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Where’s My Sandwich?

STICKER SHOCK P.25

Q&A With Kim Phuc

“NAPALM GIRL” P.10

Busking for a Cause

HELPING THE ARMY P.14

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

MARCH 2018

Dancing With the Star HOW GYMNAST AND DANCE-SHOW FINALIST LAURIE HERNANDEZ STAYS GROUNDED. P.16


Morning Has Broken There are few things better than a morning prayer to start your day. Tell God what worries you. Ask Him to be present in the lives of your loved ones. Thank Him for His blessing. Start your day off on the right foot by focusing on God before your attention and energies are pulled in all directions by the day ahead. Your soul will be revived, your heart will be refreshed and your mind will be renewed. To learn more about the power of prayer, email us at faithandfriends@can.salvationarmy.org or visit your local Salvation Army church.

Photo: Used with permission. © Ray Majoran, compassiongallery.com

“Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” —Philippians 4:6-7


March 2018

VOLUME 21 NUMBER 3

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BEYOND BORDERS 5 Trading for Hope

Every Others product changes a life for the better. BETWEEN THE LINES 8 Trial by Fire

Vietnam’s “napalm girl” shares her journey to forgiveness and healing in new book. IN CONVERSATION 10 The Path to Peace

Vietnam War survivor Kim Phuc discusses her new book and how she’s learned to love her napalm scars. FEATURES

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COVER STORY

16 22

Busking for Change

Three brothers find a unique way to raise money for an Army soup kitchen.

She’s Got This

Gymnast Laurie Hernandez stays grounded in faith.

River Rescue!

Michael Ramsay’s friend was literally up a creek without a paddle.

Cover photo: Courtesy Shade Global, Inc.

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GOD IN MY LIFE 25 Sticker Shock

The last thing Jeanette Levellie expected at a Christian bookstore was rudeness from a fellow employee. LITE STUFF 28 Eating Healthy With Erin

Sudoku, Quick Quiz, Word Search. REFASHIONISTA RULES 31 An Easy DIY Shamrock Shirt

Create a unique T-shirt to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

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Faith&Friends

FROM THE EDITOR

Behind the Photo

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don’t remember the exact moment I first saw Kim Phuc’s photograph, but I’ll never forget the impression it left on me,” says staff writer Kristin Ostensen. “The pain on her face as she ran naked down the road toward the camera—I could almost hear her crying through the photo. It was awful. As a high school student learning about the Vietnam War, this photograph taught me everything I needed to know.” Reading Fire Road, Kim’s memoir, Kristin was amazed to see how far that little girl had come, from the horrors of war in Vietnam to freedom in Canada and faith in God. In an exclusive interview with Kristin for Faith & Friends, Kim opened up about what led her to write the book and how she has come to love the scars left by the horrific bombing. “When I told Kim how the photo had impacted me, she seemed surprised that I had seen it at all,” smiles Kristin. “Though her story has touched countless people around the world, she’s humble, giving all credit to God.” You can read a review of Kim’s book and her Q&A with Kristin in this month’s issue of Faith & Friends. Elsewhere this month, we spotlight Olympic gymnast and Dancing With the Stars winner Laurie Hernandez, we see how three brothers found an innovative way to raise money for a Salvation Army soup kitchen, and we look at how lives have been transformed through a remarkable Salvation Army program operating out of Pakistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Moldova.

Ken Ramstead

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Mission Statement To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith.

Faith & Friends is published monthly by: The Salvation Army 2 Overlea Blvd, Toronto Ontario, M4H 1P4 International Headquarters 101 Queen Victoria Street, London, EC4P 4EP, England William and Catherine Booth FOUNDERS

André Cox, GENERAL Commissioner Susan McMillan TERRITORIAL COMMANDER

Lt-Colonel Jim Champ SECRETARY FOR COMMUNICATIONS Geoff Moulton, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ken Ramstead, EDITOR

Brandon Laird DESIGN AND MEDIA SPECIALIST

Timothy Cheng SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Pamela Richardson, COPY EDITOR, PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR

Ada Leung CIRCULATION CO-ORDINATOR

Kristin Ostensen STAFF WRITER, PROOFREADER

Giselle Randall STAFF WRITER Scripture Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture references are taken from New International Version Contact Us P. (416) 467-3188, F. (416) 422-6120 Websites faithandfriends.ca, salvationist.ca, salvationarmy.ca Email faithandfriends@can.salvationarmy.org Subscription for one year: Canada $17 (includes GST/HST); U.S. $22; foreign $24 P. (416) 422-6119 circulation@can.salvationarmy.org All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada & Bermuda and cannot be reproduced without permission. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064794 ISSN 1702-0131


Faith&Friends

BEYOND BORDERS

Trading for Hope

Photos: The Salvation Army U.S.A. Easterm Territory

Every Others product changes a life for the better.

