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APPROACH 11 – 12

Campus Box 1079 One Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130

314.935.6227 phone 800.295.6227 continental US 314.935.7656 fax wuarch@wustl.edu samfoxschool.wustl.edu

GR ADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN | WASHINGTON UNIVERSIT Y IN ST. LOUIS

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design Washington University in St.Louis

A Approach 11–12

G R ADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN WASHINGTON UNIVERSIT Y IN ST. LOUIS


Contents Dean’s Introduction 2 Director’s Notes 4 An Inspirational School: Symposium 6

An Intellectual School: Public Lecture Series 18 Master of Architecture 22 core studios 24 advanced studios 68 international studios 130 degree project 148 Master of Landscape Architecture 198 MLA core studios 200 MLA advanced studios 208 Master of Urban Design 228 mud CORE studios 230 mud DEGREE PROJECT 244 About Sam Fox School 256

gr a duate school of a rchitecture & urba n design

An International School: Visiting Faculty 12

APPROACH 11-12

An Intimate School: Faculty List 8


Contents Dean’s Introduction 2 Director’s Notes 4 An Inspirational School: Symposium 6

An Intellectual School: Public Lecture Series 18 Master of Architecture 22 CORE STUDIOS 24 ADVANCED STUDIOS 68 INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS 130 DEGREE PROJECT 148 Master of Landscape Architecture 198 MLA CORE STUDIOS 200 MLA ADVANCED STUDIOS 208 Master of Urban Design 228 MUD CORE STUDIOS 230 MUD DEGREE PROJECT 244 About Sam Fox School 256

GR A DUATE SCHOOL OF A RCHITECTURE & URBA N DESIGN

An International School: Visiting Faculty 12

APPROACH 11-12

An Intimate School: Faculty List 8


Dean’s Introduction THE KIND OF PROBLEM A SCHOOL IS

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In Jane Jacob’s seminal book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, the final chapter is titled “The Kind of Problem a City Is.” In it, she describes cities as a problem of organized complexity, that present situations in which, “dozens of quantities are all varying simultaneously in connected ways.” Jacob states there is “no use wishing it were a simpler problem… the interrelationships of their many factors are complex, there is nothing accidental, or irrational, about the ways in which these factors affect each other.” Like a city, I would argue a school is a problem of organized complexity. There is no wishing it were a simpler problem. Complexity, from the Latin complexus, means entwined or twisted together. What distinguishes a situation of organized complexity from one that is unorganized might be described as intent (which, by the way, is one of my favorite definitions of design). Complexity also necessitates the need for more than one part; it is difficult to imagine a complexity of one. For us, these parts are represented by architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design. At a higher level, it would also include the College of Architecture, the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design, and the Sam Fox School. Nesting and scalar relationships are common traits of complex situations, so this extrapolation could extend to the University and beyond. As we look back at where we have come from and forward to where we want to be, we see that the first 50 years of Architecture’s history is that of an undergraduate program. In the early 1960s, with the addition of the urban design program and the


invention of the 4 + 2 graduate program, the school changed and became more complex. With the more recent addition of the landscape architecture program and our role within the Sam Fox School (along with Art and the Museum), we are now faced with the task of building an environment of organized complexity. The complexity draws life and vitality from our differences, mutually reinforcing interrelationships between our students and faculty and between our programs and our place. In other words, the strength of each of our programs is dependent upon the strength of the others. This has important implications – it means that disciplines are distinct and need depth. For example, there is a difference between architecture and landscape architecture, making them important to each other. The vitality of discovery and energy which undergraduate students bring to their studies is important to the experience and focus of the graduate students. The cross section of integration and environmental design represented by the school becomes a model for the future. Design is the interdisciplinary intelligence that we share, and practice is the method of our engagement. So, while “The Kind of Problem a School Is� remains for us, I congratulate the faculty and students for working on that problem every day. This publication recognizes and celebrates that effort and that accomplishment. BRUCE LINDSEY Dean, College of Architecture, Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design E. Desmond Lee Professor for Community Collaboration

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Director’s Notes AT ITS BEST, THE STUDY OF ARCHITECTURE expands our horizons. We continuously refine our understanding of both our personal experiences and our worldview. 4

The 2011-2012 school year was indeed an expansive one for the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design at Washington University in St. Louis. We united to produce a beautiful exhibition for our accreditation review. Work of this caliber required an extraordinary amount of inspiration in our studios, a constant diligence in strengthening our core curriculum, a continual review of our required courses, and outstanding seminar teaching. Our faculty and students met these challenges with exhilarating passion! Following this review, nine internationally recognized architects presented their work for a symposium entitled DIGITAL DESIRES: Technology at the Intersection of Nature, Culture, and Meaning. The event situated constantly evolving digital technologies around the core foundations of architecture. While embracing elements of the digital agenda that is increasingly an exciting focus of architectural education, the symposium also offered a critique of the lack of focus in much of the experimentation. The same principles have guided our school’s trajectory under my directorship. We live in a world where both our environment and our cultures are at substantial risk, and it is our responsibility to expand our thinking to be able to protect these precious resources. We have been so fortunate to have inspiring practitioners and dedicated faculty members who have shared their very best energies toward achieving this goal.


These past four years have also been a delightful opportunity for me to expand my own horizons. Recently, a young woman asked me. “How is it possible to have done everything that you have accomplished?” I replied, “I have never dwelled on the obstacles that stood between me and what I wanted to do. Instead, I remain clearly focused on my goals in order to address challenges in the most thoughtful ways. Building an ever stronger graduate program here at the University has been the focus of what I wanted to accomplish as Director of the Graduate Program. I am deeply grateful to each and every one of our faculty members who have given so much of their time, energy, and creativity to make so many changes to advance our curriculum and shape our programs at such a rapid rate. I thank Deans Carmon Colangelo and Bruce Lindsey for providing the resources to develop a fabrication facility in my first year at the school. I warmly thank all the visitors who have contributed their time and expertise to support such incredible growth! Finally, I am extremely proud of the accomplishments of our students—they are both intelligent and talented. Perhaps even more remarkable than their academic success is the incredible generosity they have with each other—a hallmark of our education here in St. Louis. I am happy to report that many of our recent graduates are now working in the most important offices in the world. Thank you to all of you for your generosity and for giving me the opportunity to lead you—I hope your horizons have been expanded as well! K ATHRYN DEAN Director, Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

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An Inspirational School MARCH 30-31, 2012

DIGITAL DESIRES: Technology at the Intersection of Nature, Culture, and Meaning investigated the potential for increasing digitization in the profession. It also engaged those aspects of the human condition that are often excluded from digital practices: the roles of nature, culture, and meaning. Divided into two sessions—Ecological Energies and Cultural Complexities—the symposium addressed both the rational and irrational sides of humanity, with the hope of facilitating more in-depth exploration of these subtopics. Gregg Pasquarelli, AIA, Keynote Lecture

Robert Stuart-Smith

Founding partner, SHoP Architects, New York Graduate Architecture Open House Lecture

Design director and co-founder, Kokkugia, London and Melbourne; visiting professor of architecture, Washington University

Thomas Auer Partner and managing director, Transsolar GmbH, Stuttgart, Munich, and New York

Benedetta Tagliabue

Frank Barkow

Nader Tehrani

Co-founder, Barkow Leibinger Architects, Berlin

Principal and founder, NADAAA , Boston; professor and head of Department of Architecture, MIT School of Architecture + Planning

Lisa Iwamoto Partner, IwamotoScott Architecture, San Francisco Associate professor of architecture, University of California, Berkeley

David Ruy Co-director, Ruy Klein, New York; visiting professor of architecture, Washington University; associate professor, School of Architecture, Pratt Institute

Co-founder, Miralles/Tagliabue-EMBT, Barcelona

J. Meejin Yoon MY Studio / Höweler + Yoon Architecture, Boston; associate professor, Department of Architecture, MIT School of Architecture + Planning

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An Intimate School

FACULT Y 2011 – 2012

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Kathryn Dean JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Paul J. Donnelly Rebecca and John Voyles Professor Iain Fraser Professor DorothĂŠe Imbert Professor Christof Jantzen I-CARES Professor of Practice Stephen Leet Professor Bruce Lindsey Dean, E. Desmond Lee Professor for Community Collaboration Adrian Luchini Raymond E. Maritz Professor Robert McCarter Ruth and Norman Moore Professor Eric Mumford Professor Gia Daskalakis Associate Professor Bob Hansman Associate Professor John Hoal Associate Professor Sung Ho Kim Associate Professor Zeuler Lima Associate Professor Peter MacKeith Associate Professor, Associate Dean of Sam Fox School Igor Marjanovic Associate Professor Heather Woofter Associate Professor


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Patty Heyda Assistant Professor Derek Hoeferlin Assistant Professor Seng Kuan Assistant Professor Natalie Yates Assistant Professor Christine Yogiaman Assistant Professor Elena Cรกnovas Visiting Professor Brad Cloepfil Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

Andrew Colopy Visiting Assistant Professor Sarah Cowles Visiting Assistant Professor Andrew Cruse Visiting Assistant Professor Kristi Dykema Visiting Professor Craig Dykers Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

Forrest Fulton Visiting Assistant Professor Eric Hoffman Visiting Assistant Professor Joe MacDonald Visiting Professor David Ruy Visiting Professor Justin Scherma Visiting Assistant Professor Oliver Schulze Visiting Professor Robert Stuart-Smith Visiting Professor Kenneth Tracy Visiting Assistant Professor Janet Baum Senior Lecturer Hunter Beckham Lecturer Robert Booth Lecturer Charles Brown Lecturer Andrew Faulkner Lecturer Ben Fehrmann Lecturer Jim Fetterman Lecturer Catalina Freixas Senior Lecturer Carolyn Gaidis Lecturer John Guenther Lecturer Esley Hamilton Lecturer

Lisa Harper Chang Lecturer Philip Holden Senior Lecturer Matt Horvath Lecturer Brok Howard Lecturer Courtney Howard Lecturer Gregg Hutchings Lecturer Dennis Hyland Lecturer Rich Janis Senior Lecturer George Johannes Senior Lecturer Rick Kacenski Lecturer Carl Karlen Lecturer Elisa Kim Lecturer Don Koster Senior Lecturer Andreas Kultermann Lecturer Kevin Le Lecturer Gay Lorberbaum Senior Lecturer Nick McFadden Lecturer Albie Mitchell Lecturer Tim Montgomery Lecturer Pablo Moyano Senior Lecturer John Mueller Lecturer Stephen Mueller Lecturer Jonathan Murphy Lecturer Mike Naucas Lecturer Kimberly Newcomer Lecturer Brian Newman Lecturer Stephen Perdue Lecturer Andrew Raimist Lecturer Michael Repovich Senior Lecturer Jodi Rios Senior Lecturer Hannah Roth Lecturer Peter Salsich Lecturer James Scott Lecturer Phillip Shinn Senior Lecturer Akshita Sivakumar Lecturer


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Nathaniel Smith Lecturer Jonathan Stitelman Lecturer Lindsey Stouffer Senior Lecturer Lavender Tessmer Lecturer Kelly Van Dyck Lecturer Andrew Weil Lecturer Bill Wischmeyer Senior Lecturer Stephen Mueller Lecturer Eric Zencey Lecturer Catty Dan Zhang Lecturer Tomislav Zigo Lecturer Alejandro Achaval Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires)

Clara Albertengo Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires)

Manuel Bailo Lecturer Abroad (Barcelona) Jeffery Berk Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires) Mark Brosa Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Bing Bu Lecturer Abroad (Hong Kong/Shanghai) Sang Un Choi Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Gerardo Caballero Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires)

Gustavo Cardón Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires) Kimmo Friman Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Sirkka-Liisa Jetsonen Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki)

Choi Won Joon Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Susanna Kallio Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Pentti Kareoja Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Hille Kaukonen Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Jun Sung Kim Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Daniel Kozak Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires)

Erik G. L’Heureux Bing Bu Lecturer Abroad (Hong Kong/Shanghai)

Sang Jun Lee Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Fabián Llonch Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires) Daniel Oh Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Hyungmin Pai Lecturer Abroad (Seoul) Juhani Pallasmaa Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Matti Rautiola Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Tsuto Sakamoto Lecturer Abroad (Hong Kong/Shanghai)

Antonio Sanmartín Lecturer Abroad (Barcelona)

Julie Scheu Lecturer Abroad (Helsinki) Fernando Williams Lecturer Abroad (Buenos Aires)

Chunxia Yang Lecturer Abroad (Hong Kong/Shanghai)

Yu Zhuang Lecturer Abroad (Hong Kong/Shanghai)


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An International School VISITING FACULT Y 2011 – 2012

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Elena Cánovas

Elena Cánovas is principal of aSZ arquitectes, which she co-founded with Antonio Sanmartín in Barcelona in 1996 after several years of joint professional and academic experiences. Projects by the firm have included the Badalona Central Library, the Santiago de Compostela Towers at the Cidade da Cultura, the Vidrá Public Housing, the Rianxo Auditorium, the Gavá seafront units, the Capuchinas Building for Huesca University, and the Tramway system for Barcelona. Cánovas has been an associate professor in design projects at Escola Técnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (ETSAB) since 1993, and has served as coordinator of the first-year design studio since 2009. She also has been a lecturer abroad for the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design’s international summer studio in Barcelona since 2007.

