Page 1

The End of Lightning?

CARS 3 P.22

A Culinary Dream

MENU FOR LIVING P.12

Unexpected Encounter

HER TWO DADS P.5

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

JUNE 2017

Finding His Voice RECORDING ARTIST ANTHONY EVANS’ MESSAGE RESONATES BEYOND THE HIT TV SHOW P.16


Sky High Greek and Roman mythology portrayed the gods as sitting in judgment high above the clouds on Mount Olympus, watching humankind’s struggles and triumphs from an unreachable and uncaring distance. While it is true that the Christian God transcends space and time, He also wants a personal relationship with each and every one of us. He cares about our trials, our worries and concerns, our loves and losses. God’s awesome love has no strings attached and is free for the asking. All we have to do is open our hearts to Him. That’s not always the easiest thing to do for some, but the

reward of having God in our hearts is beyond price. God is as close as a thought, as near as a friend, as accessible as a prayer. “Who is like the Lord our God, who is seated on high?”—Psalm 113:5 (English Standard Version) To find out more about God’s everlasting love, mail the coupon on page 26, e-mail us at faithandfriends@ can.salvationarmy.org or visit your local Salvation Army church. Photo: Used with permission. © Ray Majoran, compassiongallery.com


June 2017

VOLUME 20 NUMBER 6

DEPARTMENTS FAMILY TIME

5 My Two Dads

Diane Stark had treated both of them badly. Could they forgive her? SOMEONE CARES

8 The Day the Dolls

Came to Church An extraordinary woman received an extraordinary tribute at her funeral.

FEATURES

12

COVER STORY

16

22

10

COMMON GROUND

10 Having a Ball

A Salvation Army thrift store in Toronto supports a kids’ soccer camp.

Menu for Living

Paul Wessel fulfilled his dream with the help of The Salvation Army.

Finding His Voice

Recording artist Anthony Evans’ message resonates beyond the hit TV show.

Cars 3

Will Lightning McQueen ever race again?

27

DEPARTMENTS LITE STUFF

24 Eating Healthy With Erin

Cover photo: Courtesy Anthony Evans

Word Search, Sudoku, Quick Quiz GOD IN MY LIFE

27 Stepping Out

For Alex Woodley, dance and faith are two sides to the same God-given coin. EVERYDAY ETHICS

30 Troubled Waters

In many communities across Canada, the water isn’t safe to drink. faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

•3


Faith&Friends

FROM THE EDITOR

Extreme Thanks

R

ecently, my pastor told the story of Corrie ten Boom and her sister, Betsy, who were sent to the Ravensbruck concentration camp during the Second World War. They smuggled a Bible into their flea-infested barracks, and read that in all things they were to give thanks, that God can use anything for good (see 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18). For Betsy, that meant thanking God—even for the fleas. This was too much for Corrie, who protested she’d do no such thing. But Betsy insisted. Over the next few months, a wonderful thing happened. The guards never entered their barracks and they were not taken away to be executed. When they were liberated by Allied soldiers at the end of the war, the guards were shocked to find the sisters still alive. Children never lived for long in the camps. Only then did they discover why the guards had left them alone. It was because of the fleas. This story is an example of extreme gratitude and there can be little doubt that this can be challenging, especially with the “fleas” in our own lives: irritating co-workers, nasty neighbours, rude customer service staff. But when you are struggling, take a moment and remember the fleas of Ravensbruck. In this issue of Faith & Friends, you’ll find some examples of extreme gratitude. Paul Wessel is grateful for the addictions that brought him to The Salvation Army and a new life, and singer Anthony Evans is grateful that a mentor’s critical comments propelled him to be more genuine in his music. Ken Ramstead 4 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

Mission Statement To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith.

Faith & Friends is published monthly by: The Salvation Army 2 Overlea Blvd, Toronto Ontario, M4H 1P4 International Headquarters 101 Queen Victoria Street, London, EC4P 4EP, England William and Catherine Booth FOUNDERS

André Cox, GENERAL Commissioner Susan McMillan TERRITORIAL COMMANDER

Lt-Colonel Jim Champ SECRETARY FOR COMMUNICATIONS Geoff Moulton, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ken Ramstead, EDITOR

Brandon Laird DESIGN AND MEDIA SPECIALIST

Timothy Cheng SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Pamela Richardson, COPY EDITOR, PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR

Ada Leung CIRCULATION CO-ORDINATOR

Kristin Ostensen STAFF WRITER, PROOFREADER

Giselle Randall STAFF WRITER Scripture Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture references are taken from New International Version Contact Us P. (416) 467-3188, F. (416) 422-6120 Websites faithandfriends.ca, salvationist.ca, salvationarmy.ca E-mail faithandfriends@can.salvationarmy.org Subscription for one year: Canada $17 (includes GST/HST); U.S. $22; foreign $24 P. (416) 422-6119 circulation@can.salvationarmy.org All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada & Bermuda and cannot be reproduced without permission. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064794 ISSN 1702-0131


Faith&Friends

FAMILY TIME

My Two Dads It took an unexpected message from my biological father to make me reflect on how I’ve treated both of them.