F

rom the very first time I heard the story of transformation, dignity and hope experienced through the innovative work of Others—Trade for Hope, I felt compelled to do something,” says Major Shirley King, consultant for women’s ministries resources for The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. “As I heard the stories of change and deliverance from a life of poverty, hopelessness

Happy Twosome “When I am stitching the cloth hearts,” says Nipa, here with her son, “I feel great joy in my heart”

and dependence, I knew this was a program that deserved to be supported.” The response has been overwhelming as more and more people from coast to coast have become involved. “It’s wonderful knowing the items give hope on one side of the world and bring joy on the other!” says Major Shirley. Behind every beautifully handcrafted Others product purchased

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Faith&Friends

BEYOND BORDERS

“Working with Others has allowed us to pay off our loan, and now I am able to better care for my son.” NIPA is a person from Bangladesh, Kenya, Pakistan or Moldova whose life is being changed. Here are just three from Bangladesh:

Ameena Ameena has been married for 12 years and has two children. She’s been part of the Others program for five years. “It was challenging when I first started working with Others, because I had a young child. I had no income when I first joined the group. I was trained in skills such as working with jute and embroidery. I now earn 4,000-5,000 taka per month. “My income helps to support our family, and I have purchased chickens and ducks for cultivation. I have become very good at tailoring and I make all our clothes. “I am very happy that I am working.”

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Anawara Anawara has worked with the Others program for 15 years and has four children and a granddaughter. “I first heard about Others from a community worker from The Salvation Army. I needed work, so I came for training. I had no experience when I started. Now, I work well with jute and embroidery. “My husband is a day labourer. During the monsoon season, it is hard for us as work is more difficult for him to find. “With the income I make from Others, I have put all of my children through school.” Nipa Twenty-year-old Nipa is married


(left) “Bangladesh has woven a thread of their story into my life, and my story is more beautiful because of that,” says April Foster (left), here with Lily, an Others productions manager

with a five-year-old son. “My husband works as a garment worker in Dhaka, which requires him to be away from home and pay rent there. He can only come home for one week every three months. “When my husband was not employed, we had to take a loan to survive. Working with Others has allowed us to pay off our loan, and now I am able to better care for my son. “When I am stitching the cloth hearts, I feel great joy in my heart.” Bangladesh

To purchase items from Others— Trade for Hope contact others@ can.salvationarmy. org or visit salvationist.ca/ others

April Foster: Others Director, The Salvation Army U.S.A. Eastern Territory “You can’t be in Bangladesh without being inspired. It’s the stories of people that do that for me more than anything else. When you sit alongside a woman and watch as she makes something beautiful with her hands and tells you her story, it’s as if that product is given life by that story. And I saw items come to life every day in Bangladesh. “So as I reflect on this time in Bangladesh, I am grateful for new life. New life that comes when our stories connect us around the world. New life that comes when men and women are given opportunity to work. New life that comes as we experience the love of God when people gather together.”

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Faith&Friends

BETWEEN THE LINES

Trial by Fire Vietnam’s “napalm girl” shares her journey to forgiveness and healing in new book. by Kristin Ostensen

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im Phuc ran as fast as she could, trying to escape the bombs falling around her, but it was too late. A cloud of sticky napalm had engulfed her, burning away her clothing, scorching her skin. Her journey down Route 1 in Trang Bang, Vietnam, was captured by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut, and with the click of a shutter, the worst moment of Kim’s life became one of the most iconic photographs in history. Forty-five years later, Kim recounts that fateful day, the aftermath, and her path to physical and spiritual healing in her riveting autobiography, Fire Road: The Napalm Girl’s Journey Through the Horrors of War to Faith, Forgiveness and Peace. Scarred for Life Fire Road takes readers back to the

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early 1970s, when Kim was simply a carefree, mischievous child. Kim describes the daily rhythms of family, friends and faith, which were slowly eroded by the Vietnam War and forever changed by the napalm bombing on June 8, 1972. With Ut’s help, Kim was taken to a hospital in Saigon where the doctors assessed her third- and fourth-degree burns. “Napalm-burn victims never survived,” Kim writes. “And so, in my unconscious state … I was left to die.” Thankfully, her parents found her in the morgue and insisted she receive medical care. The treatments were incredibly painful, but Kim’s life was saved. After her release from hospital, Kim tried to resume her previous life—going to school, playing with friends—but the constant pain made every day difficult. Worse still, her


scars changed her perception of herself: “Because I would now and forever be seen as ‘different,’ I was unfit to be loved.” Freedom As Kim entered adulthood, she faced new challenges. The 10th anniversary of her photograph brought renewed attention to her, and government officials seized the opportunity to use Kim for propaganda. Fire Road

not stumbled upon freedom that the world could detect—freedom from communism, from oppression, from pain,” she writes. “But inside—on the level of my soul—I was settling into a type of contentment that paid little mind to external things.” Healing the Future In 1992, Kim finally attained freedom from communism, defecting to Canada where she thought she would

