was made by American Golf Corporation, which closed all of its

courses around the country, including four in Orange County. In San Clemente, Talega Golf Club, a public course, and Bella Collina San Clemente, a private club, both closed their courses on Sunday, March 22. Talega made the announcement with a short Facebook post that said the course was closed, advised its patrons to be safe and that they hoped “to see you all teeing it up soon.” Bella Collina made the announcement with a letter from general manager Jay Pesicka on its website. “Throughout this recent COVID-19 crisis and government imposed restrictions, we have taken steps to ensure your health and safety, as well as the health and safety of our staff,” Pesicka said. “However, due to recent government restrictions imposed on our business and our members, we must now close Bella Collina. We appreciate your understanding during this difficult time and look forward to serving you again soon.” Other courses in the local area, including Ben Brown’s Golf Course in Laguna Beach, Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club in Mission Viejo and Tijeras Creek Golf Club in Rancho Santa Margarita, were also closed. SC

While every other course in the local area has closed due to precautions related to the coronavirus pandemic, Shorecliffs Golf Club in San Clemente remained open. In a Facebook post, the club said that “golf is a natural social distancing sport.” Photo: Zach Cavanagh San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

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PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE INVITING ELECTRONIC BIDS ARENOSO LANE SEWER LINE REHABILITATION City Project No. 10207 Bids shall be submitted electronically through the City’s electronic procurement system (PlanetBids) at: https://www.planetbids.com/portal/portal. cfm?CompanyID=28939 Bids must be received by no later than 2:00 p.m. on Monday, April 27, 2020. All bids received after that time will be returned to the Bidder, as they will be deemed disqualified. Only electronic bids submitted through PlanetBids will be accepted. Bid tabulations will be available on PlanetBids immediately following the bid closing. Bidders must complete line items information (PlanetBids Line Item Tab), and attach a paper Bid Form, completed in full and signed (PlanetBids Attachments Tab). In addition the Bidder shall attach Subcontractor(s) Listing, Experience Form, Bid Security, and all other documents required herein (PlanetBids Attachments Tab). The system will not accept a bid for which any required information is missing. The work to be done consists of furnishing all materials, equipment, tools, labor and incidentals as required by the plans, specifications and contract documents for the ARENOSO LANE SEWER LINE REHABILITATION, City Project No. 10207, in the City of San Clemente, California. Reference is hereby made to these Specifications for further particulars, and same are by such reference incorporated herein and made a part thereof, the same as though fully set forth hereunder. Specifications and contract documents are posted in the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System Vendor Portal website at: https://www.planetbids.com/portal/portal.cfm?CompanyID=28939 All bidders must first register as a vendor on the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System website to participate in a bid or to be added to prospective bidders list. The contract does call for monthly progress payments based upon the engineer’s estimate of the percentage of work completed. The City will retain 5% of each progress payment as security for completion of the balance of the work. At the request and expense of the successful bidder, the City will pay amounts so retained upon compliance with the requirements of Government Code Section 14402 and the provisions of the contract documents pertaining to “substitution of securities.” NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations, in accordance with Section 1770 of the California State Labor Code and in accordance with the terms of he Southern California Master Labor Agreement, has heretofore established a prevailing rate of per diem wages to be paid in the construction of the above entitled work. The said wage rates are herein referred to and adopted in this Notice as though fully set forth herein, and said scale is made a part of this Notice by reference. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.1, no contractor or sub-contractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project submitted on or after March 1, 2015 unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Furthermore, all bidders and contractors are hereby notified that no contractor or sub-contractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. San Clemente Times March 26–April 1, 2020

TO ADVERTISE: 949.388.7700, EXT. 100 • LEGALS@PICKETFENCEMEDIA.COM

Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.4, all bidders are hereby notified that this project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. No bid will be accepted from a contractor who has not been licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code, State of California. Bidder shall possess a Class “A”, California State Contracting License in good standing and shall have successfully completed at least three projects of similar scope, size and complexity for a public agency. The bidder, by submitting its electronic bid, agrees to and certifies under penalty of perjury under the laws of the state of California, that the certification, forms and affidavits submitted as part of this bid are true and correct. The City of San Clemente reserves the right to reject any or all bids. To be published:

