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9 March 2019 20p/25c

MAKING A DRAMA OUT OF A CRISIS New musical about the day the planes stopped flying

WHEN GOOD BREEDING SHOWS Canines compete to be top dog at Crufts

THE FOCUS IS ON HYMN

BEHIND THE SCENES OF TV’S ‘SONGS OF PRAISE’ WITH SEAN FLETCHER


2 COMMENT AND CONTENTS • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

From the editor’s desk

What is The Salvation Army? The Salvation Army is a church and charity providing services in the community, particularly to those who are vulnerable and marginalised. Motivated by our Christian faith, we offer practical support and services in over 700 centres throughout the UK to all who need them, regardless of ethnicity, religion, gender or sexual orientation. To find your nearest centre visit salvationarmy.org.uk/find-a-church

MANY people can still remember where they were and what they were doing when they first heard about the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001. The horrific scenes of death and destruction impacted all who saw them, and the event changed the world. As the reality of what people were seeing became clear, the date of 9/11 became inextricably associated with evil acts that brought misery and disaster in a manner never seen before. But that is not the whole story. In this week’s War Cry Irene Sankoff and David Hein, who were living in New York at the time, recall the increased sense of community and the acts of kindness that the city residents showed each other in the days immediately after the attack. Many months later, the couple discovered that those acts of kindness were not restricted to the city of New York, or even to the United States. With the airspace above the country closed, planes already in the air were diverted to towns and cities in other countries. One such place was Gander, in Canada. David and Irene heard how the people of the small town looked after crew and passengers from all over the world for days until the planes were allowed to fly again. The couple were so taken with what happened in Gander that they wrote a musical about it. And after success on Broadway, Come from Away opened in London’s West End last month. An event that occurred because of a terrorist attack may not seem the most likely topic for a stage show but, as the couple explain in this week’s issue, the story is a testimony to the kindness, goodness and bravery of ordinary people in the face of evil. That is worth remembering and celebrating – and it should be an inspiration to us all.

What is the War Cry? The Salvation Army first published a newspaper called the War Cry in London in December 1879, and we have continued to appear every week since then. Our name refers to our battle for people’s hearts and souls as we promote the positive impact of the Christian faith and The Salvation Army’s fight for greater social justice.

WAR CRY Issue No 7413

Editor: Andrew Stone, Major Deputy Editor: Philip Halcrow Production Editor: Stephen Pearson Assistant Editor: Claire Brine Assistant Editor: Sarah Olowofoyeku Staff Writer: Emily Bright Editorial Assistant: Linda McTurk Graphic Designer: Rodney Kingston War Cry office: 020 7367 4900 Email: warcry@salvationarmy.org.uk The Salvation Army UK Territory with the Republic of Ireland 101 Newington Causeway London SE1 6BN

Contents

Tel: 0845 634 0101 Helpline: 020 7367 4888 Subscriptions: 01933 445445 (option 1, option 1) or email: subscriptions@sp-s.co.uk Founder: William Booth General: Brian Peddle Territorial Commander: Commissioner Anthony Cotterill Secretary for Communications: Lieut-Colonel David Kelly

FEATURES 3

Competitors who lead a dog’s life

Crufts returns

5

Something to sing about

How Songs of Praise aims to produce Published weekly by The Salvation Army ©The Salvation Army United Kingdom Territory with the Republic of Ireland ISSN 0043-0226 The Salvation Army Trust is a registered charity. The charity number in England and Wales is 214779, in Scotland SC009359 and in the Republic of Ireland CHY6399. Printed by Walstead Grange Ltd, Southwick, on sustainably sourced paper

Your local Salvation Army centre

uplifting television

8

Faith in humanity restored

True stories of kindness in the face of

terrorism inspire new musical

REGULARS

6 6

8

4 News 12

Browsing the Bible

13 Thought 14 Puzzles 15

What’s cooking? Front-page picture: ANDREW STONE

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9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • FEATURE 3 Flick.digital

Who

let the

dogs out?