“In my unconscious state … I was left to die.”  KIM PHUC describes the countless anti-American interviews Kim was forced to give for years. In despair, Kim planned to commit suicide, but a trip to a library in Saigon introduced her to a new source of hope. While browsing the religion section, she came across a New Testament and was amazed by the story of Jesus, the God who suffered and died to save humanity. Could He be the one true God? she wondered. “If this Jesus was indeed who He said He was, and if He had truly endured all He said He had endured, then perhaps He could help me make sense of my pain and at last come to terms with my scars,” Kim writes. Kim’s conversion to Christianity marked a turning point. Her circumstances did not change overnight, but faith gave her new strength. “I had

escape the attention the “napalm girl” photograph had brought her. Yet, that same photograph has opened all kinds of doors for her— to a book, a documentary film, the opportunity to promote peace as a goodwill ambassador for UNESCO. Day by day, the darkness Kim once felt has gradually left her, being replaced by love and forgiveness— even for the pilot who caused her so much pain. As historical biography, Fire Road provides the fascinating story behind the famous photograph. But more than that, Kim’s book is an inspiring story of faith that will resonate with anyone who has struggled to endure pain and forgive others for past wrongs. “We cannot change history,” she says, “but with love, we can heal the future.”

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Faith&Friends

IN CONVERSATION

Photo: © Richard Kimball

Ambassador to Peace Kim Phuc Phan Thi is a UNESCO goodwill ambassador who has received numerous awards and recognitions for her commitment to global peace and reconciliation

The Path to Peace Vietnam War survivor Kim Phuc discusses her new book and how she’s learned to love her napalm scars.

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n June 8, 1972, a series of napalm bombs were dropped on Trang Bang, Vietnam, resulting in one of the most haunting photographs from the Vietnam War. More than 40

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years later, “the girl in the picture,” Kim Phuc, tells her life story in Fire Road: The Napalm Girl’s Journey Through the Horrors of War to Faith, Forgiveness and Peace (see book review on page 8). Staff writer Kris-


When people ask me, “Who sponsored you to come to Canada?” I say, “God did!”  KIM PHUC tin Ostensen spoke to Kim about the book, her scars and what she would say to the man who dropped the bombs that changed her life. Why did you write Fire Road?

I wanted to share my story about what happened to me as a child. I used to feel a lot of hatred, anger and bitterness. I’d ask, “Why did this happen to me? Why do I have to suffer?” I was in darkness. But now I have peace and joy. I went through many trials and challenges, but God helped me get through all of them. With Fire Road, I want to tell people that God has been so good to me. I want to express my thankfulness to Him and let readers know that they can have peace and joy like me. What was the most difficult part for you to write?

The hardest part was remembering how my parents watched me suffer as a child, wishing they could carry that burden, that pain, for me. I’ll never forget when my dad told me about how he stayed beside my bed, waiting until I moved my eyes, making sure I was still alive. Now that

I’m a mother and a grandmother, it’s very difficult for me to think about what my mom and dad experienced. It was also difficult for me to go back to the time when I was filled with hatred and bitterness, before I became a Christian and learned about forgiveness. You found political asylum in Canada in 1992 and settled in Toronto. After what you’d been through, it must have felt like a whole new world.

Yes! It was my dream. I kept praying that God would open the door for me—I just wanted to have freedom. I had spiritual freedom because I became a Christian in 1982, but I wasn’t a free citizen. So when I came to Canada—Wow! It was so wonderful. I didn’t know much about Canada. I had no money, no friends, nothing. But I had faith, so I had everything. When people ask me, “Who sponsored you to come to Canada?” I say, “God did!” In the book, you write that you’ve learned to love your scars. How is that possible?