Photos: © monkeybusinessimages/iStock.com

by Diane Stark

I

hope we can have a relationship, but I love you, regardless of your decision.” It was a text message from my biological father, whom I hadn’t seen in 17 years. He’d never met my husband and he’d only seen my oldest child the day he was born.

He and my mom divorced when I was 24. The circumstances were beyond ugly. Lines were drawn, sides were taken—and us kids sided with Mom. Over the next two decades, I’d had virtually no relationship with my father.

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

•5


Faith&Friends

FAMILY TIME

“You’re Forgiven” Except when I needed something. Once, I got into a financial bind and I e-mailed him to ask if I could borrow a large sum of money. Without hesitation, he sent me a cheque. But when the time came to pay him back, I didn’t honour the agreement I’d made, and I somehow justified it by blaming him for the mistakes he’d made. Years later, I was going through a divorce, and I needed his help again. He gave it freely, despite my previous dishonest behaviour and the fact that we hadn’t spoken even once in the years since. I’d ignored him and treated him badly—but he helped me anyway. And now he’d sent me that text message. He wasn’t angry with me, and he loved me no matter what, even if I continued to ignore him. I wrote back, telling him that I forgave him for past hurts and that I thought he would be proud of who I’d become. I told him about my husband, who works in the same field he does, and about my children, the grandchildren he’d never met. When he asked if our families could meet for dinner, I accepted. But I knew I couldn’t meet with him until I asked for his forgiveness as well. I texted him, apologizing for taking that money from him and offering to pay it back over time. “A lot of the

6 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

distance between us had more to do with what I did than what you did,” I told him. “I was ashamed of my behaviour. I still am.” “I’d completely forgotten about that,” he wrote back. “And you should, too. You’re forgiven.” Wandering’s End The meeting with my dad went better than I could have imagined. It felt like picking up with an old friend, where even though time had gone by, nothing in the relationship had changed. And as I sat there, listening to my father ask my husband about his job and my children about their activities, I couldn’t help noticing the similarities in my relationships with my earthly father and my


I’d ignored my father and treated him badly—but he helped me anyway.  DIANE STARK heavenly Father encourages me to leave my mistakes at the cross. John 3:16 states: “For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.” That is God telling the whole world that He loves us and He went to great lengths to have a relationship with us. Reuniting with my earthly father has made me even more grateful for my heavenly Father’s unconditional love. It made me realize that when I feel distant from God, it’s never His fault. It’s always because I wandered away. And thanks to my two dads, I’m done wandering.

© J.Sanko/C. Layton, 2016

OH MY WORD!

by John Sanko

heavenly one. For nearly two decades, I was estranged from my earthly father, only contacting him when I needed something. I’ve been a prodigal from my heavenly Father, too, more times than I care to admit. I would call on Him when I got into trouble, only to ignore Him again once the crisis had passed. I’d treated both of my fathers the same way, but neither had held it against me. And seeing my earthly father again after so many years reminded me how wonderful it feels to return home. My earthly father not only forgave me for the things I’d done, but he actually forgot them, and he encouraged me to do the same. Just as my

Adam … I really don’t think that’s what God meant when He said, “Go forth and multiply!”

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

•7


Faith&Friends

SOMEONE CARES

The Day the Dolls Came to Church An extraordinary woman received an extraordinary tribute at her funeral. by James Watt

V

alerie Nichol possessed a quiet, joyful spirit so big that it overwhelmed her diminutive form. She was a waitress at a local restaurant and a greeter at The Salvation Army’s Berkshire Citadel Community Church in Calgary for years when her beloved husband, Arnold, passed away. “I don’t think I will ever smile again,” she told me then. But within weeks, her happy spirit burst forth again, warming the hearts of old and young as they entered and left the church, especially the children, who looked forward to her hugs. At Christmas, the kids did not wear the usual bathrobes for the pageant, but gorgeous costumes of kings, queens, angels, shepherds and little woolly sheep. Few knew that

