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War Cry THE

salvationarmy.org.uk/warcry

Est 1879

No 7065

FIGHTING FOR HEARTS AND SOULS

THE LIGHT HAS COME THE WAIT IS OVER writes NIGEL BOVEY THE Olympic flame is coming to a street near you. Starting today (Saturday 19 May) at Land’s End, an army of runners will carry the torch the length and breadth of the UK. While on its travels, it will be within viewing distance of 95 per cent of the population. Ignited by the sun’s rays in Olympia, the flame will burn continuously throughout the four-yearly Turn to page 3

19 May 2012

20p/25c


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The War Cry 19 May 2012

News LORD PUTTNAM OPENS EXHIBITION ‘Chariots’ producer gets event off and running FAITH Under Fire by Canon Q Andrew White has won an Ultimate Christian Library Book Award

FILM producer Lord Puttnam opened the 2012. Christian Resources Broadcaster and writer David Winter Exhibition International at presented the canon with his award, Sandown Park in Esher, which won the Adult category, during and launched a set of a ceremony at the Christian Resources resources to accompany Exhibition International. The book the rerelease of his documents Canon White’s experiences Oscar-winning Chariots as a leader of a Christian community in of Fire. Baghdad. A digitally remastered Andrea Skevington’s The Lion Classic version of the film – Bible won the award in the Children’s which tells the story of category. Her book tells Bible stories in Olympic sprinter Eric a style suitable for young readers. Liddell, who refused The awards are organised by the to run on a Sunday, charity Speaking Volumes. because of his Christian beliefs – is scheduled to be shown in cinemas in the summer. Christian education trust Damaris has produced free downloadable resources to encourage church and community groups to discuss its themes of passion, dedication and trust. For the first time, CRE International held a Christian Film Festival.

LEGISLATION FOR 0.7 PER CENT NOT IN QUEEN’S SPEECH

Make aid plans law, say agencies Lord Puttnam opens the resources exhibition

SONGS IN THE KEY OF LISSA

JOCELYN BROWN AT FESTIVAL

Soul singer joins celebrations

INSIDE

p8 COMMENT

p6

LIFESTYLE

p7

PUZZLES

p12

INNER LIFE

p13

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

p14

WHAT’S COOKING?

p15

JOCELYN BROWN is to perform at the finale of the annual Pentecost Festival in London. The soul singer, who had UK hits with ‘Always There’ and ‘Something Goin’ On’, is scheduled to sing at the Change the World concert being staged by Christian Aid at Westminster Central Hall on Saturday 26 May. Tens of thousands of Christians are expected to attend the Pentecost Festival, which is organised by Share Jesus International and features music, theatre, comedy and seminars. Pentecost is celebrated by Christians throughout the world as ‘the birthday of the Church’, when God sent his Holy Spirit to the early believers. For more information visit pentecostfestival.co.uk

TWO Christian aid agencies have criticised the Government for the absence of legislation on overseas aid in its programme announced in the Queen’s Speech. Christian Aid and Tearfund were disappointed that there was no announcement of legislation that would commit the UK to spending 0.7 per cent of its gross national income (GNI) on overseas aid. In 2010, the coalition partners said they would ‘honour our commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of GNI on overseas aid from 2013, and to enshrine this commitment in law’. But the Queen’s Speech stated only that the Government ‘has set out firm plans’ for such aid.

Tearfund said it acknowledged that the Government was committed to the target but would press for legislation in its meetings with ministers. Sol Oyuela of Christian Aid said: ‘This was not just a coalition promise; it was a promise made to the world’s poorest people, and one which we just cannot renege on. ‘Protecting the 0.7 per cent in law would safeguard the aid budget from future political jockeying, guaranteeing effective and predictable spending to fight global poverty, whichever party is in power. ‘It would also enable the UK to exert more pressure on other EU countries to move towards the UN goal of a 0.7 per cent aid commitment from rich countries.’


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They have a place in the historic relay by virtue of being counted as worthy From page 1

sporting celebration, as a symbol of peace, unity and friendship. By the time it reaches the stadium in London’s East End, the torch will have travelled some 8,000 miles across the UK. At the end of its 70-day journey, the torch will have been carried by 8,000 torch-bearers, each of them carrying it for 300 metres. Whereas the last person to handle the torch and light the flame in the Olympic Stadium will be well known, most relay torch-bearers are members of the public. They have a place in the historic relay by virtue of being counted as worthy. In May 2011, the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games launched its Moment to Shine campaign, inviting people to nominate inspirational members of the public who had a story