The bottom line is that my heart has been healed. Before, when I

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Faith&Friends

IN CONVERSATION

looked at my scars, I hated them. I thought they were so ugly. I didn’t know about my future then, that one day I would be a goodwill ambassador for UNESCO; that I’d have the opportunity to meet kings and queens in Europe, to share my story with everyone; that I’d have the opportunity to help children in Africa [through the Kim Phuc Foundation]. I treasure these opportunities. I love my life. So when I look at my scars, I’m thankful because I know that all the things I’m doing right now are not because of me; it’s because of God. He knew my future, He gave me these opportunities and I never

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Photo: © Anne Bayin

(right) Kim with her son, Thomas. “No one believed I would ever be physically able to bear children,” Kim says. “Thomas’ arrival in 1994 proved them wrong!”

take it for granted. My scars are rough and hard, and still painful, but when the pain comes to me, I pray, “God give me strength. Help me to deal with it.” I’ve learned not to focus on the pain because then it seems bigger. The more I pray, the more peace I have. In the acknowledgments of Fire Road, you’ve written a note to the pilot who dropped the napalm, saying that you’d like to meet him. Why did you include this?

I pray for him every day, even though I don’t know him. If he’s still alive, I want to let him know that I forgive him. I want to give him a hug and let it go. That is my heart.


Photo: © Steven Stafford

In the book, you write that we all have our own “fire road.” What do you mean by that?

Everyone has their problems and challenges. My fire road has cost me so much—not only that physical fire when I was nine, but my whole journey. I have had many fires along the way! You may have a different road, but if we have hope, if we have joy, we can get through it, and then we can help other people. What do you hope readers will take away from Fire Road?

I received a letter from a teenager who read my book. She told me about her mother, who had treated

(left) Kim with Nick Ut, the photographer who captured her journey down Route 1 in 1972. Kim and “Uncle Ut” remain friends to this day

her badly. Later, her mom became sick and ended up in the hospital. “After I read your book,” she wrote, “I went to the hospital, held her hand, and I was able to say, ‘I love you, Mom.’ Later, my mom died and I was so happy that we reconciled. If I didn’t go see her, I would have missed that opportunity forever and regretted it for the rest of my life. You gave me hope and peace, that I could take that action.” It made me cry when I read that. We have to learn how to live with love, hope and forgiveness. That’s why I wrote Fire Road. Everyone can do it—if the “napalm girl” in the picture can do it, you can, too.

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

Busking for Change

Photo: Lauren Collins

(from left) Liam, Ewan and Connor Docherty began raising money for The Salvation Army after learning their great-grandfather stayed at the Army after returning from the Second World War and hearing about a shortage of donations at the food bank. Here they are posed with their project about the importance of remembering the service and sacrifice of veterans

THREE ENTERPRISING BROTHERS FIND A UNIQUE WAY TO RAISE MONEY FOR A SALVATION ARMY SOUP KITCHEN. by Lauren Collins

S

ince last summer, 10-yearold Liam, eight-year-old Ewan and four-year-old Connor Docherty have been busking at the Thrifty Foods store in Parksville, B.C., and the nearby Qualicum Beach farmers market to raise money for The Salvation Army, after having read an article that the food bank was running low.

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Natalie Docherty, the boys’ mother, says the brothers had a goal of covering the costs of running the Salvation Army soup kitchen for four days. “When we spoke to Earl Blacklock, the manager of community ministries at the Salvation Army church in Parksville, he explained that it costs $400 to run the soup kitchen for one


day and that feeds 100 men, women and children. So we hoped to cover the four days they run it per week,” Natalie says. As of December, the brothers had surpassed their goal and had raised $1,700. Of that money, $600 was awarded to the boys for winning the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy award in the ages five to 10 category at the Association of Fundraising Professionals Victoria chapter last November 22. While living on Salt Spring Island,

that our music can continue to make a difference for the most vulnerable people in our community.” Virtual Giving Early last year, Natalie notes the boys worked on a project about the importance of remembering the service and sacrifice of veterans. It was through that that the boys got into raising money for The Salvation Army. “Their great-grandfather, after he came back from the Second World

Reprinted from Parksville Qualicum Beach News, December 4, 2017

“We would like our final thank you to be for The Salvation Army for the work they do both in our local community and elsewhere.”  LIAM DOCHERTY B.C., the brothers had seen kids busking at the local market and decided to try it out. But then, they read that the Army’s emergency shelter had issued an urgent appeal for donations. “We saw that the emergency shelter was running low on supplies and money, so we thought maybe instead of busking for ourselves, we could busk for other people as well,” Liam says. At the awards ceremony, Liam got up to speak on behalf of his brothers. “We would like our final thank you to be for The Salvation Army for the work they do both in our local community and elsewhere and we hope