8 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

Val had made nearly all of them. She also had another secret. Babies born at Berkshire, and some born to clients at the restaurant where she worked, were each quietly given a homemade, huggable doll. Under each shirt or blouse was stitched a heart with a hidden message: “I love you.” Youthful Tribute Recently, Val was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. For a while, she continued to greet us at church, but the time inevitably came when she was admitted to hospice care. Still, her joyful spirit remained, nurtured by her hope of heaven. Children prayed each night for her. Some came to sing hymns at her bedside. Her own children, now


(left) In tribute to the memory of Valerie Nichol, the handmade dolls she had lovingly crafted were in attendance

grown, took turns keeping vigil by her bed. One night, her daughter sat, softly singing Amazing Grace, when she felt a tear on her hand—Val’s parting gift as she slipped quietly into heaven. Young Danica went silent when she heard the news that her friend Valerie had passed away. Then she looked up at her father and quietly said, “She really loved us, didn’t she, Dad?” A short time later, Danica’s cat died. Relieved more than sad, she said, “I’m glad our cat waited until Valerie was there to take care of her.” Silent Honour The church was packed for Val’s funeral service. Her children and grandchildren sang and her son-inlaw gave the sermon. What was unusual was the sight of so many children and teens at a funeral. Young Julian, who had had much encouragement from Val and, together with his brother and sister, had prayed every night for her, whispered as he passed her coffin, “Thanks for everything.”

Not only had the young attended but they had brought their beloved dolls and seated them side by side at the front of the church, smiling at the congregation just as Val had always done, each with the secret message written on its heart: “I love you.” As she prepared her own doll for the funeral, one of those children, Aurora, saw a smudge on the cheek of her doll. Upset, she carefully cleaned its face and combed its hair until she felt it fit for her “Valerina.”

Under each shirt or blouse was stitched a heart with a hidden message: “I love you.” One young woman in attendance was stunned to see how many people had come to honour “just” a waitress and Christian mother. She was forced to entirely rethink what was important in her own life. Many people paid tribute to Val that day, but the greatest honour was seen, not heard—Val’s dolls in attendance at her funeral. These were not “handmade gifts” to the children, but old friends with personalities and names who had comforted them at bedtime when the lights were out, and in times of fear and trouble. Now, these dolls were honouring their own creator.

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

•9


Faith&Friends

COMMON GROUND

Having a Ball A Salvation Army thrift store in Toronto supports a kids’ soccer camp. by Krista Henry

(above) Salvation Army thrift store employees Lori Taylor (left) and Jennifer Silveira proudly display a Bloor Central Soccer Club jersey. More than $3,000 was raised to support the local youth sports program

T

here are many things that are learned about life, success and hard work through kicking around a ball on the soccer field. Toronto’s Bloor Central Soccer Club (BCSC)— with the assistance of a Salvation Army thrift store—is helping to teach those lessons to underprivileged children.

10 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca


(left) The Salvation Army’s Major Douglas Hammond, pastor at Toronto’s Bloor Central Corps, is presented with a cheque from (left to right) Army thrift store retail district manager Maria Guayacan, and store managers Kyle Brennan and Kalpita Thakore

Each year, the BCSC, which is operated by The Salvation Army’s Bloor Central Corps (church), works closely with almost 300 kids in Toronto’s Parkdale area. Five years ago, The Salvation Army’s Bloor Street West thrift store took the opportunity to assist them through an in-store fundraising campaign. “This is a program we’ve seen grow over the years,” says Kyle Brennan, thrift store manager. “This campaign is personal for the community. They can walk by the local school, see the kids practising and see for themselves how this is helping.” Last summer, the thrift store raised more than $3,000 to keep the soccer program kicking for the

community. Two hundred and fiftyfour children, ranging in age from seven to 12, participated in the soccer camp. “We’re happy to have done so well, and we’re also grateful for support from our Queen Street store,” Kyle says. “It’s rewarding to see these kids enjoying soccer. Parents who visit our store can see the benefit and get their kids signed up, too.” “We wanted to take this challenge to help families in our community, and we’re excited to have contributed and raised awareness,” says Kalpita Thakore, the Army’s Queen Street thrift store manager. “This year, our team is looking forward to supporting the soccer program again.”

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 11


Faith&Friends

FEATURE

Menu for Living

PAUL WESSEL FULFILLED HIS DREAM WITH THE HELP OF THE SALVATION ARMY.