The need for light in our darkness is an everyday occurrence

of personal achievement or contribution to their community. By last August, 28,000 had made it through to the second round. Since December, the chosen ones have been finding out that they will be carrying the three-sided, golden torch. Sports Minister Hugh Robertson says the relay will bring ‘the magic of the Games to communities up and down the UK and give local heroes a once-in-a-lifetime experience’. Being part of a global event is a once-in-alifetime experience for many torch-bearers, ticket-holders, participants and families. The need for light in our darkness, however, is an everyday occurrence. And not just physical light. The period of history known as the Enlightenment was about the use of reason. ‘Light’ is used to describe a mental process. We talk of ‘casting light’ on a subject, of something ‘appearing in a new light’ and of someone ‘seeing the light’. The Bible writer Paul’s dramatic conversion on the Damascus road is sometimes seen as the prime example of someone ‘seeing the light’ and becoming a Christian. Jesus said: ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life’ (John 8:12 New International Version). Jesus reached out to people who were stumbling in the darkness of their sin. He forgave those who asked for his forgiveness. Those who thought that God was interested only in the deserving, in the worthy, in the self-righteous had their eyes opened. Jesus said that God’s gift of eternal life is available to everyone, whatever they have done. ‘I am the way,’ he said, ‘and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me’ (John 14:6). We do not need to be lost because of our sin. We do not need to look far and wide for the answer. Jesus is the way. Jesus is the light. And he invites us all to follow him.


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Interview God’s Rich Pattern is published by SPCK

‘I

‘At the age of 15, I became totally blind and, as a result of other conditions, had to have my eyes removed. ‘Just before my operation, I prayed to God to make everything OK. The words that Jesus prayed before his arrest came to me: “Not my will but thine be done.” I knew then that everything would be OK for me.’

Dr LIN BERWICK tells Renée Davis about her rich life

It’s your

WAS born three months premature. In 1950, doctors weren’t aware that if you gave oxygen to a very premature baby, it could burn the eyes and damage the brain,’ explains Dr Lin Berwick. ‘And that’s what they did. I developed cerebral palsy and an eye condition called retrolental fibroplasia, which meant that I was partially sighted. Life since has not been smooth for

Lin, but throughout it – as she says in her new book – she detects ‘God’s rich pattern’. Lin trained in psychotherapeutic counselling, had her own practice and for 23 years ran a helpline for the Disability Now newspaper. She has served as a Methodist preacher. And in 1989, she and her husband, Ralph, founded the Lin Berwick Trust, which builds holiday accommodation specifically for disabled people. The idea for the properties came about when Lin and Ralph struggled with accommodation on their own holidays. ‘We were


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OK to have faith

N E K A H S

staying in places that were supposed to be wheelchair-friendly, and when we’d go there they would be terrible,’ Lin explains. ‘The properties we have built are self-catering and sleep a family of six. They include overhead hoists, specialist beds, rise-and-fall sinks and talking microwaves. The guests pay a holiday rent, which covers the maintenance of the property and pays for a manager. We are not a profit-making business – the money is put towards the building of the next property.’ So far, the trust has built two holiday homes, one in Norfolk and one in Scotland. Lin hopes to build three more. Lin met and married Ralph around the time she qualified to become a Methodist preacher. They shared many things in common – but, at first, not their faith. ‘God has a sense of humour, doesn’t he?’ Lin laughs. ‘He put a self-confessed atheist with a preacher. But I never talked to Ralph about the Christian faith or spouted biblical texts at him. I knew that if I did, he would run away frightened. I just let him see what the Christian life was like.’ Ralph would drive Lin to Sunday services at church. He began to attend church with her. Lin says that ‘gradually, gradually the Lord worked on him’. Ralph committed his life to God. The couple left their home in Essex and moved to Suffolk. Life was calm, until Ralph developed Parkinson’s disease. ‘Ralph’s illness was a 16-year nightmare,’ says Lin. ‘He gradually lost

his mobility. He also lost the power of speech, and that was the most tragic thing for me, because we were always chatting. It got to the point where it was difficult or sometimes impossible to understand him. Then he developed dementia and went into a care home. ‘When Ralph became ill, I became angry with God. ‘I couldn’t preach any more. I didn’t feel God’s love. I felt abandoned. I’d scream at God: “How could you do this to me?” I’d found the love of my life and he was taken away from me. It seemed so cruel.’ Ralph died last year. When he was ill, Lin began to write a book. The result is God’s Rich Pattern, in which she reflects on her life and encourages readers to recognise the presence of God in their own anger, fears, anguish and suffering. ‘God’s Rich Pattern is about faith that gets sorely tested. I wanted people

Faith means that I can go to God and ask ‘Why?’

