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2020 LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES As Utah’s business leader, we stand as the voice of business, we support our members’ success and we champion community prosperity.

S A LT L A K E C HA M B E R ’ S 2 0 2 0 P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E


“For six out of the last nine years, Utah has been named the best state for business by Forbes — and we continue to rack in accolades from across the nation. The Wall Street Journal called Utah ‘America’s Economic Star,’ and we have the fastest job growth rate in the nation. Thanks to the hard work of many, we have been able to make Utah the best state in the nation to live, to work, and to raise a family. But now is no time to rest on our laurels. We must work together and plan together to ensure that Utah’s future is even brighter than its present.” -Governor Gary R. Herbert


Fellow Utahns, For many years, state and community leaders have looked forward to the year 2020 as a future milestone for setting goals and developing policy. The future is here! And we can’t help but reflect on where Utah — and particularly its economy and community — stands in terms of where we were, where we are, and how we move forward. This century has been a period of unprecedented growth for our state. Our population has increased by nearly 1.2 million people in the last 20 years and is projected to do the same in the next 20. As a result, demands on our schools, our roads, and our resources have increased significantly. While we have benefited from the increased diversity, workforce resources, and accompanying economic growth, we have also felt the strain. Because of and despite this significant growth, Utah is a place where people want to live, build businesses, and raise families. Utah is a unique community where we work together to solve difficult challenges. Because of wise leadership and strong partnerships we have navigated this remarkable growth well, but we must continue in a careful, thoughtful, and responsible way. Toward this end, our business community has never been so active in public policy issues — wholly invested in promoting Utah’s continued economic prosperity. To capitalize on this, the Salt Lake Chamber has restructured its policy process to more fully represent its members and improve engagement between business, community, state, and national leaders. As the voice of business in Utah, the Salt Lake Chamber is committed to building a bright future. Through trusted and constructive partnerships that balance and accurately reflect the interests of businesses and the individuals and families who depend on them, we know that we can continue to grow in a way that will preserve Utah as the best state in America to live and work for the next 20 years and beyond. Sincerely,

Derek Miller President & CEO

Linda Wardell 2019-2020 Board Chair


TA B L E OF C ONT EN T S BUSINESS CLIMATE

................................. 03

EDUCATION

................................. 05

LABOR & EMPLOYMENT

................................. 07

H OUS ING AFFOR DAB I LI T Y

................................. 09

TRANSPORTATION

................................. 11

ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

................................. 13

HEALTH CARE

................................. 17

COMMUNITY

................................. 19

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES

................................. 21

CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS HIGHLIGHTS ........................ 23


B U S I N E S S C L I M AT E

For the past 20 years, Utah has consistently ranked as one of the nation’s most diverse and highest-performing economies. The state’s strong business climate provides a foundation for future success, thanks in part to the business-cognizant policies implemented by the Governor, state legislature, and visionary business and community leaders. Capital city by name, statewide by mission, the Salt Lake Chamber represents businesses large and small — from Logan to St. George — and its members understand that for Utah and its economy to prosper, constructive policies must consider the interests of, and impact on, employers and employees, as well as their families and communities. Utah holds the record for the most years in first place on Forbes Magazine’s list of “Best State for Business,” and it is the only state to have “podium finishes” every year since 2007.

“BEST STATE FOR BUSINESS” RANKINGS PER YEAR 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 1 2ND 3RD 4TH ST

#

23

Business Costs

#

2

Labor Supply

#

6

Regulatory Environment

#

8

Economic Climate

#

7

#

Growth Prospects

9

Quality of Life

The secret to Utah’s success is disarmingly simple: The state’s politicians tend to do everything right to encourage business development and job creation. —The Wall Street Journal, Why Utah Has Become America’s Economic Star, December 6, 2019

3

SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT RANKING Economy

#2

Employment #1

Growth #6

Business Environment

#5

Job Growth

#2

GDP Growth

#4

Entrepreneurship #3

Labor Force Participation

#5

Growth of Young Pop.

#1

Patent Creation

#12

Low Unemployment

Low Tax Burden

#28

Fiscal Stability

Top Company HQ.