Doggy diversity is on show at Crufts, writes Emily Bright

OGGED determination will be on display with D the return of Crufts on Thursday (7 March). During the annual event, more than 200 pedigree breeds will

Kennel Club

chase the coveted title of best in show. The breeds featured represent all corners of the world and this year include three new additions: the Russian toy, the white Swiss shepherd dog and the black and tan coonhound. During the four-day contest, thousands of pampered pooches will take part in obedience and agility championships in a bid to become top dog. Man’s (and woman’s) best friends are also commemorated through the Kennel Club’s Friends for Life competition, which honours the most outstanding working dogs. This year’s nominees are retired police dog Finn, who saved his handler’s life when a robbery suspect attacked them with a knife, doggy blood donor Ringo, and Down’s syndrome assistance dog Emma. Also shortlisted are military dog Lance, who served in Afghanistan, and cuddly canine Snoopy, who supported his young owner through leukaemia treatment. ‘Dogs play a significant role in our lives,’ says Kennel Club

secretary Caroline Kisko. ‘Every day there are dogs out there saving lives in war zones, giving confidence and independence to those with disabilities and showing remarkable bravery and loyalty as pets. The Friends for Life competition epitomises what Crufts is about – we care for dogs, and they care for us as well.’ Whether they’re a bullish bulldog, cocky spaniel or a wild whippet, our four-legged friends are testament to the sheer variety

The natural world can give joy to humans

of the animal kingdom, and how the natural world can give joy and comfort to humans. Be it through cuddling a canine or admiring animals in the wild, people often paws to appreciate nature. Individuals have always been inspired by the glory of creation. When Bible figure Job grappled with multiple tragedies, he took strength from seeing the beauty of the world around him. Admiring nature helped him to recall what God had done for him in the past and what he was capable of in the future. Job said: ‘Ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind’ (Job 12:7–9 New International Version). Reflecting on nature didn’t solve Job’s problems. But it did help him to remember that he was in the presence of an all-powerful God who could support him through his darkest days. Christians believe that this allpowerful God offers everybody the chance to be in a loving relationship with him. We may feel as if life has dealt us a rough hand, but if we let him, God can lovingly lead us The Kennel Club’s Friends for Life finalists through our toughest trials.


4 NEWS AND MEDIA • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

Singers in harmony to help homelessness projects

THE Salvation Army has n provided emergency food parcels for communities in central

Salvation Army personnel unload emergency supplies

Mozambique after a cyclone hit the area. The church and charity distributed parcels containing maize, meal, rice, oils, beans, salt and sugar, feeding 1,775 displaced people. It has also issued mosquito nets, buckets and water-purifying chemicals to cyclone victims. Relief efforts were co-ordinated with the Red Cross, the Council of Churches in Mozambique and local government disaster management services. Cyclone Desmond hit in January, destroying homes and displacing up to 120,000 people.

A SALVATION Army church THE Church of England has ended the centuriesn in Edinburgh has rallied n old requirement for churches to hold weekly around workers made redundant by Sunday services.

At a meeting of the General Synod, church leaders formally approved the change to canon law. Regulations previously mandated that morning and evening prayers should take place in every parish church every Sunday. ‘Sunday worship continues to be central to the Church of England’s ministry,’ said a Church of England spokesman. But he explained that the change is designed to make life easier for clergy who had responsibility for more than one church. He added: ‘Morning and evening prayer continue to be the heartbeat of church life, and, whether urban or rural, communities are prayed for on a daily basis.’

Heather Small and Pete Kirtley in the recording studio

‘Exploitation of chocolate farmers unacceptable’ THE Fairtrade Foundation has launched a new three-year campaign called She Deserves to highlight the plight of female farmers in developing countries who earn less than a living income growing cocoa. In Cote d’Ivoire, female farmers carry out 68 per cent of the labour involved in cocoa farming yet estimates from the Africa Development Bank suggest they earn only 21 per cent of the income generated. As part of the campaign, the Fairtrade Foundation is compiling a petition calling on the prime minister to ensure fairer trade deals and is encouraging supporters to bake with Fairtrade products and share their cocoa creations on social media using #SheDeserves. ‘As a nation of chocolate lovers, it is shocking that the women who grow and harvest the cocoa that goes into our treats are barely able to put food on the table or send their kids to school,’ said Fairtrade Foundation CEO Michael Gidney. ‘The majority of us think the exploitation they suffer is unacceptable. We can all take action today by supporting this campaign.’ CHRIS TERRY

a local company. More than 150 people lost their jobs after Healthcare Environmental Services collapsed in December. In response, the church in Shotts offered access to its laptops and internet connection. Within two days, 115 people had come through their doors. Representatives from the Scottish government and the UK department of work and pensions, benefits advisers, employments rights advisers, job centre staff, councillors and MPs all arrived to help. ‘We sent out a message on social media, inviting people to come and use our hall and computer equipment to look for jobs. All of a sudden there was a place where everyone could go,’ said church leader Lieutenant Amy-Jo Battersby. ‘It would have taken these people weeks to get around all the agencies, but we were able to help them achieve that locally, in one place and within a few hours.’