to understand that it is OK to have your faith shaken. If you never have to question your faith, that’s wonderful, but you don’t grow either.’ Lin hopes that the book helps readers. Writing it certainly helped her. ‘Now my faith means something different to me – it means that I can go to God and ask “Why?” Through writing the book, I could rise above my own physical and emotional pain. I could be creative and truly express what I wanted to say in a way that I couldn’t otherwise because of physical limitations.’ Disability isn’t something that Lin hides behind. Instead, she identifies a purpose for it. ‘I feel that God wants me to speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves. Many of them are too ill or too frail. ‘But I believe that, through my writing, God is giving me a voice to reach out to people. If I’m able to dispel the misconceptions about disabled people not being able to make valid contributions to society, then all the pain and struggle I’ve been through has had a purpose.’


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The War Cry 19 May 2012

Comment

Time to create a track record

Media

PA

Kieran’s old priorities left back

PA photo

THE Olympic Games will move a step closer today (Saturday 19 May) as members of the public step out on the torch relay. Over the next 70 days, 8,000 torchbearers will carry the flame towards the Olympic Stadium in London, where the opening ceremony will take place on Friday 27 July. The Olympic and Paralympic Games are part of what has the potential to be a memorable summer for the UK. Before the Games begin, many Britons will be celebrating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. Shortly afterwards, one of the Home Nations, England, will be trying to make its mark at the Euro 2012 football championships in Poland and Ukraine. The coming months are likely to prompt some self-reflection. What is the UK’s place in the world? What is it good at? What is it bad at? Britons may ask themselves what goals are worth pursuing and where they should look for a sense of achievement. At the Olympics, Britain will be hoping for many medals for its athletes – but it will surely also be aiming to stage an event that welcomes people from all over the world. There is another arena in which Britain could aim to be up there with the best. In the run-up to the last election, all three main parties pledged to make legislation that would require the UK to commit 0.7 per cent of its gross national income – the UN’s golden figure – to overseas aid. So far, the Government has ‘set out firm plans’ to spend 0.7 per cent from next year – but aid agencies are disappointed that, as yet, it has not made the legislation. A spokesperson for Christian Aid tells The War Cry that legislation would be good because ‘aid is most effective when it’s predictable’. If Britain has been among the leading pack in international efforts to hit 0.7 per cent in giving, it should look to stay there. Making a welcome difference to the poorest countries of the world is a goal worth pursuing.

A slice of history JONATHAN KENT examines the significance of bread in faith, history and culture in a five-part series Our Daily Bread, which begins on Radio 4 on Monday (21 May 1.45 pm).

PREMIER League star Kieran Richardson told a church congregation ‘I have Jesus Christ in my life’, reported the website of The Sun. It revealed how the Sunderland footballer told his story to 100 people at a Durham church, which he attends with his partner, model Natalie Suliman. He said that during his time at Manchester United, he was not happy with his life and was more interested in cars and houses than football. He was left out of the United squad for the 2007 FA Cup Final and, after watching his side lose to Chelsea, went out in London’s West End. During the night out, he met Natalie. Richardson said: ‘After a while I asked her: “Do you want to come on holiday to Barbados?” She said: “I’ll come to Barbados if you go to church.” ‘My faith is so strong now … Now I have Jesus Christ in my life and I feel so good within my heart.’

And finally … a newsreader’s prayer ITV NEWSREADER Julie Etchingham has written a prayer for a Day of Prayer for the Media. It has been posted on the website of the Church and Media Network (CMN), which has encouraged churches to include local, regional and national media in their prayers tomorrow (Sunday 20 May). In the prayer, Julie asks: ‘Lord, give us the grace to do our job with patience, dedication, warmth and energy, and the wisdom to listen much more than talk!’ Andrew Graystone, director of CMN, says the prayer day ‘is part of our response to the intense discussion of media standards over the past 12 months’. It arose out of a desire ‘to affirm the vast majority of journalists and others who work in the media, who are doing their best to work to high

ethical and professional standards, and to pray for them’. One church to have signed up to mark the day is All Souls, Langham Place, which stands next to BBC Broadcasting

House in London. The Rev Mark Meynell of the church says: ‘If anyone needs divine wisdom in our generation, it is all those involved in communicating with our generation.’

SOCIAL justice campaigners from the Q Christian faith and other religions are to go on a 12-day pilgrimage from St Paul’s Cathedral

to Canterbury Cathedral, reported The Guardian. The activists will walk under the name Occupy Faith, echoing the name of the Occupy movement, whose protest in the City of London was based next to St Paul’s. The pilgrims will walk through Rochester, where they will be addressed by the Bishop, and will end their joutney at Canterbury Cathedral, where an ecumenical service will be held.