War, didn’t have anywhere to live, he had no family to stay with, so he stayed with The Salvation Army,” Natalie says. “We saw that the Army needed donations for the food bank, so that’s what started the fundraising this year.” Liam, Ewan and Connor wrote to Thrifty Foods in Parksville, which allowed the brothers to busk in front of the store. After raising hundreds of dollars by the end of the year, they launched an online “virtual kettle” for people to continue to donate to the cause. For more information, visit www.buskingforchange.ca. faithandfriends.ca  I  MARCH 2018

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Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

She’s Got This

WHETHER SHE’S GOING FOR GOLD AT THE RIO OLYMPICS OR NAILING 10s ON DANCING WITH THE STARS, GYMNAST LAURIE HERNANDEZ STAYS GROUNDED IN HER FAITH. by Jayne Thurber-Smith

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Laurie Hernandez and her Dancing With the Stars partner Val Chmerkovskiy

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COVER STORY

HER BIG BROWN EYES sparkled as Laurie Hernandez flashed a brief smile to the huge crowd of spectators at the Rio Summer Olympics in 2016. The normally bubbly 16-year-old was strictly business as she stared down the balance beam she was about to conquer. She took a deep breath, placed her hands on the beam and mouthed, “I got this!” She then effortlessly vaulted onto it and into a front split en route to helping her U.S. team bring home the gold medal. Laurie also earned her own individual silver medal from the balance beam, barely beating out teammate and quadruple gold medalist Simone Biles. The teammates celebrated their success together. “I’m so proud of her. She deserves it more than anyone,” Simone told Team USA’s writer Nick McCarvel, after their award ceremony. As Simone knew, Laurie’s road to Rio wasn’t a smooth one. “Early in 2014, I fractured my wrist, then injured my knee that June,” she recalls. “The last thing you want is time off when you are supposed to be training! Having to 18 • MARCH 2018  I faithandfriends.ca

sit out and watch my teammates perform made me long so badly to be out there with them. But I knew there was still time to make a comeback. I believed physically, emotionally and mentally that I could do it.” Dream Come True Without skipping a beat, Laurie went from the Olympic finals into rehearsals for Dancing With the Stars that same year. She competed with dancer Val Chmerkovskiy and became the show’s youngest winner, not allowing herself to be intimidated by a roomful of adult competitors. Where does a young teenager suddenly thrust into the bright lights of television get that kind of confidence? “It was developed over years of training and took a long time to get to,” Laurie smiles. “I knew the more confident I was the better I could perform, because I was more comfortable. My mom is a social worker, so any time I’ve had difficulty in a competition through the years or had a rough day, she would give me ideas how to tame that, like speaking positively.”


Photos: Courtesy Shade Global, Inc.

Laurie’s unwavering confidence also comes from her strong faith in God, who has always been an important part of her daily life. Her favourite Bible verse is Philippians 4:13, “I can do all this through Him who gives me strength.” “I was raised by Christian parents,” she comments. “They were very passionate about my siblings and me being guided in the right direction. As an athlete, it’s important to me to have that foundation through all the ups and downs.” However, what was intimidating was the drastic difference between competing as a gymnast and as half of a dancing duo.

The Look of a Winner: Laurie’s confidence developed over years of training and through her strong faith in God

“As a gymnast, you do everything solo and barefoot, so it was a big change to dance with a partner and wear high heels,” she laughs. “Both changes were uncomfortable for me at first, but I adjusted. We practised for four hours a day and it was gruelling, but I enjoyed every second on that show. It wasn’t until we got closer to the end that I thought we might actually have a chance to win. I was also used to only instrumental music in gymnastics and found it faithandfriends.ca  I  MARCH 2018

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Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

“Whatever time you can spare, you need to pray.”  LAURIE HERNANDEZ

was hard dancing to music with lyrics because I had to keep myself from singing along with it.” The week before her win, Laurie had no voice to sing along with the lyrics even if it had been permitted. Tears clogged her throat as she danced soulfully and courageously with Val to the sad song Hollow. The video that introduced the dance showed clips of Laurie’s beloved Grandmother Bruny, who had passed away just days before. Showing a grace and strength far beyond her years, Laurie danced in tribute to a life well lived and loved. “I saw you breathing into every move, using all of that emotion and channeling it into something beautiful for all of us to watch,” judge Carrie Ann Inaba told her, as Laurie and the audience wiped away their tears. Laurie earned straight 10s. “It was a dream come true,” says Laurie of her win. “I felt the same joy as I had at the Olympics.” Pushing Through Fear Dancing With the Stars finished in November 2016, and in January 20 • MARCH 2018  I faithandfriends.ca