JENNY ROBERTS

A HOST of singers have released a charity single to raise money for The Salvation Army’s homelessness projects. Peter Andre, Heather Small, Newton Faulkner, Lee Ryan and Alexander O’Neal all feature on the track, the proceeds of which go to Shelter and The Salvation Army. The celebrities recorded a cover version of ‘He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother’ – taken to No 1 by the Hollies – in collaboration with record producer Pete Kirtley. Jenny Roberts, who runs non-profit Homelessness Worldwide, set about organising the musical collaboration in memory of her brother Darren, who experienced homelessness. ‘I wanted to dedicate this song to my brother, all the homeless who’ve died on the streets and those who are still fighting homelessness,’ Jenny explained. ‘I want people to take a stand and unite together to help eradicate this.’

CHRISTIAN media group Premier has created n a petition urging the government to take action against the global persecution of Christians. The petition follows the launch of a governmental review that will examine the issue of the estimated 245 million people around the globe who experience persecution for being Christian. ‘We will campaign wholeheartedly for the British government to show leadership and tenacity to deliver meaningful action that can help save the lives of vulnerable Christians around the world,’ said Premier CEO Peter Kerridge.

Cocoa farmer Tanoh Ahou


9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • FEATURE 5 Sean Fletcher is filmed interviewing an ACT team member

TV programme I tunes into faith ANDREW STONE

Andrew Stone spends time behind the cameras of Songs of Praise RODUCING Songs of Praise is a ‘labour of love’. That’s P what Mark Warburton tells me as we stand on a chilly street in Oxford and he films presenter Sean Fletcher’s

links for the programme scheduled to be shown on BBC One tomorrow (Sunday 10 March). Mark and Sean are two of a team of five people who arrived at St Aldate’s Parish Centre earlier that morning to film the volunteers who run ACT, a scheme at the church, serving breakfast to ex-offenders and people experiencing homelessness. When I joined the programme-makers and the volunteers, along with the people they were serving, there was a tangible feeling of excitement in the room. Not everyone gathered for breakfast wanted to appear on the screen, but even those who did not were caught up with the novelty of being around a film crew from the world’s longestrunning religious television programme. Songs of Praise was first broadcast in October 1961 from a Welsh chapel. Formats and presenters have changed, but it continues to bring congregational hymn singing into people’s front rooms – although now with high-definition colour pictures rather than the grainy black-and-white images of 58 years ago. One of the newest members of the team is researcher Lorna Reader, who joined the programme in January. ‘Songs of Praise is a fantastically positive programme to work on,’ she tells me. ‘I am a Christian and studied theology at

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Researcher Lorna Reader discusses the filming schedule with producer Mark Warburton


6 FEATURE • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

From page 5 university. I have always felt comfortable talking about Christianity and all religions, and with this job I get to meet all kinds of people who talk about their faith. ‘Today we’re working with people who have criminal records and not the easiest of pasts, but we’re seeing a whole different side to their life now that they’ve welcomed God into it. I hope that the viewers will see how life can be really tough but that, if you trust God, everything can be OK.’ Guiding the viewers through the way God has changed the people’s lives is presenter Sean Fletcher, who joined the programme in 2017. When we meet he greets me with an apology. ‘You meet a Songs of Praise presenter and it could have been Katherine Jenkins or Aled Jones – but, instead, you have to make do with me!’ Sean, though, is one of the most versatile presenters on the programme – he also works on Countryfile and Sunday Morning Live and he arrived in Oxford straight from working on the ITV breakfast show Good Morning Britain. However, as a Christian, Sean finds working on Songs of Praise a very different experience. ‘I remember doing my first few programmes having worked in the media for 15 years,’ he recalls. ‘I found it made a massive difference working with people

‘Songs of Praise’ has content that lifts the spirits and inspires people who either have a faith or, at least, an understanding of it. ‘The programme is another aspect of what I do to help my faith. Every time I film with Songs of Praise, I hear somebody’s story of how they have come to God. At the end of filming I’ll be on the train home and I’ll remember that testimony, and it inspires me in my faith.’