19 May 2012 The War Cry

Lifestyle

7

Look back in

hanger BRITS hoard an average £1,212 worth of clothes in their wardrobes, yet 40 per cent are bored with their outfits, according to research carried out by home store Ikea. Just 3 per cent of the people who took part in the survey said that they felt excited about picking out their clothes each day. A third admitted to wearing only 10 per cent of their outfits, resulting in £1,090 worth of clothes hanging on the rails untouched. Almost half the respondents described their wardrobe as a place of ‘unorganised chaos’. Nearly a quarter of people admitted to grabbing the first article of clothing that comes to hand each morning, with a further 23 per cent rotating the same outfits over and over again. Ikea’s Pippa Swain says: ‘Instead of buying new clothes, money-savvy Brits should invest in storage solutions that can help them rediscover the items they once loved.’ She says that for the cost of a pair of tights, it is possible to organise an entire drawer with dividers. She also encourages people to make use of equipment such as shoe racks and trouser hangers in wardrobes, which can make it easy to pick out outfits quickly. Celebrity stylist Grace Woodward has put together some tips for getting the most out of your wardrobe. Clarity is key – Clear out your wardrobe every year, but bear in mind the upcoming season. Decluttering isn’t a quick job, so set aside plenty of time. If a piece of clothing doesn’t fit or look as though it will work with your other outfits, don’t hang on to it. Hang with pride – Once the space is decluttered, reorganise it. Make the most of your wardrobe space by using drawers and shelves, as well as rails, to store your clothes. Kick off – For shoes, try using racks and boxes. They are not only useful storage solutions, but also protect your shoes. Boxes with clear fronts help to keep the dust away and mean the shoes can be viewed easily.

Some people’s wardrobes are ‘unorganised chaos’ Library picture posed by model

How the mite-y haven’t fallen RESEARCH carried out by Allergy UK found that 58 per cent of allergy sufferers react to house dust mites. It also revealed that people are not doing enough to reduce this allergen, which often affects people in the bedroom. Allergy UK recommends that people wash bedding once a week at 60C or higher to remove house dust mites. The research suggested that many people wash their bed linen less frequently, and that 58 per cent of people wash it at 30C or 40C. To further reduce indoor allergens, Allergy UK says that people should replace mattresses every eight to ten years and buy new pillows every year.


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Interview

On t

k c for a ra

e e l i b

ju

t i h

LISSA HERMANS tells Claire Brine how she came to record a new single

CLAIRE BRINE

W

HEN a trustee at the Chickenshed Theatre Company asked member Lissa Hermans if she would be willing to record the National Anthem as a charity single to celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the first thing Lissa did was pray about it.

‘Mum and I asked God if recording the song was his will, and if it was, that he would let it go ahead,’ says Lissa, 30, who has been blind since birth and also has autism. ‘We really wanted to know if making the single was the right thing to do,’ adds Jane, Lissa’s mother. ‘So we prayed about it – and then kept on praying.’ Lissa and Jane’s prayers were answered. Record label Sony got behind Chickenshed’s idea and last month Lissa recorded ‘God Save the Queen’. ‘I am so excited by everything that has happened,’ beams Lissa. ‘When I hear myself singing on the CD, I can’t quite believe that it is me. I feel good about it.’ For the past few months, Lissa has been busy working on the single, giving interviews to national newspapers and taking part in photo shoots. The schedule has been heavy, but she has taken it in her stride. ‘I had my picture taken outside Buckingham Palace,’


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Lissa and her mum Jane

says Lissa. ‘I loved posing in front of the cameras. The photographer wrapped me up in a flag.’ Jane reveals: ‘Lissa loves singing, but I was a bit worried about how she would cope with the media attention. In the end she coped brilliantly. When she is in front of the cameras, she gets this energy from somewhere and pulls a big smiley face.’ Speaking together and finishing each other’s sentences, Lissa and Jane explain how the charity single came about. ‘Back in February, I took part in a Charles Dickens bicentenary celebration in London,’ says Lissa. ‘The Queen was there. The organisers wanted me – along with a group from Chickenshed – to sing at Guildhall. I sang the first verse of “God Save the Queen” as a solo, then everyone else sang the second verse with me. Afterwards, we were presented to the Queen and she shook my hand.’