#39

Long-term Fiscal Stability #13

#4

Short-term Fiscal Stability #9

Venture Capital

#13

Net Migration

#13 #5

SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON SALES TAX ON PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

12.89% may or may not support it depending on the mechanism

68.89% do not support a sales tax on professional services

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support a tax structure that promotes economic prosperity and job growth by avoiding tax pyramiding and taxes on business inputs and services. We support a comprehensive evaluation of all existing rural economic development incentives in order to improve effectiveness and reduce potential duplications. We support reasonable regulation that fosters business success. We support legislative efforts that facilitate economic growth across diverse industries.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

4


E D U C AT I O N

Utah’s business community has always recognized the need for quality education to build a talented workforce and support a strong economy for the state’s future. In light of our continued growth, it is imperative that we prioritize education funding to ensure high-quality teachers and the resources necessary to help students achieve greater outcomes. The Salt Lake Chamber is proud of the role it plays to facilitate the collaboration between government, education, and industry partnerships by strengthening relationships between leaders in the public and private sectors, sustaining open and regular channels of communication, and coordinating working groups on important issues and among myriad industries and community interests.

UTAH SCHOOL AGE POPULATION ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS 2000-2040 1,000,000 800,000 600,000

School Age (5-17) Estimate

400,000

School Age (5-17) Projection

200,000

College Age (18-24) Estimate

0

College Age (18-24) Projection 2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

Sources: 1980-1989: Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget, Population estimates by sex and single year of age: 1980-1989; 1990 to 2009: Governor’s Office of Management and Budget, 2012 Baseline Projections; 2010 to 2065: Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute 2015-2065 State and County Projections.

Utah consistently ranks high in student performance despite having the lowest per-pupil expenditure in the nation. As education continues to build the foundation for our future, the state must be dedicated to securing the necessary resources for even greater success.

5

With Utah’s growth, student enrollment for K-12 increased 43% in the last 20 years. Though demographic projections over the next 40 years anticipate a decline in the growth rate, prioritizing education funding remains vital.

SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON EDUCATION FUNDING

49.75% support maintaining the constitutional earmark for education funding

13.07% support maintaining the earmark but lowering the percentage

13.95% support maintaining current funding levels

4.19% support a decrease in funding

81.86% support increasing educational funding

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support increasing per-pupil spending to improve the overall quality of education and teacher compensation. We support legislative efforts that contribute to an overall consistent state education plan. We support programs and assessments that improve early learning in literacy and mathematics. We support improving access to STEM education. We support funding to provide high-quality computer science education for every student. We support programs that address technical and trade-based skill development for identified workforce gaps. We support ongoing investment for a state-wide college access advisor program to help increase the number of high school graduates enrolling in college. We support a strong higher education governance system that is empowered to develop and achieve both state-wide goals and support local priorities, as well as provide affordable, accessible education, and meet workforce demands.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

6


LABOR & EMPLOYMENT

Not only does Utah have one of the fastest-growing economies in the nation, it is also one of the fastest-growing states. We cannot ignore the connection between population growth and economic prosperity.

2001

POPULATION: 2,291,000 EMPLOYEES: 1,050,031

POPULATION: 3,161,000 EMPLOYEES: 1,517,592

2018

In the past 20 years, Utah has added more than 1,000,000 new residents, among them 500,000 new employees. Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute projections show this growth trend continuing, with almost 4,500,000 people expected to call Utah home in 2040.

The growing economy has been a changing economy as industries like health care, retail, and education have surpassed manufacturing as major employers for Utahns.

INDUSTRY BREAKDOWN BY EMPLOYMENT 2001 Industry Sector

2018 Average Employment

Manufacturing 121,990 Education Services 114,285 Retail Trade 105,321 Health Care and Social Assistance 93,619 Accommodation and Food Services 82,274 Construction 72,714 Public Administration 71,602 Food Services and Drinking Places 66,002 Admin., Support, Waste Mgmt, Remediation 65,000 Administrative and Support Services 62,230 Transportation and Warehousing 51,874 Professional Scientific & Technical Svc 50,598 Finance and Insurance 48,495 Specialty Trade Contractors 46,747 Wholesale Trade 41,155

Industry Sector

Average Employment

Health Care and Social Assistance 174,351 Retail Trade 173,192 Education Services 169,018 Manufacturing 132,987 Accommodation and Food Services 123,881 Construction 105,535 Professional Scientific & Technical Svc 105,050 Food Services and Drinking Places 102,719 Admin., Support, Waste Mgmt, Remediation 93,765 Administrative and Support Services 90,169 Public Administration 80,351 Specialty Trade Contractors 72,416 Transportation and Warehousing 71,045 Finance and Insurance 67,524 Ambulatory Health Care Services 65,485

Source: Utah Department of Workforce Services.

