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LO C A L

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January 16-22, 2020

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Local Filmmaker Documents Story of Perseverance PAGE 6 VOLUME 15, ISSUE 3

A Family Affair

FAM Director Talks New Role, Addresses Mistruths E Y E O N S C / PAG E 3

Catherine Kendall, who volunteers her time with Family Assistance Ministries, puts together a bag of vegetables for clients who stopped by the nonprofit on Monday, Jan. 13. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

Santa Ana Sues South County Cities on Homelessness EYE ON SC/PAGE 3

Pot Retailer Starts Delivery Service with Local Business EYE ON SC/PAGE 3

sanclementetimes.com

Passionate New Coach Leads SCHS Girls Soccer SPORTS/PAGE 21

GO TO SANCLEMENTETIMES.COM FOR THE LATEST NEWS, EVENTS AND SPORTS


SC EYE ON SC San Clemente

LOCAL NEWS & IN-DEPTH REPORTING

What’s Up With... Five things San Clemente should know this week Santa Ana Sues South County Cities on Homelessness; City Responds THE LATEST: The City of Santa Ana filed a lawsuit against the County of Orange, as well as the three South Orange County cities of Dana Point, San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano this week, alleging that the municipalities have leaned heavily on Santa Ana to take on the homelessness crisis. In the complaint filed in federal court on Monday, Jan. 13, Santa Ana accuses the three South County cities of opposing and refusing to establish their own homeless shelters and has instead relied on the Orange County Armory Emergency Shelter Program at the National Guard Armory in Santa Ana (Santa Ana Armory) to resolve their homeless woes. “Despite state requirements for each city to provide housing for homeless individuals, Defendants have made insubstantial progress or failed to do so entirely, instead unfairly shifting their obligations to Santa Ana,” the filing states. Santa Ana also accuses the County of Orange of establishing “homeless services almost exclusively in Santa Ana, thereby further contributing to the dense concentration of homeless individuals therein.” In response to the lawsuit, San Clemente Mayor Dan Bane called Santa Ana’s refusal to allow other cities’ homeless to access the armory “absurd” when it’s meant to be a countywide resource that’s funded in part with grants. “The notion that certain cities can’t have access . . . I find absurd, particularly given that countywide resources were provided for those programs,” Bane said. Bane stated that, to his knowledge, not a single homeless individual in San Clemente had accepted the city’s offer for round-trip transport to and from the armory. “The idea was, when it’s winter months and rainy, to provide access to beds . . . they serve a purpose because it’s dangerous on the street when it’s rainy and wet,” Bane said. “The city was willing to provide transport back and forth.” The City of Santa Ana is seeking monetary damages as a reimbursement for the costs associated with providing homeless-related services and resources. San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

While volunteering for Family Assistance Ministries on Monday, Jan. 13, Larry Pridholme, of San Juan Capistrano (left), and San Clemente resident Jan Lines sort out eggs and other food products that will help support families in need. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

It’s also seeking a prohibition of transporting homeless individuals to the Santa Ana Armory for sheltering purposes. WHAT’S NEXT: A preliminary injunction hearing to hear from all parties has been scheduled for Feb. 4 at 8 a.m.—Shawn Raymundo and Lillian Boyd

FAM Director Talks New Role, Addresses Mistruths THE LATEST: When Mary Purdue shifts into her new role as chief development officer for the San Clemente-based Family Assistance Ministries next month, she’ll get to utilize her expertise and skills as a strategist. “It’s been evident for quite a while now that there’s far too much on this plate, because I’m doing both development and executive director,” Purdue, the current CEO for FAM, explained last week. “So, we’ve thought about lots of different scenarios with the board and myself … what scenario would be best for FAM, what would be best for me,” she said. “And really being chief development officer is really my thing.” As the head of development for the local nonprofit organization, which focuses on providing help to families and individuals on the brink of becoming homeless, Purdue will oversee business development, community relations and fundraising. For a long while, Purdue was in charge of both operations, running day-to-day activities, as well as managing and coordinating fundraising activities, which is how FAM makes roughly a third of its annual revenue. “As I thought about that, I thought, ‘Do I want to stay here and do the operational

side of it or let’s split this job and let me go do (development)?’ ” she recalled. “So, that became my choice of where I wanted to go and what I wanted to do. So all the operations will be on the new CEO.” Already embracing the community relations side of things, Purdue sat down with San Clemente Times, wanting to set the record straight and address some of the mistruths and misinformation that have been spread about the nonprofit’s operations. One example Purdue gave was a charge that FAM had been delivering food to the homeless at North Beach, as well as providing three meals a day to the homeless campers staying at the city’s outdoor shelter on Avenida Pico. “We didn’t deliver food ever, which I read in one place. Somebody sent me something that said we were delivering three meals a day, steak and wine. I go, ‘What?’ ” Purdue said. Doing so, Purdue said, would go against FAM’s philosophy. “We want people to come here, we want to see them one-on-one,” she explained, adding: “If somebody is homeless on our streets and they’re new here, we will not continue to provide them food. ‘We will provide emergency food today, but here’s your options.’ ” Purdue notes that FAM’s goal has always been on homeless prevention, working with families, single parents and individuals to make sure they don’t end up living on the street. “Most of the people we see are people trying to not become homeless,” she said. “Ninety-five percent are trying not to become homeless.” While FAM will provide food and family shelter assistance for a time, Purdue stressed that those seeking help need to

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be willing to come up with a plan that’ll get them out of their current predicament. For many, that often means they’re struggling to pay their rent and bills for a myriad of reasons. FAM, she added, doesn’t just offer housing and food assistance, it encourages clients to become self-sustaining. “Your goal isn’t shelter; your goal is eventually to help people become independent in housing,” she said. One program FAM offers that has been successful in helping the homeless is its Homeward Bound initiative, reuniting individuals with their families and friends, or any other support system they may have. Purdue cited several examples of the program’s success. Most recently, the city asked FAM to provide its Homeward Bound assistance to two of the remaining individuals who had been staying at the Pico encampment before it closed last month. “A lot of people have transition years,” Purdue said of her interaction with some of FAM’s clients. “So, let us help you get back to your family or friends, but have a plan and work the plan. It’s not the endall.” Regarding the false statements about FAM, Purdue said she doesn’t understand why the community isn’t working together to fulfill a common goal when it comes to homelessness. “I don’t know why we’re not all rowing together,” she said. “We should be. We all have the same goals.” Despite the negative comments, Purdue acknowledged that most in the community, city officials and, most importantly, the volunteers know exactly what FAM does. Reflecting on her time as CEO, Purdue praised the work of FAM’s staff and volunteers, as well as other individuals and groups that helped make FAM a successful nonprofit. “You don’t do it alone,” she said. “It’s done with a wonderful board of directors and great staff who are so talented and all those volunteers in the community.” WHAT’S NEXT: On Feb. 10, Purdue’s title will change, handing over the operational reins to Elizabeth Andrade, the current chief operations director for the homeless services organization Mercy House.—SR

Pot Retailer Gets Around City’s Ban with Delivery Service THE LATEST: The Joint, a Santa Ana-based marijuana dispensary, has partnered with a local vape shop to offer a cannabis delivery service, essentially bypassing San Clemente’s ban on commercial dispensaries within city limits. (Cont. on page 5) sanclementetimes.com


EYE ON SC (Cont. from page 3) Marijuana shoppers in South County, who have had to travel to Santa Ana— the nearest licensed dispensary in the county—to purchase marijuana, can now walk into Vix Vapes on Avenida Del Mar, where they can place an order through a digital kiosk and, within minutes, get their items delivered to them outside the store. How it works is, customers can walk into the vape shop, where they’re greeted by a representative of The Joint who walks them through their purchase. The Joint representative cards the individual, assists them with their order, collects the payment, either through cash or debit card, and after about five to seven minutes a van pulls up to deliver the products. Chris Glew, The Joint’s director of legal affairs, stressed that the kiosk at Vix Vapes is not a storefront. “I think the main problem is the mischaracterization of what it is,” he said. “Many have the perception that it’s a storefront. You kind of realize, there’s no cannabis inside the (smoke or vape) shop, it’s a mobile ordering tool.” That mobile ordering tool, he added, was meant for marketing but has become an educational resource, letting consumers know that weed delivery services are legal in the state. “Our goal was to educate consumers about the legal licensing in California,” Glew said. “In all of our feedback today, a lot of consumers just didn’t know (delivery services) existed. It’s easy and functional and I can get this delivered to my home.” Courtney Vickery, the owner of Vix Vapes, which has been a San Clemente business for 11 years, explained that she simply rents out a portion of her space to The Joint, which provided its own employees and products. San Clemente and several neighboring cities have adopted ordinances prohibiting the commercial licensing of marijuana dispensaries. The city’s ban also outlaws the delivery services in San Clemente. However, according to Glew, provisions in the state’s law establishing the Bureau of Cannabis Control authorize licensed retailers such as The Joint to offer delivery services even in municipalities that have banned storefronts. “So what’s going on is you have a preemption argument,” he said. “The state law preempts local law.” City Manager James Makshanoff told San Clemente Times this week that while city staff is aware of the service and working with legal counsel, he’s not aware of anyone formally reaching out to Vix Vapes or The Joint to address any issues or concerns. Vickery gushed to the SC Times about her partnership with The Joint, stating that it has been beneficial for her business in the wake of media reports on the negative health impacts of e-cigarettes and vaping. Since news reports disrupted the vape industry, Vickery said, “I lost a lot of busiSan Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

ness, so I had to partner with someone or decide to shut it down. This definitely is bringing more traffic to the store. To have this available to the community is a positive thing.” WHAT’S NEXT: According to Glew, The Joint does intend to expand its kiosk and delivery service in San Clemente. However, Glew said the retailer doesn’t want to be an impediment to other businesses in town. “We would like to create as much of an opportunity to educate the community as possible, with the understanding that we don’t want to have our business be an impediment to other businesses,” he said. “We have no problem working with the city to respect those boundaries.”—SR