A

Vancouver man has traded in his highway maps for a chef’s apron and hat, thanks in large measure to the help he’s received from The Salvation Army. As a child, Paul Wessel dreamed of becoming a gourmet chef. Instead he became a truck driver, and, over the years, his youthful aspirations faded away until he barely gave them any thought. He was in his 50s before he could finally fulfil his lifelong dream, and his journey hasn’t been an easy one. A Sister’s Help Paul was born in the small town of Kamloops, B.C. He grew up with a mother who was addicted to both alcohol and pills, and a father whose job as a long-haul truck driver kept him away from home for long periods of time. 12 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

That gave Paul a great deal of freedom as a teenager. “I partied pretty hard in high school,” he admits, “and I was very angry and rebellious.” But it seems that God was tapping him on the shoulder even in the midst of his rebellion. The parents of his high school girlfriend, Melissa, were religious, and her mother tried to help Paul study the Bible and live by its teachings. “I will be eternally grateful to Melissa’s parents for inviting me into their home and trying to steer me away from the wrong path, although they could see I was rough around the edges,” Paul says. But he wasn’t ready to change his ways at that point. Instead, he wound up marrying another woman with whom he had two children. His marriage ended after a decade, and Paul’s life took a drastic downturn

Photos: Kim Stallknecht

by Joyce Starr Macias


Paul Wessel (right) shares a laugh with Alvin Chong, Belkin House’s food services manager

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 13


Faith&Friends

FEATURE

(right) Paul found unconditional love at The Salvation Army’s Belkin House

after the divorce. He became so discouraged that he quit his job as a truck driver, took money out of his pension fund and sat alone drinking, day after day, with no hope in sight. In desperation one night, he reached out to his older sister, Jacqueline, who encouraged him to seek help. Finding His Way Soon after, Paul entered a 12-week program at a treatment centre in Vancouver, where people with addictions can get a safe place to live while undergoing counselling. Paul did so well there that, after completing the program, he was recommended for a personaldevelopment program at The Salvation Army’s Belkin House in downtown Vancouver. 14 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

Belkin House is an eight-storey building that can accommodate 225 men and women who need emergency shelter or transitional housing. “Residents get life-skills training, addiction counselling and other support services,” says Les McAusland, director of residential services. “I was nervous there at first, but the main thing I learned was God’s patience,” Paul says. “I also found unconditional love. “I appreciated how The Salvation Army didn’t push it on me but patiently let me find my way. I was able to reconnect with God in my own time and in my own way.” Pursuing His Passion As Paul grew in his faith and became more comfortable living without alcohol, he began to think about his long-forgotten dream of becoming a


Paul became so discouraged that he quit his job as a truck driver, took money out of his pension fund and sat alone drinking, day after day, with no hope in sight. chef. He wondered if it could still be a possibility for him. His counsellor, Rafik Daudjee, thought so. He encouraged Paul to apply for a culinary arts program headed by Belkin House food services manager Alvin Chong. Paul finished the program with flying colours, graduating as a level 1 professional chef. He currently works as a grill cook at Malone’s Restaurant in Vancouver and plans to continue his education to professional chef levels 2 and 3. His ultimate goal is to become a red seal chef, a highly coveted certification of excellence that could open doors to Canada’s finest restaurants. “Paul’s story has been a true inspiration to me,” says Alvin. “I admire the way Paul has tackled every challenge he has faced with hope and humility. By the grace of God, He planned for Paul to find community and support at Belkin House. And He has given me the opportunity to help Paul find his passion in cooking and turn that into a new career option late in his life. I’m humbled to have been a part of his journey.”

The praise is mutual. “Alvin deserves credit for his excellent culinary instruction and for spiritual guidance along the way,” says Paul. Getting in Touch Paul now lives at Grace Mansion, another Salvation Army facility in Vancouver that offers transitional housing to people who are recovering from addictions. Sober for more than three years now, Paul wants to emphasize that he blames himself for the mistakes he made in the past, and that he is grateful for the good relationship he has with his children. He and his father, who is now 80 years old, are also close. “I’ve put Dad on a pedestal for never giving up on me,” Paul says. Becoming alcohol-free after years of addiction and realizing his childhood dream are great accomplishments, but Paul says none of it could have happened without the practical and spiritual help he got at Belkin House. “I didn’t get in touch with God until I got in touch with The Salvation Army,” Paul concludes. faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 15


Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

Photo: Summer Pennino

Finding His

RECORDING ARTIST ANTHONY EVANS’ MESSAGE RESONATES BEYOND THE HIT TV SHOW. by Christy Heitger-Ewing 16 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca


s Voice

Anthony Evans in concert. “I don’t write songs to be clever or to rhyme lines,” says Anthony. “I want listeners to internalize the lyrics”