Elena Cánovas

Visiting Professor


Sarah Cowles

Andrew Colopy

Brad Cloepfil 14

Brad Cloepfil

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Brad Cloepfil, AIA, NCARB, founded Allied Works Architecture in his native Portland in 1994, followed by the New York office in 2003. His body of work is as informed by the land and the history of place as it is by formal training. His approach to design combines a research-intensive focus on the specific character of each project with an understanding of the profoundly affecting possibilities of building. The firm’s projects include the Wieden + Kennedy Agency World Headquarters in Portland, the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, the University of Michigan Museum of Art in Ann Arbor, the Dutchess County Residence Guest House in New York, and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. OCCUPATION, a monograph featuring nearly every project the firm has worked on since its founding, was released in 2011.

Andrew Colopy

Visiting Assistant Professor Andrew Colopy, LEED AP, directs COBALT OFFICE, a New York-based research and design practice collaborating on an interactive media plaza in St. Louis’ Grand Center neighborhood. He is a project editor for PRAXIS: a journal of writing + building and a research fellow at Van Alen Institute,

where he co-created Life at the Speed of Rail, a national project to generate public dialogue across the disciplines of design, transportation, and public policy. As a senior designer with Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Colopy played a leading role in the redevelopment of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York and the Museum of Image and Sound in Rio de Janeiro. His work has been published and exhibited internationally, including as part of Home Delivery: Fabricating the Modern Dwelling at the Museum of Modern Art. He previously taught at the School of Constructed Environments at Parsons The New School for Design.

Sarah Cowles

Visiting Assistant Professor Sarah Cowles is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University, and a founding partner of Maybe One More, an architecture and landscape planning studio. She is partnering with the Foundation For The Revival And Development Of Cultural Heritage Of Shida Kartli to develop a master plan for a regional arts and culture center in Akhalkalaki, Republic of Georgia. Cowles’ studio, workshop, and seminar topics include environmental justice, cultural site planning, disturbance ecology, and mapping and information design. She has extensive experience


Craig Dykers

Kristi Dykema

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in the long-term cleanup and redevelopment of former military bases in California, including Treasure Island and Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. With Tom Leader Studio, she was the project designer for the landscape of the U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou, China.

Kristi Dykema

Visiting Professor Kristi Dykema is the Suzanne Turner Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture at Louisiana State University, where she also is director of the College of Art and Design Rome Program. She has received two Great Places Awards from EDRA/ Places journal/Metropolis magazine, one in 2008 for her work on a forthcoming book, The Landscape Totems: Speculations on Growth and Decay, and the other in 2011 for Measured Change: Tracking Tranformations on Bayou Lafourche, conducted by the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio. The latter project was awarded a 2012 Art Works Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts that will fund design-build studios and transdisciplinary seminars on the intersection of the built environment and coastal ecologies. Recently, Dykema’s research has explored the role played by Mississippi River control structures on the culture, memory, and settlement patterns of the Louisiana Delta.

Craig Dykers

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Craig Dykers, NAL, AIA, co-founded Snøhetta as an integrated architecture, landscape, and interior design company, first in Oslo, Norway, in 1989, and subsequently in New York in 2004. He has worked on the design of several prominent cultural projects, including the Alexandria Library in Egypt, the Norwegian National Opera and Ballet in Oslo, and the National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at the World Trade Center site. Other projects include the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art expansion, the redesign of Times Square, and the newly completed Wolfe Center for the Arts at Bowling Green State University. His work has received numerous awards, including various categories of the World Architecture Awards and, recently, the Mies van der Rohe Prize. Dykers has taught at City College of New York, Syracuse University, and Cornell University, as well as at the Architectural College in Oslo.


David Ruy

Stephen Mueller

Joe MacDonald 16

Joe MacDonald

Visiting Professor Joe MacDonald is founding principal of URBAN A&O, one of a handful of architecture and design firms that operates within the sophisticated computer design environment of parametric modeling. MacDonald has served as an associate professor of architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design for the past ten years, and regularly incorporates his academic research into practice at the scales of building, landscape, and urban design. His built work investigates the possibilities of emerging design and manufacturing technologies as well as their implications on new building materials and assemblies in the city, and how they may impact and influence our collective cultural and social lives. He received Architectural Record’s Design Vanguard award in 2008, and his work has been exhibited and published widely.

Stephen Mueller Lecturer

Stephen Mueller is an archi­tectural designer and founding partner of AGENCY, an award-winning collaborative design and research practice in New York. Mueller and his partner, Ersela Kripa, received the 2010-2011 Rome Prize in Architecture from the American Academy in Rome, and a MacDowell Colony Fellowship in 2009. Most recently, AGENCY’s work has been exhibited at the 12th International

Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale, Sofia Architecture Week, Eme3 International Architectural Market in Barcelona, and SUPERFRONT LA. The practice was featured in Architect magazine’s “Emerging Talent” issue in July 2011, and its specula­tive proposal for a new brand of coastal urban infrastructure was selected as a winner of the One Prize, an international design competition.

David Ruy

Visiting Professor David Ruy is an architect, theorist, and co-director of Ruy Klein. The New York-based design office examines contemporary problems at the intersection of architecture, nature, and technology. Encompassing a wide array of experimentation, projects study the mutual imbrications of artificial and natural regimes that are shaping an ever more synthetic world. Widely published and exhibited, Ruy Klein was selected as one of the Architectural League of New York’s Emerging Voices in 2011 and has received numerous other awards in recognition of its work as a leading experimental practice. Ruy is an associate professor in the School of Architecture at Pratt Institute, where he is also the director of The Network for Emerging Architectural Research (NEAR). He is studying the history of the architectural object and its relationship to theories of milieus and networks.


Robert Stuart-Smith

Oliver Schulze

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Oliver Schulze

Visiting Professor Architect Oliver Schulze is the director of the Gehl Studio in Copenhagen. The urban research and design consultancy focuses on the relationship between the built environment and people’s quality of life. Project experience spans a diverse portfolio of international commissions, ranging from strategic urban planning initiatives at the scale of cities and regions, to the completed delivery of award-winning public spaces. Recent projects include the refurbishment of streets in San Francisco and Los Angeles; the design of pilot projects for public spaces in Oman; and the award-winning design of New Road in Brighton, one of the few sharedsurface, multi-modal, non-residential streets in the United Kingdom. Schulze served as a member of the Dutch jury for Europan 10 and was a founding member of the German Sustainable Building Council.

Robert Stuart-Smith Visiting Professor

Robert Stuart-Smith is a design director and co-founder of Kokkugia, an architectural and urban design practice based in London and Melbourne, with current projects in the United States, United Kingdom, and Mexico. In his professional and academic research, Stuart-Smith investigates algorithmic design methodologies with a focus

on nonlinear processes of self-organization. He also leads Kokkugia’s consultation to Cecil Balmond on algorithmic design research. Before co-founding Kokkugia, Stuart-Smith gained extensive experience in cultural, commercial, and infrastructural projects while working in the offices of Lab Architecture Studio and Sir Nicholas Grimshaw & Partners. High-profile projects include Southern Cross Station in Melbourne and Museo del Acero in Monterrey, Mexico, both completed with Grimshaw. Stuart-Smith is a studio course master in the Design Research Laboratory master’s program at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London.


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An Intellectual School PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES 2011 – 2012

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Richard Meyer 9.7.11

Stephen Kieran, FAIA 10.3.11

Associate professor of art history and fine arts, University of Southern California Multiple Feminisms Lecture

Partner, KieranTimberlake, Philadelphia AIA St. Louis Scholarship Trust Lecture

Thomas Demand 9.14.11 Getty Scholar, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles Artist featured in Precarious Worlds: Contemporary Art from Germany, Kemper Art Museum

Saskia Sassen 9.19.11 Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and co-chair of The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University Neil Denari 9.26.11 Principal, Neil M. Denari Architects, Inc., Los Angeles Abend Family Lecture

Tomás Saraceno 10.5.11 Artist featured in Tomás Saraceno: Cloud-Specific, Kemper Art Museum Brad Cloepfil, AIA, NCARB 10.10.11 Founding principal, Allied Works Architecture, Portland and New York Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Lecture

Allison Williams, FAIA, LEED AP, NCARB 10.17.11 Design principal and director of design, San Francisco office of Perkins+Will Supported by funds from Washington University Provost’s Office Diversity & Inclusion Grant


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Theaster Gates, Jr. 10.19.11 Artist and urban planner Director of arts programming, Department of Visual Arts, University of Chicago In collaboration with The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

Jean-Louis Cohen 10.26.11 Sheldon H. Solow Chair for the History of Architecture, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University Radcliffe Bailey 11.2.11 Artist, Atlanta Arthur L. and Sheila Prensky Island Press Visiting Artist Lecture Patrick Dougherty 11.9.11 Artist, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Louis D. Beaumont Artist in Residence Lecture

Gregg Pasquarelli, AIA 11.21.11 Principal, SHoP Architects, New York Coral Courts Lecture

Kyna Leski 1.20.12 Principal, 3SIXØ Architecture, Providence Professor and head of architecture, Rhode Island School of Design Laskey Sophomore Design Challenge Lecture

Balázs Kicsiny 1.30.12 Artist, Budapest, Hungary Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Visiting Artist Lecture Craig Dykers 2.1.12 Co-founder, Snøhetta, Oslo and New York Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Lecture Monica Ponce de Leon 2.13.12 Design director, MPdL Studio Dean and Eliel Saarinen Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan Cannon Design Lecture for Excellence in Architecture and Engineering

Brigitte Shim 2.15.12 Principal, Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, Toronto Associate professor, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto Coral Courts Lecture

Jessica Hische 2.20.12 Illustrator, Brooklyn, New York Mabel Wilson 2.27.12 Director, Studio6Ten Associate professor, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University Supported by funds from Washington University Provost’s Office Diversity & Inclusion Grant


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Wang Shu 2.29.12

Trenton Doyle Hancock 4.16.12

Chief architect, Amateur Architecture Studio Professor and dean, School of Architecture, China Academy of Art Fumihiko Maki Lecture

Artist, Houston Arthur L. and Sheila Prensky Island Press Visiting Artist Lecture

Susan Laxton 3.5.12 Assistant professor of art history, University of California, Riverside

Robert Bruegmann 3.7.12 University Distinguished Professor of Art History, Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Illinois at Chicago AIA St. Louis Scholarship Trust Lecture Claudia Bernardi 3.21.12 Professor of community arts, diversity studies and visual and critical studies, California College of the Arts, San Francisco and Oakland Co-sponsored by George Warren Brown School of Social Work

Adam Budak 3.26.12 Curator for contemporary art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC Chelsea Knight 4.4.12 Artist, New York Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Teaching Fellow Lecture

Barbara Kasten 4.11.12 Professor of photography, Columbia College, Chicago

Julia Bryan-Wilson 4.23.12 Associate professor, modern and contemporary art, University of California—Berkeley Multiple Feminisms Lecture


M Master of Architecture

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The Master of Architecture (MArch) program focuses on the critical role of architects in society and culture and on the synthetic activity of design. Fundamental to the graduate curriculum, therefore, is the architectural design studio sequence. Following the threesemester core studio sequence, students select from a range of advanced studio options organized around projects and topics offered by different design instructors. These studios emphasize the development of strong conceptual abilities, thoughtful integration of technical information, and convincing representations of architectural ideas in two- and three-dimensional form, and through a variety of media. The ultimate goal is for each student to develop clear design principles, strong technical resources, and an independent, critical position on the making of architecture in the world. The independent character of a student’s abilities is demonstrated and tested in the final semester through the Degree Project.