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


Business leaders consistently identify the need for an increasingly diverse, skilled workforce to meet demands. Workforce development partnerships between employers and our education system help to address the challenges that accompany an evolving economy. The Salt Lake Chamber supports a balanced and fair legal immigration system that embraces our role as a free society that benefits from a diverse set of backgrounds and ideas. Employers must also demonstrate a responsive and proactive approach to the needs of their employees in the areas of diversity and inclusion, mental health, child care, and the gender wage gap — offering sustainable solutions to the common barriers that cause employees to feel dissatisfaction, switch jobs, or leave the workforce entirely.

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKINGS Opportunity Economic Opportunity Low Food Insecurity GINI Index

#24 #4 #13 #1

Household Income

#13

Low Poverty Rate

#6

Education Gap by Race

#36

Employment Gap by Race #16

Equality #49

Income Gap by Gender

#49

Disability Employ. Gap

Income Gap by Race

#14

#47

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support workforce development partnerships between employers and our K-12 and higher education system, specifically programs that identify workforce needs. We support ongoing funding for the Build to Success program. We support immigration laws that comply with the principles of the Utah Compact and promote the education, availability, and expertise of our workforce. We support H-1B visa reform that raises the cap on the number of granted visas. We support policies that maintain Utah as a welcoming place for Utahns and visitors of all backgrounds to live, work, and play. We support policies that encourage best practices for addressing mental health issues and suicide prevention in the workplace. We support family and personal leave policies that provide employers and employees with flexibility in addressing the needs of family and life outside of the workplace. We support policies that address the quality and quantity of child care options, easing the burden and cost to employers and employees. We support data-driven and employer-led policies that close the gender wage gap.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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HOUSING AFFORDABILITY

MEDIAN SALES PRICE OF NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOME VS. PERCENT OF HOUSEHOLDS ABLE TO AFFORD A NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOME 60% $500,000 50% $400,000 40% $300,000 30% $200,000 20%

2010 - $ 2018 - $

$100,000

2010 - % 2018 - %

10% $0

Davis County

Salt Lake County

Utah County

Weber County

Source: Metrostudy and Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute.

Growth comes with challenges, and one of the greatest we currently face is housing. Supply has not kept up with our rate of growth — we have more families than we have homes. Utah currently has a shortage of approximately 50,000 housing units and the gap continues to grow. This growing chasm has contributed to the rising prices of homes: current home prices are 20% higher than in neighboring states. Our economy can’t succeed without a workforce, and our workforce can’t exist without housing.

In May 2018, the Salt Lake Chamber convened the Housing GAP Coalition to address the high priority the business community places on housing. Employers can’t recruit or retain employees if those employees can’t live in their communities. The Coalition works closely with state and local governments to raise public awareness, to implement best practices, and to create policies that will make space for smart growth.

The Salt Lake Metropolitan area ranked in the top 15% of all metropolitan areas in median sales price. —Jim Wood, Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, The Year in Charts: Utah’s Housing Market 2018

9

SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING

36.87% feel the pace of growth is appropriate

60.83% feel that Utah’s pace of growth is too quick

95.87% responded that reasonably priced housing is important to their business

94.93% agree that affordable housing is a major problem for Utah’s continued economic growth

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support programs that provide technical assistance to local communities as they plan for growth, specifically the connection between land use, property rights, economic development, and quality of life. We support ongoing funding for public awareness efforts regarding Utah’s housing gap and the need for positive, responsible growth. We support incentivizing mixed-use developments that align with state and local transportation investments and make smart use of land that allow residents to live in walkable, accessible communities. We support initiatives and workforce development efforts that address the state’s ongoing construction and trade labor shortage. We support the provisions and funding priorities set forward in the Commission on Housing Affordability’s priority bill. We support public/private partnerships to address housing affordability issues. We support ongoing legislative efforts to adapt local land use strategies to allow communities to address affordable housing needs. We support ongoing funding for public awareness efforts regarding Utah’s housing gap and the need for positive, responsible growth so Utah residents have housing choices.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

Maintaining our high quality of life as Utah continues to grow requires careful planning and prudent investment in transportation. Access from our homes to destinations such as existing, emerging, and future job centers depends on a well-functioning, multi-modal transportation system.