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 17


Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

Photos: Jon and Annie Rouse, Rouse Photography

“Honesty, vulnerability and transparency freed me from the heaviness, made me whole and brought me back to life,” says Anthony

RECORDING ARTIST, worship leader and The Voice alumnus Anthony Evans had just finished performing in New York City when one of his fans approached him during the postshow meet-and-greet. The man extended his forearm to reveal a tattoo that read, “Could It Be?” Anthony’s eyebrows raised, shocked to see the title of one of his songs permanently inked on someone. “There’s a story behind this,” the man said, his voice catching with emotion. “A few years ago, I was determined to take my life. I was standing by the Hudson River, about to jump in, when suddenly your 18 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

song came on my iPod shuffle.” Recorded in 2009, the lyrics speak to how we search for things that culture says we need, when really all we’re missing is a relationship with God. The man told Anthony that when he heard the song, he abandoned his suicidal plan and instead chose to pursue Christ. Each time his pen hits the paper, Anthony hopes his messages will resonate with his listeners. That’s why he writes about pain, fear, depression, anxiety and addiction. “I don’t write songs to be clever or to rhyme lines,” says Anthony. “I want listeners to internalize the lyrics.”


That’s what this man at the Hudson River did, and in doing so, he not only received hope but eternal salvation. Starting Out Anthony didn’t always envision a singing career. In fact, in his youth he wanted to become a large-animal veterinarian; singing only took over at the age of 17. “I wasn’t initially big into it,” says Anthony, who grew up with his three siblings in Dallas, where his father, Dr. Tony Evans, is senior pastor at the 6,000-member Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship Church. “Unbeknownst to us, we grew up in a master class for ministry,” says Anthony, who joined the church choir as a teenager. His gift was soon recognized, celebrated and utilized when the chancellor of Liberty University invited Anthony to sing in the school’s public-relations group. Struggling With Self-Worth Despite his sweet face, smooth voice and successful career, Anthony grappled with grace, acceptance and self-worth for nearly a decade. “I didn’t feel like I was enough,” he says. “I felt like I had to be a certain kind of person because of my last name. And I thought that if God really knew me, He wouldn’t accept me.” He woke up every morning with a weight pressing down on his

chest due to the unrealistic standard he set for himself. While he continued to perform, his faith felt flat. “I’d be standing on stage, believing at my core the truth of what I was singing, but I didn’t feel it,” he explains. “That distance on stage created a rift internally.” To get to the other side of his tormented emotion, he forced himself to slow down on the road, talk openly with his family about his

(above) “My goal was to never compromise my message, but to push it to a point where I could communicate with people outside of the Christian circle” faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 19


Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

“If I wanted to do surface-level stuff, I’d write pop tunes.”  ANTHONY EVANS struggles, seek counselling and spend quality time with God. “Honesty, vulnerability and transparency freed me from the heaviness, made me whole and brought me back to life,” says Anthony. The experience provided inspiration for his new album, appropriately titled Back to Life. Anthony now takes what he’s learned about emotional health and well-being and pours it into his music. “If I wanted to do surface-level stuff, I’d write pop tunes,” says Anthony, who penned seven of the 11 songs on this, his eighth album. “I do ‘life music’ that’s meant to reach listeners on a gut level.” Connecting With the Disconnected Choosing courage over comfort is not always easy. In 2012, Anthony worked up the nerve to step outside of his comfort zone when he became a contestant on the second season of The Voice, the reality television singing competition. “It’s an odd feeling to look into a camera, knowing that on the other side of that lens are 17 million people casting judgment,” he says. “Plus, to be sitting in a room with four mon20 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

ster celebrities whose job it is to tell you what they like and don’t like about you—that’s tense.” The experience, however, helped him reshape his career and alter his life goals. During his time in Los Angeles, Anthony realized that a great deal of the population do not know the ins and outs of Christian culture. While on The Voice, his coach, Christina Aguilera, asked him to define “worship leading,” and he struggled to explain the term without using “churchy” words. Then his advisor, Jewel, said, “I get that you’re a Christian preacher kid guy, but for anyone who doesn’t know church, they’re going to need to know the depths of you.” Anthony longed to reach the disconnected and unchurched, and he knew that music can lead to tears, trust and transformation. Aguilera encouraged him to blaze his own trail, believing that no matter where he went, fans would follow. “My goal from that day forward was to never compromise my message, but to push it to a point where I could communicate with people outside of the Christian circle.” Giving Back Committed to giving back, a con-


Photo: Courtesy Anthony Evans

The Evans clan

cept that his dad instilled early on, Anthony partners with several charitable organizations, including Generosity Water (generosity.org) and Food for the Hungry (fh.org). Earlier this year he travelled to Lima, Peru, to meet one of the children he is sponsoring. “Meeting this boy face to face was an amazing heart-wrenching day because I got to see what my dollars were doing in this child’s life,” says Anthony, who, through his 2017 FerVent tour, secured sponsorship for 630 children from that same Peruvian village. “I love that the concerts are about more than the music,” says Anthony.