2017, Laurie came out with a New York Times bestseller I Got This—To Gold and Beyond. The book is dedicated to her grandmother, parents and siblings who have all been tremendous supporters. She has been busy with various appearances and book signings, and is scheduled to speak at The Salvation Army’s annual luncheon in San Antonio, Texas, on May 8. “The first time I did a public speaking engagement I was nervous and thought I had nothing to share,” she remembers. “But now I look forward to doing it. I am becoming a social butterfly!” Even though Laurie is often on the road and can’t always make it to church, staying strong in her faith is a priority, so she watches a lot of Christian content on YouTube. And no matter how busy her day will be, she makes sure to start it with prayer. “There’s always time for that,” she maintains. “Whatever time you can spare, you need to pray.” Something else she makes time for is helping others. She is of Puerto Rican descent and has been out-


Two-Step: (left) Laurie in action as an artistic gymnast and (below) posing with the Mirrorball trophy seconds after her and Val’s triumph on Dancing With the Stars. The 16-year-old was the show’s youngest winner

spoken in fundraising for the island that was devastated by hurricane Maria this past September. “Thankfully, my relatives there are OK, but Puerto Rico still needs aid,” she says. In early fall, she visited Japan to

coach gymnasts at U.S. military bases, and she enjoys encouraging other Olympic hopefuls. “No matter what you take on, make sure you stay rooted in your faith and family,” Laurie advises. “And don’t let your fears stop you.” faithandfriends.ca  I  MARCH 2018

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

River Rescue! OUR FRIEND WAS LITERALLY UP A CREEK WITHOUT A PADDLE. COULD WE GET HIM TO DRY LAND? by Michael Ramsay

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ast August, a number of people from our church decided to go kayaking on a river near Paris, Ont. We all thought it would be a great opportunity to build relationships. It was—but not in the way we expected. I was especially happy that Howard was coming along with us. Howard’s life had been interesting. He’d lived on the streets before meeting Captains Ron and Linda Farr, my predecessors at The Salvation Army’s Warehouse Mission in Toronto, and his faith and church involvement had continued to grow since my arrival. I wasn’t as certain about his seafaring abilities, however— he’d never kayaked before—and no sooner had the seven of us

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adventurers climbed into our crafts and drifted out of sight of the kayak rental facility than Howard’s paddle snapped in two. We joked later that he was up the creek without a paddle, but at the time, it wasn’t anything to laugh about, especially as we were heading down the river toward a waterfall a short distance ahead. A Wet Reunion Even veteran kayakers such as myself would have experienced difficulty at this point. While Howard gamely tried to keep his craft seaworthy in the fast-moving current, he wasn’t able to avoid a large rock. With his life preserver keeping him afloat, Howard abandoned ship and clung to the rock for dear life.


Photo: © gaspr13/iStock.com

We could see that Howard was getting a little agitated, so I sent Rob, one of our number, to paddle over to watch him. Meanwhile, Howard’s kayak started filling up with water as it drifted downstream, so after collecting the broken oar, Sam and I paddled over to retrieve it. All the while, we had drifted further away from Howard, who was stranded on the rock. We had to paddle upstream, kayak in tow, and figure out how to get Howard back into his craft. I was exhausted but relieved by the thought that the worst was over. Up until now, Howard had been perched safely on the rock next to

Rob in his own kayak. All we had to do was steady the kayak so Howard could safely climb back in. But when he saw us labouriously paddling toward him, he couldn’t resist jumping in the river to meet us! When we finally managed to get Howard back in the kayak, we paddled down the river to reunite with the rest of our group. Never Too Late As it happens, our church had been looking at the story of David, the humble shepherd who became the king of Israel (see 2 Samuel 7). Some in the congregation had gotten a less-than-favourable impression of faithandfriends.ca  I  MARCH 2018

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FEATURE

When Howard saw us labouriously paddling toward him, he couldn’t resist jumping in to meet us!  MICHAEL RAMSAY King David and wondered how God could love him despite the choices and mistakes he had made. In my sermon the Sunday after our outing, I contrasted that with the choices and mistakes made by Howard on the river: breaking his paddle, capsizing his boat and jumping back in the water to swim out to us. Despite all that, we had been

willing to do anything for Howard, because we love him. Yet God loved David—and loves us—infinitely more than we could ever love Howard. And there is nothing we can do that will ever cause God to withhold the eternal joy of salvation. But like Howard, all we need to do is reach out and make the choice—hopefully without getting waterlogged in the process!

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© J.Sanko/C. Layton, 2018

OH MY WORD!