UTAH’S UNIFIED TRANSPORTATION PLAN

Utah’s transportation agencies and stakeholders collaborated to develop Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan, which identifies the highest priority road, transit, and active transportation investments needed to keep Utah moving. Implementing the Unified Plan will result in the creation of over 200,000 new jobs. Each $1 spent on transportation infrastructure delivers more than $2.50 in economic activity.

UTAH TRANSPORTATION COALITION

The Utah Transportation Coalition collaborates with government, nonprofit and private sector partners to make smart and sustainable transportation choices that will secure adequate, sustainable, and long-term funding to support necessary transportation planning and growth.

UTAH ANNUAL VEHICLE MILES TRAVELED History (2008-2017) and Forecast (2019-2050) 60 50 30 20

Historic (UDOT)

Billions

40

Forecast Linear Historic (UDOT)

10 0

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

Source: Wasatch Front Regional Council.

TRANSIT TRIPS TAKEN IN THE WASATCH FRONT AND ESTIMATED AUTO VMT SAVED Year 2015 2019 2024 2030 2040 2050

Transit Trips 35,600,000 44,700,000 51,700,000 65,800,000 80,700,000 99,500,000

Est. VMT Saved 296,000,000 355,000,000 371,000,000 447,000,000 576,000,000 735,000,000

Taking into account our current travel behavior and the planned enhancements Utah can afford, this chart forecasts transit use and the amount of auto vehicle miles saved as a result — a projection which can fluctuate as we change our decisions and habits surrounding transportation.

Source: Wasatch Front Regional Council.

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


TRAX Reached 1M Riders 2000 1999 First TRAX Line Opens

FrontRunner 29B Vehicle FrontRunner Southbound Opened Miles Traveled Opened 2012 2015 2008

2000 20B Vehicle Miles Traveled

2008 Legacy Parkway Opened

2013 GREENbike Program Started

Mountain View Corridor Opened 2017

2015 TRAX Lines Opened/Expanded

MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION TO WORK

TRAX Reached 283.4M Riders 2019

2018 Golden Spoke Trail Completed

% OF UTAHNS

Drive Alone

76.10%

Carpooled 10.70% Public Transportation 2.30% Walked 2.40% Bicycle 0.70% Taxicab, Motorcycle, or Other Means 1.00% Worked at home 6.80% Source: United States Census Bureau.

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support transportation policies and plans that support a high quality of life by promoting good health, better mobility, a strong economy, and connected communities. We support continued investment and long-term funding solutions for our state’s multimodal transportation network in order to expand capacity to accommodate growth in travel demand; provide choices for driving, transit, and active transportation; as well as maintain and safely operate Utah’s transportation system. We support users bearing the primary responsibility for funding Utah’s transportation infrastructure, including the expansion of the road usage charge program. We support programs that provide technical assistance to local communities as they plan for growth, specifically the connection between transportation, land use, and transit-oriented development. We support encouraging local governments to plan and zone for mixed-use, multifamily housing in coordination with high-capacity transportation and transit service.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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E N V I R O N M E N T & N AT U R A L R E S O U R C E S

AIR QUALITY

While Utah’s mountains are a beautiful backdrop along the Wasatch Front, they also create a natural barrier that can adversely affect air quality, especially during the winter months. Improving air quality and the environment in general must be a community effort involving everyone — business, government, communities, and individuals. The Salt Lake Chamber is proud to partner with these groups to implement policies to clean our air, protect our health and make sure we can see the mountains that contribute to the majesty of our state. Smart planning and coordination can address the air quality concerns that accompany population growth.