The 16-city FerVent tour, which kicked off in early February and ran through the end of this month, is a family affair as he shares the stage with his sister, Priscilla Shirer, bestselling author, speaker and actress. On tour, Priscilla communicates keys to experiencing God’s power in personal and practical ways; Anthony provides the soul-stirring musical worship. “When God is not on the sidelines, but rather is downtown, making legislation in the city hall of your heart, change happens,” says Anthony. “I want folks, including myself, to put Christ back in the centre of their lives.”

(left)

Christy Heitger-Ewing is a freelance writer, columnist and author of Cabin Glory: Amusing Tales of Time Spent at the Family Retreat faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 21


FEATURE

Heart of a Champion

IN THE NEW CARS 3 MOVIE, RACE CAR LIGHTNING McQUEEN FACES A CROSSROADS IN HIS LIFE AND CAREER. WHICH WAY WILL HE DRIVE? by Jeanette Levellie

D

isney-Pixar’s newest 3D computer-animated film, Cars 3, zooms into theatres June 16. Similar to Cars (2006) and Cars 2 (2011), the storyline of Cars 3 is driven by action, humour and unexpected twists. Unlike the first two times around, viewers will experience a more emotional ride as they follow Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson, Night at the Museum, Zoolander) and his sidekick, Mater (Larry the Cable Guy), onto a different track. On Track “McQueen is not the young hotshot anymore, the kid he was back then in Cars,” says first-time Pixar director Brian Fee in an interview with Entertainment Weekly. “He’s in the middle of his life and, as an athlete, that’s getting up there. He’s looking in the mirror and realizing, ‘I’m 40 22 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

Photo: Courtesy of Disney

Faith&Friends

years old,’ and dealing with the fact that the thing that you love more than anything else, you might not be able to do forever.” It doesn’t help that a new generation of younger, more powerful race cars—all faster and more tech-savvy than the aging McQueen—have entered the race, determined to prove he’s a has-been. Armie Hammer (The Man From U.N.C.L.E.) voices Jackson Storm, the loudest and cruellest of the up-and-coming competitors. “Jackson was born with a silver spoon in his mouth,” Fee explains. “Everything comes easy to him, and everything about him says he’s faster. We’ve designed him so that even when he’s standing next to McQueen, McQueen looks old.” With McQueen being bested on the racetrack, he must face the inevitable: age cannot compete with youth. Or can it?


(left) A new generation of race cars—all faster and more techsavvy than the aging Lightning McQueen (right)—have entered the race, determined to prove he’s a has-been

Refusing to back down from the younger cars, McQueen pushes himself to the limit, only to experience a tragic crash. Is his racing career at an end? In spite of the deterrents and badgering by bullies such as Storm, McQueen refuses to quit, declaring, “I decide when I’m done.” Then he enlists the help of his biggest fan, Cruz Ramirez, voiced by Cristela Alonzo (Cristela, The Angry Birds Movie). The zealous young race technician’s optimism and determination prove to be the perfect combination to help McQueen get back on track. Take Heart! Fee refuses to say if Cars 3 marks the end of the road for McQueen’s onscreen presence. “Where the franchise goes from here, I have no idea what may be down the road, but I can tell you that for Lightning McQueen,

as a character, I think by the end of the movie it’s safe to say that this is only the beginning for him.” “You can’t turn back the clock, but you can wind it up again,” McQueen recalls his late mentor, Doc Hudson, saying. Is this saying true of human beings as well as animated cars? When unforeseen setbacks or aging bodies force us to slow down, can we refuel our souls and maintain the heart of a champion in spite of a few potholes along the way? Jesus tells us in John 16:33, “In this godless world you will continue to experience difficulties. But take heart! I’ve conquered the world” (The Message). This means that if we put our faith in Jesus, He’ll give us the strength to overcome whatever difficulties get in our way. We may not be as fast as we used to be, but our faith in God makes us champions. faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 23


Faith&Friends

LITE STUFF

Eating Healthy With Erin CREAMY POPPYSEED MACARONI SALAD 500 ml (2 cups) cooked, chilled macaroni 1 red pepper, diced 1 green pepper, diced 125 ml (½ cup) carrot, shredded 500 ml (2 cups) celery, diced 125 ml (½ cup) mayonnaise 15 ml (1 tbsp) honey 30 ml (2 tbsp) apple cider vinegar 30 ml (2 tbsp) poppy seeds 2 ml (½ tsp) dry mustard 1 ml (¼ tsp) salt

Sudoku Puzzle

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 × 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9.