John Sanko

(left) Captain Michael Ramsay is the pastor at The Salvation Army’s 614 Warehouse Mission in Toronto


Faith&Friends

GOD IN MY LIFE

Sticker Shock When I began working at a Christian bookstore, the last thing I expected was rudeness from a fellow employee. How dare she! by Jeanette Levellie

Pointing the Finger Jeanette Levellie can smile about it now, but at the time, the paper-bag sticker seemed to be just plain rude

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t all started with Imogene’s grumpy stickers. Imogene was older than most of us employed at a family-owned Christian bookstore. She rarely smiled at other staff members—only customers, and then only when the owners were nearby. At those times she’d call everyone “darling” and “love”

and go out of her way to serve and delight. When the owners had the day off, Imogene snapped, grumped and complained. A few weeks after I started at the store, I asked a co-worker why they kept Imogene on staff. “She’s been here almost as long as the store has been in business,” he told me. “I think they feel sorry for her. She’s had a rough life and is trying to raise her grandson while her daughter serves time in prison.” While this revelation helped me

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Faith&Friends

GOD IN MY LIFE

Stay Away! The offending lunch bags’ messages were not subtle

see Imogene in a kinder light, I was still shocked when I opened the lunchroom fridge one day to find a brown paper sack with a horrid sticker on the front. “Back Off!” was written on the bag, and it was signed “Imogene.” Wow, I thought. Imogene is really worried that someone might steal her lunch. But in spite of my new understanding of Imogene’s difficulties, I still found the sticker rude and unnecessary. I mean, who around this place full of Christian employees would steal a co-worker’s food? How Could She? Over the next few days, I was subjected to several of Imogene’s lunch

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bags—all labelled with messages such as “Mine!” and “Stay Away!”— nearly every time I opened the fridge. I wondered how Imogene had the nerve to be so rude. I would never … or would I? When I had lunch with a friend at a nearby restaurant, I ordered an albacore and almond salad tucked into a buttery croissant. The sandwich made my taste buds dance and sing, but it was too large for one meal. I asked for a to-go box, wrote my name on the top in red ink and put it in the fridge when I got back to work. I went to bed dreaming of that second half sandwich. But when I opened the fridge door


I was livid. How could someone take a sandwich that was clearly marked with my name? the next day at noon, my sandwich was missing! I asked everyone working that day if they’d seen it. Finally, a co-worker replied, “Oh, yeah. I saw Jennifer eating it last night on her break. I had no idea it was yours.” He chuckled and waved a hand in the air. “You know teenagers. They see food and grab it. I’m sure she meant no harm.” But I was livid. How could someone take a sandwich that was clearly marked with my name? I wanted to find Imogene and ask her where she bought those “Back Off!” stickers. Making New Friends It’s easy to judge others, thinking we know the motivation behind what they do, especially when their actions offend us. I had judged Imogene as a crabby-pants until I experienced a need for her “rude” stickers. Then I became grumpier than she ever dreamed of being! I had also judged Jennifer, thinking of her as a thief. But when I didn’t give her a chance to explain why she’d taken my sandwich, hadn’t I robbed her of the opportunity for reconciliation?

I thought of Jesus’ words to His disciples: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?” (Matthew 7:1-3). I knew these words applied to me as well as the 12 men who walked with the Master. I repented, asking God to help me develop more compassion for those who rubbed me the wrong way. There is always more to each person’s story than we see from the outside. Once I set aside judgment, I found a new friend. When Imogene’s daughter got out of prison, I had a party for her at my home. I invited all our fellow employees—including Jennifer—to bring potluck. As Imogene and her daughter entered the living room, their smiles of gratitude made me forget all about the crabby stickers. And when I caught Jennifer’s look across the table, I offered her the last chicken croissant sandwich on the platter.

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LITE STUFF

Eating Healthy With Erin MEDITERRANEAN BOWL WITH LEMON TAHINI TIME 25 min  MAKES 2 servings  SERVE WITH vegetables

250 ml (1 cup) uncooked quinoa 500 ml (2 cups) water 60 ml (¼ cup) tahini 2 ml (½ tsp) garlic powder 15 ml (1 tbsp) fresh lemon juice 5 ml (1 tsp) dried parsley 125 ml (½ cup) cherry tomatoes 125 ml (½ cup) sprouts 250 ml (1 cup) cooked chicken 250 ml (1 cup) kale 250 ml (1 cup) cucumber 60 ml (¼ cup) artichoke hearts 60 ml (¼ cup) pitted kalamata olives

1. Place rinsed quinoa and water in medium sauce pan and bring to bowl. Cover and reduce to low and simmer for 15-20 minutes until liquid is absorbed. Set aside and fluff with a fork. 2. Mix tahini, garlic powder, lemon juice and parsley. 3. Add vegetables and chicken in bowl with quinoa and pour dressing generously.