Council to Discuss Agenda-Setting Procedure THE LATEST: City councilors will reconvene for their first regular meeting of the New Year on Tuesday, Jan. 21. When they do, they’re expected to take up what’s likely to be a contentious discussion on amending the council’s procedural rule over placing items on the agenda. Currently, when a councilmember requests to place a topic for consideration on the agenda—colloquially referred to as agendizing—it requires a three-vote majority of the council to do so. Mayor Pro Tem Laura Ferguson, however, is hoping to reduce the threshold to either one or two votes. “I believe that the policy needs to change, because to make it a majority to place an item on the agenda, it limits the voice of the people. I think it’s very stifling,” she said, later adding: “It doesn’t mean I agree with (the item) or disagree with it, but it allows for discussion, for members of the population to be heard.” During the most recent regular city council meeting on Dec. 17, among a fully impaneled council body, Ferguson asked to agendize such discussion, sparking lively debate on the dais, as well an assurance from Councilmember Chris Hamm that the minority will put “ridiculous things on the agenda” not supported by the majority. “(I’d like) to take up the issue of number of members it takes to bring a topic on agenda for discussion,” Ferguson said, before launching into her formal request. “Do I have any support to bring this policy back for revisions?” “We already voted on this, I believe, at the last meeting, and we said no,” Councilmember Kathy Ward quickly responded. “It’s not a policy-oriented action, so I can bring it up again,” Ferguson fired back. “OK, well, I’m going to say no,” Ward said. Ferguson had previously made a similar request at the council’s Dec. 3 meeting, from which Hamm was absent and was

also the first day on the dais for new Councilmember Gene James. The mayor pro tem asked to revisit the policy then, suggesting to possibly reduce the threshold down to only one vote in favor of agendizing items for discussion. The motion received pushback from Ward, who said it’s always been the policy of the council to require a majority approval. “I’ve been on here five or six years, and it’s always been three,” Ward said. “And there’s been times where I didn’t get something on . . . I didn’t always get something agendized, but it was fine.” Ferguson turned to James to see if he supported the motion, but he responded that he didn’t at that time, concluding the discussion that night. Though her motion was defeated at the Dec. 3 meeting, Ferguson decided to make the request again on Dec. 17, after she had read social media comments expressing support for the change, she told San Clemente Times. Acknowledging that the majority supported a discussion to amend the agenda procedures, Hamm opined that reducing the threshold to two votes, giving the minority more say in setting the agenda, would prolong city business. It “doesn’t make any sense to me. And I’m speaking from the minority,” Hamm noted, later pleading with Bane: “I’m hopeful that the rational side of your brain is going to understand that discussing items that aren’t going to be passed is not rational or . . . useful of our time.” Hamm went on to state that the council is wasting its time discussing the change. “Kathy and I will be putting ridiculous things on the agenda,” Hamm said, pausing for emphasis, “that the majority doesn’t support. Do you understand what I’m telling you? We’ll have staff wasting time on issues that the majority of council doesn’t support.” As of press time, Hamm had not responded to a request for comment. WHAT’S NEXT: The next city council meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 6 p.m.—SR

Governor Proposes Record-Setting Budget; State Officials Issue Response THE LATEST: Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, proposed his second annual budget of $222 billion on Friday, Jan. 10. If passed, it would be the largest budget in California history. The spending plan would invest in wildfire prevention and preparation, housing and homelessness, as well as K-12 education. In Newsom’s proposal, he states: “There are deep, structural challenges that threaten our state’s future and demand our urgent attention. These prob-

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lems—catastrophic wildfires and their impacts, the expanding homelessness crisis, and growing inequality of opportunity—have been decades in the making and won’t be fixed overnight. California can and must do more to tackle these challenges and fortify our future.” The proposal dedicates $2 billion for emergency services, including flood protection and mapping of areas prone to wildfires, floods, tsunamis and mudslides. It would fund a new Wildfire Forecast and Threat Intelligence Integration Center in addition to research on better firefighting equipment and ways to protect firefighters. As for combating homelessness, according to CalMatters, a nonprofit news organization that focuses on policy, roughly 150,000 Californians are living on the streets or in shelters. With $1.15 billion previously being set aside for local governments, the proposed budget tacks on an additional $1 billion. That includes $750 million planned for the California Access to Housing and Services Fund, which offers new affordable housing. State Sen. Patricia Bates and Assemblymember Bill Brough, both Republicans, represent San Clemente in the state Legislature. In a statement Brough issued, he says California families and businesses deserve an affordable California. “This will not be solved by tax increases but by lasting reforms to reverse the years of over-taxing, regulating and spending,” Brough said. Brough did say he applauds the governor for addressing California’s staggering home prices and out-of-control homelessness problem. “We need to look at the layers of regulation, permitting fees and requirements that actually make homes expensive to build,” Brough stated. Bates gave Newsom credit for increasing the Rainy Day Fund reserves, investing in teacher training and enhancing the state’s emergency response capabilities, such as dealing with wildfires. Bates called for Newsom to work with the Legislature to “fix AB 5’s job-killing flaws and make the law fair for all.” As for Newsom’s spending plan on homelessness, Bates emphasized that leaders cannot spend more on the “status quo and expect different results.” “More funding needs to be combined with more accountability and public safety,” Bates said. “Californians want to help the homeless, but they also want to live in safe and clean communities.” WHAT’S NEXT: State legislators have until June 15 to pass the budget, which would go into effect in July for the start of the fiscal year. To view the proposed budget, visit ebudget.ca.gov.—LB EDITOR’S NOTE: For the full-length versions of all these stories, head to sanclementetimes.com sanclementetimes.com


EYE ON SC

San Clemente Filmmaker Documents Snowboarder’s Story of Perseverance

long. But we joke about it now, but I was so nervous at first. There were so many vulnerable moments. I was extremely hesitant to kind of go to his house and dive into his life, but he’s extremely open and straightforward with me. We had a great communication system. It was so run-and-gun filming: “Hey, are you free tomorrow afternoon?” I’d come, and it was put together super-fast, considering that I was definitely super nervous at first. But what happened to his life after was super awesome. SCT: Your focus has been on sports, telling stories about their passion, true grit and extremes. As I understand, you were an athlete yourself, specifically playing lacrosse. How has being an athlete shaped the way you tell the stories you’re documenting? T: So, I’ve been playing sports my whole life, all four years at Chapman, but for some reason all I watched were videos on Red Bull (Youtube Channel) and of Kelly Slater. I loved what it was all about. For some reason, when people push the limits, action sports, team sports, it sparks my interest.

BY SHAWN RAYMUNDO, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

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an Clemente High School alumna Shelby Thompson has quickly made a name for herself as a young documentary filmmaker. The 23-year-old’s film debut, Relentless, recently earned her a nod as a finalist for the 2019 Student Academy Awards. Relentless, a film about Marty O’Connor, a once-aspiring professional snowboarder who suffered a paralyzing spinal injury several years ago, documents his “journey of selfimprovement” as he learns to snowboard with an adaptive chair. O’Connor, who grew up in Orange County and attended University of Colorado Boulder as a collegiate snowboarder, holds a B.A. in Film Studies and also an MBA in Marketing & Entrepreneurship. He currently runs his own creative agency, the Marty O’Connor Creative Agency, or MOCA. Thompson, a student-athlete herself, explains that in 2012, after spending a day out with friends, a dehydrated O’Connor was walking out of a pizza restaurant when he got lightheaded, slipped and then swan-dived onto his neck. “It was just mind-blowing,” Thompson said of O’Connor’s spinal injury, pointing out the irony of the incident for a snowboarder who had grown up doing tricks and “insane jumps.” Thompson, whose film will be screened at Stance headquarters in San Clemente on Thursday, Jan. 16, spoke with San Clemente Times over the phone this week to talk about her movie and O’Connor’s journey to the mountain, seven years after his accident. SC TIMES: For our readers, could you talk about what this movie is and give a brief synopsis? THOMPSON: Basically, this documentary is about a quadriplegic who kind of went on a journey of self-improvement and a journey of challenges. Just watching his growth and accepting his accident when that happened. We go through his life, beginning with him trying to be a pro snowboarder as a teenager, follow his life in Boulder after a freak accident. Everything was going for him, he had a great job and it was kind of all about filming life 2.0—him trying to embrace his challenge. We ended up taking him back up the mountain, where he snowboarded with an adaptive San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

SCT: When you were bouncing around from major to major, were you searching for something where you can remain in the sports industry? T: Sports has always been my passion, I thought I always wanted to be a D1 (NCAA Division I) lacrosse coach. In the back of my head, I knew I wanted to represent people in sports or in production in sports. That may change over time. But that has been the underlying thing, my passion.

Filmmaker Shelby Thompson and Marty O’Connor in the snow while filming the documentary Relentless. Photo: Courtesy of Shelby Thompson

chair. We documented, really, his transformation process. It’s a whole different process for him, something he didn’t do for six years after his accident. We got that on camera. It was a journey of self-improvement after a freak accident that could happen to anybody. SCT: How did you and the film’s subject, Marty O’Connor, meet? T: I was a junior at Chapman University; he graduated with an MBA about four years before I got there. He was running an internship program for Divert Collective, which is an action sports company. I was a content producer. He was my boss for a full year, before I decided to choose a major and film him. We worked well for that year; it was kind a no-brainer for me. SCT: What do you hope viewers will take away from this film? T: We want to inspire individuals to embrace challenges and achieve their goals through his personal testament and my personal testament in college. We want to raise spinal cord injury awareness through his foundation, the Marty O’Connor Foundation. And because the documentary focuses a lot on his caregiver, which is his mom, we want to

celebrate the millions of caregivers in this country and be able to provide tools and resources for them through this Foundation. SCT: You had switched majors a few times before meeting O’Connor. What was it about meeting him that inspired you to switch once more and transfer into film school? T: So film school was something that was always in the back of my mind. I was just kind of not thinking about my future and kind of, honestly, wasting college away, as I put it. But I think, seriously, almost the first or second day after meeting Marty, he made it super clear to me and the other interns in the program, that it’s going to be a great opportunity. “You’re not going to waste time here.” He kind of ingrained that into my brain—to seize every moment. I applied to film school and got in the next semester through my content that I collected through the Divert Collective. I played around with other ideas for my senior thesis, but he was my obvious top choice. SCT: What was it like following O’Connor around with a camera? How long did you work with him on this film? T: I think, in total, the film was six months

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SCT: At 22 years old, you were a Student Academy Award finalist. Could you talk a little about what that accomplishment meant to you as such a young filmmaker? T: That was honestly something that I was not expecting. Something I don’t think a lot of people were expecting for me, especially my classmates. But for that to resonate with people on the Academy was incredible. Just that honor alone opened up so many doors that I couldn’t even imagine. That was our jumping-off point of resonating with people that meant something. That got attention from a lot of schools around the country. The feedback we got was so inspiring. That’s when we knew we had something on our hands that we had to work with. SCT: What are you working on next? Anything you can tease to our readers? T: As of now, I’m kind of focusing on gaining more production and directing knowledge here at Fox Sports and kind of just doing freelance work on the side. But I’m actually hoping to make another documentary, be part of another team that makes documentaries. My goal one day is to hopefully work with HBO’s sports documentaries. To RSVP for the exclusive screening of Relentless, go to relentless-film.com. The screening is scheduled for 6 p.m. at Stance headquarters at 197 Avenida La Pata, San Clemente. SC sanclementetimes.com


EYE ON SC

NEWS BITES

Community Meetings

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SDG&E Explains Time-of-Use Plans SDG&E officials explained their Timeof-Use plans and billing rates during a community forum on Thursday, Jan. 9, at the San Juan Capistrano Library. Assemblymember Bill Brough hosted the forum, introducing the SDG&E representatives. Different plans have different rates, with 4-9 p.m. considered peak hours of use when energy costs can be higher. Users can save costs if they reduce energy use and use energy outside of those peak hours. Some SDG&E users have already begun transitioning to Time-of-Use plans. For instance, under the TOU-DR1 plan, typical baseline off-peak rates Monday through Friday would be 25 cents per km/h (kilometers per hour). Users going above 130% of their baseline would be charged 33 cents per km/h. Typical on-peak rates Monday through Friday would be 27 cents for the baseline and 34 cents above 130% of the baseline. Baselines vary depending on several factors, including the climate zone and number of days in a billing cycle. SDG&E is encouraging users to conserve energy based on state standards so that California is a cleaner state. Users have flexibility in changing plans, and Time-of-Use bills will provide regular data on energy usage. Visit sdge.com for more information.