Lima

Bryan Bogaards

Courses in architectural history and theory, building technology and structural principles, urban design, professional practice, landscape design and sustainability, and representational and digital media studies inform and enrich the studio experience. Great emphasis is placed on a student’s ability to integrate and synthesize the information in these courses into appropriate architectural form in the design studio.

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C Core Studios

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FALL 2011 – SPRING 2012

Core studios introduce students to experimentation and expression in a three-semester sequence that provides a foundation in design research. Students are exposed to a broad range of issues in preparation for the advanced studios, with the goal of developing methods that continuously pose questions that might expand practices of contemporary architecture. Core I studio uses a strategic three-project sequence to ground students in the articulation of material systems and the organization of architectural formations. The first project uses geometry and complex order in the iterative making of a complex system. In the second project, site and human scale are additional parameters for a horizontal dynamic terrain in an urban landscape. In the final project, program that requires interior space develops a fully threedimensional proposition for a vertical urban site. In Core II studio, students engage a full-semester project through inclusive and cyclical processes of investigation. They begin by looking at the geometry and climatic response of natural systems


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Raymond Chau

to build formal and operative logics. Three landscapes with widely varied topographies, climates, and material conditions are studied, both analytically through their microclimates and expressively in response to their horizons. Students reengage the cultural conditions that are the basis of strong urban construction for Core III studio. Through the design of a housing project, students are asked to pose questions of identity for both the individual and the collective in the urban context. Students learn to uncover cultural knowledge through analytical investigations of the architectural precedent; in the process, they discover that strong architectural ideas are often a set of choices about what is valued, what is privileged, and what is ignored.


C

Catalina Freixas Kenneth Tracy Andrew Colopy Christine Yogiaman

Senior Lecturer

Visiting Assistant Professor

Visiting Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor

Material Organization

Complexity has always been a part of our environment, inducing many scientific fields to deal with complex systems and phenomena. Indeed, some would say that only what is somehow complex—what displays variation without being random—is worthy of interest. The use of the term complex is often confused with the term complicated. Complex is the opposite of independent, while complicated is the opposite of simple. The scientific method uses the experiment, a set of actions concerning phenomena, to understand complexity. The experiment is a cornerstone in the empirical approach to acquiring deeper knowledge about the physical world. In the field of psychology, heuristics are simple, efficient rules, hardcoded by evolutionary processes or learned, that have been proposed to explain how people make decisions, come to judgments, and solve problems, typically when facing complex issues or incomplete information. This design studio, the first of the three-semester sequence of core studios, is rooted in representational techniques, concepts, and metaphors founded on the articulation of material systems and organizations of architectural formations. Scientific methodologies and inquiries are developed to appreciate the heuristics of research in architectural discipline. The studio concentrates on the individual development of the design process through production of complex architectural projects. As students develop their skills—including, but not limited to, understandings of scale, material tectonics, and the role of landscape and natural phenomena in the design process—they are asked to commit to the discipline of architecture.

Xinrui Zhong

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CORE STUDIO I FALL 2011


William Bloomer

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Yuye Peng

CORE I F11

Michelle Hauk

Emily Rosa

Freixas 27


Student Emily Rosa

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Michelle Hauk

Emily Rosa

Freixas


William Bloomer

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Yuye Peng

CORE I F11

Yuye Peng

Freixas 29


Tiffin Thompson

Ashlie Rathgeber

Xinrui Zhong

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Xinrui Zhong

C Tracy


Ashlie Rathgeber

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

CORE I F11

Tiffin Thompson

Ashlie Rathgeber

Tracy 31

Tiffin Thompson


Tiffin Thompson

Xinrui Zhong

Tracy

32 Kirsten Goedeker

C


Emily Chen

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Brian Cho

CORE I F11

Yu Xin

Hao Wu

C Colopy 33


Hao Wu

Hao Wu

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Yu Xin

Colopy


Emily Chen

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Qianqian Huang

CORE I F11

Yu Xin

Colopy 35


Bryan Bogaards

Bryan Bogaards

Nash Waters

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Bin Feng

C Yogiaman


M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Jessica Olson

Bin Feng

CORE I F11

Nash Waters

Yogiaman 37


Megan Berry

38 Nash Waters

Yogiaman

C


C

Catalina Freixas Pablo Moyano Stephen Mueller Christine Yogiaman

Senior Lecturer, Co-Coordinator

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer

Assistant Professor

Systemic Sections

CORE STUDIO II SPRING 2012

In the second semester of the three-semester core studio sequence, environmental complexity is expanded to address larger natural systems. The interplay among geometry, climate, and site conditions is studied through an initial investigation of pattern formation in nature. Constructed drawings that extract the essence of these patterns are developed into sectional strategies. This pattern strategy is linked to site conditions found in one of three sites, each of which has very different climate and ground conditions. Students respond with a second constructed drawing that addresses the latent qualities of the physical construction. They mine this drawing to uncover topographic response. Simultaneously, analytical drawings are used to address environmental conditions that articulate climatic possibilities. Finally, program is introduced. As a vehicle for students to expand this understanding of the relationships between geometry/site and program/climate, the studio uses Washington University’s International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES), which encourages and coordinates University-wide and external collaborative research into alternative energy applications. Students are asked to create a joint facility that suits I-CARES’ programmatic needs.

Student

Yu Xin

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S12

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Elise Novak

Yung Hong

Megan Berry

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Megan Berry

C Freixas


Megan Berry

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

Emily Chen

CORE II S12

Freixas 41

Yung Hong


Emily Chen

Haosheng Zhang

42 Haosheng Zhang

Freixas

C


Deena Saeed

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

Deena Saeed

CORE II S12

Yuye Peng

C Moyano 43


Nash Waters

44

Youngah Jung

Moyano

Youngah Jung


Nash Waters

Nash Waters

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S12

Nash Waters

Moyano 45


Ashlie Rathgeber

Bin Feng

46

Jessica Olson

C Mueller


Ashlie Rathgeber

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S12

Jessica Olson

Mueller 47


Kirsten Goedeker

Jessica Olson

48

Bin Feng

Mueller

C


Tiffin Thompson

William Bloomer

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S12

Yu Xin

C Yogiaman

49


William Bloomer

50 William Bloomer

William Bloomer

Yogiaman


Yu Xin

Yu Xin

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S12

Tiffin Thompson

Yogiaman 51


C

Andrew Cruse Ben Fehrmann Pablo Moyano Matt Horvath Stephen Mueller

Visiting Assistant Professor, Co-Coordinator Senior Lecturer

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer

Lecturer

Urban Housing

CORE STUDIO III FALL 2011

The third semester of the three-semester core studio sequence is a counterpoint to the knowledge base and skills acquired during the previous year. The goal is to introduce the students to the traditional concerns of modern architecture and allow them to make choices for their trajectory as they encounter the increasing expectations and complexities of the upper-level studios. This studio investigates the contemporary situation of urban housing, determined by the increasingly dominant demands of technology and economics, the inherited typologies of dwelling form, the constantly changing definition of housing as a program, and the unchanging nature of humankind in their dwelling. The studio emphasizes the intertwining of personal and collective identity as students undertake the design of urban housing sites in St. Louis. Students learn to identify strong concepts early in their design, through research and analysis of divergent concepts in housing and by their own design decisions and intentions. Students begin with an abstract formal organization that identifies issues of the collective project. They then inhabit the idea, asking how it affects the individual. Finally, they explore what collective spaces express the idea, and how responses to the setting (site) reinforce the idea. The program of urban housing advocates density over dispersal—a density that contributes to the social life of neighborhoods and cities, and attempts to reverse the increasingly detrimental consequences of horizontal dispersal and shrinking cities. Each student designs a project for a unique site in concert with students assigned to surrounding sites, resulting in the design of a neighborhood.

Haley O’Brien

52


Xi Chen

Seth Bartlett

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Seth Bartlett

Cruse 53


Doh Young Kim

54 Doh Young Kim

Alexander Morley

Cruse


Freda Weng U Chu

Alexander Morley

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Freda Weng U Chu

Cruse 55

Freda Weng U Chu


Ashley Morgan

Ashley Morgan

56

Jae Yun

C Fehrmann


John Song

URBA N HOUSING

John Song

CORE III F11

Jae Yun

Fehrmann 57


Ashley Morgan

Ruben Aya Malin

58

Jaeyun Cho

Fehrmann

C


Raymond Chau

Jicheng Shen

Jicheng Shen

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Raymond Chau

C Moyano 59


Haley O’Brien

JiNa Kim

60

Raymond Chau

Moyano


Raymond Chau

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Haley O’Brien

Moyano 61

JiNa Kim


Nick Berube

Allison Conley

He Haibo

62

Ruogu Liu

C Horvath


Ruogo Liu

Nick Berube

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Allison Conley

Horvath 63


Nichos Berube

64 Ruogo Liu

Horvath

Allison Conley

C


Ivy (Xingzhu) Wang

Ivy (Xingzhu) Wang

URBA N HOUSING

Leif Lee

CORE III F11

Laura Wang

C Mueller 65


David Orndorff

Leif Lee

Leif Lee

Mueller

66


David Orndorff

Laura Wang

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F11

Laura Wang

Mueller 67

Laura Wang


A

Advanced Studios

68

FALL 2011 – SPRING 2012

The advanced semesters center on the design studio as the site for synthesis and integration of conceptualization, research, and development through technology and media. Advanced studios support a variety of scales, issues, and methodologies, presenting a wide range of opportunities for students to experiment and/or specialize. These studios use multiple means of representation, from the scale of the metropolitan landscape to that of the detail, and from an emphasis on physical model-making to an emphasis on design development in digital media. The full-scale fabrication studios provide students expanded opportunities to engage in the empirical investigation of architectural detail and material. Each advanced studio is instructed by permanent faculty and by renowned visiting professors.


Christopher Perrodin

Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller

69


A Brad Cloepfil

Amplifier | Four Acts Of Immanent Architecture ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011

This studio examines four distinct sites in the United States and the cultural, environmental, and experiential landscapes manifested in them, with the intent of developing resultant and responsive acts of propositional architecture. Students are charged with identifying local conditions and concentrating those forces acting upon a site to create a new built form of ritual and communal architecture—a form that supports both individual and collective use for the purpose of celebration, contemplation, and ceremony. This architecture manifests an absolutely specific response to context with a distinct new function. Through acts of immanent domain, students select sites, explore their potential, and propose new architecture that amplifies understanding, experience, and purpose. The studio begins with a three- to four-week investigative charrette that explores the physical and cultural context of the four given sites. These sites may include “unbuilt/sacred” sites in the pristine landscapes of National Wildlife Preserves, “devastated/toxic sites” found in inner-city neighborhoods of cities such as Memphis and Detroit, “completed/stable” urban sites such as Michigan Avenue in Chicago or NoMad/Broadway in New York City, or “unstable/dangerous” sites such as those along the Mississippi River and Gulf Coast that have been pounded by continual natural disasters. Students look deeply into the potential of these disparate environments, using the tools and precedent of landscape design, infrastructure design, and site-specific art combined with environmental and architectural precedent. Allison Mendez

70

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor


Allison Mendez

Allison Mendez

A MPLIFIER

ADV V-VI F11

Sushwala Hedding

Daphne Robinson

Cloepfil 71


Aubree Robichaud

72 Daphne Robinson

Cloepfil

Aubree Robichaud


Aubree Robichaud

A MPLIFIER

ADV V-VI F11

Sushwala Hedding

Cloepfil 73

Aubree Robichaud


M John Hoal

Spatial Disruptions :: hyper_structures | hyper_cities ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011 For this studio, students focus on researching and proposing new hybrid programs and spatial-temporal practices for high-density, high-rise living, working, and recreating in the emerging, densely populated hyper-cities of Asia. The location provides one of the great laboratories for the future of the city and the space of radicalization of architectural urbanism. It is anticipated that in the next 20 years in China alone, with more than 8.5 million people moving to cities annually, over 40 billion square meters of floor space will be built in approximately 4 to 5 million buildings, of which 51,000 will be skyscrapers; in total, this is equivalent to at least one Chicago every year. This studio seeks to disrupt current architectural spatial practices, taking a position of resistance to the imported global practice of urbanism and architectural imposition and acceptance of singular typologies and programs. In so doing, it accommodates an intensified urban living condition within an ever-changing society that is globally networked yet locally specific [LIFE]; in an altogether new dimension of urban density, personal space, and hybrid communal areas [SPACE]; that requires a new kind of social and environmental sustainable architectural urbanism [BUILDING]. The concepts of spatial multiplicity, thickness, saturation, elasticity, liquidity, locality, and collective complexity frame this production and the investigation. The project is the design of a new high-density, high-rise complex of multiple buildings comprising living, working, entertainment, and recreating spaces; cultural venues; biotopes and microclimates; and energy, water, waste, and food production. The site along the Hupong River is the third edge of the international face of Shanghai and was the location of the international concession; thus, it has a deep and complex global/local history, and an architectural and urban form that is undergoing substantial transformation.