MANGO CHICKEN NAAN PIZZA TIME 55 min  MAKES 4 servings  SERVE WITH hot sauce

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1. Slice chicken breasts into strips and season with salt and pepper. 2. Heat frying pan on medium and, once hot, place chicken and oil in pan for 1 minute. Flip to other side and cook an additional minute. Turn heat to low and cover with tight-fitting lid. Cook for 10 minutes, then turn off and remove from heat. Allow to sit with lid on for 10 minutes. 3. Preheat oven to 190 C (375 F) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 4. Arrange naan on baking sheet and top with chutney, diced garlic, tomato and chicken. Cook for 15 minutes, then remove from heat and sprinkle dried parsley generously.

Recipe photos: Erin Stanley/veganvirgin.ca

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts 1 ml (¼ tsp) salt 1 ml (¼ tsp) black pepper 15 ml (1 tbsp) olive oil 4 pieces naan bread 60 ml (¼ cup) mango chutney 2 garlic cloves 2 Roma tomatoes 60 ml (4 tbsp) dried parsley


Pooch on the Loose

DOGGONE IT! P.5

Double the Recipes

LITE STUFF P.26

Love at Any Age

MARRY ME? P.13

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

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THE COUPLE WERE SEPARATED BY HALF A WORLD, BUT LOVE FOUND A WAY P.16

From Bermuda to Fiji

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Sudoku Puzzle

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Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 × 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9.

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9 1. In which American state is the Statue of Liberty found? 2. Does daylight saving time begin or end in March? 3. Who wrote Les Miserables?

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© www.kevinfrank.net

HEAVEN’S LOVE THRIFT SHOP by Kevin Frank

Answers on next page.

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QUICK QUIZ

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LITE STUFF

Word Search Places in Ireland B R G M O U N T S T E W A R T P Z T L E I N S T E R D R O G H E D A J S D H A E X N O S N E B E V L E W T A O O N R Y E B B A E R O M E L Y K F O M T I A M G C L X F D T Z T A I L L F S Q B P L O S J I Y D B S B L E I O C E Y H E N I B R R R P A Y L B N S A L R G N N G R I E O E C A A N P F U T T U V E I U S T F U R W R I O F S S N O E M L N H S G C I L N L R I E A A L A A L A S N N O H A E B T L W C B A G R E B E U I N A G Y U M C A S B D H A K O A M L N C E R D A D Y S D N A L S I N A R A Y N R J G K R O C E L A S N I K A U W O E Q E H E R A L C Y T N U O C G G D K S E G N A R G W E N E D A E H S G A H U L S T E R L L I H A R A T X E W H ARAN ISLANDS BANTRY BAY BEARA PENINSULA BELFAST BRU NA BOINNE CAHIR CASTLE CARLINGFORD CLIFFS OF MOHER CONNAUGHT CONNEMARA CORK COUNTY CLARE

DONEGAL DOOLIN DROGHEDA DUBLIN GALWAY BAY GIANT’S CAUSEWAY GLENDALOUGH GLENVEAGH HAG’S HEAD IRISH SEA KERRY KILLARNEY KINSALE

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KYLEMORE ABBEY LEINSTER MOUNT STEWART MUNSTER NEWGRANGE PORTMAGEE ROSS CASTLE SKELLIG ISLANDS TARA HILL TWELVE BENS ULSTER

Quick Quiz Answers: 1. New York; 2. Begin; 3. Victor Hugo. 8

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Faith&Friends

REFASHIONISTA RULES

An Easy DIY Shamrock Shirt

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Create a unique T-shirt to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day: Step 1  Purchase a plain cotton T-shirt at your local thrift store. Grab some chalk, cotton swabs, a small glass bowl, bleach and a plasticwrapped piece of cardboard.

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Pop the plastic-wrapped cardboard inside the T-shirt to prevent bleach leakage. Step 2  Sketch your design or text onto the shirt with the chalk. Pour a bit of bleach into the glass bowl. Dip a cotton swab into the bleach and dot it along your chalk outline.

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Step 3  Continue dipping and dotting until your design is covered with bleach. Set it aside and allow the bleach to do the rest of the work. Once the bleach has completely dried, launder as usual and enjoy your fancy new shirt.

(left) Sheri Pavlović is the do-it-yourself diva behind the Confessions of a Refashionista book series, channel and blog, which are full of step-by-step upcycling tutorials for everything from clothing and accessories to home décor. She is also a creative expert for The Salvation Army’s thrift stores. Find a thrift store near you at thriftstore.ca.

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PM 40064794

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Faith & Friends March 2018  
Faith & Friends March 2018  

To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith. http://...