March 26th, 2020

and:

April 2nd, 2020 __________________________________ DAVE T. REBENSDORF UTILITIES DIRECTOR

In light of the current situation there will be NO pre-bid meeting held for the “Arenoso Lane Sewer Line Rehabilitation Project”. In-lieu of the pre-bid meeting the City is requiring that any questions in reference to the project be submited via planet bids. The deadline to submit any questions will be Thursday April 23rd at 2:00 PM. Thank you for your understanding. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE INVITING ELECTRONIC BIDS FY 2019 Parking Lot Maintenance, Project No. 29304 and Street Maintenance for Campo Raso, Project No. 27306 Bids shall be submitted electronically through the City’s electronic procurement system (PlanetBids) at: www.san-clemente.org/vendorbids. Bids must be received by no later than 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 2, 2020. All bids received after that time will be returned to the Bidder, as they will be deemed disqualified. Only electronic bids submitted through PlanetBids will be accepted. Bid tabulations will be available on PlanetBids immediately following the bid closing. Bidders must complete line items information (PlanetBids Line Item Tab), and attach a paper Bid Form, completed in full and signed (PlanetBids Attachments Tab). In addition the Bidder shall attach Subcontractor(s) Listing, Experience Form, Bid Security, and all other documents required herein (PlanetBids Attachments Tab). The system will not accept a bid for which any required information is missing. The work to be done consists of furnishing all materials, equipment, tools, labor and incidentals as required by the specifications and contract documents for the Plans and Specifications for FY 2019 Parking Lot Maintenance, Project No. 29304; and Street Maintenance for Campo Raso, Project No. 27306 in the City of San Clemente, California. Reference is hereby made to these Specifications for further particulars, and same are by such reference incorporated herein and made a part thereof, the same as though fully set forth hereunder. Project specifications and contract documents are posted in the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System Vendor Portal website at www.san-clemente. org/vendorbids. All bidders must first register as a vendor on the City of San Clemente PlanetBids

System website to participate in a bid or to be added to the prospective bidders list. The contract does call for monthly progress payments based on the engineer’s estimate of the percentage of work completed. The City will retain 5% of each progress payment as security for completion of the balance of the work. At the request and expense of the successful bidder, the City will pay amounts so retained upon compliance with the requirements of Government Code Section 14402 and the provisions of the contract documents pertaining to “substitution of securities.” NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations, in accordance with Section 1770 of the California State Labor Code and in accordance with the terms of the Southern California Master Labor Agreement, has heretofore established a prevailing rate of per diem wages to be paid in the construction of the above entitled work. The said wage rates are herein referred to and adopted in this Notice as though fully set forth herein, and said scale is made a part of this Notice by reference. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.1, no contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Furthermore, all bidders and contractors are hereby notified that no contractor or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.4, all bidders are hereby notified that this project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. No bid will be accepted from a contractor who has not been licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code, State of California. Bidder shall possess a Class “A” California State Contracting License in good standing. The bidder, by submitting its electronic bid, agrees to and certifies under penalty of perjury under the laws of the state of California, that the certification, forms and affidavits submitted as part of this bid are true and correct. The City of San Clemente reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Dated: To be published: and:

March 12, 2020 March 19, 2020 March 26, 2020

_____________________________ Tom Bonigut Public Works Director / City Engineer PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 146504 Title No. 170355583 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/25/2014. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04/20/2020 at 9:00 AM, The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 09/26/2014, as Instrument No. 2014000392161, in book xx, page xx, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Orange County, State of California, executed by John A. Palliser, a Married Man as His Sole and Separate Property, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGH-

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EST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/ CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States), Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Anaheim - Orange County, 100 The City Drive, Orange, CA 92868 - Auction. com Room. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State, described as: FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE DEED OF TRUST. APN 779-103-07 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 18 Tomahawk St, Trabuco Canyon (Unincorporated Area), CA 92679 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $584,381.60 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Dated: 03/19/2020 THE MORTGAGE LAW FIRM Adriana Durham/Authorized Signature 27455 Tierra Alta Way, Ste. B, Temecula, CA 92590 (619) 465-8200 FOR TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (800) 280-2832 The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC. may be attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained may be used for that purpose. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site - www.Auction.com - for information regarding the sale of this property, ussanclementetimes.com