Rian Johnson Gets First Oscar Nomination San Clemente’s own Rian Johnson earned his first Oscar nomination with the script for his latest film, Knives Out, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced this week. The star-studded, murder-mystery flick, which has received critical acclaim while grossing more than $265 million worldwide so far, scored Johnson the Oscar nod for Best Original Screenplay, according to Entertainment Weekly. Johnson took to Twitter on Monday, Jan. 13, to express his appreciation to the Academy as well as to his fellow nominees, which include Noah Baumbach for Marriage Story, Sam Mendes and Krysty Vilson-Cairns for 1917, Quentin Tarantino for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, and Bong Joon Ho for Parasite. “That is a helluva list of writers, very honored & proud to be up there with them,” he wrote. “Love & so much gratitude to my fellow writers in (The Academy).” The filmmaker previously earned some critical success with his recent foray into the Star Wars universe, as he directed San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18

CHALLENGING CANCER 10-11:30 a.m. The Challenging Cancer group meets every first and third Saturday of the month at Heritage Christian Fellowship, 190 Avenida La Pata, San Clemente. heritagesc.org. TUESDAY, JANUARY 21

CITY COUNCIL 6 p.m. The San Clemente City Council will conduct its regularly scheduled meeting. 100 Avenida Presidio, San Clemente. 949.361.8200. san-clemente.org. Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) and director Rian Johnson on set during the filming of ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi.’ Photo: David James/Copyright 2017 Lucasfilm Ltd

2017’s Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi. But while he received the admiration of movie critics, his directorial vision was met with significant scorn from diehard fans of the franchise. Knives Out, which stars Ana de Armas, Daniel Craig, Jamie Lee Cutis, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon and Lakeith Stanfield, has more widespread support from critics and moviegoers, as it has a Certified Fresh score of 97% on Rotten Tomatoes, and an audience score of 92%.

Local Republican Group Hosts 2020 Candidates The San Clemente Area Republican Women Federated recently hosted its monthly luncheon, where it featured several of the Republican candidates running for office in this year’s elections. At the group’s Jan. 8 luncheon, San Juan Capistrano Councilmember Brian Maryott, who is campaigning to unseat Democratic incumbent Rep. Mike Levin for the 49th Congressional District, was among a slew of other local officials who are also currently seeking either reelection or higher office. The group of candidates also included Mission Viejo Councilmember Greg Raths, Laguna Hills Councilmember Don Sedgwick, Yorba Linda Councilmember Peggy Huang and special education teacher Rhonda Furin. Those four are challenging Democratic incumbent Rep. Katie Porter for the 45th Congressional seat. Laguna Niguel Mayor Laurie Davies and Mission Viejo Councilmember Ed Sachs, who are vying for State Assemblymember Bill Brough’s seat in the state’s 73rd Assembly District, also attended the luncheon. Each of the candidates made a presenta-

tion as to why he or she should be voted into office. Following the presentations, each candidate participated in a Q&A session. Next month, the SCARWF will feature more 2020 Republican candidates at its luncheon.

AARP to Host Tax-Aide Program Next Month Trained and IRS-certified volunteers will provide free tax help for low- to moderateincome taxpayers, primarily those who are 50 and older, at senior centers throughout South Orange County, as part of a tax-aide program through AARP. Last year, volunteer counselors prepared more than 600 tax returns for such taxpayers residing within the San Clemente, Dana Point and San Juan Capistrano communities, according to Audie Sturla, the district coordinator for the AARP-Tax Aide. For the whole South County region, volunteers prepared more than 3,000 tax returns, Sturla said in a press release. The program will be available at the San Juan Capistrano Senior Center located at 25925 Camino Del Avion on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. beginning on Feb. 4. This is a walk-in/sign-up site, so you must appear in person to get on the schedule. The appointment book and Intake/ Interview sheets are available now in the Senior Lounge at the Community Center. Other locations will include Mission Viejo, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Woods, Lake Forest, Laguna Beach and Corona del Mar. Taxpayers with appointments will be given priority. But no appointment is needed, provided there is an opening. Taxpayers may also call 949.493.5911 or email sjc_taxaide@yahoo.com for additional information.

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BECAUSE I LOVE YOU (BILY) 6:30-8:30 p.m. Meets every Tuesday. Because I Love You (BILY) is free and can help parents navigate through whatever parenting challenges they may be facing (e.g., failure to launch, drug abuse, disrespect). San Clemente Presbyterian Church. 119 Avenida De La Estrella. bilysc.org. SAN CLEMENTE TOASTMASTERS 7-8:40 p.m. The San Clemente Toastmasters meets every Tuesday, with the doors opening at 6:30 p.m. so everyone can greet each other. San Clemente Baha’i Center, 3316 Avenida Del Presidente. 858.900.6175. sanclementetoastmasters. toastmastersclubs.org. SUNRISE ROTARY 7:15-8:30 a.m. San Clemente Sunrise Rotary meets every Tuesday at Talega Golf Club Signature Grille. 990 Avenida Talega. scsunriserotary.com. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22

PLANNING COMMISSION 6-10 p.m. The city’s Planning Commission conducts its regularly scheduled meeting. 100 Avenida Presidio, San Clemente. 949.361.8200. san-clemente.org.

Have something interesting to submit to our News Bites section? Tell us about awards, events, happenings, accomplishments and more. We’ll put your submissions into “News Bites.” Send your information to sraymundo@picketfencemedia.com. Submissions are due by 10 a.m. the Monday of the week you’d like published. sanclementetimes.com


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ART/DESIGN Art Director > Jasmine Smith Graphic Designer > Chelsie Rex OPERATIONS Finance Director > Mike Reed General Manager > Alyssa Garrett Accounting & Distribution Manager > Tricia Zines SPECIAL THANKS Robert Miller CONTRIBUTORS Megan Bianco and Jake Howard

Associate Publisher > Lauralyn Loynes San Clemente Times, Vol. 15, Issue 3. The SC Times (sanclementetimes.com ) is published weekly by Picket Fence Media, publishers of the Dana Point Times (danapointtimes. com) and The Capistrano Dispatch (thecapistranodispatch. com). Copyright: No articles, illustrations, photographs or other editorial matter or advertisements herein may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, photos or negatives. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

CUSD’s Newest Bond Tax Attempts: An Expensive Bad Idea!

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or the March 3, 2020 ballot, Capistrano Unified School District is pushing two bond tax measures on the voters: Measure H for San Clemente (except Talega) and Capistrano Beach property owners and Measure I on the rest of Dana Point, all of Laguna Niguel and Aliso Viejo owners. If passed, both measures would obligate voters to pay (with interest) an additional $724 million ($519 million for Measure I plus $205 million for Measure H)—on top of all of the other taxes and bond taxes we already pay. My knowledge of this subject comes from when I ran for the CUSD Board of Trustees in 2014 against current Trustee Martha McNicholas, being part of a group that opposed CUSD’s Measure M in 2016 and the research I and others have done regarding past and present bond tax attempts. I wish to make three points. The first is taxes. Or I should say taxes, taxes and more taxes. California residents are already among the highest-taxed in the nation. In 2012, voters passed new “temporary taxes” (Proposition 30) promoted by the teacher unions with a promise these taxes would provide billions of dollars for the school system. Then in 2016, the same unions were successful in passing Proposition 55, resulting in most of the Prop. 30 “temporary taxes” being extended for 12 years. Again, voters were promised this was for public education. These higher income taxes have given California the dubious distinction of having the highest state income tax rates in the nation. This is in addition to gasoline taxes (second-highest in the nation then; as of July 1, 2020, the highest), higher sales and utility taxes, higher DMV fees, etc., with most of these taxes’ deductibility being limited by Federal tax law. It is reported that the state expects a $22 billion operating surplus and to have $20.59 billion in reserves this year. Voters have every right to ask: Where are those tax dollars we have already paid? CUSD Mismanages its Funds There is one bond tax voters shouldn’t forget about. CUSD’s Mea-

sure A bond tax passed in 1999. It’s on your current property tax bill, and we are still paying for this bond tax (millions are still owed). Importantly, as part of the 1999 Measure A pitch to the voters, the District listed as reasons for that bond tax the need for asbestos removal/roof repairs/renovating science laboratories. Yet for Measures H and I, CUSD is still listing these same items as needing repair. So what did CUSD do with the bond tax money from Measure A? Why are we being asked to pay twice for the same repairs? CUSD constantly states it has no money of its own and it is slated via this bond tax to put zero of its own funds into these projects. Where are our tax dollars going that CUSD currently receives? Over 86% of the District’s funds are spent on salaries and benefits of adult employees of the District. Thus, over the years, it does not manage our tax money wisely to plan for building upBy Craig keep and maintenance. Alexander In 2018, Superintendent Kirsten Vital received more than $425,000 in salary and other pay and benefits. Deputy Superintendent Clark Hampton was paid more than $300,000. For context, Governor Jerry Brown Jr. received a total of slightly more than $285,000 in salary and benefits. Thus, the Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent each is paid more than the Governor of the State of California. CUSD Is a Declining Enrollment District CUSD’s own documents confirm the district itself knows this. Yet it wants to use these new bond taxes to pour hundreds of millions of dollars into school building projects. The district, at pages B-3 (Measure H) and B-3 & B-4 (Measure I) list all of the existing schools, implying all are slated for new construction from bond taxes. So this raises the question: Why is the district asking the taxpayers to pay for improvements to school sites it will