Sony Music

‘God Save the Queen’ is released by Sony digitally on 27 May and as a physical single on 28 May

performance. Jane remembers: ‘One of the trustees who works in the music business suddenly piped up: “Why don’t we release the National Anthem as a single?” He said that Lissa could sing it, the single could raise money for Chickenshed and it could be ready for the Diamond Jubilee. Then someone from Chickenshed rang Lissa and asked

ater that day, a small group of people taking part in the celebration – including Lissa – went back to Buckingham Palace for a reception. Not long after the event, the trustees at Chickenshed – an inclusive theatre company – held a meeting. Some of them mentioned how touched the Queen had been after seeing Lissa’s

LOUISE HOLLINGSBEE/PA

L

Lissa meets Diana, Princess of Wales

her if she would like to do it. That’s when we prayed.’ ‘I made a demo in March,’ says Lissa, ‘then I did the photo shoot for the CD cover. In April, I recorded the song for real. I was accompanied by a 50-piece orchestra, who were recorded in Prague. The whole process happened very quickly.’ Lissa enjoyed making the single – but, she says, her dream is to perform it live. ‘I would love to sing the National Anthem at a concert, accompanied by an orchestra.’ While Lissa has been busy promoting her single in the press, some journalists have reported that the Sex Pistols are planning a Diamond Jubilee rerelease of their 1977 single of ‘God Save the Queen’. Is there a bit of competition between the two acts? ‘I don’t think so,’ says Lissa. ‘Johnny Rotten hasn’t been in touch.’ Although Lissa is excited by the upcoming release, it is not the first time that she has recorded a royal-related single. After Diana, Princess of Wales died in 1997, Chickenshed released ‘I Am in Love with the World’ as a tribute to her memory. Lissa was the soloist on the track. ‘I recorded that song in a studio in Notting Hill,’ says Lissa. ‘I sang with a full backing choir. I was 15 at the time. ‘I remember meeting Princess Diana when I was a little girl. She saw me perform with Chickenshed. At the end of my performance, she said how impressed she was with my voice. She was very gentle with me and made me feel special. I think she was a good person, and I liked her very much.’ Singing has always been an important part of Lissa’s life. Her

Turn to page 10


10

Interview

Sometimes I feel sad can’t see, and I have a But I pray for strength

From page 9

interest in music began in childhood. Jane explains: ‘When Lissa was about four years old, she didn’t really talk much. I’d say something to her and she would repeat back to me what I had just said. Because of her autism, she didn’t realise that communication was a two-way thing. For her, talking meant just noise. ‘But for some reason, Lissa liked singing. So – although I’m not musical at all – we started communicating with each other through song. She preferred it to talking. She learnt lots of musicals off by heart. ‘Then when she turned five, Lissa got into playing the keyboard. She used to pick out tunes and play the notes by using three fingers. She taught herself for a while, then I bought her some piano lessons. She learnt how to play using the Lissa learnt to Suzuki method, with means that each finger is numbered.’ play the keyboard Once Jane realised that music had such a positive influence on Lissa’s development, she was on the lookout for other ways to help her daughter. She heard about the Chickenshed Theatre Company. Lissa began attending the organisation’s singing, acting and drama workshops when she was seven years old. ‘When I first took Lissa, she just sat on my lap the whole time,’ remembers Jane. ‘But when the class ended, she toddled off to the piano and copied what had just been played.’

‘T

hat first day, I was very clingy,’ says Lissa. ‘But then one of the leaders came and gently took me away from my mum for a little while. She was very nice.’ Lissa soon became a regular member of Chickenshed and took part in many of the company’s performances. It was through Chickenshed that Lissa got to meet Stevie Wonder. ‘The staff at Chickenshed realised how much Lissa enjoyed playing music, so they arranged for Stevie Wonder to present her with a Casio keyboard,’ says Jane. ‘We went off to Wembley to meet him. I was excited, because I was a big fan. ‘Lissa was seven at the time, and during this period of her life she was quite obsessed with carrying out certain actions, such as repeatedly opening and closing doors. When Stevie Wonder arrived, Lissa wouldn’t come away from the door to meet him. ‘So I said to Stevie: “You couldn’t play a few notes on your keyboard, could you?” He was so nice, and started playing. Straight away, Lissa went off to join him, and then they played on his own keyboard together.’ Although Lissa had her new Casio, Stevie turned to his colleagues and

JANE HERMANS

asked them to send Lissa another keyboard – the same model that he used. ‘The next week, a keyboard turned up at the house for Lissa. I couldn’t believe it! In the end, we gave it to Chickenshed so that everyone there could use it, as Lissa was quite happy with the Casio.’ As well as keeping busy at Chickenshed, Lissa and Jane are also committed to their church – The Salvation Army at Enfield. They remember the first time they went. ‘When I was six, Mum saw an advert for a Salvation Army Christmas concert in