‘He was asking me questions about my faith so, to a certain extent, the questions were easy to answer, because I love speaking about my faith – but knowing it was going to go on national TV was a bit different!’ While the whole experience was new to Roisin, this year is producer Mark’s 25th on the programme. ‘I joined as a researcher in 1999, but previously I’d been a session musician,’ he explains. ‘Three of my great loves are my ne of the people Sean hears from in Christian faith, music-making and the Oxford is Roisin Jackson, who is a media, so Songs of Praise feels like my volunteer intern at St Aldate’s. She and natural home. I’ve worked on attachment Sean took on the duty of serving the on other programmes, but always breakfasts and, as they dished up the returned. eggs and bacon in front of the cameras, ‘I do like working on media content that Roisin spoke to Sean about her work with is positive and uplifting. There is so much the church and her faith. in today’s world that can leave you feeling ‘It was quite odd,’ she tells me underwhelmed and anxious, but Songs of Praise has content that lifts the spirits and afterwards. ‘I hadn’t done anything like that before and it was hard to remember inspires people. not to look at the camera. But Sean talked ‘Working on the programme has me through it. He was nice and helped me definitely impacted my faith. It has helped me see how vast and wide and high and to relax. deep God’s love is and how vast and wide and high and deep is the expression of our Christian faith.’ It is estimated that more people watch Songs of Praise each week than go to church and, while the programme is not specifically aimed at people with faith, it does target what Mark describes as ‘a Christian-literate audience’. ‘We try to make it as all-encompassing and diverse as we can,’ he tells me. And that diversity includes the songs featured in each programme so that, as Mark explains, ‘people of all ages, denominations and worship styles see something of their experiences of Christianity reflected on the screen from week to week’. Sean interviews Roisin Jackson The congregational while they serve breakfast songs are recorded separately from the

O


9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • FEATURE 7 ANDREW STONE

The team know exactly what they want. It’s a pleasure to work with them interviews and so there is not any singing in Oxford. Instead, after filming scenes of breakfast being served and eaten and recording interviews, the Songs of Praise team head onto the streets of Oxford to record Sean’s links that will be shown on tomorrow’s programme. While no link will last more than a few seconds on the screen, recording on busy roads full of people is a time-consuming business. Buses, squeaky shopping trolleys, a man with a balloon, bicycles and a fan stopping Sean for a selfie all conspire to delay the filming. ‘It’s harder when you’re in a town,

because there are lots of people around,’ Sean confides. ‘When I first started presenting almost 20 years ago, being in an environment where there were lots of people walking around would have really thrown me. But I’ve learnt to keep my focus. ‘And the Songs of Praise team know exactly what they want. The programme is on every week and it is a well-oiled machine – it’s a pleasure to work with them, they are so professional.’ After a couple of hours filming in the centre of Oxford, the team quickly grab a sandwich before setting off to record

another feature in a residential back garden. It is almost 2.30 pm and, despite having been up since four o’clock to read the news on Good Morning Britain, Sean is still focused on the job in hand. ‘I know I need to smile when presenting Songs of Praise because I’m telling good news,’ he says. ‘From a presenting point of view, I think about the viewer sitting down with a box of chocolates and feeling warm inside. ‘There aren’t many Christian programmes on TV and Christian messages aren’t in other programmes, so Songs of Praise is rare – it’s one of television’s crown jewels.’


8 FEATURE • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

‘We wanted every detail to come from a true story’ A new musical in the West End tells how a small Canadian town welcomed air passengers stranded in the days after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the US. Philip HE characters onstage say they remember how the day began for them. Members of the audience who are old enough can probably call to mind Halcrow speaks with its what they were doing on that day too. The writers of the musical Come from Away – wife and writers IRENE SANKOFF husband Irene Sankoff and David Hein – certainly can recall 11 September 2001. and DAVID HEIN and ‘We were living in New York, where Irene was studying for her master’s and I was working in a with ALF RICHARDSON, recording studio,’ says David, when he and Irene speak with me in London ahead of the musical’s West End who helped co-ordinate opening. ‘The phone rang,’ remembers The Salvation Army’s Irene, ‘and it was my dad. He said: “Don’t go to school today efforts to support the – there has been a terrorist attack.”’ unexpected arrivals At first, Irene didn’t realise the

T

ANDREW ROWAT

gravity of what had happened. ‘But he said: “Turn on your television, don’t get on the Subway and don’t go to school.” ‘We turned on the TV in time to see the second plane going into the towers.’ The Canadian couple were living in accommodation with students from all over the world. ‘People responded in different ways,’ says David, ‘but the response I remember most is that a music student sat down at a piano and we all gathered round. There was something about the ‘Come from Away’ writers Irene Sankoff and David Hein

music that allowed us to come together as a community, even though we came from all around the world. ‘And in the days afterwards there was so much kindness around. In New York, where usually you might not even talk to your neighbour, suddenly you could talk to anyone.’ ‘But over the years,’ Irene reflects, ‘I think we forgot about that experience in which people cared for each other whatever their backgrounds. It somehow got pushed aside. But when we heard about what happened in Gander, there was something familiar about it.’ When the US closed its airspace on 11 September 2001, tens of planes were diverted to the airport in Gander, Newfoundland. At first the passengers