Chengzhi Cai

74

Associate Professor


Zhuoli Yang

SPATI A L DISRUP TION

ADV V-VI F11

Anne Buchele

Amber Organtini

Hoal 75


Amber Organtini

Zhuoli Yang

76

Liang Liang

Hoal


SPATI A L DISRUP TION

ADV V-VI F11

Zhuoli Yang

Hoal 77

Amber Organtini


A Joe MacDonald

78

Visiting Professor

Reticulated Form: Full-Scale Prototyping_Digital Fabrications ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011

This research and design studio focuses on parametric explorations of reticulation: division, marking, and assembly with the intention of forming programmatic and structural networks. Students are asked to seek creative architectural solutions based on material properties, formal geometry, and the spatial implications of a full-scale installation. Reticulated surfaces—like the patterned skin of a giraffe or a python—have non-repeating patterns comprised of lines and surfaces, which generate networks that arise spontaneously but inevitably from the programming of genetics. Using this process of form-making as inspiration, the studio’s work with reticulation aims to systematically engage building, landscape, and program as self-generating and multidimensionally connective systems. Topics of study include: Con-Figurative Processes (Bottom-Up vs. Top-Down); Part to Whole Relationships; Base Unit and Aggregation: Global and Local Modulation; Relational Architecture; and Armature, Surface, and Interface. Over the course of the semester, students integrate a conceptual understanding of both the potential implications of the fabricated form and of Givens Hall and environs as the host site. That relationship should be understood as a reciprocal one. Students are asked to develop individual programs associated with fabrication, based in part on their understanding of a very specific local context. They then work in teams during the fabrication component of the studio. This studio is Rhino-based. The first weeks of the semester are dedicated to intensive tutorials in Rhino and its parametric plug-in Grasshopper, led by instructor Arash Adel.


RE TICUL ATED FORM

ADV V-VI F11

Zephyr Anthony | Andrew Davis | Kyle Fant | Xiaoshuang Hu | Allyson Justmann Andrew McCready | Kelly Peoples | Xiaofei Ren | Bo Sheng | Jordan Smith Benjamin Stephenson | Duo Yu | Thomas Watkins

MacDonald 79


80 Zephyr Anthony | Andrew Davis | Kyle Fant | Xiaoshuang Hu | Allyson Justmann Andrew McCready | Kelly Peoples | Xiaofei Ren | Bo Sheng | Jordan Smith Benjamin Stephenson | Duo Yu | Thomas Watkins

MacDonald


RE TICUL ATED FORM

ADV V-VI F11

Zephyr Anthony | Andrew Davis | Kyle Fant | Xiaoshuang Hu | Allyson Justmann Andrew McCready | Kelly Peoples | Xiaofei Ren | Bo Sheng | Jordan Smith Benjamin Stephenson | Duo Yu | Thomas Watkins

MacDonald 81


A Sung Ho Kim

Associate Professor

Camouflage: Mega_Church ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011

A mega church is one with an average weekend attendance of 2,000 or more people, thus requiring many adjustments. The immense architecture of the mega church requires that the entire congregation can see and hear. Large open spaces allow lines of sight to elaborate video presentations and projections. The need for large parking lots to accommodate worshipers has often led to these churches being located on the outskirts of large cities, on tracts encompassing multiple acres. For this comprehensive studio, students develop an alternative solution for mega big box architecture to mutate into a tight urban context by using the city’s texture and material as the transformative tool. The program of mega church is a complex system of infrastructural and massing experimentations. The notion of the Camouflage—a method of crypsis (hiding) that allows an otherwise visible organism or object to remain unnoticed by blending with its environment—supports new strategies to integrate massive volumetric building that interface with the urban landscape. Students use the concept of camouflage as a transformative process by deploying Google Earth, a virtual globe and geographical information program that maps the earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography, and GIS 3D globe. Specifically, students open Google Earth’s data source and graft it into a virtual environment for architectural operations. This design strategy develops a layering of materials and textures to blend into the site condition, allowing smoother transitions from architecture into landscape and overall urban concept. The site for this project is Dongdaemun Market, a large commercial district in Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea. Completely destroyed during the Korean War, the market has slowly rebuilt over the years, and now has 26 shopping malls situated over 10 blocks, 30,000 specialty shops, and 50,000 manufacturers.

Reid Caudill

82


CA MOUFL AGE: MEGA _CHURCH

Jinfan Chen

ADV V-VI F11

Jinfan Chen

Kim 83


Christopher Perrodin

Christopher Perrodin

84

Jinfan Chen

Kim Reid Caudill


Jinfan Chen

CA MOUFL AGE: MEGA _CHURCH

ADV V-VI F11

Reid Caudill

Kim 85


A Don Koster

Parkview Gardens Sustainable Housing Design Studio ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011 Citing a lack of neighborhood connectivity, a deficit of affordable housing, and a need for improved recreation and open spaces, University City joined with Washington University and the Parkview Gardens Association to initiate a longrange partnership to facilitate the redevelopment and revitalization of the Parkview Gardens neighborhood. In fall 2010, a $315,687 combination U.S. Department of Transportation Tiger II and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Sustainable Community Challenge Grant was awarded to fund a neighborhood redevelopment and sustainability plan. To facilitate the planning process, The Parkview Planning Partners was formed, bringing together a variety of community groups to address neighborhood transportation, housing, and open space needs. Students in this comprehensive studio are responsible for the development of progressive, energy-efficient, ecologically sound, affordable housing models for infill and new development opportunities in Parkview Gardens. Working closely with project partners, they establish design parameters and develop, evaluate, and present designs. Approved designs will be submitted as part of the final sustainability plan for City Council approval and future funding applications; it is anticipated that designs developed in this studio will be implemented in the future once financing has been secured. All students are expected to demonstrate a command of building systems, material assemblies, structural applications, enclosure systems, life safety, and environmental systems. During the semester, they participate in a LEED for Homes design charrette and are expected to demonstrate the achievement of LEED Platinum for all designs. Students also participate in a mandatory Habitat for Humanity St. Louis build day to receive fundamental exposure to building methodologies and make a positive contribution to the local built environment. Thad Martin

86

Senior Lecturer


PA RK V IE W GA RDENS SUSTA IN A BLE HOUSING DESIGN STUDIO

Tingting Wu

ADV V-VI F11

Tingting Wu

Koster 87


Lauren Comes

Thad Martin Lauren Comes

Koster

88 Tingting Wu


PA RK V IE W GA RDENS SUSTA IN A BLE HOUSING DESIGN STUDIO

ADV V-VI F11

Lauren Comes

Koster 89

Christopher Chappell


A Robert McCarter

International Center for Literature: An Addition to Terragni’s (Unbuilt) Danteum in Rome ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2011 The studio program, an International Center for Literature, is a monastic enclave providing for long-term residence by writers and scholars, as well as short-term symposia. It serves as a new international cultural center where people come to write works and to study how human history and thought are embedded in works of literature, as exemplified by Dante’s The Divine Comedy. The program includes seminar rooms, an auditorium, residences for fellows, a dining hall, and, at its center, the rare literature library and associated reading room. Students must create this new International Center for Literature as an “addition” to Giuseppe Terragni’s Danteum, designed in 1938 and—for the purposes of this project—presumed to have been built by 1940 at the northern edge of the ancient Roman Forum. The Danteum encloses three sequentially higher spaces, each referencing one of the books of The Divine Comedy: Inferno, a lightless room with a black ceiling and downward spiraling floor and columns; Purgatorio, where the ceiling opens to the sky and the floor rises in a spiraling set of diminishing rectangular apertures and terraces; and Paradiso, a room open to the sky above through a grid of glass beams, and to the darkness below through the slots that cut the floor into blocks. The studio begins with a sketch project that allows students to develop their own interpretation of a place for writing and literary studies, engaging and embedded in both past and future but only realized in the present. Following a field trip to Rome, they abstractly engage the studio program through a second sketch project, paralleled by disciplinary research in which they reconstruct Terragni’s Danteum in site model and drawings. These are used in designing and documenting the “additions” of the students’ individual designs—the primary project for this comprehensive studio.

Tim Scolarici

90

Ruth and Norman Moore Professor


Xiaoyang Gui

INTERN ATION A L CENTER FOR LITER ATURE

ADV V-VI F11

Lingde Jia

Lingde Jia

McCarter 91


Xi Qui

Xiaoyang Gui

92

Xi Qiu

McCarter Lingde Jia


Xi Qiu

INTERN ATION A L CENTER FOR LITER ATURE

Xiaoyang Gui

ADV V-VI F11

Xiaoyang Gui

McCarter 93


A Andrew Cruse

Masons Learning Latin: An Architecture Museum in Grand Center ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012 How can an unapologetically contemporary architectural imagination address historical cultural monuments to produce compelling buildings? Although facile historicism and slavish preservation may have left a bad taste in the mouths of many architects, the last decade has seen a range of innovative contemporary practices engage directly with historic buildings. St. Louis’ solid stock of empty or underutilized early twentieth-century buildings begs to be reimagined as part of a living urban fabric. Often, these buildings are located on important civic sites and constructed of materials that would not be typically available for new construction. Beginning with historical research and spatial explorations, this comprehensive studio examines how “existing” and “new” can merge conceptually, statially, and materially to form a complex, dynamic whole. The primary project is the design of an architecture museum in St. Louis’ Grand Center district. How best can architecture itself become the subject of cultural display to address its historical development and current trajectories? New curatorial agendas have recently emerged around architectural themes. Barry Bergdoll, chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, is developing “activist exhibitions” that act as incubators to engage in contemporary debates and experimental research relevant to the culture of architecture and of cities. Elsewhere, Kurt W. Foster has suggested that the best way to exhibit architecture is not in the white cube of the gallery space, but through the museum building itself. By examining strategies of architectural display and local architectural archives, this studio engages with architecture both as subject and object, consciously foregrounding historical and contemporary themes to explore some of the many ways architectural narratives can be constructed.

Allison Conley

94

Visiting Assistant Professor


Allison Conley

M A SONS LE A RNING L ATIN

Raymond Chau

ADV V-VI S12

Raymond Chau

Cruse 95

Haitao Zhou


Raymond Chau

Cruse

96 Jovanni Carter-Davis


Haitao Zhou

M A SONS LE A RNING L ATIN

ADV V-VI S12

Allison Conley

Allison Conley

Cruse 97


A Craig Dykers Peter MacKeith

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

Caring Places and the Power of the Every Day ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012 Architectural development and the forces that drive it tend to promote everincreasing levels of protection. In many ways buildings have become increasingly representative of a form of control, especially control over the natural conditions that frame our daily lives. To promote a sense of control over the uncontrollable, many architectural works disassociate the solution from the natural and the physical conditions affecting it. Roofs are made flat because the architecture should be more powerful than the raindrops that fall on it; windows recede into slots as the recognition of spending time to view something is lost. Is there a way to work with this challenge, to connect directly to the physical? This comprehensive studio focuses on creating places of connection and relevance by focusing on human conditions for living. In particular, students evaluate new environments for people with cancer care. It is not a cancer treatment center; instead, it is a post-cancer facility for those who have completed or are completing cancer treatment at another facility. The project is located in St. Louis and small in size窶馬o larger than about 4,000 square feet. The small scale allows students to more carefully examine the project at many levels. Cancer is not a scientific problem. The high potential for discomfort and death that cancer creates forces a re-evaluation of what architecture can do for the living. This is an important component of the disease, especially amid the current state of elevated disassociation and pacing in our lives. Cancer care includes physical as well as psychological challenges not dissimilar to those most people face every day, except at a heightened level; it is a valuable program for understanding immediacy in architecture and reconsidering architectural goals.