Stevie Wonder and Lissa played on his own keyboard together

the local newspaper,’ says Lissa. ‘She took me along. She wondered how I would react to the brass band. I absolutely loved it.’ And they never looked back. Lissa and Jane began attending weekly services. ‘I liked the way everyone made us feel at home,’ says Lissa. ‘It felt so comfortable. It still does. And I like the music.’ ‘In our early days of attending, I was feeling quite mixed-up about how life had turned out for Lissa and me,’ admits Jane. ‘I wasn’t bitter, but I wasn’t happy either. I looked around the congregation and thought that everyone looked really happy. I wanted that for myself. ‘So for a long time I’d go to the services, pray, listen to the sermons but think: “I don’t feel anything.” Then one


19 May 2012 The War Cry

11

Lissa and some friends from Chickenshed

that I few tears. from God day I prayed, and suddenly I thought: “There is a God. And I’m forgiven.” I became a Christian.’ As Jane’s faith developed, so did Lissa’s. It remains an important part of their life. ‘I’m always talking to God,’ says Lissa. ‘I love praying. Mum and I pray every morning. We ask God to help us and other people. We thank him for what he has done for us. I feel God in my head and heart. Sometimes I can hear him talking to me. He says: “Lissa, I will be with you always, every day.”’ ‘My faith is my bedrock,’ says Jane. ‘Without it, I wouldn’t have the strength to do what I do. Life isn’t always rosy.

‘L

issa didn’t know that she was blind until she was 11 years old. She wasn’t aware that she was different from anyone else. So over the years, we have had lots of

CLAIRE BRINE

Chickenshed

Lissa preferred singing to talking conversations about healing – and how not everyone gets physical healing in this lifetime.’ ‘Sometimes I feel sad that I can’t see, and I have a few tears,’ says Lissa. ‘But I pray for strength from God and then I can cope with everyday life.’ ‘It doesn’t help us to get bogged down in what we don’t have,’ adds Jane. ‘Some questions in life aren’t answered right now or answered as we would want them to be. But we have to leave them with God. We focus on being thankful

for all the good things we have.’ And whether she is releasing singles for royalty or singing with the Salvation Army junior choir, making music is what brings Lissa the most pleasure. She reveals that she would love to release a CD of Christian songs. ‘I know that God is my friend and that he is with me wherever I go,’ she says. ‘I do wish that I could see – but maybe God is teaching me and telling me to wait. Maybe he is planning to use me to help others a bit more, just as I am.’


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The War Cry 19 May 2012

Puzzlebreak WORDSEARCH

SUDOKU

Look up, down, forwards, backwards and diagonally on the grid to find these places on the Olympic torch route

Fill the grid so that every column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9 Solution on page 15

ABERDEEN BELFAST BIRMINGHAM BOLTON BOURNEMOUTH BRISTOL CAMBRIDGE CARDIFF CARLISLE

QUICK CROSSWORD

ACROSS 1. Frighten (5) 4. Ban (5) 8. Yes (3) 9. Grade (5) 10. Hold tightly (5) 11. Part of a foot (3) 12. Immerse (5) 13. Vanity (7) 16. Swarm (6) 19. Mean (6) 23. Desired (7) 26. Striped quadruped (5) 28. Namely (3) 29. Colour slightly (5) 30. Slip of memory (5) 31. Prosecute (3) 32. Bishop’s headdress (5) 33. Evade (5)

ANSWERS

O X F O R D W A S D S E E L G O O

N N L M B R R H G L A S G O W S G

L E I E E O E L S I L R A C I N S

O T I L L F T R O M I U R L I O U

C F X A F D I P A A S I H D D T R

DOVER DURHAM EDINBURGH EXETER GLASGOW GUILDFORD HULL

N L L I A L O L H H B W A B R L H

I E E H S I G Y J G U E S M E O A

L L E H T U O M E N R U O B T B O

D C S D H G P O S I Y U E D S D S

F F I D R A C U L M E E B R E E W

JERSEY LEICESTER LINCOLN LIVERPOOL LUTON MANCHESTER ORKNEY

M A N C H E S T E R G B S N C C A

L O T S I R B H E I O H B R I S N

G R L N E Y C A M B R I D G E D S

H N A T O R L O O P R E V I L J E

Y L E R A T G A M A G T V E L D A

Y X K N O E U R Y E N K R O L W N

E E L T M I R L C M A H R U D S R

OXFORD PLYMOUTH READING SALISBURY SHEFFIELD SWANSEA YORK

HONEYCOMB Each solution starts on the coloured cell and reads clockwise round the number