9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • FEATURE 9 MATTHEW MURPHY

The West End cast of ‘Come from Away’ had to stay on the aircraft. But when they were allowed off – virtually doubling the population of the small town – the Newfoundlanders took them in and took care of them for days until the planes were allowed back in the air. David says: ‘It reminded us of our experience in New York of an international community coming together to support each other. When we started researching the story we found out that there was going to be a commemoration ceremony in Gander on the tenth anniversary of 9/11 and that all these “come from aways” would be returning to reunite with the friends they had made. It’s a difficult trip to make, which itself spoke volumes about how important it was for these people to return to Gander.’ So the couple headed for the town and stayed for a month, interviewing the people who had been there ten years earlier and collecting their stories. ‘We interviewed every single person we possibly could,’ says David. ‘Every one of them had so many stories and every story was better than the last. We couldn’t wait to tell them.’ They decided to tell them by developing Come from Away, which has become

a Broadway hit and has now opened in London. ‘Irene and I joke sometimes that there were about 7,000 people on the planes and about 9,000 people in the town, so we came back from Gander with 16,000 stories that we wanted to tell in a 100-minute musical with 12 actors. ‘We amalgamated characters and storylines to keep it concise, but we wanted every detail to come from a true story.’ So, for instance, there are true stories behind the episode in which some of the

They could communicate by looking up passages in the Bible stranded passengers are fearful about being bussed to a Salvation Army camp. They do not understand where they are going or what is happening and cannot speak English. But their fears are allayed when one of the townspeople, spotting a Bible being carried by passengers, works out that if he points them to Philippians 4:6, they will be able to read in their own language the words: ‘Be anxious for

nothing.’ David explains: ‘That scene is an amalgamation of stories. A number of Moldovan refugees were put into a Baptist church. The people in the church didn’t have any way to communicate with them until someone realised that the church and the Moldovans had Bibles and that the numbering system would be similar in both. They saw that they could communicate by looking up passages in the Bible.’ As for the fear of passengers who were being driven to the Salvation Army camp, Lieut-Colonel Alf Richardson can verify: ‘That actually happened.’ Speaking over the phone from Canada, Alf says: ‘A group of Eastern European people had initially been accommodated in a school for a number of days, but had developed some kind of stomach ailment. So the town officials made the decision to send them to the Salvation Army camp, where there was already another group staying. They put them on a bus late at night and drove them to the camp. The camp was quite isolated, in the middle of a forest area, and the people had no idea

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10 FEATURE • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

From page 9 about The Salvation Army, so when they disembarked from the bus to be greeted by men in military-style uniform they were afraid.’ In 2001, Alf was in charge of The Salvation Army’s work in the area. On 11 September he learnt of the terrorist attacks while sitting with some of the other Salvation Army staff in a restaurant. ‘The television in the restaurant was on, but the sound was off. The screens kept showing a clip of the planes hitting part in the operation to provide food. the twin towers, and I ‘The arena became a warehouse,’ says was thinking that it was Alf. ‘All the facilities that were hosting a movie tape that had passengers would order food and we got stuck. would arrange for delivery or pick‘Shortly after, up. We recognised that some food one of our needed refrigeration, so I called the Salvation Army mayor and requested the use of the officers came ice surface in the arena. The town in and said promptly put wooden panels on that the the ice and it became what one pictures magazine called “the world’s were real largest refrigerator”.’ and we were The Salvation Army tried to expecting meet other needs. a number of ‘Along with many other groups planes to land who were hosting passengers, we also Lieut-Colonel Alf Richardson in Gander. He provided new clothing, as the people said that an had not been able to take any of their accommodate passengers. I went on emergency meeting was being held at the belongings from the planes. local television and made an appeal for town hall. I instructed him to go and offer ‘Quite a number of passengers stayed in any support we could. From that moment, whatever people could provide – stews, private houses – people just opened their casseroles, whatever – and gave phone we went into high gear for the next week doors. The Salvation Army opened up five numbers for them to call. or so.’ facilities: four of them were our church ‘The people from the community would buildings and one was the camp.’ call the volunteers in the boardroom, who As well as the need for food and would then tell them which facility to take clothing, the stranded passengers had to the food to. lf explains how The Salvation Army make sense of their situation. ‘We more than met our goal.’ worked alongside the mayor Claude Alf says: ‘None of the passengers knew The Salvation Army continued to play a Elliott – ‘who worships regularly at The what had happened until they got off the Salvation Army’ – and other individuals and groups to help people with a host of needs. ‘Because of the gravity of the situation and the need to make arrangements, the passengers were not allowed off the planes for more than 24 hours,’ says Alf. ‘The first thing we did was to assist the Red Cross. They were doing a remarkable job in registering people and providing information as they got off the planes, but they needed more volunteers. ‘At about 2 pm on 12 September, I received a call from the mayor, informing me that 3,000 meals were required by 6 pm for the passengers who had begun to disembark. The problem was finding a kitchen large enough. ‘So instead, we recruited some volunteers from the school board and they joined with our staff in our boardroom. Everyone was equipped with a phone, and the town provided us with a list of which facilities were being used to Volunteers prepare meals at Gander Salvation Army in 2001; (right) the mayor Claude Elliott