Zhuoli Yang

98

Associate Professor


Jonathan McKee

CA RING PL ACES A ND THE POW ER OF THE E V ERY DAY

ADV V-VI S12

Zhuoli Yang

Dykers | MacKeith 99


Anita Hsieh

100

Yu Chen

Dykers | MacKeith Anita Hsieh


Zhuoli Yang

CA RING PL ACES A ND THE POW ER OF THE E V ERY DAY

ADV V-VI S12

Anita Hsieh

Dykers | MacKeith 101


A Christof Jantzen Don Koster

I-CARES Professor of Practice

Senior Lecturer

M>O>B

Nicholas Brow

102

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

There has been much discussion about health-care reform in the United States and the way health-care services are provided. Beyond notions of service and cost, this comprehensive studio rethinks some of the architectural parameters of health-care institutions through the development of design concepts for a small, environmentally conscious, patient- and family-oriented Medical Office Building (MOB) in St Louis. The MOB offers comprehensive and convenient medical, diagnostic, and treatment services in one location. It houses medical practices along with laboratory, vascular, cardiology, and imaging services. The project also features a Health Resource Center where patients, families, and the community can access or review educational materials about various health conditions and treatments. This center offers a comprehensive research setting to help patients understand the specifics of a disease and any proposed treatment for it. The integrated Health Resource Center is staffed by a community resource nurse who assists community members in locating disease-specific information through videos, books, journals, and online resources. Ultimately, this service supports patients in becoming educated and active participants in their own health care. It also includes a small community center with a state-of-the-art meeting facility to accommodate activities such as meetings, social events, and educational programs. The room comfortably seats up to 80 people and features an adjacent outdoor patio.


Wei Kou

Mark Mangapora

M>O>B

ADV V-VI S12

Xi Chen

Jantzen | Koster 103


Xi Chen 104

Wei Kou

Jantzen | Koster


Wei Kou

Wei Kou

M>O>B

Xi Chen

ADV V-VI S12

Jantzen | Koster 105


A Derek Hoeferlin

Gutter to Gulf

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

Now in its fourth year, Gutter to Gulf is a five-year, multidisciplinary effort between Washington University and the University of Toronto that aims to develop resilient, comprehensive, synthetic water management strategies for New Orleans and its environs. In order to provide clear and accessible information to diverse audiences, the initiative is designed to extend and support efforts by grassroots organizations. It has been organized to address water management questions across the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design, and is intended to ground multi-scaled design proposals in a clear understanding of the challenges facing southern Louisiana. While Gutter to Gulf’s first three phases studied the urbanized area of New Orleans, this fourth phase has moved downriver to St. Bernard Parish and its drainage unit (polder). The St. Bernard polder is the strategic first line of defense protecting New Orleans from the Gulf of Mexico’s potential storm surges and effects of sea-level rise. The polder is an extreme landscape that includes urbanized and suburbanized areas; massive flood protection infrastructures and industrial refineries; fishing camps; and deteriorating wetlands. The specific area of study for this studio engages four sites along the Violet Canal, the Central Wetlands Unit, the “Great Wall of Louisiana,” and the decommissioned Mississippi River Gulf Outlet’s closure structure. Students are asked to take design positions on how and why architecture can occupy such an extreme deltaic landscape that is radically experiencing current and future transformations. Students develop their own architecture programs and strategies that adapt to such conditions. Final proposals include cypress nurseries, hunting camps, public markets, water parks, and wellness retreats.

Christopher Perrodin

106

Assistant Professor


John Song

Lynette Salas

GUT TER TO GULF

ADV V-VI S12

Lauren Harrison

Hoeferlin 107


Lauren Harrison

108

Christopher Perrodin

Hoeferlin

Lauren Harrison


Christopher Perrodin

GUT TER TO GULF

ADV V-VI S12

Lauren Harrison

Hoeferlin 109

Lynette Salas


A Zeuler Lima

Associate Professor

Interstitial Landscapes

This comprehensive studio embraces the unique history of Florence, Italy, not as a static legacy from the past, but as a dynamic contemporary phenomenon. Students are invited to respond to one of the world’s most renowned public spaces—the Piazza degli Uffizi—through the creation of a City Museum connecting the plaza and the right bank of the Arno River. The museum should not be conceived of as the traditional depository of a collection, but rather as a dynamic center for the study of the coexistence between the past, present, and future of the city. In particular, students should promote the understanding of the city’s urban and architectural history, particularly its restructuring as a European metropolis in the 21st century. They must develop complementary design strategies combining the understanding and delimitation of site; the approach to urban, landscape, and architectural elements (both historic and new); and the consideration of public access and circulation, spatial sequencing, and material and environmental conditions. The City Museum should serve as a point of encounter for citizens and visitors alike. It should provide a forum for the debate between the simultaneous efforts of historic, territorial, and environmental preservation and the promotion of innovative studies and projects that deal with contemporary, everyday spatial and social processes as well as urban and architectural challenges. The historic Uffizi building and existing rowing club on the riverbank should not be affected by the City Museum proposal. However, while the plaza and belvedere must remain visually open, the area along the riverbank may be occupied with new elements connected to the museum, extending the existing belvedere and offering a second access point from the street.

Ashley Morgan

110

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012


INTERSTITI A L L A NDSCA PES

ADV V-VI S12

Ashley Morgan

Lima 111

David Orndorff


Reid Caudill

112

Ashley Morgan

Lima David Orndorff


INTERSTITI A L L A NDSCA PES

Reid Caudill

David Orndorff

ADV V-VI S12

Reid Caudill

Lima 113


A Igor Marjanovic Heather Woofter

Associate Professor

Associate Professor

Global Features: Monte Carlo Revisited ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

114

Young-Il Pyun

In 1969, the Archigram Group entered a competition to design a multifunctional entertainment and recreational space in Monte Carlo, Monaco. The project was a landscape proposal that engaged the ground and the sea through a combination of under- and above-ground spatial features. Ultimately, the project fell through before completion, resulting in the dispersal of the Archigram members around the world. Yet these architects continued to collaborate over great distances, sustaining a dialogue of ideas through various forms of media. This studio revisits Archigram’s working model of delayed conversation, engaging in a critical dialogue through beautifully crafted drawings and artifacts. These visual resources serve as vehicles to explore the critical questions raised by Archigram’s Monte Carlo project. Students are challenged to think about the idea of the environment on a global scale, addressing it as a cultural, social, and technological construct. The studio brings together graduate and undergraduate students and also engages international voices, including Dennis Crompton, one of the founding members of the Archigram Group. In order to sustain this dialogue with context and specificity, the studio engages the historical program of Monte Carlo—a place where local Italian, French, and Occitan cultures blend with a truly global diaspora. Additionally, the city was founded on the merger of health-related bathing treatments and the lucrative entertainment industry. Through a series of iterations and conversations, projects evolve into a series of spaces and events of cleansing and entertainment. While these two types of activities are emblematic of Monte Carlo’s complex history, they also engage broader dichotomies of contemporary environments around the world—literal/metaphorical, health/amusement, and physical/ephemeral—allowing each project to develop unique combinations of public events. Projects progress from domestic to environmental scale, operating simultaneously on personal, communal, and overall systematic levels.


Young-Il Pyun

GLOBA L FE ATURES: MONTE CA RLO RE V ISITED

ADV V-VI S12

Laura Wang

Ruotian Cai

Marjanovic | Woofter 115


Ruotian Cai

Laura Wang

116

Ruotian Cai

Marjanovic | Woofter

Young-Il Pyun


GLOBA L FE ATURES: MONTE CA RLO RE V ISITED

Jae Yun Cho

ADV V-VI S12

Jae Yun Cho

Marjanovic | Woofter 117

Laura Wang


A Robert McCarter Robert Gero

Ruth and Norman Moore Professor

Lecturer in Art

118

A Montessori School: Space and Learning in Contemporary Elementary Education ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

Kirsten Akerman

In this comprehensive studio, students engage in the design of a small Montessori School. They begin with two projects that are inspired in part by art and architecture critic Adrian Stokes’ thoughts on carving. The first project, “Carving the Classroom: Abstract CUBE,” is intentionally abstract and requires each student to construct a highly resolved proposal for a single Montessori classroom. The second project, “Etching the Earth: Concrete DATUM,” is intentionally concrete and requires each student to evolve a highly resolved spatial proposal, deploying the programmatic elements of the Montessori School to construct a “society of spaces” as an inhabited surface. Following these initial projects, the site for the school is given and developed over the remainder of the semester. This final project asks students to bring the building design to a high level of resolution. As is appropriate to the “tectonic culture” of modern architecture, students are asked to resolve “the poetics of construction” for their design, developing the materials, construction, and details that shape the interior experience of the school’s inhabitants. This architecture studio works in parallel with a graduate art seminar; the two groups meet at least once a week to pursue a variety of parallel exercises centered on the subject of Montessori education, as well as its precursors and offspring. The collaborative setup introduces students to the “tradition” of architects and artists sharing concepts of space, order, and perception as they work across fields to construct joint pedagogical events and exercises.


Kirsten Akerman

A MONTES SORI SCHOOL

ADV V-VI S12

Sally Shadlun

McCarter | Gero 119


120 Jinfan Chen

McCarter | Gero Jinfan Chen


Jinfan Chen

Jinfan Chen

A MONTES SORI SCHOOL

ADV V-VI S12

Kirsten Akerman

McCarter | Gero 121

Sally Shadlun


A David Ruy Jonathan Stitelman Visiting Professor

Park/Park

Lecturer

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

This comprehensive studio investigates a recent interest in rethinking parking structures as a new kind of civic space for the 21st century. Parking structures were originally understood either as purely utilitarian shelters devoid of architectural content or as fenced off, non-spaces. However, as architects, planners, and developers began to realize in the mid-20th century that cars were starting to dominate urbanization, some interesting examples started to emerge, speculating on more productive ways to think about parking. This has culminated recently in Herzog & de Meuron’s well-publicized project 1111 Lincoln Road, Miami, the success of which has encouraged many cities to start rethinking the architectural possibilities of parking structures. Such innovative examples of parking structures from the past century provide inspiration as students develop projects that privilege the parking structure as a significant architectural object. Because parking structures are, in essence, uninterrupted extensions of the ground coiled into a building, students can think of the parking structure as occupying a vague condition in between surface and volume. The elimination of enclosure (slabs without exterior cladding) makes the relationship between inside and outside indeterminate. In this regard, students extend this geometric and spatial ambiguity into a consideration of what might be in between landscape and building, public and private. The project site is the southern edge of St. Louis’ Forest Park. The proposed parking structure must interface between the fast movement of the highway and the slow movement of the landscape, integrating leisure programs and park services. Though parking is usually thought of as the minor adjunct of enclosed program (enclosed program with some parking), students are asked to think of this project as the reverse (parking with some enclosed program).

Jina Kim

122


Cai Chengzhi

Natasha Dunn

Jina Kim

PA RK /PA RK

ADV V-VI S12

Ruy | Stitelman 123

Natasha Dunn


Kyle Fant

124 Cai Chengzhi

Ruy | Stitelman

Cai Chengzhi


Kyle Fant

Kyle Fant

Natasha Dunn

PA RK /PA RK

ADV V-VI S12

JiNa Kim

Ruy | Stitelman 125

JiNa Kim


A Robert Stuart-Smith Robert Booth

Visiting Professor

Lecturer

Material Agencies

126

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2012

This studio explores architectural fabrication through a programmed process of material formation. Materiality is understood not as a passive, homogeneous condition but rather as an arrangement of active matter that incorporates varied degrees of intensity. Properties such as stiffness, thickness, or density operate locally; they are heterogeneously distributed, and work toward the expression of an emergent whole that arises from the assemblage of simple but effectively collaborating parts. A post-tensioned assemblage is fabricated at 1:1 scale that hybridizes numerous structural and material properties/qualities to generate an installation whose spatial, structural, formal, and ornamental character is intrinsic to the forces and organizational strategies embedded within its materials, fabrication, and assemblage. This digital fabrication studio explores the compression of design and assemblage within a bottom-up organization of matter in order to create emergent architectural effects that range from the rigid to the supple, the sharp to the smooth. The studio features three phases of development: experiments in design systems, the hybridization of these experiments into design proposals, and the fabrication and assembly of a 1:1 scale installation. The size, location, and purpose of the installation are largely defined through students’ design research. The systemic approach to tectonic prototyping undertaken early in the semester facilitates in narrowing the scope and brief of the installation to one appropriate to the materials, production timeframe, and budget constraints of the studio. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating the active role designed material organizations can have as generative tectonic formations in architectural design.