9

QUICK QUIZ

5

1. What was the setting for the musical The King and I? 2. What is the shortest verse in the Bible? 3. What is Canada’s largest bird of prey?

8

Answers on next page.

24 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

1

1. Dice all vegetables and add to cooked and chilled macaroni. 2. Whisk mayonnaise, honey, apple cider vinegar, poppy seeds, mustard and salt. 3. Toss and enjoy.

6

4

7

2

8

3

6

8

5

3

2 6

8

4 3

6

4

9

2 7

8

5

1

4

3

1

9

2

7

5

Recipe photo: Erin Stanley/veganvirgin.ca

TIME 25 min  MAKES 3 servings  SERVE WITH chicken, beef or veggie burger


Word Search Gone Fishin’ G Y A P S F S F T R E V I R P U D Q S D X M I C T A S H O R E B B O B M C D C L N R H R M P N T S M R O W X A S L A K T G U O Z A Q U A T I C V S E C N E C I L M W C X W E M O I D T K M K R K E S R M B L U R E S N J O N C L M W W E W Q I O D T Q I A T O U T A I O D R E L G N A S U P R H B J J C L N A C G C O C G T W G R N P R L L U S E F M P K B Y Y X R C R I N A O B K L B Q L U N P V E N F G H H K G E O B M E B N Y D K D Q S P S R E D A W B A I T X O K P B B N P Z N L T C Y I W L K I F A N T O W I M N A Y H S N U M B Y B I I I B W O O U K B O Y L H Z Q Y D L I Y L E O E A R Q O L A O O H B C H I N C H S J W I U K V R K B R I C K P W A O U

6 8 5 9 1 2 3

5

8

5

9

2

9 7

1

3

4

6

6

2

7

2

3

1

7

4

8

5

6

9

1 8 3 4

2 6 4 3 8 5 9 1 7

3 1 8 9 4 7 5 6 2

1 4 5 2 9 6 3 7 8

6 3 9 7 1 8 2 4 5

7 8 2 5 3 4 6 9 1

Quick Quiz Answers:  1. Siam (Thailand); 2. “Jesus wept.” (John 11:35); 3. The bald eagle.

POND ROD ROWBOAT SHALLOWS SINKER SLACK STREAM TACKLE UNDERWATER UPRIVER WADERS WORMS

7

FLOAT GRIP HIP BOOTS HOOK LAKE LEAD WEIGHTS LICENCE LINE LOB LURES NIBBLE POLE

4

AQUATIC ANGLER ASHORE BAIT BEACH BITE BOBBER BUCKET HAT CANOE CAST CHUMMING FILLET

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 25


Subscribe to Faith&Friends today! Photo: © Ingimage.com

• inspiring true stories of hope and salvation • practical resources that will rejuvenate your spirit • uplifting articles that you can share with friends I want to: ❏ learn more about Jesus and how to be a Christian ❏ connect with a local Salvation Army branch ❏ ask for prayers for ❏ volunteer with The Salvation Army

❏ SUBSCRIBE to Faith & Friends at its annual price of $17 [U.S. $22; foreign $24] Name

E-mail

Address

Prov/State

Town/City Postal/Zip Code

Phone (

)

❏ Send a GIFT SUBSCRIPTION to (include your contact information above): Name

E-mail

Address

Prov/State

Town/City Postal/Zip Code

Phone (

)

❏ Send a card announcing my gift

Payment: ❏ Cheque (Payable to Faith & Friends) ❏ Visa ❏ Mastercard

Name on credit card

Card #

Expiry

/

Return to: Faith & Friends, 2 Overlea Blvd., Toronto ON M4H 1P4 or contact

26 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

© www.kevinfrank.net

HEAVEN’S LOVE THRIFT SHOP by Kevin Frank

(416) 422-6119; circulation@can.salvationarmy.org; faithandfriends.ca/subscribe


Faith&Friends

GOD IN MY LIFE

Stepping Out For Alex Woodley, dance and faith are two sides to the same God-given coin. by Ken Ramstead

(left) “God gave me every opportunity to pursue dance, and when I do, I feel empowered,” says Alex Woodley

I

used to feel that my dancing and my faith were separate, that one was my job and the other my religion, that they rarely intersected or affected the other,” says Alex Woodley. “But I’ve come

to recognize that the Lord has made the two readily accessible to me. Both my ability to dance and to have a relationship with God are blessings that make up a huge part of my identity.”