The people had not been able to take any of their belongings from the planes

Courtesy of Claude Elliott

A


9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • FEATURE 11 MATTHEW MURPHY

Rachel Tucker playing an airline captain, Beverley Bass, in ‘Come from Away’ planes. They had sat on the planes for a whole day or more, trying to figure out what was going on. ‘We made sure that they had television sets to watch. And they sat there for hours and hours, watching the footage of the

planes hitting the towers and seeing the updates. ‘We ensured that there were counsellors available at every site to help with people’s emotional needs.’ In noting the actions of various sections of the community, Come from Away references the help given by The Salvation Army. ‘We’ve seen the emergency committee notes,’ says David. ‘There are 29 pages of what happened every single minute of those five days, and The Salvation Army is mentioned time and time again. The notes repeatedly say, “we have suchand-such a crisis” and then, “The Salvation Army will take care of it”. ‘The Salvation Army was such a huge force during that time.’ Irene is impressed by the way the whole town responded to the unexpected arrivals from all kinds of backgrounds at a time of insecurity. ‘Gander didn’t need to let these people off the planes

at all,’ she says. ‘No one would have questioned if they would have left the people on the planes or kept everyone sequestered at the airport. Taking people into the town and then into their community buildings and even their

What happened restored their faith in humanity homes was an act of bravery.’ ‘No one knew who was on those planes,’ adds David. ‘There was a lot of fear about. But, despite that, the people in Gander did not hesitate. A number of people have said that what happened at the time restored their faith in humanity.’ Not that the people who were in Gander see that what they did was something special. ‘It’s the way the Ganderites and the people of Newfoundland were raised,’ says Irene. ‘You don’t ask questions, you just do what you were meant to do.’ l Come from Away is at the Phoenix Theatre, Charing Cross Road


12 INNER LIFE • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

Prayerlink YOUR prayers are requested for Matthew, who is feeling depressed and finding life difficult in prison; for Adrian, who would like to commit a relationship to God; for the couple known to Richard, who are hoping to conceive after the loss of a baby; and for Eadwina, that she will be given strength. The War Cry invites readers to send in requests for prayer, including the first names of individuals and details of their ­circumstances. Send your requests to Prayerlink, War Cry, 101 Newington Causeway, Lon­don SE1 6BN. Mark your envelope ‘Confidential’.

Becoming a Christian There is no set formula to becoming a Christian, but many people have found saying this prayer to be a helpful first step to a relationship with God Lord Jesus Christ, I am truly sorry for the things I have done wrong in my life. Please forgive me. I now turn from everything that I know is wrong. Thank you that you died on the cross for me so that I could be forgiven and set free. Thank you that you offer me forgiveness and the gift of your Holy Spirit. Please come into my life by your Holy Spirit to be with me for ever. Thank you, Lord Jesus. Amen Extract from Why Jesus? by Nicky Gumbel published by Alpha International, 2011. Used by kind permission of Alpha International

1 Samuel

Nigel Bovey gives chapter and verse on each book in the Scriptures

HE First Book of Samuel describes a T sea change in the governance of the people of Israel. Since establishing them-

selves in the Promised Land, the Israelites had been ruled by judges. But Samuel would be the last. From birth, Samuel is dedicated into the service of God and is raised by the priest and judge Eli (chapters 1 to 3). Because of the sin of Eli’s sons, Israel loses in battle against the Philistines, who capture the sacred Ark of the Covenant. On hearing the news, Eli dies (4:18) and Samuel succeeds him. Although the ark is returned and the Philistines defeated, the leaders of Israel demand that Samuel appoint a king (chapters 6 to 8). Samuel selects and anoints Saul (chapters 9 to 11). Saul gains military victories over neighbouring tribes, including the Philistines, but when he fails to complete a scorched-earth campaign against the Amalekites, he is deemed unworthy of kingship and Samuel looks for a successor (chapters 13 to 15). Samuel anoints David, the youngest son of Jesse, and finds him a position as a musician in Saul’s court (chapter 16). David defeats the Philistine champion Goliath in battle (chapter 17), and Saul welcomes him into his family. But not for long. Saul becomes jealous of the hero-worship David attracts and tries, unsuccessfully, to kill him. Further battlefield successes against the Philistines enamour David to the nation but further

enrage Saul. David marries Saul’s daughter, but Saul still orders his servants to kill him. David goes on the run, but Jonathan, Saul’s son and David’s close friend, helps him escape (chapters 18 to 20). A troubled and determined Saul pursues David throughout the region, killing anyone he suspects of aiding the fugitive. In desperation, David heads for somewhere he reckons Saul will not want