EMISSIONS BY SOURCE

%

13%

%

320

39

9%

2%

12%

291

TONS A DAY

TONS A DAY

34

TONS A DAY

TONS A DAY

2019

4

10%

386

471

3

6%

2014

48

13%

5

8%

2008

%

17%

4

2002

29%

Point: Smoke-stack industries

Mobile: Vehicles and Motorized Equipment

Area: Homes, Buildings, Commercial and Consumer Activities

Nonroad: Rail, Construction, Lawn Equipment, etc.

Source: Data from DEQ / worksheet from UCAIR.

CLEAR THE AIR CHALLENGE

The Clear the Air Challenge is a month-long competition that gives Utahns the chance to reduce their vehicle emissions by choosing alternative methods of transportation using TravelWise strategies. To participate, please visit cleartheairchallenge.org Over the past decade, Utah has significantly reduced emissions and improved our air quality. Despite a steady increase in population, state-wide emissions have decreased — thanks to an effort to reduce the number of cars on the roads, improve refinery standards, lessen reliance on wood burning, and implement red air day initiatives. 13

SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


With Rocky Mountain Power’s renewable energy portfolio growing by more than 70%, and with significant investments in electric vehicle charging infrastructure, communities all along the Wasatch Front will be able to dramatically reduce greenhouse emissions. In just the next 10 years, Rocky Mountain Power will have reduced emissions by nearly 60% from 2005 levels. We look forward to working together to achieve the clean air future the state deserves. —Rocky Mountain Power

STATEWIDE ANNUAL EMISSIONS RATE 3,500,000

1.20

3,000,000

1.00

2,500,000

0.80

2,000,000

0.60

1,500,000 0.40

1,000,000

0.20

500,000 0

2002

2005

2008

2011

2014

0.00

2017

Emissions Population Per-Capita Rate T/Y

Source: Utah Department of Environmental Quality.

Extremely Important

Very Important

Moderately Important

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

Slightly Important

5%

4%

4

.9

8

2

.7

6%

27 %

.0

6

2.

3.

98 %

SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON EFFORTS TO IMPROVE AIR QUALITY

0

Not Important 14


E N V I R O N M E N T & N AT U R A L R E S O U R C E S

WATER

Utah is the second driest state in the nation with a climate that requires careful planning and coordination between industry, government, agriculture, and citizens. As our population continues to grow, we need to increase efforts for greater water efficiency and optimization. Careful and coordinated state plans with input from all types of users are imperative to safeguarding this precious resource. An important step to optimizing our water is through secondary metering. When secondary water metering is used, outdoor water use is reduced by 30-40%.

ENERGY

Utah’s natural environment is a legacy that has been preserved and passed to succeeding generations. The Salt Lake Chamber has always supported conservation as well as innovation in order to create a diverse energy portfolio that allows us to both care for and utilize the rich energy resources we have.

Energy is roughly a $20 billion industry in Utah generating over $500 million in state and local revenues. There are more than 50,000 direct energy jobs in the state. Utah ranks in the top 10 for ENERGY STAR certified schools and LEED-certified ENERGY STAR buildings.

Utah is the 3rd largest producer of geothermal energy in the U.S. Utah has one of the most affordable electricity rates with an average cost across all sectors of 8.24 cents/kwh - 8th lowest in country. Utah ranks 13th in the U.S. for natural gas production, 10th for oil and 12th for coal.

Source: Governor’s Office of Energy Development

15

SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON ENERGY DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

1

PROMOTING ENERGY EFFICIENCY

2

INCREASING SOLAR ENERGY

3

UTILIZING NATURAL GAS

4

SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKINGS Natural Environment

#49

Air and Water Quality

#47

Pollution #48

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support investment in the continued development of key energy infrastructure to facilitate greater use of diverse energy technologies. We support advancements in infrastructure and market access for Utah’s abundant energy and mineral resources. We support maintaining Utah’s diverse energy portfolio, including working towards greater energy efficiency and the development of new energy technologies. We support targeted efforts to assist home and building owners to become more energy efficient. We support data-driven legislative efforts and Chamber partnerships to improve air quality. We support deterring wood burning through increased enforcement on mandatory non-wood burning days and investment for wood burning change outs specifically targeted to geographic areas that are disproportionately affected by air pollution. We support advancements in technology, infrastructure and market access for Utah’s water — including for conservation and efficiency. We support water policies that focus on state-wide, long-term plans that incorporate stakeholder input and support. We support educating the public on their secondary water use through metering and pricing based on usage.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