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likely need to close over the next few years? Or is the district not planning to spend the bond tax funds on some of these schools it will be forced to close due to declining enrollment? If this is the case, what is it really planning to do with these taxpayer funds? Voters deserve straightforward answers on what CUSD intends to do with their bond taxes before they vote to place additional 30-year tax liens on their properties. Either the district is not planning properly or it is not being forthright with its constituents. Residents and taxpayers deserve better stewardship of their tax dollars. They deserve transparency from their local government school trustees and education bureaucrats. I urge you to vote No on Measures H and I. For more information, go to nocusdbonds.com, capokidsfirst.com and on Facebook at Capo Kids First. Learn more by attending the combined Chamber of Commerce Forum on this subject on Wednesday, Jan. 29 at 7 p.m. at the City of Laguna Niguel’s Community Room, 30111 Crown Valley Pkwy, Laguna Niguel, CA 92677. Craig Alexander is a Dana Point resident, property owner and an attorney. He thanks the Dana Point Times and the San Clemente Times for allowing him to publish this guest column. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

No Beachside Chat on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020 There will be no Beachside Chat on Friday, Jan. 17. Beachside Chat will resume on Jan 24, at 8 a.m. Beachside Chat is a spirited, town hall forum on community issues, hosted by SC Times Editor Shawn Raymundo every Friday at the Dorothy Visser Senior Center, 117 Avenida Victoria. All are welcome.

sanclementetimes.com


SOAPBOX

Letters to the Editor REP. MIKE LEVIN’S WAR VOTE GARY WALSH, San Clemente

Last week, Congressman Mike Levin voted in favor of the “War Powers Resolution,” ostensibly to stop President Donald Trump from taking any further actions against Iran. Major General Qasem Soleimani was a committed terrorist responsible for hundreds of American deaths—tens of thousands of deaths through militias he directed, 150 deaths of Iranian protesters, and the list goes on. Think of Soleimani to the Iranian leadership as Joseph Goebbels was to Hitler—a murderous zealot. He had high designs on continuing to sow terror upon the populations of the Arab region in the hopes of forming a Shia Muslim-ruled region. He made no bones about the satisfaction he derives from the killing and maiming of American soldiers. No civilized person should feel his demise, by whatever reason, is worthy of sympathetic retrospection. Soleimani was acting on the direction from Tehran. Iran is committed to ruling the region. This is the same Iranian leadership that hijacked ships, shot down protesters, shot down a civilian airliner, launched missiles and attacked Saudi oil refineries, just to name a few. Let’s not forget, they loudly and unabashedly chant. “Death to Israel.” Iran only understands brute force. This was easily discernible by Iran’s measured and feeble response to the killing of Soleimani. They got the message that we can and will use our full military might should they continue to attack Americans and our interests in the region. Well, wait, maybe not now, thanks to Levin. The War Powers Resolution’s stated purpose was to limit President Trump’s ability to use military powers against Iran. This resolution was written as “nonbinding.” That means President Trump doesn’t have to obey it. The only purpose to such a farce is to give a Machiavellian appearance to the ill-informed that the Democratic Party is holding the President in check to prevent an all-out war. In reality, it did nothing but embolden Iran. They read actions like this as favorable to them. Iran’s leaders understand completely—this was only for show. Levin’s reelection is coming up later this year. Let’s get somebody in office who finds it offensive that people like General Soleimani, who advocated and celebrated the death of the very U.S. Marines that Levin purports to represent, exist; and then can clearly step back from partisan politics and can acknowledge a job well done.

IT’S A BAD LAW CORD BAUER, San Clemente

Last week was one for the history books. Not only was the term “WW III” bandied San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

about like we should all be researching bomb shelters, U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi finally said she’d send impeachment papers to the Senate—as if that wasn’t the normal procedure. If someone looked at our political system, they’d think that we were the most divided nation ever. But I don’t think that’s true. Every news hour reads like a soap opera, and if the news isn’t that exciting, the media makes sure they “sex it up” a bit for ratings. Otherwise, TV does not represent real life. But maybe I’m wrong. So let me ask a few questions to those reading this note and see if there’s common ground. Last week, we learned that blue collar wages were increasing at a 9% rate, far higher than the 2% rate of the top earners. I think that’s awesome, and I can only assume that Democrats are happy that our economy is helping everyone, not just the rich. And despite President Donald Trump’s massive tax cuts, the Fed is collecting record tax revenues. That’s great news—dropping tax rates created more tax revenue. Apparently, economist Art Laffer knows something. But the government has also increased their spending by $200 billion, which means we continue to increase our deficit. I don’t like this, and hope everyone feels the same. Are we still on the same page? Closer to home, despite spending $3 billion on homelessness and drug abuse, California saw its homeless population increase by 17% last year. Here’s where I think the politicians don’t represent everyday voters; if Prop 47 and Prop 57 aren’t working, we should abolish them and go back to what worked before. I have no idea why having an illegal gun (worth $550 or less) on your person was changed from a felony to a misdemeanor. This doesn’t sound one bit like a Democrat position, but it’s Democrats who made these laws. How about changing the laws so the rape of an unconscious person is no longer a violent crime? Democrats, are you OK with this? I didn’t think so. A new ballot initiative will seek to repeal Prop 13, but it won’t mention Prop 13 at all. Instead, it will be called “Education and Local Funding.” I can’t imagine Republicans or Democrats being OK with their property taxes skyrocketing. Regardless of who made these lousy laws, I can’t imagine anyone from any party wants them to continue. Am I wrong?

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY

Have something you’d like to say? Email your letter to sraymundo@picketfencemedia.com no later than 8 a.m. on Monday morning. San Clemente Times reserves the right to edit reader-submitted letters for length and is not responsible for the claims made or information written by the writers. Limit your letters to 350 words or less. Please send with your valid email, phone number and address for verification by staff. Your address and phone number will not be published.

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SC GETTING OUT San Clemente

YOUR SEVEN-DAY EVENT PLANNER

The List

What’s going on in and around town this week COMPILED BY STAFF

HAVE AN EVENT? Submit it to San Clemente Times by going to sanclementetimes.com, and clicking “Submit an Event” under the “Getting Out” tab.

Thursday | 16 BEGINNING GENEALOGY CLASS 5:30-7:30 p.m. Presented by the South Orange County California Genealogical Society, this class is meant to equip you with organizational skills, resources, and a road map to start your journey of discovering who you are and where are you from. No specific skills are needed other than an insatiable interest in your family’s history. Handouts will be provided, as well as an overview of the resources that are available in the Genealogy Research Center at the Mission Viejo Library. Class size will be limited to 20 in order to provide good interaction during the free two-hour class. Registration is required and can be done at soccgs.org/evening-classes. Mission Viejo City Hall, 200 Civic Center, Mission Viejo. vicepresident@soccgs.org. CELTIC MUSIC IN HOLLYWOOD 7-8 p.m. See world-famous bagpipe master Eric Rigler perform at Casa Romantica. From performing “Amazing Grace” at President Ronald Reagan’s funeral to hundreds of appearances, films and recordings such as in Braveheart and Titanic, Rigler has been called “the most recorded piper in history.” Casa Romantica Cutural Center and Gardens, 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. casaromantica.org. ACOUSTIC THURSDAYS AT BARNOA 7-9 p.m. Live music every Thursday. A rotating cast of Orange County’s most talented musicians play acoustic covers and original music. Enjoy a great wine selection, craft beers, tasty appetizers and Barnoa’s full dinner menu. Must be 21 and older. Barnoa Wine and Craft Beer Bistro. 831 Via Suerte, San Clemente. 949.388.4378. barnoawinebar.com.

Friday | 17 ‘STEEL MAGNOLIAS’ 7:30 p.m. The Cabrillo Playhouse is opening with its performance of Steel Magnolias by Robert Harling. Steel Magnolias explores the bonds between six women at San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

EDITOR’S PICK Photo: Courtesy of Stuart Palley/Casa Romantica

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17: OPEN CASA: ‘TERRA FLAMMA’ 6-8 p.m. Join Casa Romantica for the opening reception of “After The Fires: Stuart Palley.” Admission to the reception is free and includes complimentary wine and cheese. Palley is a photographer based in Southern California focusing on environmental issues and wildfires as an acute effect of climate change. His photographic art series Terra Flamma: Wildfires at Night documents the most acute effects of drought in California—wildfires—through long exposure images at night. Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens, 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. casaromantica.org.

a beauty salon. Combining light-hearted comedy and quirky characters with a serious, heart-rending storyline, Steel Magnolias has appealed to audiences both onstage and in its popular 1989 film adaptation. The production will run through Feb. 9. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased online. The Cabrillo Playhouse, 202 Avenida Cabrillo, San Clemente. 949.492.0465. cabrilloplayhouse.org.

Saturday | 18 SOUTH OC CARS AND COFFEE 9-11 a.m. South OC Cars and Coffee is the U.S.’s largest weekly car meet, attracting a mix of 500-1,000 hypercars, supercars, exotics, vintage, classic, muscle and sports cars, hot rods, rat rods, pickups, 4x4s and motorcycles. The Outlets at San Clemente, 101 West Avenida Vista Hermosa, San Clemente. southoccarsandcoffee.com.

Sunday | 19 SOUL FOOD 11 a.m. Join the San Clemente Baha’i Center for its monthly Soul Food gathering. This month’s program is called “Sweet Scents of Friendship.” The program will explore the theme of friendship as a foundation for the unity of humankind. Everyone feels a desire to help one another and to see the society around each other advance and prosper. Everyone looks forward to a future where peace and harmony have been established and the people of the

world live in unity. This effort can grow and bear fruit as more and more of us unite in service to humanity. Explore how the Center can develop the community’s capacity to undertake acts of service selflessly and purely for the good of others. Baha’i Center, 3316 Ave Del Presidente, San Clemente. 949.791.9192. bahaicenter.com.

Monday | 20 PTSD WARRIOR GROUP 7 p.m. Warrior Groups are fellowships for combat veterans and their families to share their experiences, testimonies of healing, compassion and hope in overcoming the invisible wounds of war. PTSD Foundation of America-Southern California, 216 Avenida Fabricante, San Clemente. 619.362.0642. ptsdusa.org.