PUBLIC NOTICES ing the file number assigned to this case: 146504. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4721663 03/19/2020, 03/26/2020, 04/02/2020 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee’s Sale No. CA-RTP-19019096 NOTE: PURSUANT TO 2923.3(C)THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED. [PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE Section 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.] YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/17/2019. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com, using the file number assigned to this case, CA-RTP-19019096. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. On April 9, 2020, at 12:00 PM, AT THE NORTH FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 700 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE WEST, in the City of SANTA ANA, County of ORANGE, State of CALIFORNIA, PEAK FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under that certain Deed of Trust executed by COREY JOSEPH VONBANK, A SINGLE MAN, as Trustors, recorded on 7/11/2019, as Instrument No. 2019000246820, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ORANGE County, State of CALIFORNIA, under the power of sale therein contained, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Property is being sold “as is - where is”. TAX PARCEL NO. 060-073-13 THE BENEFICIARY MAY San Clemente Times March 26–April 1, 2020

TO ADVERTISE: 949.388.7700, EXT. 100 • LEGALS@PICKETFENCEMEDIA.COM

ELECT, IN ITS DISCRETION, TO EXERCISE ITS RIGHTS AND REMEDIES IN ANY MANNER PERMITTED UNDER SECTION 9604(1) OF THE CALIFORNIA COMMERCIAL CODE, OR ANY OTHER APPLICABLE SECTION, AS TO ALL OR SOME OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY, FIXTURES AND OTHER GENERAL TANGIBLES AND INTANGIBLES MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN THE DEED OF TRUST. Lot 148 of Tract No. 938, in the City of San Clemente, County of Orange, State of California, as per Map recorded in Book 29, Pages 22 through 25, inclusive of miscellaneous Maps in the Office of the County Recorder of said County. From information which the Trustee deems reliable, but for which Trustee makes no representation or warranty, the street address or other common designation of the above described property is purported to be 2731 CALLE DEL COMERCIO, SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92672. Said property is being sold for the purpose of paying the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, including fees and expenses of sale. The total amount of the unpaid principal balance, interest thereon, together with reasonably estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee’s Sale is $242,606.55. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SALE INFORMATION LINE: 714-730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com Dated: March 9, 2020 PEAK FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC; AS TRUSTEE By Lilian Solano, Trustee Sale Officer A-4721445 03/19/2020, 03/26/2020, 04/02/2020 PUBLIC NOTICE Order to Show Cause For Change of Name Case No. 20-FL000293 To All Interested Persons: Gianna Simonelli on behalf of Luke Skywalker Draper, a minor, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME A. Luke Skywalker Draper PROPOSED NAME A. Luke Skywalker Simonelli The Court Orders that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court of the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objective is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing Date: 06/19/2020 Time: 08:30 a.m. Dept.: W10. The address of the court is West Justice Center, 8141 13th Street, Westminster, CA 92683-4593.

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Clemente Times Date: March, 9th, 2020 JUDGE LON F. HURWITZ, Judge of the Superior Court Published: San Clemente Times March 26, April 2, 9, 16, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE Order to Show Cause For Change of Name Case No. 30-2020-01136264 To All Interested Persons: Petitioner Christian Altamirano filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME A. Christian Altamirano PROPOSED NAME A. Christian Bowley The Court Orders that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court of the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objective is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing Date: 04/23/2020 Time: 08:30 a.m. Dept.: D100 Window: 44. The address of the court is Central Justice Center, 700 Civic Center Drive West, Santa Ana, CA 92701. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Clemente Times. Date: March 5, 2020 JUDGE JAMES J. DI CESARE, Judge of the Superior Court Published: San Clemente Times March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206570376 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: REVIVE 7040 SCHOLARSHIP IRVINE CA 92612 Full Name of Registrant(s): AGENT ANGEL LLC 7040 SCHOLARSHIP IRVINE CA 92612 This business is conducted by a CA limited liability company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: 01/01/2020. /s/AGENT ANGEL LLC/MICHAEL ALLADAWI, MANAGING MEMBER, MANAGER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 03/06/2020. Published in: San Clemente Times March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206569789 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: INNOVATIVE DIAGNOSTICS 28612 DEEPCREEK MISSION VIEJO CA 92692