DOWN 2. Separately (5) 3. Oriental (7) 4. Fault (6) 5. Pig meat (5) 6. Lift (5) 7. Power (5) 9. Venomous snake (5) 14. Feline (3) 15. Tavern (3) 17. Cry down (3) 18. Employ (3) 20. Pushed against gently with the nose (7) 21. Male duck (5) 22. Recommend (6) 23. Capture (5) 24. Poison (5) 25. Entertain (5) 27. Two-footed animal (5)

1. Local inhabitant 2. Situation comedy 3. Meat from a pig 4. Aimed at in archery 5. Place frequented for holidays 6. Civil force responsible for the prevention and detection of crime

QUICK QUIZ 1. In 2011, which country hosted its first Formula One Grand Prix? 2. Which film director is the artistic director for the opening ceremony of this year’s Olympics? 3. The Greater Antilles is made up of Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and which other Caribbean island? 4. Lady, ground and scarab are all types of what insect? 5. Which chef and food writer presents the cooking show The Good Cook? 6. Complete the saying: Good things come to those who...

QUICK CROSSWORD ACROSS: 1 Scare. 4 Debar. 8 Aye. 9 Class. 10 Cling. 11 Toe. 12 Bathe. 13 Conceit. 16 Abound. 19 Intend. 23 Coveted. 26 Zebra. 28 Viz. 29 Tinge. 30 Lapse. 31 Sue. 32 Mitre. 33 Dodge. DOWN: 2 Apart. 3 Eastern. 4 Defect. 5 Bacon. 6 Raise. 7 Might. 9 Cobra. 14 Cat. 15 Inn. 17 Boo. 18 Use. 20 Nuzzled. 21 Drake. 22 Advise. 23 Catch. 24 Venom. 25 Treat. 27 Biped. QUICK QUIZ 1 India. 2 Danny Boyle. 3 Jamaica. 4 Beetle. 5 Simon Hopkinson. 6 Wait. HONEYCOMB 1 Native. 2 Sitcom. 3 Gammon. 4 Target. 5 Resort. 6 Police.


19 May 2012 The War Cry

THE woman had been stealing from her firm for quite a long time. It was easy to do. As shop manager, she found it wasn’t difficult to tweak the books every month so she could pocket a few extra pounds.

Whoever walks in integrity walks securely, but whoever takes crooked paths will be found out

Her justification ran something like this: ‘It’s a big firm, so it isn’t going to miss the odd £50 or £100. They don’t pay me enough to do this job anyway. I deserve something extra. It’s such a small amount, they’ll never miss it. And I’m not the only one doing such things by a long way.’ However, when the firm called in independent auditors to examine the books, the woman’s light-fingeredness came to light. She lost her job, her business reputation and, indeed, her freedom, as she served a jail term. Nor was she the only employee to find themselves in that position. As she surmised, she wasn’t the only one who was stealing, and it was the build-up of losses which alerted the firm to what was going on. It took quite a long time for that woman to get her life back on the right track, and she felt that no one ever trusted her completely again. Integrity and trust are important in all areas of life. When a person has the reputation for straight dealing and honesty, they don’t have to be afraid of scrutiny or judgment. Their conscience Proverbs 10:9 is clear. They can walk securely in the knowledge that no one can accuse them New International of being deceitful. Version The crooked path might sometimes look more attractive than the narrow way of doing what is right. But ultimately it leads in the wrong direction. There is no reason to stay on the wrong path, though. It may be hard to PHILIPPA SMALE regain a reputation once takes a look at some it is lost in the eyes of the world but, as far as of the Proverbs from the Bible Jesus is concerned, once a person accepts him as Lord and Saviour, their feet are on the right path and they are headed the right way.

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Inner life


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The War Cry 19 May 2012

WHEN he was five years old, my grandson had a stock phrase that he would use if anything displeased him. Puckering his little face, he would say: ‘It’s not fair!’

Food for thought

It’s fair to say we can be

Some older people seem to have that feeling too. They say it isn’t fair that someone else has a better job or car than them. Maybe they resent the fact that their friends can shop in expensive boutiques, while they can barely afford last season’s fashions. Perhaps we have the ‘poor is hardly fair for us to moan me’ feeling on occasions. when others are starving. But, at those times, we We may feel that having should think a bit harder only two bedrooms or a about what’s really fair less-than-perfectly furnished and what’s not. Are there house is unfair – but it is positives in life which we are more unfair that many failing to see? people in the world live in We complain that we do nothing more than a tiny, not have our preferred food overcrowded hut. in our kitchen cupboard – Perhaps we ought to be but, as we munch our way more grateful. Life isn’t through three meals a day, it always fair, but most of us have experienced good things we have not earned – for example, the sight of a sunset or the sound of some music. When the Bible

positive

by WESLEY HARRIS

writer Paul went through hardships, he focused on remaining positive. Even when he was in prison, he sang songs of praise to God. He was confident that having God by his side was enough to face whatever lay ahead. ‘If God is for us, who can be against us?’ he said (Romans 8:31 New International Version). When problems surround us and we want to whinge about life not being fair, we can remember that God never leaves us and thank him for his amazing grace. Fair enough?