Tuesday | 21 UNDER THE BLUE ARCHES 6-9 p.m. What better way to spend time with some friends than to enjoy some vino while painting a masterpiece? Grab a tasty beverage (food and beverage sold separately) and join Paintings & Vino Orange County at Bella Collina San Clemente country club for step-by-step instruction with Nick LeGuern on how to recreate the peaceful painting “Under the Blue Arches.” Have a fabulous time sipping your favorite drink and being creative. A 48-hour notice for cancellations and rescheduling is required. Check-in begins 15

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minutes before the event start time. Give yourself time to park so you do not arrive late. Must be 21 and older to attend even if you will not be drinking. Bella Collina San Clemente, 200 Avenida La Pata, San Clemente. 855.410.8330. paintingandvino.com. BEGINNING HULA CLASS 6:30-7:15 p.m. Have fun and learn basic language, songs, dance steps, motions and meanings. Includes work with poi balls (Maori culture from New Zealand), Hawaiian hula, Tahitian, Samoan music/dance forms. All are welcome. Hula Connection, 3551 Camino Mira Costa, Suite J, San Clemente. 949.842.0662. hulaconnection.net.

Wednesday | 22 CASA KIDS: STORY TIME 10-11 a.m. Casa Romantica welcomes children aged 1-7 for a picture book reading every Wednesday in the courtyard. A Q&A session and a dance will be held after each story. Admission is free. Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens, 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. casaromantica.org. LIVE MUSIC AT IVA LEE’S 7 p.m. Join Iva Lee’s for live music every Wednesday through Sunday. For the ultimate live music experience, be sure to reserve a lounge table on Fridays and Saturdays. Check their website for the latest scheduled performances. 555 N. El Camino Real, San Clemente. 949.361.2855. ivalees.com. sanclementetimes.com


GETTING OUT

On Stage at The Coach House: Coco Montoya

Coco Montoya is bringing the blues to The Coach House on Jan. 16. Photo: Ken Weingart BY COLLIN BREAUX, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

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hough the blues can bring up images of sadness, blues musician Coco Montoya was a happy man when asked how he felt before his upcoming gig at The Coach House on Jan. 16. He felt great and was ready for the new year days before his stop in San Juan Capistrano. “I happen to love playing at The Coach House,” Montoya said. “I’ve been playing there for many years.” Montoya first played The Coach House with Albert Collins. The venue— a home away from home for Montoya, who was born in Santa Monica—has a great sound system and always makes things easy for him, Montoya said. Montoya released the album Coming in Hot in 2019, and true to the album name, said the title track is doing well on the roots music charts. “It’s wonderful to have something people appreciate,” Montoya said. For his concert at The Coach House, Montoya is bringing fellow musicians Jeff Paris, Rena Beavers and Nathan Brown with him, all of whom he has known for a while and calls good friends and incredible musicians. The San Juan Capistrano performance is part of a tour through California. After The Coach House, Montoya will head to Arizona and other spots west before playing some dates up north. “In March is when we’ll really be busy,” he said. San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

Montoya is driven to listen to, record and play music that affects him emotionally, one reason he’s drawn to the blues. “The blues is the basis for everything,” Montoya, a self-taught player, said. “It’s not something you think. It’s something you feel.” He always tries to go by his ear when it comes to music and knows it’s working based on his gut feeling. Reflecting on the live experience during a concert, Montoya said anything can happen. “That’s the challenge of playing live,” Montoya said. “You have to develop the attitude of it’s going to be what it’s going to be.” His musicians take chances here and there, and everyone laughs if there’s a screw-up. Montoya also spoke about the synergy musicians have with audiences during concerts, saying each feeds off the other. He aims to entertain crowds while on stage. San Juan Capistrano is a beautiful area from Montoya’s perspective, a high compliment given he’s traveled all over the world and has seen some lovely places. As a Southern California native, Montoya appreciates getting to come back to the area after touring. “When I come home, this is home. I’m not a snow guy,” he said. “I love the weather. I love the people.” Montoya will play The Coach House on Jan. 16 at 8 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., and tickets are $15. SC Page 13


SC SC LIVING San Clemente

PROFILES OF OUR COMMUNITY

GUEST OPINION: On Life and Love after 50 by Tom Blake

New Mates’ Family Threatened by Potential Loss of Inheritance

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n Sunday, Jan. 5, my partner, Greta, and I thoroughly enjoyed the movie, Knives Out. As we settled into our seats, I had no idea the movie would inspire my first column of 2020. Why did it? The movie, a humorous, modern-day, Agatha Christie-type of murder mystery, focused on estate planning and how family members can be greedy over their inheritance. The movie coincided with an email I received from a woman who had similar estate distribution issues with the daughter of the new man in her life. The woman requested to remain anonymous. She met a widower on an Internet dating site who lived 500 miles from her. They are both 72. After a two-year courtship, and several visits to each other’s homes, they decided that she would move to live with him. It seems to me they had made intelligent choices. She did not sell her home; she rented it to tenants she liked. She said, “We are very grateful to have found love with each other at this stage in our lives and to have each other for help and

support whatever may come our way.” Her family and friends, in her words, “gave him the seal of approval.” Her children were happy for her. She added, “The only regret I have about the decision to move to his home is that I didn’t meet his daughter, his only child, before I made the move and didn’t talk to him about his relationship with her as much as I should have. “While he and his daughter lived 10 minutes from each other, she had a demanding job and they didn’t see each other often. I assumed their relationship was closer ON LIFE AND than it is. LOVE AFTER 50 “Before I moved, I By Tom Blake asked him if he had asked his daughter how she felt about me moving into the home where she was raised and where her mother had lived. “His daughter told him she had no objection and thought it made sense and wondered why we hadn’t talked about doing it sooner.

of inheritance distribution. And be particularly cautious about saying the words to your beneficiaries, “I’ve made a slight change in my will.” As we see from this woman’s story, and from the film Knives Out, those words, or similar words, can cause chaos. Tom Blake is a retired Dana Point business owner and San Clemente resident who has authored books on middle-aged dating. See his website at findingloveafter50.com. To comment: tompblake@gmail.com. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

SINGLES MEET & GREET THURSDAY, JAN. 23 5-7 p.m. This months Singles Meet and Greet will be held at Tutor and Spunky’s Deli, 34085 PCH, Dana Point. Complimentary appetizers will be provided and there is no admission fee. Beer and wine are $5 per glass.

Sudoku

Adoptable Pet of the Week: Comet

BY MYLES MELLOR

SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

Last week’s solution:

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his goofy guy is Comet, a 3-year-old Saint Bernard mix with a heart of gold. Comet initially arrived at the shelter in very poor condition, but through the exceptional care of shelter staff and volunteers, he has gained more than 25 pounds and is now in great health. Comet is essentially an overgrown lap dog and loves to snuggle. He is a strong and active dog and would do best with an experienced owner. If you would like to know more about Comet,

“However, a red flag was raised the first week I lived with him, as his daughter asked him to meet with her privately. The discussion centered around money. He assured her that we were keeping our finances separately and she would not be affected financially by our partnership. “A short while later, he and I met with the daughter and her boyfriend. During the outing, he mentioned that he had made a slight change in his will to provide funds for me to return to my home should he predecease me. “That news seemed to be the catalyst for her subsequent alienation/estrangement. He has had no contact with her in more than two years. It’s a very sad situation for them and affects me as well. “So, I encourage seniors to thoroughly investigate family relationships that a potential partner has, to understand what the possible repercussions might be in making a long-term commitment.” Tom concludes: Finding love later in life can be a wonderful thing. But remember, when children or other family members are involved, tread lightly regarding the subject

Comet. Photo: Courtesy of San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter

please call the San Clemente/Dana Point Animal Shelter at 949.492.1617 or visit with him at 221 Avenida Fabricante, San Clemente. SC

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult. Level: Medium

See the solution in next week’s issue.

Local Real Estate By Local Experts Jeremy Conrad Broker, DRE# 01279209 949.542.8348 Jconrad@conradrealestate.com Bill Conrad Broker, DRE# 01461548 949.542.8349 Billc@conradrealestate.com Steve Conrad Property Manager, DRE# 01297404 949.542.8347 Stevec@conradrealestate.com

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• 953 homes in San Clemente closed escrow in 2019, with an average sales price of $1,122,400. The highest sales price was $6,495,000. • In San Clemente, nearly 50% (454) of the homes closed in 2019, sold above $1,000,000 • Neighboring cities Dana Point and Capo Beach, had a combined 530 homes sold in 2019, with an average sales price of $1,341,275

It’s time to expect more… Established 1963


SC LIVING CoastLines by Fred Swegles

Carson’s Tonight Show, Knapp relates in his book. Try to picture Carson, impersonating Reagan, sparring with Gorby. Knapp could actually blurt out Russian convincingly. He had memorized a Volkswagen commercial. Decades later, Knapp ran into Carson’s TV sidekick, Ed McMahon, at a San Clemente supermarket. “We talked for half an hour,” Gorby recalled. Knapp appeared repeatedly on Maury Povich’s televised news magazine, A Current Affair. When Russia brought the world’s biggest cargo plane to an event in San Diego, the crew, fascinated with this Gorby impostor, asked if all Americans were like him. “Nyet!” he replied. “The other half are women.” Once, meeting a World War II veteran who wanted to thank Gorbachev because Russians had freed him from a concentration camp, Gorby signed a photo for him. ”He kissed me, with tears running down his cheeks,” Knapp recalled. Knapp said he turned down appearances that would’ve made Gorbachev look bad for laughs. He respected Gorbachev. The Soviet ambassador to the United Nations once thanked him for handling the role with dignity and respect.

How an Impersonator Who Now Calls San Clemente Home Tricked America’s Future President

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s everyone knows, late-night talk show hosts thrive on spoofing the President. All San Clemente resident Ronald Knapp can do is muse, “Been there, done that!” Thirty years ago, when the Soviet Union dissolved, the Berlin Wall came crashing down and a tense five-decade U.S.-Soviet Cold War ended, Knapp drew international notoriety by fooling Donald Trump in a very public way. Knapp did it one momentous day in 1988 in New York City while acting as a celebrity look-alike for Soviet Secretary General Mikhail Gorbachev, the man who ended the Cold War. Knapp memorized Russian phrases, wore a dabbed-on likeness of Gorbachev’s facial birthmark, played the role boldly and managed to fool lots of people. He became known as The Guy Who Got Trump, which is the title of a rollicking autobiography that Knapp and Adrian Windsor co-authored in 2013 in San Clemente, recounting escapades as “Gorby 2.”