M ATERI A L AGENCIES

ADV V-VI S12

Wing Yin Alice Chan | Sang Hyuk Chung | Enrique De Solo Shuang Jiang | Guru Liu | Ruogo Liu | Christopher Moy Christopher Quinlan | Zhe Sun | David Turner | Matthew White

Stuart-Smith | Booth 127


128 Wing Yin Alice Chan | Sang Hyuk Chung | Enrique De Solo Shuang Jiang | Guru Liu | Ruogo Liu | Christopher Moy Christopher Quinlan | Zhe Sun | David Turner | Matthew White

Stuart-Smith | Booth


M ATERI A L AGENCIES

ADV V-VI S12

Wing Yin Alice Chan | Sang Hyuk Chung | Enrique De Solo Shuang Jiang | Guru Liu | Ruogo Liu | Christopher Moy Christopher Quinlan | Zhe Sun | David Turner | Matthew White

Stuart-Smith | Booth 129


A 130

Advanced International Studios FALL 2011 – SPRING 2012

The School’s international programs provide an extraordinarily rich learning environment for students, who can take advanced studios in Buenos Aires, Seoul, Helsinki, and Barcelona. These world cities offer unparalleled urban experiences not available in the Midwest, as well as a deeper understanding of the relationship between culture, climate, and the construction of urban and architectural space. The urban design found in these locales, as well as the intensity of use by their inhabitants, enhance students’ perceptions of the city as a cultural artifact where architecture is a fundamental component of its identity. These international experiences offer visions of reality that increase an architect’s capacity to learn and to work more responsibly as professionals and citizens.


Seth Bartlett

131


A Gerardo Caballero Gustavo Cardon Fabián Llonch

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

132

FALL 2011

This studio explores the diversity and contradiction of Buenos Aires and includes it as material for design. Looking at the plan of the city, we imagine a homogeneous territory, one that suggests a repetitive, manmade fabric rarely altered by exceptional artifacts. But a photograph of any piece of this urban landscape reveals a much more complex urban condition that makes room for a variety of buildings, uses, and meanings, often juxtaposed in the most uninhibited ways. In this setting, design work strives to overcome dichotomies between old and new, closed and open, vastness and enclosure, repetition and exception, and other dualities. The program is the design of a place for local ceremony—specifically, a building that houses the past, present, and future memorabilia of the Argentinian tango— in San Telmo. This old neighborhood is the focus of cultural activities related to tango—a cornerstone of the city’s identity—and is one of the touristic spots of the city, housing numerous art galleries. In addition to offering a place for people to dance tango, the new building must serve as a receptive public facility that offers administrative services and commercial activities related to cultural programming. The building is intended to be as attractive to those directly engaged with its main activities as it is to curious individuals who get in touch with tango in a casual way. Students are asked to design the same program in two different lots that are located close to one another but possess contrasting formal conditions, allowing them to experience a wider range of design attitudes when confronting the fabric of Buenos Aires. They must recognize both the opportunities and restrictions of the local culture in terms of building techniques and materials.

Philip Balsiger

Buenos Aires International Studio


Pierre Hoppenot

Lauren Harrison

BUENOS A IRES

INTL F11

Christopher Moy

Hiep Hoang Che

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch 133


Jason Butz

Sarah Moore

134

Sarah Moore

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch

Philip Balsiger


Pierre Hoppenot

Jason Butz

BUENOS A IRES

INTL F11

Sarah Moore

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch 135


A Marc Brossa Junsung Kim

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Seoul International Studio

The project for this studio is the design of an institute for Korean craft in Samcheongdong, in Bukcheon, close to the Gyeonbukgung palace. Students explore different building technologies in relationship to the issues of program, site implementation, and the crafts involved. The institution is dedicated to the research and education of Korean traditional crafts such as linen, porcelain, Hanok construction, and paper-making (hanji), among others. The facility must contain educational spaces—classrooms, workshops, and an auditorium—as well as spaces for exhibition and commercial shops. Students choose a site in between Samcheong-ro street and Bukcheon-ro 5 alley for their proposal. The northern portion of Samcheong-ro street has become one of the main destinations for Seoulites, thanks to its combination of renowned restaurants, modern art galleries, fashionable stores, and comfortable cafés. In contrast, the inner alleys of Bukcheon, located higher up the hill, are characterized by their traditional hanok-style buildings and quiet residential daily life, interspersed with traditional institutions such tea houses and craft museums. Students must deal with an important topographical drop between these two streets. Understanding craft as “the skillful way to do things,” students use traditional Korean techniques as references in proposing contemporary building solutions. They investigate and develop construction systems based on materiality, structural capabilities, dimensional limitations, and environmental impact in order to respond to programmatic and contextual requirements. Final proposals are expected to bridge the gap between craft/technology, high/low ground, and past/future.

Natasha Dunn

136

FALL 2011


Lydia Hagedorn

Samantha Stein

SEOUL

INTL F11

Anita Hsieh

Lydia Hagedorn

Brossa | Kim 137


Anita Hsieh

Natasha Dunn

138

Natasha Dunn

Brossa | Kim


Natasha Dunn

SEOUL

Natasha Dunn

INTL F11

Anita Hsieh

Brossa | Kim 139


A Peter MacKeith Kimmo Friman Sirkka-Liisa Jetsonen Pentti Kareoja Juhani Pallasmaa Matti Rautiola

Associate Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Helsinki International Studio

The ethos of architectural design in Finland and the Nordic countries can be understood by its attention to issues of cultural identity, environmental responsiveness, material substance, and democratic intentions. This studio seeks to transfer this sensibility to students through a series of researched visual investigations, scaled material constructions, and tectonic architectural designs. The curriculum places an emphasis on fostering an appreciation for the “art of building,” with equal focus on materials and the experience of place. Students begin with a short sketch project, working in teams of two to design a series of nine temporary pavilions that house information relating to Helsinki’s designation as World Design Capital in 2012. Sited in nine public squares throughout the city, the pavilions are intended to be assembled on-site; to provide virtual interaction with one another and the world beyond; and to demonstrate commitment to environmental sustainability. For the studio’s more comprehensive “long project,” students design a small American Cultural Institute in Helsinki’s central Ullanlinna neighborhood. Each student must craft a strongly experimental yet highly resolved architectural proposal, working from initial design conceptions and structural, energy, and systems analyses to building models, interior and exterior elevations, and technical wall sections of materials and assemblies.

Alexander Morley

140

SPRING 2012


MacKeith | Friman | Jetsonen Kareoja | Pallasmaa | Rautiola

Caitlin Davis

HEL SINK I

Alexander Morley

INTL S12

Brian Driska

141


MacKeith | Friman | Jetsonen Kareoja | Pallasmaa | Rautiola

Caitlin Davis

Alexander Morley

Alexander Morley

142


Brian Driska

MacKeith | Friman | Jetsonen Kareoja | Pallasmaa | Rautiola

Alexander Morley

HEL SINK I

Alexander Morley

INTL S12

14 3


A Adrian Luchini Elena Cánovas

Raymond E. Maritz Professor Lecturer Abroad

Barcelona International Studio

The project for this studio is the design of the Bestiari Foundation, a public building to host the collection of Giants, Beasts, and Bigheaded Figures of Ciutat Vella. The Giants have been part of Catalan tradition for centuries. In the beginning, they consisted of men walking on stilts who sought to attract crowds, teaching sacred scenes as part of the Corpus Christi processions. Nowadays, they consist of larger-than-life figures carried on stretchers that support their weight. Catalonia is currently home to an estimated 3,000 Giants organized in more than 300 groups that animate the streets during various festivities. In developing design proposals, students must ask themselves what the Giants would see while wandering through the streets of the Gothic Quarter. The recreation of their gaze acknowledges these are not static sculptures but actual living components of the city experience. Students’ own experiences with the site—what their senses register as well as the factual data of the site’s dimensions—provide inspiration for their projects. The task of this studio is to engage the architecture of the project with the architecture of the city. Proposals must define complex and diverse indoor and outdoors spaces, suitable to all scales of occupation, activity, and position within the site. The program includes both neighborhood-scale and city-scale activities (ie., exhibition, presentation, parades). The main areas include a hall linking the public exterior space with activities inside the foundation; an exhibition area for presentation of the traditional Giants; an educational area for seminars and workshops; and outdoor space for events. The urban area not occupied by the building must be considered as part of the proposal and be defined as well as the rest of the project.

Guru Liu

14 4

SUMMER 2012


Seth Bartlett

Seth Bartlett

BA RCELON A

INTL SU12

Seth Bartlett

Luchini | Cรกnovas 145


Guru Liu

146 Jennifer Wong

Luchini | Cรกnovas

Seth Bartlett


Guru Liu

BA RCELON A

INTL SU12

Seth Bartlett

Luchini | Cรกnovas 147


D Degree Student Project

14 8

FALL 2011 – SPRING 2012

In this final semester studio, each student develops a comprehensive design project that conveys an independent, critical position on the making of architecture in the world. This includes development of program spaces and relationships, development of structural and environmental systems, building envelope systems, life-safety issues, and technical construction sections and assemblies, along with experiential renderings and a focus on telling a critical project story. Based on the product of the preceding Design Thinking Degree Project Preparation—an individually initiated programmatic, intentional, and situational framework—each student develops an aspiring and compelling conceptual framework, progresses to a convincing development of all aspects of the project (formal, spatial, experiential, organizational, structural, and technical), and creates a clear, full, and persuasive presentation of their work.


Raymond E. Maritz Professor Professor Senior Lecturer

Adrian Luchini Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim

Visiting Assistant Professor Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

Sha Hua

149


Sha Hua 150


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

151

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Cameron Bence 152


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

153

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Nathaniel Elberfeld 15 4


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

155

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Anne Landau 156


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

157

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Shirin Reklaoui 158


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

159

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Sangyoon Kim 160


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

161

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Max Bemberg 162


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

163

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Heather McArthur 164


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

165

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Margina Demmer 166


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

167

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Heywook Chan 168


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

169

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Belle Stone 170


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

171

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Alexandra Waller 172


Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Philip Holden Eric Hoffman Adrian Luchini Heather Woofter

Visiting Professor

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Senior Lecturer

Professor of Practice Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEG F11

173

DEGREE PROJECT

Associate Professor


Jason Butz 174


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

175

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Helen Schneider 176


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

177

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Pierre Hoppenot 178


Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

179

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Allison Mendez 180


Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

181

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Lauren Comes 182


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

18 3

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Aubree Robichaud 18 4


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

185

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Andrew Davis 186


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

187

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Sushwala Hedding 188


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

189

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Jaymon Diaz 190


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

191

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Samantha Stein 192


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

193

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Ji Hao 194


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

195

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Lingde Jia 196


JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Senior Lecturer

Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Sung Ho Kim Adrian Luchini

Professor in Practice Senior Lecturer

Associate Professor

DEG S12

197

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


M Master of Landscape Architecture

198

As heirs to design, ecological, and urban traditions, landscape architects are uniquely suited to articulate a spatial vision for today’s environment. The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) degree program is distinguished by a commitment to design excellence, regional and international perspectives, and interdisciplinary studies. We focus on the subjects of design, ecology, and urbanism, using St. Louis as a laboratory for understanding and testing theories at the local and regional scales. The transformative process of design—linking cultural, historical, and technological investigations—forms the pedagogical basis for research. Ecology informs design practice to address a multiplicity of scales and systems within the environment. Finally, urbanism serves as a terrain for contemporary landscape practice. The curriculum is centered around studio teaching and supported by instruction in technology, natural systems, history/theory, and representation. The core studios examine a series of landscape


Lima problems—spatial, ecological, social, infrastructural— that increase in scale and complexity, from site to region. Instruction builds on skill sets such as hand and digital representation and landscape technology to subsequently explore advanced topics such as remote sensing and innovative materials. Following the core sequence, students are encouraged to develop their own research interests through offerings in landscape architecture, architecture, urban design, and other Washington University programs.

Irene Compadre | Taliah Weber

199


C Natalie Yates

Urban Spaces

Assistant Professor

ML A CORE STUDIO I FALL 2011

The first studio in the MLA core sequence introduces students to the principles, concepts, and skills that define landscape architecture design. Students learn to analyze, design, and describe landscape space through a series of problems exploring design strategies from concept to materials. Beginning with precedent studies of small urban spaces, the studio builds on exercises aimed at developing design through methods of representation, narrative, and most importantly, conceptual iteration, culminating in the design of urban spaces for the St. Louis neighborhood of Grand Center. The site for the final project is a parking lot located adjacent to the St. Louis Symphony/Powell Hall. Aside from being a parking lot, one of the site’s main uses is as host to Circus Flora throughout the month of June. Students must redesign this parking lot as a flexible urban space that engages the range of users (residents, workers, visitors, etc.) and reflects the diverse activities held in the Grand Center district. The space should also draw new users and activities. The client does not want designs that erase differences between these various users and activities; instead, designs must use these contradictions and potential conflicts as the material for the project to be diverse and exciting. Manipulation of the ground plane through earthworks is a requirement. All of the existing landscape elements could be removed; students also must consider circulation and provide handicapped access to the entire site. This final project draws on previous explorations of the semester: an understanding of the fundamental language of landscape architecture, especially as it relates to the design and experience of public space; the question of scale; the exploration of the ground plane; and the experiential and spatial qualities inherent in the manipulation of ground plane and vegetation.