Saul becomes jealous of the hero-worship David attracts to go looking – among the old enemy, the Philistines (chapter 27). David calculates correctly. Saul gives up his pursuit. David becomes the Philistine king’s bodyguard, but when the Philistines are about to go into battle against Saul’s army, the king releases him (chapter 29). The Philistines win the battle, during which the critically wounded Saul falls on his own sword (chapter 31). Israel’s first king is dead.

Key verse ‘To obey is better than sacrifice’ (1 Samuel 15:22 New International Version)

"

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9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • EXPRESSIONS 13

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by Christine Barrett

All dressed up T was a windy day and the sea was rough. I could see heads Iwhat, bobbing up and down in the water as surfers took advantage of for them, were ideal conditions.

One woman, however, was not leaping joyfully into the waves. She was fully kitted out and had a surfboard under her arm, but she stood at the water’s edge, eyeing the sea. I don’t know whether she plucked up the courage to jump in the water. I didn’t stay to watch, but I hope she did. All sorts of life events can place us in a similar position: kitted out, ready to go, but reluctant to launch out from familiar surroundings. If we believe in God, we know that he gives us all we need to accomplish what we have to We can still be do, but we can still be hesitant to take the hesitant to take plunge. In his letter to Christians in Ephesus, the plunge the Early Church leader Paul lists the ‘equipment’ to which believers have access to help them withstand life’s battles: the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness, gospel-spreading shoes, the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Holy Spirit (see Ephesians 6:14–17). God gives us all the equipment we need to fight any battles we face – whether they are to do with relationships, our jobs or ill health. I think that the shield of faith is the most important bit of kit. Without that, we’re not likely to use other items. And when we use it, we are more likely to do things that seem risky because we know that God is with us. If we’re not prepared to take risks, we will probably find ourselves in the same position as the woman standing on the beach – watching her fellow surfers having fun, but afraid to join them. So let’s use the resources God gives us and live life to the full by putting our faith in him.


14 PUZZLES • WAR CRY • 9 March 2019

QUICK CROSSWORD

SUDOKU Fill the grid so that every column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9

7

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QUICK QUIZ

ACROSS

DOWN

1. Foretell (7) 5. Anchor chain (5) 7. Tableland (7) 8. Entertain (5) 10. Vow (4) 11. Merry (8) 13. Din 6) 14. Managing (6) 17. Distribution (8) 19. Level (4) 21. Silk fabric (5) 22. Anxiety (7) 23. Linger (5) 24. Gratify (7)

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7 6 1 2 5 3 9 8 4 1. Who had a No 1 hit with the song ‘Love Me for a Reason’? 2 8 invade 3 4England? 7 9 6 1 5 2. In what year did the Normans 3. In imperial measurements, 4 how 5 many 9 6 pounds 8 1 make 7 3 up2a stone? 8 2 4 9 1 7 3 5 6 4. Who wrote the stories featuring the characters Bertie 5 9 7 8 3 6 2 4 1 Wooster and Jeeves? 5. What is measured by the 1Beaufort 3 6 scale? 5 4 2 8 7 9 6. Who directed the films Lost in Translation, Marie Antoinette 6 1 5 3 2 8 4 9 7 and The Bling Ring? 3 7 2 1 9 4 5 6 8 2

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4 8 7 6 5 PUZZLE9 ANSWERS

Stretchy (7) Notion (4) Tutored (6) Escort (8) Attempt to deceive (5) 7. Sticks out (9) 9. Clarify (9) 12. Divine (8) 15. Ailment (7) 16. Brawl (6) 18. Not now (5) 20. Weave (4)

WORDSEARCH Look up, down, forwards, backwards and diagonally on the grid to find these C. S. Lewis books

A GRIEF OBSERVED MERE CHRISTIANITY MIRACLES PERELANDRA PRINCE CASPIAN SURPRISED BY JOY THAT HIDEOUS STRENGTH THE FOUR LOVES THE GREAT DIVORCE THE HORSE AND HIS BOY THE MAGICIAN’S NEPHEW