16


H E A LT H C A R E

Utah ranks 51st in the United States in a national analysis of adult mental health, due to high rates of mental illness and low access to care. The ratio of mental health professionals to residents falls beneath the national average and over half of the adults with a mental illness do not receive treatment or counseling. The prevalence of mental health disorders among children is over 20%, and as of 2017, suicide is the leading cause of death for Utahns between the ages of 10 and 24. This data highlights the need for increased and improved mental health services for youth as well as adults. Nearly 40% of Utah’s youth between 12-17 experience depression and do not receive treatment.

Nearly 1 in 5 adults experience poor mental health.

Over 100,000 adults in Utah experience Serious Mental Illness. Suicide is the leading cause of death for Utahns ages 10 to 24.

Over half of Utah adults with mental health issues do not receive treatment or counseling. Source: Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, Utah’s Mental Health System August 2019.

PERCENT OF UTAH ADULTS WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH, 2009-2017 20% 15.8%

15.7%

15.8%

15.3%

15.9%

15.4%

15.6%

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

15%

16.5%

17.5%

10% 5% 0%

2016

2017

Note: Age-adjusted. Poor mental health is measured as seven or more days of not good mental health in the last 30 days. Source: Utah Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health.

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


About 61% of Utahns purchase health insurance through employers. This is the highest in the nation and significantly higher than the U.S. average of 49%. As such, Utah’s employers can play a larger role in the future of our state’s health care system and promote greater flexibility and control in costs. A report investigating median out-of-pocket spending on medical expenses per state between 2016-2017 showed that Utahns spent significantly more than the average American for their care and prescription drugs. Between 2012 and 2017, the average annual cost of brand name prescription drug treatment in Utah increased by 58%. Private sector innovation and drug pricing transparency laws, which require drug companies to disclose price increases in advance, will be critical steps for greater transparency and affordability.

SALT LAKE CHAMBER MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ON HEALTH CARE PRIORITIES Priority 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th

Issue Drug costs Mental health Transparency Medicaid Opioid abuse Medical cannabis Opposing mandates

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKINGS Health Care

#9

Adult Wellness Visits

#48

Mental Health

#23

Access #22

Child Wellness Visits

#25

Low Suicidal Rate

#44

Affordability #30

Quality #4

Low Obesity Rate

#4

Insurance Enrollment

Public Health

Low Smoking Rate

#1

#29

#10

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support reforms that apply market principles to contain currently unsustainable costs and improve health. Such reforms require bold action to increase transparency and quality, as well as foster private sector innovation leading to better outcomes. We support improving price transparency to better inform Utahns on health care costs. We support policies that encourage best practices for addressing mental health issues and suicide prevention. We support efforts to increase access to care and services for mental health treatment.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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COMMUNITY

Utah is life elevated — a dynamic state that attracts tourists, visitors, and residents — not only because of a growing economy, but also because we provide a quality of life experience that is unmatched anywhere. In 2018, the Utah Department of Tourism reported approximately 20 million visitors to Utah. Our state is consistently ranked as one of the healthiest and happiest places to live, and as business and community leaders we have both an opportunity and a responsibility to maintain and promote Utah’s storied status as the best place in America to live, work, and play.

Second only to attracting and maintaining workforce, business leaders identified outdoor lifestyle and access to outdoor recreation as the top factors in their company’s decision to locate and expand in Utah. —Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute Survey

2019 STATE RANKINGS FOR BEST QUALITY OF LIFE #

1

Best State for Middle Class

#

1

Upward Mobility

#

24

Business Insider’s

50 Best Places to Live

#

24

US News & World Report’s

Best Places to Live

#

5

#

Healthiest State

2

Happiest State

Sources: SmartAsset, Bloomberg, Business Insider, Real Estate/U.S. News, America’s Health Rankings - United Health Foundation and WalletHub - World Population Review.