ORIGINS

In 1987, Gorbachev had achieved rockstar status in America as a refreshingly different kind of Soviet leader. Unlike the gruff, cold Soviet bosses of old, Gorbachev was friendly, smiling, and eager to end animosities. President Reagan, on a visit to West Berlin, sought to coax his Soviet counterpart by delivering a historic speech: “Mr. COASTLINES Gorbachev, tear down this By Fred Swegles wall!” Knapp, then living in Huntington Beach, had won a Gorbachev look-alike contest in Hollywood. He conceived a music video, “Rock the Wall,” in which he, as Gorby, sings, dances and rides a construction ball. It explodes into the San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

Ronald Knapp strikes a statesmanlike pose on the San Clemente Pier, impersonating former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Photo: Fred Swegles

Berlin Wall, smashing it. Multitudes pour out through the hole, from Communist East Germany into the freedoms of the West, exulting. This was filmed two years before the Berlin Wall actually fell in late 1989. The Gorbachev impostor’s big day came on Dec, 7, 1988, when Gorbachev arrived in New York City to address the United Nations. Fox TV’s Good Day, New York set up Knapp the impostor atop a limousine, parading openly on the streets, greeting adoring New Yorkers. The highlight reel, for evening news, showed Knapp outside Trump Tower. Mogul Donald Trump came down to greet the Soviet leader. Trump later insisted he recognized it was a gag. The video doesn’t support that. “It’s a great honor, very nice,” Trump tells the impostor. When Fox TV reporter Gordon Elliott tells Trump “we hope we didn’t disturb your

schedule,” Trump insists it was no problem, coming down to meet the man. “No, it was beautiful,” Trump says, “and I heard and I couldn’t have been happier. Good luck with everything.” Moments later, Elliott winks into the camera, saying he thinks Trump finally got it. Fake news, 1988.

INSTANT CELEBRITY

Gorby 2 became an instant celebrity. “Rock the Wall” appeared on international TV. Knapp was in demand across America, impersonating Time Magazine’s 1987 Man of the Year and 1989 Man of the Decade. Asked to “do something Russian” at a Car of the Year auto dealers’ party, Knapp mimicked a tantrum that former Soviet boss Nikita Khrushchev had once tossed at the United Nations. Taking off his shoe, Gorby raised it to pound on the hood of the car. The crowd erupted. There were seven appearances on Johnny

ANOTHER SIDE OF ‘GORBY’ For more about the 2013 book The Guy Who Got Trump: Outrageous Adventures of an Audacious Impostor, or to watch a video of the 1988 Trump incident, or to view Knapp’s Gorby music video “Rock the Wall,” visit gorby2.com. For a gripping work of fiction, based on a true story related by Ronald Knapp, check out Adrian Windsor’s book, published in 2019, The Butcher from McGregor.

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YEARS LATER

Today, there isn’t much market for Gorby 2. “Young people don’t even know who Gorbachev is,” Knapp said. He met Gorbachev at an event in Anaheim, years after the general secretary had left office and was on a speaking tour. Wearing the birthmark, Knapp sat in with a choir, lip-syncing songs, with Gorbachev in the audience. Afterward, Gorby 2 was mobbed by attendees wanting autographs. No one could get past guards to the real Gorbachev. After the event, Knapp found himself face to face with the real Gorbachev. “He kissed me on both cheeks,” Gorby 2’s book says, “and then he said, ‘I really need to go to the bathroom.’ ” Knapp, a U.S. Army veteran, corresponded with Trump, little realizing Trump would be elected president. He said he sent Trump an American flag with a letter signed by veterans at his American Legion post and Trump, realizing who it was from, sent Knapp a “VIP for Life” certificate, which Knapp is proud to have. “He didn’t care; he just liked me,” Gorby said. Fred Swegles is a longtime San Clemente resident with nearly five decades of reporting experience in the city. Fred can be reached at fswegles@picketfencemedia.com. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

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SC LIVING GUEST OPINION: Life’s a Beach by Shelley Murphy

Happy New Year; Hindsight is 2020 T his New Year began like so many before, with a walk on the beach trail alongside a favorite friend. During our countless weekend walks, we’ve shared our kids’ successes and setbacks, including their fanatical Little League tournaments, notable high school hijinks and painful college rejection letters. Throughout the years, we’ve pondered plenty of parenting questions during our trail talks, but one continues to plague us: Did I prepare my kids for the real world? In the days following our recent heartto-heart, I continued to contemplate the question. Seeking an answer, I hopped online and found an article identifying 33 life skills young adults should master before they fly from the nest. The skills range from sublime to silly, and the following five are my favorites:

1.

They should know how to compose a thoughtful, handwritten note. Agreed, a handwritten note never goes out of style. My boys began writing thank you notes in elementary school, and I like to think the practice continues.

2.

They should know how to read a map and follow directions without using a screen or device. Moving to a new city, my older son honed this skill under duress when I volunteered to help him search for an apartment. After two defeating days, I opted to trade tricky technology for the tried-and-true. I drove my son to the local Automobile Association of America and instructed him to get a map. We found an apartment that afternoon.

3.

They should know to place a trivet beneath hot items to protect furniture. Really? I struggle to get my kids to use a coaster beneath wet water bottles.

4.

They should know that “U” isn’t an acceptable form of “you” in workplace and academic communications. My older son’s girlfriend, a smart and savvy young lady, learned this lesson the hard way. She and her family share a group text. Often, their texts end with an abbreviated term for Follow Up: FU. It’s OK; she laughs about it today.

5.

They should know how to apply and interview for a job. Last month, my younger son began interviewing for summer internships. Concur-

San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

rently, I realized I hadn’t instilled one of life’s most important lessons—prepping for a job interview. One of the many benefits of living in our small village by the sea is the sense of community and bonds of friendship. When my sons sought part-time summer jobs in high school, they relied on the kindness of friends, not lengthy employment practices. I never considered bypassing a job interview to be a roadblock to future success. At the time, fostering my sons’ future life skills took a back seat to tackling present-day teenage tribulations. While in college, my older son navigated the employment process and became adept at the art of the interview. When he set his sights on a post-college dream job, he survived several telephone interviews before the final Skype video interview. The night before the big interview, my son called. He seemed nervous but said he’d spoken with friends and planned to follow their advice to ace the online interview. He told me about a buddy who sat at the computer for his video interview dressed in a suit jacket, shirt and tie—and gym shorts and socks. I warned my son against following in his LIFE’S A BEACH friends’ footsteps. I sugBy Shelley Murphy gested that he act as if the interview were in a boardroom, not a bedroom, and advised him to dress from head to toe in suitable attire— and held my breath. After the interview, my son called; he sounded pleased and reported that the call went well. He said, near the end of the interview, his potential employer asked, “Can you do me a favor and walk to the other side of the room?” My son got the job. In hindsight, I know I neglected to teach my boys some of life’s lessons. Yet, I also know they taught me more than I ever imagined. Shelley Murphy has lived in San Clemente with her husband for the past 21 years, where she raised her two sons. She’s a freelance writer and has been a contributor to the San Clemente Times since 2006. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

Page 17


PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206564532 The following person(s) is doing business as: FLOWERS AND FRIENDS 1844 N. EL CAMINO REAL SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92672 Full Name of Registrant(s): GORDON KEITH JONES 111 E AVE SAN ANTONIO SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92672 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: 04/23/1991 /s/GORDON JONES This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On 01/10/2020 Publish: San Clemente Times January 16, 23, 30, February 6, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE

TO ADVERTISE: 949.388.7700, EXT. 100 • LEGALS@PICKETFENCEMEDIA.COM

diem wages to be paid in the construction of the above entitled work. The said wage rates are herein referred to and adopted in this Notice as though fully set forth herein, and said scale is made a part of this Notice by reference. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.1, no contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Furthermore, all bidders and contractors are hereby notified that no contractor or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.4, all bidders are hereby notified that this project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all bids must be on the Bid Form provided, and the outside of the envelope must read as follows: OFFICIAL BID - DO NOT OPEN

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS

Project Name:

Street Rehabilitation for: Ave. Presidio (S. El Camino Real to N. Ave. La Esperanza), Project No. 14331

Street Rehabilitation for Ave. Presidio

Bid No.:

14331

Bid Opening Date:

February 5, 2020 at 2:00 p.m.

Sealed bid or proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California, until 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 5, 2020, and will be publicly opened and read on said day and time at 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California.

No bid will be accepted from a contractor who has not been licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code, State of California. Bidder shall possess a Class “A” California State Contracting License in good standing.

The work to be done consists of furnishing all materials, equipment, tools, labor and incidentals as required by the specifications and contract documents for the Street Rehabilitation for Ave. Presidio (S. El Camino Real to N. Ave. La Esperanza), Project No. 14331 in the City of San Clemente, California.

The City of San Clemente reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Reference is hereby made to these Specifications for further particulars, and same are by such reference incorporated herein and made a part thereof, the same as though fully set forth hereunder. Project specifications and contract documents are posted in the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System Vendor Portal website at www.san-clemente. org/vendorbids. All bidders must first register as a vendor on the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System website to participate in a bid or to be added to the prospective bidders list. No bid will be received unless it is made on a proposal form furnished by the City Engineer. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified or cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond, made payable to the City of San Clemente for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the contract. The contract does call for monthly progress payments based on the engineer’s estimate of the percentage of work completed. The City will retain 5% of each progress payment as security for completion of the balance of the work. At the request and expense of the successful bidder, the City will pay amounts so retained upon compliance with the requirements of Government Code Section 14402 and the provisions of the contract documents pertaining to “substitution of securities.” NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations, in accordance with Section 1770 of the California State Labor Code and in accordance with the terms of the Southern California Master Labor Agreement, has heretofore established a prevailing rate of per San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

Dated: To be published: and:

January 10, 2020 January 16, 2020 January 23, 2020

____________________________ Tom Bonigut Public Works Director / City Engineer PUBLIC NOTICE

posal form furnished by the City Engineer. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified or cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond, made payable to the City of San Clemente for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the contract. The contract does call for monthly progress payments based on the engineer’s estimate of the percentage of work completed. The City will retain 5% of each progress payment as security for completion of the balance of the work. At the request and expense of the successful bidder, the City will pay amounts so retained upon compliance with the requirements of Government Code Section 14402 and the provisions of the contract documents pertaining to “substitution of securities.” NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations, in accordance with Section 1770 of the California State Labor Code and in accordance with the terms of the Southern California Master Labor Agreement, has heretofore established a prevailing rate of per diem wages to be paid in the construction of the above entitled work. The said wage rates are herein referred to and adopted in this Notice as though fully set forth herein, and said scale is made a part of this Notice by reference. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.1, no contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Furthermore, all bidders and contractors are hereby notified that no contractor or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Pursuant to Labor Code Section 1771.4, all bidders are hereby notified that this project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all bids must be on the Bid Form provided, and the outside of the envelope must read as follows:

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS

OFFICIAL BID - DO NOT OPEN

Street Improvement Projects – FY 2020, Project No. 10319 and Slurry Seal Program – FY 2020, Project No. 20307

Project Name:

Street Improvement Projects – FY 2020 and Slurry Seal Program – FY 2020

Bid Nos.:

10319 and 20307

Bid Opening Date:

February 6, 2020 at 11:00 a.m.