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Full Name of Registrant(s): MARK KOESTER 28612 DEEPCREEK MISSION VIEJO CA 92692 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: 10/01/2019. /s/MARK KOESTER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 03/03/2020. Published in: San Clemente Times March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206569486 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: INSIGHT GROUP 806 EL BERRO SAN CLEMENTE CA 92672 Full Name of Registrant(s): PBT INC. 806 EL BERRO SAN CLEMENTE CA 92672 This business is conducted by CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A. /s/PBT INC./NORM PETERSEN, PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 02/27/2020. Published in: San Clemente Times March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206568893 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SAN JUAN FINANCIAL TAX GROUP 31726 RANCHO VIEJO RD, SUITE 215 SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO CA 92675 Full Name of Registrant(s): BARRIST TAX CROUP CPAS, INC 903 CALLE AMANECER, SUITE 115 SAN CLEMENTE CA 92673 This business is conducted by a CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A. /s/BARRIST TAX GROUP CPAS, INC./BETH BARRIST, PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 02/24/2020. Published in: San Clemente Times March 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206568490 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: THE SNOOZE DOC 675 CAMINO DE LOS MARES #501 SAN CLEMENTE CA 92673 Full Name of Registrant(s): AIMEE TRUJILLO DDS INC. 675 CAMINO DE LOS MARES #501 SAN CLEMENTE CA 92673 This business is conducted by a CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A /s/AIMEE TRUJILLO DDS INC./ AIMEE TRUJILLO, PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 02/20/2020. Published in: San Clemente Times March 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020 sanclementetimes.com


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SC n te S a n C le m e

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San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

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SC SC SURF San Clemente

SCOOP ON THE LOCAL SURF COMMUNITY

Should We Still Be Surfing? During the coronavirus pandemic, it’s better to be safe than sorry BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

T

he International Olympic Committee has officially postponed the 2020 Olympic Games. And with surfing slated to make its Olympic debut in Tokyo, and a pair of local surfers having qualified to represent the United States, this decision will have a direct impact on our area’s surfing community. “In a USOPC conference call this morning, many logistics like athlete housing and the need to consider the international sports calendar for at least 33 Olympic sports were discussed,” said USA Surfing President Greg Cruse. “These are just two of the many considerations being dealt with within the IOC and Tokyo Organizing Committee.” “If there is a country that could re-organize and work out the logistics of a postponement, it is Japan,” Cruse continued. “They have been running through many different scenarios and logistical options. I think we will be impressed with the resolution being worked out.” The IOC will be looking to reschedule the Tokyo Summer Games for 2021. Further plans will be announced in the next four weeks. This is the first time in history the Olympic Games have been postponed, and it goes without saying that we find ourselves in crazy, unprecedented times. As the COVID-19 pandemic touches all of our lives in ways we never imagined possible, here in San Clemente and Dana Point, we are blessed to have the beautiful Pacific Ocean in our backyard. It provides both solace and an escape as

A surfer takes to the ocean at T-Street on a sunny Monday afternoon, March 23. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

we all try to wrangle with what we do now and what’s coming next. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has put a shelter-in-place order into effect for all of the state’s 40 million residents, some of whom are surfers. But based on the crowds at the local spots over the past weekend, there’s still a lot of surfing going on. The current order states that “people may leave their residences to engage in outdoor activity and recreation, provided that the individuals comply with social distancing requirements, including, without limitation, walking, hiking, running, cycling; use of scooters, roller skates, skateboards, or other personal mobility devices; or travel in a vehicle with household members to a location where it is possible to walk, hike, run or ride a bike, or operate personal mobility devices, while maintaining social distancing practices.” For anyone who took a spin down to Trestles this past weekend, surfers are clearly taking advantage of the “outdoor activity” clause, but based on the size of the crowds and how impacted the lineup was, especially at Lowers, they may also be flaunting it.