Yadan Luo

200


Yadan Luo

URBA N SPACES

ML A CORE I F11

Yadan Luo

Yates 201

Yadan Luo


Yadan Luo 202 Yadan Luo

Yates Fei Xie


Junru Zheng

URBA N SPACES

ML A CORE I F11

Jing Wang

Yates 203

Yadan Luo


C DorothĂŠe Imbert

Professor

Urban Pleasure Grounds

ML A CORE STUDIO II

FALL 2011

The second studio in the MLA core sequence stresses the relationship of site to context in a series of exercises of varying scale and complexity. Students develop a spatial understanding of landscape architecture in dialogue with architecture and the city, specifically St. Louis’ Grand Center district. Combining precedent study, site analysis, program elaboration, and individual design projects, the studio generates specific open spaces for flexible uses as well as temporary interventions. Students engage existing and projected buildings, urban and landscape infrastructure, vegetation, and topographic strategies to propose scenarios for urban life. At the scale of the site, students evaluate the effects of construction and ground manipulation on the experience of space, enclosure, connectors, and in-betweenness. At the scale of the city, students test the potential of landscape architecture and programming to define an urban condition that simultaneously allows for anchoring and resilience. Ultimately, the studio fosters an appreciation of landscape architecture as a systemic construct with formal, ecological, and social implications. Grand Center offers possibilities for landscape architecture interventions at a variety of scales, from lot to urban systems. Just as designers and planners have instigated schemes to halt the shrinking of midtown from the 1960s onward, this studio evaluates the neighborhood as a laboratory for testing landscape architecture strategies. Students engage in parking lot guerrilla tactics, and devise proposals for temporary, future, and intermittent uses, such as urban nursery, garden festival, and circus performance. Building on these exercises, they also establish topographic, water, and vegetation frameworks to sustain current development and inform future architecture and urban design directions. Joan Walbert

204


Joan Walbert

URBA N PLE A SURE GROUNDS

ML A CORE II F11

Joe DiBella

Imbert 205

Joan Walbert


Joe DiBella

206

Joe DiBella

Imbert

Joan Walbert


Joan Walbert

URBA N PLE A SURE GROUNDS

ML A CORE II F11

Joan Walbert

Imbert 207

Laura Barrett


A Sarah Cowles

208

ML A FALL 2011

On the morning of December 14, 2005, the earthen Taum Sauk Hydroelectric Power Station gave way, releasing a billion gallons of water down the slopes of Profit Mountain in the Johnson’s Shut-Ins State Park in the Missouri Ozarks. A 600-foot swath of vegetation was stripped from the mountain during the flood, exposing the complex underlying geomorphology. Disturbance, as defined by ecologists, is an event or process that disrupts relationships within ecological systems. Ecologist Stewart Pickett defines disturbance as a discrete event in time that disrupts community structure though killing, displacements, or damaging of individuals. Disturbances have spatial and formal properties, such as the path of a mower or the voids of the quarry. Disturbances operate at many temporal scales, from the instantaneous to the generational. The Scour site at Profit Mountain is the subject of this landscape architecture studio. Participants propose ecological, hydrological, mineral, and architectural interventions in this landscape at a range of spatial and temporal scales. This studio provides students with an opportunity to engage in critical discussions on contemporary topics of restoration and remediation ecology, and to develop an aesthetic approach to intervening in disturbed or accidental landscapes. The semester begins with a site visit to study the geomorphology of the scour path and tour current restoration projects in the park. In particular, students are asked to observe how colonization patterns of the emerging ecosystems are informed by the underlying “accidental geomorphology� of the scours as a means to beginning their own design investigations. Design development primarily occurs through physical modeling techniques.

Irene Compadre | Taliah Weber

The Scour

Visiting Assistant Professor


Sarah Xiaoying Wang | Ting Huang

THE SCOUR

ML A F11

Irene Compadre | Taliah Weber

Irene Compadre | Taliah Weber

Cowles 209


Zhihuang Li

210 Mikey Naucus | Helen Schneider

Cowles


Zhihuang Li

THE SCOUR

ML A F11

Sarah Xiaoying Wang | Ting Huang

Zhihuang Li

Cowles 211


Mikey Naucus | Helen Schneider

Cowles

212 Irene Compadre | Taliah Weber


Sarah Xiaoying Wang | Ting Huang

THE SCOUR

ML A F11

Sarah Xiaoying Wang | Ting Huang

Cowles 213


Dorothée Imbert Paula Meijerink Natalie Yates

Professor and Chair of the ML A Program Visiting Critic, Université de Montréal

Assistant Professor

Parking Plot 214

FALL 2011 PROJECT

Parking Plot could be described as a landscape performance. Although the intervention was quick and cheap, it tackled the larger questions of surface parking in St. Louis and the greening of Washington University’s Danforth Campus. After securing the use of two parking spaces from the University for a duration of one year—with the provision that the surface be returned to its original state thereafter—students moved at a rapid pace. Over a two-and-a-half day period, they poured water from bottles to understand sheet flow; sketched the position of future incisions to slow down and capture run-off; rented a concrete wet saw; cut two strips through 8 inches of hard asphaltic concrete; hammered holes to relieve compaction beneath and allow for drainage; filled the slots with compost; and planted samples collected from the ruderal forest growing on the Pruitt-Igoe site (sumac, juniper, honeysuckle, and other “volunteers”). Parking Plot is a bit of agitprop. It is a plot on parking and the impervious, hot asphalt of contemporary cities. As students and faculty monitor the plants, it is also a test plot for urban vegetation, and a suggestion that tough is beautiful. Parking Plot was one of the 124 urban interventions featured in Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good, the U.S. Pavilion at the 13th Architecture Venice Biennale. By examining how urban actions that originated as radical ideas have evolved from subversive tactic to increasingly accepted urban strategy, the exhibition resonated on many levels with the overall theme of the Biennale, Common Ground, conceived by director David Chipperfield. The projects featured in Spontaneous Interventions bring positive change to neighborhoods and cities; they are characterized by their interest in collaboration, in serving the collective needs of a community, and in improving the literal common ground— public space.


PA RK ING PLOT

ML A F11

Laura Barrett | Joe DiBella | Xing Liao | Yadan Luo | Joan Walbert Jing Wang | Fei Xei | Feixiong Yu | Junru Zheng

Parking Plot 215


A Kristi Dykema

Building Wild: Placing Security in a Fluid System ML A SPRING 2012 In his essay “Walking,” Henry David Thoreau proclaims that in “wilderness is the preservation of the world,” the go-to polemical quote often invoked by environmental groups to support a separation between the “human and nonhuman, the unnatural and the natural, the fallen and the unfallen.” But what is wilderness today (and what should it be)? This studio explores the architectural implications of “wildness” in a landscape that in recent years has been rebranded as “the Working Coast.” Though still largely uninhabited, the marshes of south Louisiana are no longer Thoreau’s “pristine wilderness,” and given the surgical approach to oil, gas, and fish extraction, are perhaps much more akin to the feedlots of the Midwest than an environmentalist’s Eden. Through two projects, students pursue design opportunities for volatile landscapes using transformations of two distinct architectural typologies: museums and banks. First, they examine wildness as a collectible item (memory, souvenir, talisman) in need of curated space. Unlike traditional collections (featuring picturesque, static narratives), these explorations focus on the dynamism inherent in wildness, culminating in an installation. The second project looks at commodified nature: wildness as a tradable good, something with value that can be extracted, secured, and exchanged. But with a valuable resource—especially one that is necessarily “a place” as much as it is “a good”—boundaries, controlled access, and systems of exchange become important design questions. Students develop proposals that apply land banking to a 400-acre site: a regressive beach chenier complex that serves as the last remaining land buffer for Port Fourchon (the state’s oil and gas gateway) and Bayou Lafourche (home to much of the state’s shrimping industry). Proposals bring together interpretations of the iconic architectural typology of the bank (as both space and system) with the wildness of the marsh.

Irene Compadre

216

Visiting Professor


Yang Shi

Zhihuang Li

BUILDING WILD

ML A S12

Zhihuang Li

Dykema 217


Yang Shi

218

Feixiong Yu

Dykema

Yang Shi


Zhihuang Li

BUILDING WILD

ML A S12

Zhihuang Li

Dykema 219


Sarah Xiaoying Wang

Feixiong Yu

220

Feixiong Yu

Dykema


Yang Shi

BUILDING WILD

ML A S12

Yang Shi

Dykema 221


A Sarah Cowles

Visiting Assistant Professor

A Winter Sports Park for Pruitt-Igoe ML A SPRING 2012

222

Joe DiBella

St. Louis is a city of iconic and well-maintained public spaces such as Forest Park, Tower Grove Park, Citygarden, and the Arch grounds. The Near North Side, a distressed neighborhood, currently lacks such a large-scale amenity—St. Louis Place and Fairgrounds Park are poorly maintained compared to parks to the south and west of downtown. For this studio, students must design a new urban public landscape at the former Pruitt-Igoe housing development site. This 57-acre parcel once consisted of a neighborhood of 30-plus blocks, featuring single-family homes, light industry, and commercial tenants. The area was cleared in 1954 to develop the Pruitt-Igoe public housing estate. Demolition of the housing began in 1971, and the majority of the parcel remains vacant, dominated by spontaneous vegetation. The existing topography is a result of both legal and illegal construction dumping. In the spirit of Bob Cassilly’s Cementland project, students are allotted an unlimited amount of fill to construct an iconic, sculpted topography with diverse landscape conditions that can accom­modate a variety of sports programs. This terrain provides the neighborhood with a monument to fun, as well as prospects from which to view the city, the Mississippi, and the Gateway Arch. The program includes a short-track speedskating rink, hockey rink, velodrome, canopied outdoor event center, bleachers and staging areas, welcome center, fire pit, restroom buildings, tot lot, playground for 5- to 12-year-olds, sledding hill, soccer field, basketball courts, regulation cyclocross course, paved multi-use trail circuit, and ice climbing towers. Developed as an intensely programmed landscape, the park will serve the community of North St. Louis, downtown residents, Saint Louis University, Grand Center, and tourists visiting downtown attractions.


Joan Walbert

A WINTER SPORTS PA RK FOR PRUIT T-IGOE

Joe DiBella

ML A S12

Joan Walbert

Cowles 223


Junru Zheng

224

Joe DiBella

Cowles Joe DiBella


Joan Walbert

A WINTER SPORTS PA RK FOR PRUIT T-IGOE

ML A S12

Joan Walbert

Cowles 225


Junru Zheng

226

Junru Zheng

Cowles


A WINTER SPORTS PA RK FOR PRUIT T-IGOE

Joe DiBella

ML A S12

Joe DiBella

Cowles 227


M Master of Urban Design

228 228

Urbanization is an increasing and constantly changing condition of contemporary society, one that presents enormous opportunities for—and challenges to—the creation of resilient, livable, and healthy urban habitats for a sustainable world. To this end, the Master of Urban Design (MUD) program addresses urbanizing conditions and environments occurring in cities nationally and internationally by considering a full range of scales, from region to metropolitan district, from district to blocks and streets of neighborhoods, and ultimately to the design of the public realm where the vibrancy of urban and community life unfolds. This innovative post-professional program allows students to pursue advanced design and research work of the urban environment while acquiring the theoretical and professional foundation for urban design practice. The curriculum is centered on the core sequence of urban design studios. Through these intensive design experiences, students develop the skills to make design proposals for a diverse range of conditions within the metropolitan landscape. The first studio


Ke Shi

MUD F11

229 229

BUENOS A IRES

introduces students to sustainable urban design concepts through theoretical and speculative exercises that explore metropolitan conditions in and around St. Louis, focusing on the regional scale and the development of projects down to the district scale. Students then take an “action-research” studio that engages in urban sustainable development issues from the scale of the district to understanding and shaping public space while more fully engaging the policy, cultural, economic, and real estate conditions of cities. The core studio sequence culminates with an international summer studio located in a rapidly growing “Hyper-City,” which serves as the Degree Project for the Master of Urban Design.