THE PROBLEM OF PAIN THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS TILL WE HAVE FACES TIMELESS AT HEART

T Z E W Q T H O X V A L L B U Z P H G Z H T E G R G T K B X L N Z Q T Z T A T H E H O R S E A N D H I S B O Y G C I S S P E P R I N C E C A S P I A N M L T V E R G C I S X L G L M A K G E B L I I N L O R H Z S D L V Z X I R R C W M P S T E B E R R G J J D L E I T R E E W N J H Z L A E M I R A C L E S W H L Q A G G E Z E T O S B H P M F S G A E B I J G A F U M D L R P Y C O U G V S E C L R H Z O K O I F K P J B O Z E S H I R M B F G U S F V E V S S E K F A Z G E S Y Y D T R P P O W Z E D X A T Z A T O J S I A R L Z A R P R I C C H K M X U Z A Y Z F Z O W I C V H Z E E O E W D N G W B K L Z V R N E T K S A B H K I A R D N A L E R E P D A Z S R E T T E L E P A T W E R C S E H T N T E Y O J Y B D E S I R P R U S T Z

8 2 5 6 7 4 9 3 1

7 1 3 5 8 9 6 4 2

6 9 2 4 3 1 8 7 5

5 4 8 2 6 7 1 9 3

1 5 4 8 2 3 7 6 9

2 6 9 7 4 5 3 1 8

3 8 7 9 1 6 2 5 4

SUDOKU SOLUTION

8

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1

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QUICK QUIZ 1. The Osmonds. 2. 1066. 3. Fourteen. 4. P. G. Wodehouse. 5. Wind speed. 6. Sofia Coppola. QUICK CROSSWORD ACROSS: 1 Predict. 5 Cable. 7 Plateau. 8 Amuse. 10 Oath. 11 Cheerful. 13 Racket. 14 Coping. 17 Delivery. 19 Flat. 21 Satin. 22 Concern. 23 Tarry. 24 Satisfy. DOWN: 2 Elastic. 3 Idea. 4 Taught. 5 Chaperon. 6 Bluff. 7 Protrudes. 9 Enlighten. 12 Heavenly. 15 Illness. 16 Fracas. 18 Later. 20 Knit.


9 March 2019 • WAR CRY • WHAT’S COOKING? 15

Kitchen Beef and sweet 2tbsp oil

pepper quesadillas Salt and freshly milled black pepper

2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

3tbsp coriander, freshly chopped 8 flour tortillas

2 spring onions, finely chopped

4tbsp tomato chutney 150g buffalo mozzarella cheese, roughly torn

1 red pepper, deseeded and finely chopped

Serves

4

1 yellow pepper, deseeded and finely chopped 100g chorizo sausage, roughly cubed Large pinch chilli flakes

Beef with broad bean and 100ml half-fat mayonnaise 2tsp wholegrain mustard 25g pack fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1 large garlic clove, peeled and finely chopped 2tsp olive oil 100g pack baby spinach leaves 150g broad beans, blanched and outer skin removed

Heat 1tbsp oil in a large non-stick frying pan.

375g lean beef mince

spinach salad

Cook the garlic, spring onions and peppers for 2 minutes. Add the mince and chorizo and cook for 7 minutes until brown. Stir in the chilli flakes and season. Add the coriander and cool slightly. Place 4 tortillas on a chopping board. Spread 1tbsp chutney on each, then add the meat mixture and cheese. Top each with another tortilla, press down and set aside.

Brush the steaks with the extra virgin olive oil and place under the grill in a suitable pan, cooking for 6 minutes on each side. Transfer to a warm plate and leave to rest for 5 minutes.

Slice the steaks diagonally, adding any meat juices to the dressing. Pile the salad leaves on a serving plate and toss in the beef strips. Drizzle the dressing over the salad. Serve immediately with the mayonnaise and mustard sauce and crusty bread.

Heat the remaining 1tbsp oil in a clean non-stick frying pan on a moderate heat and fry 1 tortilla sandwich for 3 minutes. Flip over and cook for a further 3 minutes until the cheese melts. Repeat with the remaining tortillas, adding extra oil to the pan if required.

Salt and freshly milled black pepper 2 lean sirloin steaks, seasoned 2tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Slice into quarters and serve immediately.

Preheat the grill. Mix the mayonnaise and mustard in a small bowl and set aside. To make the salad dressing, place the parsley, garlic, olive oil, spinach leaves and broad beans into a large bowl. Toss gently to coat. Season to taste.

Serves

2

Recipes reprinted, with permission, from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board website simplybeefandlamb.co.uk


Mercy fixes its eyes upon the plight of the one in need and moves into action Allen Satterlee

War Cry 9 Mar 2019  

War Cry 9 Mar 2019