“Hundreds of people from all over SoCal showing up at Trestles. (In large groups even) all weekend. Read the rules that the Governor sent out! It doesn’t say, ‘Drive out of town, up and down the freeways and look for waves!’ ” wrote resident surfboard shaper Matt Biolos on his Instagram feed. “I didn’t want to close my surf shops, shaping facilities, glass shops, warehouse ... ALL ASPECTS of my business’s AND lay off dozens of employees, but I did. We did.” As of press time, the California State Parks system has indicated it will continue to stay open. But if the rules continue to get taken advantage of, you can expect things to change. Officials in nearby Laguna Beach have already made the move to close the beaches in their town. And in surf-rich places such as Australia and France, beaches have also been closed. “I have been in contact with the county about the beaches, and the county, in turn, has been in contact with the state. If people do not self-quarantine and continue to congregate in public areas, particularly at beaches, my expectation is that the state (or County health official) will completely

close the beaches at some point for everyone,” San Clemente Mayor Dan Bane wrote in a post to his political Facebook page. “The city has stationed employees at the beaches to remind everyone that they must keep at least 6-feet of separation in public,” he continued. “But it is the responsibility of every San Clemente resident to do their part during this crisis. Strictly adhere to all social distancing guidelines and do not congregate in public places with people outside of your immediate household. Better yet, avoid the beaches altogether and walk your neighborhoods away from others and crowds. That is what my family is doing on a daily basis to get exercise and fresh air.” If ever the concept of “think global, act local” was applicable, it is now. The sooner everyone hunkers down and follows the health advisories, the sooner life can, hopefully, return to normal. We are certainly in uncharted waters at the moment, but as surfers, we understand that eventually the tide will rise, and things will improve. For the moment, play it safe, play it cool, listen to the recommendations being made by health officials and continue to hope for the best. SC

SURF FORECAST

GROM OF THE WEEK

JULIA GUILD

BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

I

t’s not always how hard you hit the lip, but how hard you hit the books. Last week, San Clemente’s Julia Guild was named the NSSA’s Surfer of the Week, for her performance at the 2020 State Championships, as well as in the classroom at San Clemente High. “Julia took back-to-back Junior Varsity Women’s State titles, winning her second straight at the 2020 State Championships. Surfing for the National and State Champion San Clemente High surf team, Julia put on a stellar backside surfing performance at Seaside Reef, putting up the highest heat totals of the event—a near-perfection 19.54 out of a San Clemente Times March 26-April 1, 2020

possible 20,” said the NSSA’s Janice Aragon. And while Guild’s posting exceptional heat scores, she’s also posting exceptional report cards. The sophomore carries a 4.33 GPA. She credits coach John Dowell and trainer Brandon Phillips of Vert Performance for her competitive successes and “helping make her the best surfer she can be.” “Coach Dowell is a great coach and has offered me insight into my surfing that has really helped,” Guild told the NSSA. “All the amazing surfers on the team are constantly pushing me to surf the best I can. It’s a supportive environment knowing your team is supporting you and cheering you on!” As far as inspirations, Guild looks to female trailblazers such as Coco Ho and Bethany Hamilton, as well as the fabulous Gudauskas brothers and their Positive Vibe Foundation. SC

Water Temperature: 60-63 Degrees F Water Visibility and Conditions: 6-10’ Thursday: Southwest swell peaks as Northwest swell joins in, for waist to head high waves, (3-5’). Breezy westerly winds due through the day for poor conditions. Outlook: For Friday, Southwest swell eases along with the Northwest, as a new South/southeast swell moves in, with surf running waist to shoulder high+, (3-4’+). Light winds due most of Friday morning, followed by moderate West winds in the afternoon. Saturday’s surf eases to waist-chest high, (3-4’), then Sunday dips into the knee-waist-chest high range, (23-4’). The weekend has light/variable morning winds, turning to a light+ afternoon sea breeze. For the latest details be sure to visit Surfline.com.

Julia Guild. Photo: Courtesy of NSSA

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