Sealed bid or proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California, until 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 6, 2020, and will be publicly opened and read on said day and time at 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California. The work to be done consists of furnishing all materials, equipment, tools, labor and incidentals as required by the specifications and contract documents for the Specifications for the Street Improvement Projects – FY 2020, Project No. 10319 and Slurry Seal Program – FY 2020, Project No. 20307 in the City of San Clemente, California. Reference is hereby made to these Specifications for further particulars, and same are by such reference incorporated herein and made a part thereof, the same as though fully set forth hereunder. Project specifications and contract documents are posted in the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System Vendor Portal website at www.san-clemente. org/vendorbids. All bidders must first register as a vendor on the City of San Clemente PlanetBids System website to participate in a bid or to be added to the prospective bidders list. No bid will be received unless it is made on a pro-

No bid will be accepted from a contractor who has not been licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code, State of California. Bidder shall possess a Class “A” California State Contracting License in good standing. vThe City of San Clemente reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Dated: To be published: and:

January 9, 2020 January 16, 2020 January 23, 2020

____________________________ Tom Bonigut Public Works Director / City Engineer PUBLIC NOTICE LIEN SALE 1/22/20 10 AM AT 4355 W. ARTESIA AVE, FULLERTON 56 OLDSM LIC# 4YYE058 VIN# 567K11500

Page 18

PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20206564141 The following person(s) is doing business as: CLJ, INC. 26271 VIA MADRIGAL SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 Full Name of Registrant(s): JAGICH INDUSTRIES 26271 VIA MADRIGAL SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: 05/06/2015 /s/JAGICH INDUSTRIES, CHRISTOPHER JAGICH, PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On 01/07/2020 Publish: San Clemente Times January 16, 23, 30, February 6, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20196563377 The following person(s) is doing business as: LUVAMERICA.ORG 6205 COLINA PACIFICA SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92673-7104 Full Name of Registrant(s): ROBERT STADICK 6205 COLINA PACIFICA SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92673-7104 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: N/A /s/ROBERT STADICK This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On 12/30/2019 Publish: San Clemente Times January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20196561638 The following person(s) is doing business as: CAMINO IMMIGRATION SERVICES 849 N BRADFORD AVE PLACENTIA, CA 92871-9287 Full Name of Registrant(s): SOLIDARITY 601 E VALENCIA AVE FULLERTON, CA 92832 BETHANY ANDERSON 849 N BRADFORD AVE PLACENTIA, CA 92871-9287 This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: 10/01/2015 /s/Bethany Anderson This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On 12/06/2019 Publish: San Clemente Times December 26, 2019 January 2, 9, 16, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20196562621 The following person(s) is doing business as: MDQSS 18 PENDANT IRVINE, CA 92620 Full Name of Registrant(s): ADAM METZGER sanclementetimes.com


PUBLIC NOTICES 18 PENDANT IRVINE, CA 92620 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: N/A /s/ADAM METZGER This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On DECEMBER 18, 2019 Publish: San Clemente Times JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 23, 2020 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20196562411 The following person(s) is doing business as:

TMS HIGH PERFORMANCE SALES 647 CAMINO DE LOS MARES SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92673 Full Name of Registrant(s): CARY SERKLEW 28082 LAS BRISAS DEL MAR SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 This business is conducted by a limited liability company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the Fictitious Business Name or Names listed above on: 12/12/2019 PERFORMANCE SALES & MARKETING /s/CARY SERKLEW, PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the Orange County Clerk-Recorder On 12/16/2019 Publish: San Clemente Times January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2020

SC Locals Only San Clemente

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

ADDICTION RECOVERY TREATMENT Body Mind Spirit Intensive Outpatient Program 665 Camino De Los Mares, Ste. 104, 949.485.4979, bodymindspiritiop.com

CHOCOLATE/CANDY Schmid’s Fine Chocolates 99 Avenida del Mar, 949.369.1052 schmidschocolate.com

DENTISTS Eric Johnson, D.D.S. 647 Camino de los Mares, Ste. 209, 949.493.9311, drericjohnson.com

Complete your required legal or public notice advertising in the San Clemente Times. • Fictitious Business Notice (FBN/DBA) • Name Changes • Lien Sale • Alcoholic Beverage License • Notice to Creditors

Shoreline Dental Studio/ Kristen Ritzau DDS, Dr. Colby Livingston 122 Avenida Cabrillo, 949.498.4110, shorelinedentalstudio.com

• Petitions for Probate • Trustee Sale • Summons – Divorce – Civil • Annual Report • Non-Responsibility • Dissolution of Partnership

DIGITAL MARKETING CONSULTING/SERVICES

EMAIL legals@picketfencemedia.com CALL 949.388.7700, ext. 100

Kelli Murrow Consulting www.kellimurrow.com 949.573.7725

ELECTRICAL Arcadia Electric 949.361.1045, arcadiaelectric.com Braker Electric 949-291-5812 Lic# 719056 Insured

JEWELRY BUCKLEY & CO. 415 E. Avenida Pico #D 949.218.1184, BuckleyJewelry.com

MUSIC LESSONS Danman’s Music School 949.496.6556, danmans.com

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Buy • Consign • Sell

949.395.5681 (24 hours) Available 7 days a week. We also offer professional appraisals, auction services, restoration and shipping.

CASH SAME DAY Dee Coleman, CEO/Owner 2485 S. El Camino Real San Clemente Web: classicautosalesoc.com Email: classicautosalesoc@gmail.com

100% positive EBAY Seller since 2001!

PERIODONTICS & DENTAL IMPLANTS Dr. Alice P. Moran, DMD 1001 Avenida Pico, Ste. K, 949.361.4867 (GUMS), moranperio.com

PLUMBING A to Z Leak Detection 1001 Calle Recodo, 949.481.7013, atozleakdetection.com Bill Metzger Plumbing 1001 Calle Recodo, 949.492.3558, billmetzerplumbing.com

PROSTHODONTICS Hamilton Le, D.M.D., F.A.C.P. 1001 Avenida Pico, Ste. K 949.361.4867 (GUMS) moranperio.com

REALTORS “Sandy & Rich” RE/MAX Coastal Homes

949.293.3236, www.sandyandrich.com

SHORECLIFFS BEACH CLUB MANAGER The San Clemente Shorecliffs Beach Club (“SBC”) is seeking a new manager for its beach club. Shorecliffs is a residential community in north San Clemente and the community has a private beach club located on the beach known as “Poche.” The SBC season begins each year on Memorial Day. The club is open daily from the last day of the CUSD school year through Labor Day. The club is also open on Friday and Saturday nights through October. The ideal candidate will have prior managerial, recreational and general maintenance experience with an energetic and self-starter attitude. The Beach Club Manager must be flexible and available for lastminute requests and willing to work unpredictable hours. The Beach Club Manager reports directly to the SBC Board of Directors and interacts with all members. The position is parttime during the off-season and full-time in the summer. Compensation for this position is a blend of a set monthly salary plus an hourly rate. Additionally, the Beach Club Manager is compensated for each private party. Salary and hourly rates to be determined based on experience. If interested, please submit a resume to Courtney Ekeberg, c/o AMMCOR 1211 Puerta Del Sol #120, San Clemente, CA 92672 or cekeberg@ammcor.com.

Scott Kidd, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services 949.498.0487, skidd@bhhscal.com

RESTAURANTS Café Calypso 114 Avenida Del Mar #4, 949.366.9386

SALONS Salon Bleu 207 S. El Camino Real, 949.366.2060, scsalonbleu.com

OBITUARY

Phillip Thompson

December 23, 1992- December 21, 2019

San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

Page 19

On December 21, 2019, Phillip Thompson passed away of cancer surrounded by loved ones. Phillip was one of the kindest, funniest people around. He left a mark on everyone who crossed his path. Phillip Michael Thompson was born on December 23, 1992 and raised in San Clemente. He graduated from San Clemente High School before moving to San Francisco where he attended San Francisco State University. In the summer of 2016, Phil was diagnosed with a rare type of sarcoma cancer. His fight was difficult but his last three years were also precious. He travelled, surfed, camped, hiked, snorkeled, mountain biked, skydived, fished as much as possible and bought cars off of craigslist. On November 16, 2018, Phil married Amelia Depue in Capistrano Beach overlooking the ocean at Palisades Gazebo Park. His passions were working on cars and fishing, and in Amelia he found his soul mate and life companion. Phil and Amelia bought an old RV, fixed it up and travelled around the United States. For those who wish to attend, there will be a paddle out for Phil on Saturday, January 18, 2020 at 1pm at the San Clemente Pier.