C MUD Core Studios

230 230

FALL 2011 – SPRING 2012

The MUD curriculum is centered on the core sequence of two urban design studios. Through these intensive design experiences, students develop the skills to make design proposals for a diverse range of conditions within the metropolitan landscape and to suggest propositions that consider splintered and differentiated urbanisms. The first studio, which takes place in the fall, introduces students to sustainable urban design concepts through theoretical and speculative exercises that explore contemporary metropolitan conditions in and around the St. Louis region focusing on the regional to district scale and the natural, infrastructural and built systems of the urban landscape while developing projects at the intra-district scale. The studio takes optional field trips to various North American cities to research precedents and investigate important historical urban morphologies. The studio is supported by a series of topic-specific master classes and lectures in history and theory of urbanism, research methods, and specialized components of landscape and infrastructural urbanism.


Amber Organtini

MUD F11

231

BUENOS A IRES

In the spring, students take the Lively City Studio that engages the scale of the district to the design of public space while more fully engaging the policy, cultural, economic and real estate conditions of cities. Using a public live / public space research and design methodology, this studio introduces students to the immense intellectual and cultural resources of major North American cities through the studio project sites being located in cities such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle, Vancouver and Toronto. Again, the studio is supported by a series of topic-specific weekend master classes by international recognized experts typically focused on the on the creation of vibrant public space and city life and/ or sustainable urban design. The studio typically takes field trips to the project sites as well as to key European cities.


C Carolyn Gaidis Patty Heyda

Lecturer

Assistant Professor

Elements of Urban Design

MUD FALL 2011

This studio addresses the complexity of urbanized landscapes as interconnected ecological systems characterized by a diversity of physical conditions. Along any given metropolitan transect, a spectrum of typologically distinct urbanisms exists where natural systems, infrastructures, open spaces, and buildings and blocks vary in their formal organizational logics and in the ways they articulate and interact with each other and with other flows. In order to develop skills and techniques in urban design, students must develop an understanding of the complexity of these environments at nested ecological scales, and through expanded perspectives from architecture, landscape architecture, city and regional planning, development, sociology, and environmental sciences. These (once separate) professions cross-matriculate on all levels throughout this studio, given our current and evolving methodologies for re-thinking “sustainability” through design. This studio provides the foundational concepts and skills for students to engage the diverse conditions of the contemporary city formally while negotiating criteria of design quality, sustainability, and human use patterns, with in-depth knowledge of the systemic and inter-scalar relationships characterizing the metropolitan landscape. Students work briefly in group formats for research and analysis, and then individually for design development over the course of the semester, rotating between three distinct sites along the St. Louis metropolitan transect. Analysis and design work reflect the intensive range of scales in view at all times: the regional to local to block and building scales. The final project id an urban design proposal for one of the three sites that reflects students’ understanding of—and a clear position towards—the site and its ecological, spatial, and programmatic identities and needs. Students are introduced to ArcView/GIS; additional readings and technical workshops also supplement the studio.

Amanda Texas

232


ELEMENTS OF URBA N DESIGN

Liang Liang

MUD F11

Liang Liang

Amanda Texas

Gaidis | Heyda 233


Shruti Shankar

234

Amanda Texas

Gaidis | Heyda Amanda Texas


ELEMENTS OF URBA N DESIGN

MUD F11

Shruti Shankar

Gaidis | Heyda 235

Amanda Texas


Yue Bi

236 Shruti Shankar


Liang Liang

ELEMENTS OF URBA N DESIGN

MUD F11

Amanda Texas

Gaidis | Heyda 237


C John Hoal Oliver Schulze Courtney Cushard

Associate Professor

Visiting Professor

MUD SPRING 2012

The magic of the city is choice, especially opportunities for “being in public”—that is, enjoying a variety of social and cultural activities, accomplishing the necessities of everyday life, and generally “being alive in the city.” Providing people with access to stimulating and lively urban environments is an important prerequisite for a high quality of life in cities. A lively city is one in which the urban economy will continue to flourish and where environmentally sustainable structures will still be culturally relevant to future generations. This MUD studio explores established and new ways of observing urban life as a starting point from which to shape design proposals for urban environments. Studying urban quality requires documenting and analyzing a complex array of data. Successful evidence-based design relies on rigorous methodology to enable the preparation and careful execution of surveys. The quality and nature of the information collated sets the context for how the data is used to understand, compare, and benchmark aspects of urban quality, and how it informs the design of proposed physical changes and consequential transformations in use by people. During the semester, students survey the public life in the Los Angeles Special Entertainment District (LASED) and the surrounding South Park District. Students practice essential skills to align the transformation of physical urban infrastructure with our changing expectations toward urban life today. Outcomes include observing existing urban life and mapping urban quality; planning for additional public life and high quality of life; developing area strategies based on urban quality; and connecting urban life and urban form through design.

Mohammed Almahmood

238

The Lively City: Imagine the Los Angeles You Want; Observe the Los Angeles You Get.


THE LI V ELY CIT Y

MUD S12

Yue Bi

Hoal | Schulze | Cushard 239


Ke Shi

Hoal | Schulze | Cushard

Ke Shi

240


THE LI V ELY CIT Y

MUD S12

Ke Shi

Hoal | Schulze | Cushard 241

Linda Levin


Mohammed Almahmood

242

Hoal | Schulze | Cushard

Linda Levin


Mohammed Almahmood

THE LI V ELY CIT Y

MUD S12

Yue Bi

Hoal | Schulze | Cushard 24 3


D

MUD Degree Project

24 4 24 4

SUMMER 2012

The 21st century is an urban century, one where the human condition has become an urban condition. This summer 10-12 week immersion urban design studio responds to this challenge and provides the students the opportunity to study, experience and make design proposals in a number of significant global cities – cities that are imbued with the complexity of urban life and have an active and lively culture, arts and design scene in which the making of the urban fabric is challenged by rapid growth, environmental stress, social complexity and the need for a new approach to urbanism. Each year the studio selects a fast-growing city in Asia, Africa or South America to compare and contrast with an American city, and utilizes a similar urban design project to explore and develop a detailed design project in order to develop a distinctive, place-specific urban intervention. Over the past five years various themes of urban intensification have been explored particularly focused on urban sustainability; vertical urbanism, hydo-urbanism, emergent urbanism, and informal urbanism amongst others all with the purpose for the creation of everyday lively, livable and socially transformational


Ke Shi

urban projects in the following cities: Shanghai; Singapore; Tokyo; Hong Kong: Mexico City; San Francisco; Los Angeles; and Chicago. The studio begins in St. Louis with two weeks of research and study prior to spending the following eight weeks immersed in the selected cities – living, researching, observing and working on the urban design project. Field trips to other significant global cities and contemporary icons of architecture, landscapes and urbanism occur throughout the duration of the studio. The studio is supported by lectures on the history, theory and methods of global urbanism, and a robust visiting international guest lecturer program that provides valuable local insight to the cultural, artist and social conditions of the city. The studio culminates in the publication of a studio research and design report that is focused on studying a series of global cities in comparative perspective with each student proposing a particular and site specific proposition within one of the cities studied.

245


D John Hoal Seng Kuan Bing Bu

Associate Professor

Assistant Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Erik G. L’Heureux Tsuto Sakamoto Chunxia Yang Yu Zhuang

Lecturer Abroad Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Hong Kong/Shanghai International Studio MUD SUMMER 2012

For this action-research studio, students undertake significant research into some of the world’s most important urban centers, which they ultimately resolve into a specific design. This year, the cities of Shanghai and Hong Kong are the focus for all projects. In preparation for their work in Asia, students conduct a two-week comparative global urbanism research project on the urban morphology and metabolism of Shanghai and Hong Kong, covering three scales of site analysis: metropolitan, downtown, and site (riverfront). During the second phase of the studio, students are subdivided into charrette teams, each of which develops a VISION_2050 plan for one of two sites: the Pudong neighborhood of Shanghai and the Kowloon district of Hong Kong. The plan must include a clearly stated vision; set of goals and urban design principles; a framework plan; 3D urban morphology mode; urban systems and performance; urban design code that describes spatial/building/landscape/infrastructural typologies and character; and a public realm plan. Finally, each team member individually completes the design of a detailed component of the group’s plan; thus, each master plan includes a number of detailed companion studies testing the VISION_2050 plan and demonstrating the functionality, character, and use of the proposition. Studio work takes place in collaboration with students and faculty from the National University of Singapore and Tongji University.

Almahmood | Shankar

246


SH A NGH A I

MUD SU12

247


24 8


John Hoal Seng Kuan Bing Bu Erik G. L’Heureux Tsuto Sakamoto Chunxia Yang Yu Zhuang

Associate Professor Assistant Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

SH A NGH A I

MUD SU12

249


Mohammed Almahmood | Shruti Shankar 250


John Hoal Seng Kuan Bing Bu Erik G. L’Heureux Tsuto Sakamoto Chunxia Yang Yu Zhuang

Associate Professor Assistant Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

SH A NGH A I

MUD SU12

251


Amanda Texas | Ian Lee Ashcraft-Williams 252


John Hoal Seng Kuan Bing Bu Erik G. L’Heureux Tsuto Sakamoto Chunxia Yang Yu Zhuang

Associate Professor Assistant Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

SH A NGH A I

MUD SU12

253


Ke Shi 25 4


John Hoal Seng Kuan Bing Bu Erik G. L’Heureux Tsuto Sakamoto Chunxia Yang Yu Zhuang

Associate Professor Assistant Professor

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

Lecturer Abroad

SH A NGH A I

MUD SU12

255


Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts 256

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN

COLLEGE OF ART

DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ART

MILDRED LANE KEMPER ART MUSEUM

KRANZBERG ART & ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY

The Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts is an interdisciplinary and diverse community of architects, artists, and designers dedicated to excellence in learning, creative activity, research, and exhibition. The School’s unique structure allows it to build on the strengths of each unit— Architecture, Art, and Museum—and to draw on the resources of the University to create new knowledge and address the social and environmental challenges of our time. As a result, students have access to expanded opportunities for critical dialogue and collaboration, and are singularly positioned to shape 21stcentury culture. The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design is engaged in architecture in all its manifestations of discourse and practice, from building technologies and professional standards to drawing, painting, and sculpture; from digital media to full-scale fabrication; from architectural history to critical theory. Our graduate programs offer vision and demand commitment throughout

a variety of options and terms of study. These programs are interconnected and integrated sequences of design studios and parallel course work that move between values of technology and craft, emphasizing both theory and practice, and taking into consideration questions of site, material, assembly, and purpose. International semesters expand the physical reach of both the undergraduate and graduate programs, connecting them to diverse educational settings in Europe, South America, and Asia.


Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN

COLLEGE OF ART

DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ART

MILDRED LANE KEMPER ART MUSEUM

257

MUD F11

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

KRANZBERG ART & ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY

The Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts is an interdisciplinary and diverse community of architects, artists, and designers dedicated to excellence in learning, creative activity, research, and exhibition. The School’s unique structure allows it to build on the strengths of each unit— Architecture, Art, and Museum—and to draw on the resources of the University to create new knowledge and address the social and environmental challenges of our time. As a result, students have access to expanded opportunities for critical dialogue and collaboration, and are singularly positioned to shape 21stcentury culture. The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design is engaged in architecture in all its manifestations of discourse and practice, from building technologies and professional standards to drawing, painting, and sculpture; from digital media to full-scale fabrication; from architectural history to critical theory. Our graduate programs offer vision and demand commitment throughout

a variety of options and terms of study. These programs are interconnected and integrated sequences of design studios and parallel course work that move between values of technology and craft, emphasizing both theory and practice, and taking into consideration questions of site, material, assembly, and purpose. International semesters expand the physical reach of both the undergraduate and graduate programs, connecting them to diverse educational settings in Europe, South America, and Asia.

buenos a ires

256

This publication was designed by Laura Burns of designlab,inc; typeset using DIN by FontFont; printed on Betalith from Case Paper Company by Bender in St. Louis, MO, in an edition of 1,500.

We are committed to environmentally responsible design at all scales. This publication is printed on paper consisting of 10% post-consumer waste, with FSC Chain of Custody and SFI fiber sourcing certifications.


Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design Washington University in St.Louis

Campus Box 1079 One Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130

314.935.6227 phone 800.295.6227 continental US 314.935.7656 fax wuarch@wustl.edu samfoxschool.wustl.edu

Approach11 12  

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University in St. Louis

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