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The War Cry

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Puckering his little face, he would say: ‘It’s not fair!’

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19 May 2012 The War Cry

What’s cooking?

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Monday (21 May) marks the start of National Vegetarian Week. So why not make these recipes

Naughty but nice fruit compote

Warm courgette scones

Ingredients: 2 apples, peeled, cored and sliced 200g ready-to-eat prunes, sliced 30g sultanas 200ml apple juice For the yoghurt mixture 50g blueberries or blackberries (reserving a few for the topping) 200g Greek yoghurt For the topping 75g oats 50g chopped hazelnuts Pinch of nutmeg or cinnamon

Ingredients: 100g courgette, grated 225g plain flour ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda ½ tsp salt 225g wholemeal flour 350ml soya milk, plus a little extra for brushing 100g cheese, grated Black pepper

SUDOKU SOLUTION

Method: Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/Gas Mark 7. Sprinkle a little salt on the courgette and leave for 15 minutes. Rinse the courgette, then place it on a clean tea towel. Press out as much water as possible. Sift both of the flours, the bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the milk, courgette and half the cheese. Gently mix the ingredients together to form a dough. Lightly dust the work surface with a little flour.

Roll out the dough to a thickness measuring 4cm, then season with black pepper. Cut out 12 rounds. (Alternatively, use your hands to shape 12 scones.) Brush the top of the rounds with a little soya milk and add the remaining cheese. Cover a baking tray with baking paper and a light dusting of flour. Place the scones on the tray and bake for 12 minutes. These scones taste best eaten straight from the oven. Serve with a spread of your choice. Makes 12

Method: Place the compote ingredients into a large pan and gently simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Fold the blueberries into the yoghurt and set aside. Place the oats, nuts and nutmeg or cinnamon into a non-stick pan. Gently heat the mixture for 5 minutes, stirring from time to time. To serve, divide the fruit into 4 dishes, add a little yoghurt, then top with the oat mixture and the reserved blueberries. Serves 4

Recipes reprinted, with kind permission, from the Vegetarian Society website vegsoc.org


OF THE M A E R SC CROP IN a Sotheby’s auction room in New York earlier this month, an anonymous telephone bidder spent $119.9 million (£74 million) to buy Edvard Munch’s The Scream. It was the largest sum paid at auction for any work of art.

The 1895 pastel is one of four versions of the same subject but is said to be the best. In all its versions, The Scream is valued not only on the art scene, but also in popular culture. Images of the masterpiece have appeared on postcards, umbrellas and computer mouse mats. It also inspired Wes Craven’s film Scream. The image has fascinated the world, but is anyone sure what it means? On the frame of the recently sold version, Munch wrote about his inspiration. He recalled walking along a path with two friends at sunset when ‘suddenly the sky turned blood red’ and he ‘paused, feeling exhausted, and leant on the fence’. As his friends walked on he ‘stood there trembling with anxiety’ and ‘sensed an infinite scream passing through nature’. According to BBC Online, Petter Olsen, who sold the pastel, suggested: ‘The Scream, for me,

Monster Munch bid wins a masterpiece

shows the horrifying moment when man realises his impact on nature and the irreversible changes that he has initiated.’ Whatever people’s interpretation, everyone can relate to the image’s central theme – pain. We know what pain looks like, whether it comes to us through bereavement, broken relationships or financial problems. Whatever its origins, pain leaves us feeling alone and trapped. We may see no way out of it. But God can show us

the bigger picture – that we are not alone, whatever circumstances we are in. The Bible assures us: ‘The Lord is close to the broken-hearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit’ (Psalm 34:18 New International Version). Exhaustion, anxiety and pain may be inevitable. But if we fix our attention on God, we can recognise his love for us, which can be ours even in the darkest times. It’s a love that is infinite. It’s a love that is freely available. It’s a love that we’ve been screaming out for.

writes RENÉE DAVIS

PA photo

YOUR LOCAL SALVATION ARMY CENTRE

Sotheby’s staff display ‘The Scream’

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The Salvation Army (United Kingdom Territory with the Republic of Ireland) on behalf of the General of The Salvation Army. Printed by Benham Goodhead Print Ltd, Bicester, Oxon. © Linda Bond, General of The Salvation Army, 2012


The War Cry 19 May 2012