SC n te S a n C le m e

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

PLACE YOUR BUSINESS CARD HERE Call 949.388.7700, ext. 111 or email tkelly@picketfencemedia.com

San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

Page 20

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS SC San Clemente

STORIES, SCORES, SCHEDULES AND MORE

Italian Invigoration Passionate new coach Marco Spaccini leads SCHS girls soccer BY ZACH CAVANAGH, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

S

an Clemente girls soccer coach Marco Spaccini’s passion for the sport is instantly evident. The Italian national possesses that trademark fire and discusses intricate soccer tactics with ease. “I absolutely love it,” Spaccini said of coaching San Clemente. “As a coach, that’s (the passion is) my strength and my weakness. I bring my job home, and I think about it too much. But we’re all full on board with everything we’re doing.” It also shows why the players campaigned for the former assistant coach when the head position became available this past summer. Former Tritons coach and SCHS alumna Lauren Leslie stepped down in August after three seasons as head coach, which featured three second-place league finishes and three CIF-SS playoff appearances. Leslie had been selected for the first-ever US Soccer Women’s National Beach Soccer Team. Spaccini, who only joined the program as an assistant last season, was the popular choice among the players and was hired as head coach in October. “I will always be grateful to them,” Spaccini said of the players. “They really

Triton Report BY ZACH CAVANAGH, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

For in-game updates, news and more for all of the San Clemente High School sports programs, follow us on Twitter @SouthOCSports

San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

San Clemente girls soccer has found success and passion under first-year head coach Marco Spaccini. Photo: Zach Cavanagh

pushed hard; they were hoping for me to get the position. I love what they did for me, and I’m trying to give back to them and the entire program.” Spaccini grew up with soccer in his native Italy. Spaccini said he played professionally and semi-professionally before moving to Chicago in 2015, where he said he hadn’t known how big soccer had become in the United States. Spaccini had some experience coaching youth teams in Italy but got more into coaching in Chicago with a club team and an internship with the Loyola University men’s soccer team. Spaccini moved to

California in 2017 and took a full-time job as the head coach at the California Football Academy in San Clemente in 2017, where he still coaches, in addition to his position with the Tritons. San Clemente hasn’t missed a beat with Spaccini at the helm, as the Tritons had a very strong showing through the preseason. San Clemente already has more wins this season (11) than last season (8). “We have a group of girls that are just amazing,” Spaccini said. “The girls love each other. That’s really, really important. We have a fantastic locker room, and

Girls Basketball Upsets League Champion

Aliso Niguel had won its previous 15 South Coast League games and had won eight straight against the Tritons until this week. San Clemente (19-2, 4-0), ranked No. 1 in Division 2A, sits alone in first place after the first round of league play. San Clemente plays at Capistrano Valley on Thursday, Jan. 16 and then plays Los Osos in the Norco Extravaganza on Saturday, Jan. 18. The Tritons return to league play at Dana Hills on Jan. 23 and host Tesoro on Jan. 28. San Clemente closes the regular season at Aliso Niguel on Feb. 3.

The San Clemente girls basketball team has not won a league title since 2014-15 and had not beaten Aliso Niguel since that same season, the last before current head coach Keri Husbands began her tenure. The Tritons don’t have that league championship yet, but they took a major step forward by overcoming their Wolverines demon on Tuesday, Jan. 14. Ella Gardiner brought a monster 19-point, 26-rebound effort, and Jessie Blaine added her own double-double with 17 points and 14 rebounds as San Clemente held on for a 52-50 win over Aliso Niguel at San Clemente High School.

Roundup

Page 21

San Clemente boys soccer (15-1-2, 1-0-1)

they’re all very supportive.” The Tritons (11-3-3, 2-1-1) have flirted with the Division 1 top 10 rankings all season, and through the first round of league play, San Clemente has already shown that this year’s South Coast League is much more competitive at the top. The Tritons fought to a draw with perennial and reigning league champion Aliso Niguel in their opener, 1-1 on Jan. 7, but lost a tight contest to a physical San Juan Hills team, 3-2 on Jan. 9. San Clemente followed up with two strong wins over Tesoro, 5-2 on Jan. 11, and Dana Hills, 3-0 on Tuesday, Jan. 14. Style-wise, Spaccini has molded his team into an adaptable group that can play no matter what the matchup dictates, emphasizing the significant help of assistant coach Jennie Mann. “We work hard every day, we try to be tough to play against,” Spaccini said. “We don’t want to play the usual kickball, but we’re also not possession style-based. Every game is different. Adapting is the best word in soccer.” San Clemente has been led by seniors in the field with leading scorer Paige Biolos, midfielder Izzy Sanchez and defender Paige Winters. Biolos leads the way with nine goals. Senior Alexi Dragotto has five goals, and senior Alyce Raumin has four. Freshman Rylie McLeish held down the fort in net before junior Emily Schad returned from injury. Shad posted a shutout against Dana Hills in San Clemente’s most recent match. San Clemente kicks off the second half of league play at Aliso Niguel on Thursday, Jan. 23, and hosts San Juan Hills on Jan. 28. The Tritons host Dana Hills in their regular-season finale on Feb. 3. SC

remains the top team in CIF-SS Division 1 with another week at No. 1 in the latest rankings. The Tritons beat Capistrano Valley, 2-0, and played a scoreless draw at Mission Viejo to open league. San Clemente hosted San Juan Hills on Wednesday, Jan. 15, but results were not available at press time. Tritons next host Capistrano Valley on Jan. 24. San Clemente girls water polo (6-9) is ranked No. 18 in the Division 1 and 2 poll going into the South Coast League. The Tritons open the single round of league play at Aliso Niguel on Thursday, Jan. 16 and host El Toro on Jan. 21 and Tesoro on Jan. 23. San Clemente plays at Dana Hills on Jan. 30 before the league tournament. SC

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SC San Clemente

SC SURF

SC SURF IS PRESENTED BY:

SCOOP ON THE LOCAL SURF COMMUNITY

Just Keep Swimming

DIRTY DOZEN: • 1 lap, 1 pushup • 2 laps, 2 pushups • 3 laps, 3 pushups • 4 laps, 4 pushups

STANDARD:

With a flat spell coming, here’s my yearly reminder to hit the pool

• 300-yard (12 laps) warmup using long, stretched-out stroke. • 10 x 50 (2 laps) with 10 seconds rest between reps

BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

L

ast week, I ran into old friend Dino Andino at the Ole Hanson Swim Club. I know he likes to be kind of sneaky and dip in and out, but it was good to catch up and see him getting after it in the New Year. Last season, his son, Kolohe, finished No. 5 in the world. He qualified for the U.S. Olympic team and will presumably be surfing in the Olympic Games this July and August. In an already stellar career, this was a personal best. Pops has a lot of which to be proud. In the spirit of the New Year and resolutions and such, Kolohe says that Pilates, a specific diet and a lot of surfing are the cornerstones of his fitness routine. Dino likes the pool. I can personally attest to the power of Pilates—or at least I better be able to, considering that my wife owns a Pilates and yoga studio in San Juan Capistrano. At present, I’m 43 years old, and I honestly believe regular Pilates sessions have saved my surf life. But if you’ve been reading this column for a while, you may know that I’m first and foremost a swimmer. I try to make it down to Ole Hanson every day at lunch for a swim. As I told Dino last week, “It’s the fountain of youth.” And as I was pondering what to write this

• 5 laps, 5 pushups • Continue progression up to 12 laps w/ 12 pushups

• 10 x 100 (4 laps) with 15 seconds rest between reps • 200-yard (eight laps) cooldown

THE LADDER:

Swimming is a great way to stay surf fit so that when the swell hits you’re ready to go. Photo: Jake Howard

week, I thought about doing a long-range surf outlook. Unless you’ve got wheels and time to get somewhere with a little more swell exposure, expect to sustain your surf appetite on a steady diet of waist-high waves. Looking at Surfline’s two-week outlook, it’s going to be slow goings for a while. So, what do you do if your New Year’s resolution was to surf more? Here’s the drum I’ll keep beating: now, more than ever, is the perfect time to get in the pool (or take a Pilates class). There’s sure to be some swell later in the season, and keeping the rig tuned is imperative. To take all of this full circle, a lot of times I talk to folks, and they don’t know where to get started with a swim workout. Easy. Some years ago, Kolohe was injured, and

Dino asked me to put a few swim workouts together for him so he could stay active in the water. Happily, I obliged. I recently found those workouts, so, in honor of seeing Dino at the pool, New Year’s resolutions, flat spells and getting ready for the next swell, what follows are the workouts I gave to Kolohe. It’s a great starting point even if you don’t swim regularly. None of the workouts should take more than an hour. The key to it all is consistency. Making a regular appearance at the pool is paramount, but hopefully it’s a nice break in your day. It’s a chance to put your head underwater, get away from phones and emails for a while, and refresh the mind and body. Hope to see you at the pool—and the beach—this year. SC

• 300-yard (12 laps) warmup • 2 x 50 yards (2 laps) • 1 x 100 yards (4 laps) • 2 x 75 yards (3 laps) • 1 x 150 yards (6 laps) • 2 x 100 yards (4 laps)

• 1 x 200 yards (8 laps) • 2 x 125 yards (5 laps) • 1 x 250 yards (10 laps) • 2 x 150 yards (6 laps) • 1 x 300 yards (12 laps) • 100-yard easy cooldown

ENDURANCE WORKOUT: • 300-yard warmup • 1 x 500 yards • 1 x 400 yards • 1 x 300 yards • 1 x 200 yards

• 1 x 100 yard • (wear hand paddles and pull buoy) • 10 x 50: Underwater down, easy back.

SPRINT WORKOUT: • 300-yard warmup • 10 x 50: first 25 allout pace, then 25 easy, back to the wall. • 6 x 100: 75 hard pace, 25 easy. • 16 x 25: All-out sprints

on 45-second pace. • 5 min. vertical kick: Alternate 30 seconds hands in the water, 30 seconds hands out of the water. • 200 easy cooldown

SURF FORECAST

GROM OF THE WEEK:

KAI FINN

BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

M

y favorite thing about surfing is definitely being out in the water with my friends and always encouraging them,” says 11-year-old San Clemente ripper Kai Finn. And he’s right, teamwork makes the dream work. A good time in the water’s not just about the waves you catch, but the company you keep and the stoke you share. “I love seeing my friends and other people get a sick wave and come back out super stoked,” Kai says. “This is my favorite thing about surfing, because it’s super cool to see other people super stoked out

San Clemente Times January 16-22, 2020

on surfing!” Kai’s been surfing since he was 3 years old. His pops taught him how at San Onofre. These days, he goes to Shorecliffs Middle School, and when he’s not hammering the homework, you’ll probably find him out in the lineup with his crew at Lowers, T-Street or Cottons. “I think that in the next 10 years surfing will take me to many great experiences in all kinds of waves all around the world,” Kai says about what the future may hold for him. “I think I will continue to stay positive, stoked and keep encouraging other kids, and hopefully that will take me far in my surfing career!” The power of positivity will take you wherever you want, Kai. Go get it! SC

Water Temperature: 59-61 degrees F Water Visibility and Conditions: 8-12’ Thursday: Blend of Northwest and South/southeast swells rolls in with waist-stomach-chest high waves (2-3-4’). Light South winds early will rise to moderate south flow for the afternoon. Outlook: More Northwest swell fills in Friday as the South/southeast swell eases, putting well exposed spots in waist-chest-head high zone surf, (3-4-5’). Light West winds for most of the day on Friday. The mix of swells fades through the weekend, with waves dropping to knee to waist high by Sunday. Favorable conditions for the weekend, with light/ variable winds in the mornings, followed by a light+ sea-breeze for the afternoons. For the latest details be sure to visit Surfline.com. Kai Finn. Photo: Courtesy of the Finn family

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January 16, 2020  

San Clemente Times

January 16, 2020  

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