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 27


Faith&Friends

GOD IN MY LIFE

“I had never even imagined church being like that—it just blew my mind!”  ALEX WOODLEY Toronto Bound Born and raised in southern Alberta, Alex was dancing almost as soon as she could walk. “Since I was little,” she says, “I’ve had a passion for the movement, expression, music and discipline of most dance genres.” Fortunately, she was blessed to be part of a family that could encourage her passion, in the form of lessons, examinations and competitions. It was no surprise to anyone that after graduating from high school, Alex decided to pursue dancing as a career. While Vancouver was an option, she was more excited about the possibilities inherent in a move to Toronto, which she did in September 2015, to study at George Brown College. Now that she was settled, Alex needed a church community, especially as she had no family or friends in the city. Fortunately, she soon found both. Introduction to Church “I started researching churches in the area and I came across The Salvation Army,” Alex says. “I called my mother: ‘Did you know they were a church? I thought they were only

28 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca

a charity!’ She encouraged me to attend.” So one Sunday morning, Alex prepared to check out The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church. “My plan was to casually pass by and check it out,” Alex says, “but as I watched all sorts of people enter, one of the greeters said hello to me and suggested I come in. I guess I should, I thought. This is why I dropped by, after all. So I did.” Alex was impressed with what she saw and heard. “I had never even imagined church being like that— it just blew my mind!” Alex smiles. “There were friendly people both in uniform and in casual wear and there was a brass band as well as a choir. The pastors were welcoming and I thoroughly enjoyed the sermon.” But there was more. As she was preparing to leave, a lady sitting behind Alex named Mrs. Lt-Colonel Dorothy Brown touched her shoulder and introduced herself. “We’re having something we call a rally day after the service,” she said. “You should come to our picnic.” Intrigued, Alex did. “When I told the ladies at the front door that Dorothy sent me,


(left) “Being able to impact an audience with my dancing—to make them laugh, cry, think and just feel something extraordinary—is amazing,” says Alex

they immediately ushered me in and introduced me to some college-aged girls. I was a stranger, and all these people made me feel at home. Everyone was so kind and considerate and answered all the questions I had. I couldn’t wait to go back next week.” Passion at Work “Alex has been a breath of fresh air,” says Major David Ivany, a Salvation Army spiritual director and member at North Toronto. “Her openness to new possibilities led her to North Toronto (not really knowing what The Salvation Army was), and her warm spirit has led her into relationships with people of all ages in the congregation, from children to adults to seniors. She assists me with

the teen Sunday school class and participates in the choir.” “It’s true!” Alex laughs. “My second week at church, my now-best friend Robyn Goodyear invited me to join the songsters. I had never read a note of music in my life until then, but everyone was so patient and accepting. I’m not a musician at all—I can’t play any instrument— but I enjoy how so much of Army worship revolves around music. “In dance, you are always working to be better, working toward a goal that is always changing. It’s where I grow the most and learn the most about myself, others and the world. Constant discovery goes hand in hand with dancing, and I absolutely love that.” Alex hopes to dance professionally after her schooling is done but has no idea where life will lead her. “I may not understand where my dance life is going, in the same way I can’t imagine where my relationship with the Lord is going to take me,” Alex reflects.” But I hope God will use my passion for dance and my faith in Him to help people, to change the world and to bring me closer to Him in a thrilling and fulfilled life.”

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 29


Faith&Friends

EVERYDAY ETHICS

Troubled Waters What does your water look like when you turn on the tap? In many First Nations communities in Canada, the water isn’t safe to drink. As of February, there were 148 drinking-water advisories (DWAs) in effect in 97 communities—some in place for decades. Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, which provides Winnipeg’s drinking water, has been under a boilwater advisory since 1997. Imagine having to boil water to wash dishes. Or worrying that giving your child a bath could make them sick.

30 • JUNE 2017  I faithandfriends.ca


What can you do to put your faith in action?

Photo: © brozova/iStock.com

Tell the federal government that clean water is a human right. In 2015, the government promised to end all long-term drinking-water advisories in First Nations communities within five years of being elected. The David Suzuki Foundation and others are monitoring progress toward this commitment. Add your support at action2.davidsuzuki.org/water.

faithandfriends.ca  I  JUNE 2017

• 31


PM 40064794

For address changes or subscription information contact (416) 422-6119 or circulation@can.salvationarmy.org. Allow 4-6 weeks for changes.

Faith & Friends June 2017  

To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith. http://...