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support the development and funding of Utah’s recreational assets, including additional facilities to meet growing demands, while improving outdoor access for residents and addressing infrastructure needs. We support funding for public transit solutions to ski resorts and mountain communities. We support directing state funds to promote Utah tourism products and assets where there is capacity for growth; this includes state parks, winter sports, cultural assets and other attractions.

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


DOWNTOWN SALT LAKE CITY

Many efforts have already been made to improve the quality of life for residents of downtown Salt Lake City, including initiatives to counter homelessness and introduce downtown ambassadors. Much remains to be done.

YEAR ROUND PUBLIC MARKET

Building on the success of the summer Downtown Farmers Market, the Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance look forward to working with the state and the city to establish a permanent public market in downtown that will provide yearround vending opportunities, continue to bolster rapid transit oriented development of downtown’s depot district, and enhance our already vibrant city. The public market will act as an important public space within the community, bringing residents and businesses together while promoting small and local business in a celebration of Utah’s agricultural roots and food production heritage.

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKINGS Best States

#4

Economy #2

S A LT L A K E C I T Y P U B L I C M A R K E T AT T H E

Health Care

Fiscal Stability

#5

#9

Infrastructure #3

Crime & Corrections

#12

Education #10

Opportunity #24

National Environment

#49

RIO GRANDE DEPOT ALISON EINERSON | Executive Director

URBAN FOOD CONNECTIONS OF UTAH - A Project of the Downtown Alliance

alison@downtownslc.org | O: 801-328-5070 | 175 E. University Blvd. (400 S.) Ste. 600, SLC, UT 84111

LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES We support funding to advance the development of the Downtown Public Market. We support improving the system for providing shelter and services for people experiencing homelessness and addressing issues related to street camping. We support initiatives that will assist in curtailing aggressive panhandling.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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L E G I S L AT I V E P R I O R I T I E S

BUSINESS CLIMATE • We support a tax structure that promotes economic prosperity and job growth by avoiding tax pyramiding and taxes on business inputs and services. • We support a comprehensive evaluation of all existing rural economic development incentives in order to improve effectiveness and reduce potential duplications. • We support reasonable regulation that fosters business success. • We support legislative efforts that facilitate economic growth across diverse industries. EDUCATION • We support increasing per-pupil spending to improve the overall quality of education and teacher compensation. • We support legislative efforts that contribute to an overall consistent state education plan. • We support programs and assessments that improve early learning in literacy and mathematics. • We support improving access to STEM education. • We support funding to provide high-quality computer science education for every student. • We support programs that address technical and trade-based skill development for identified workforce gaps. • We support ongoing investment for a state-wide college access advisor program to help increase the number of high school graduates enrolling in college. • We support a strong higher education governance system that is empowered to develop and achieve both state-wide goals and support local priorities, as well as provide affordable, accessible education, and meet workforce demands. LABOR & EMPLOYMENT • We support workforce development partnerships between employers and our K-12 and higher education system, specifically programs that identify workforce needs. • We support ongoing funding for the Build to Success program. • We support immigration laws that comply with the principles of the Utah Compact and promote the education, availability, and expertise of our workforce. • We support H-1B visa reform that raises the cap on the number of granted visas. • We support policies that maintain Utah as a welcoming place for Utahns and visitors of all backgrounds to live, work, and play. • We support policies that encourage best practices for addressing mental health issues and suicide prevention in the workplace. • We support family and personal leave policies that provide employers and employees with flexibility in addressing the needs of family and life outside of the workplace. • We support policies that address the quality and quantity of child care options, easing the burden and cost to employers and employees. • We support data-driven and employer-led policies that close the gender wage gap. HOUSING AFFORDABILITY • We support programs that provide technical assistance to local communities as they plan for growth, specifically the connection between land use, property rights, economic development, and quality of life. • We support ongoing funding for public awareness efforts regarding Utah’s housing gap and the need for positive, responsible growth. • We support incentivizing mixed-use developments that align with state and local transportation investments and make smart use of land that allow residents to live in walkable, accessible communities. • We support initiatives and workforce development efforts that address the state’s ongoing construction and trade labor shortage. • We support the provisions and funding priorities set forward in the Commission on Housing Affordability’s priority bill. • We support public/private partnerships to address housing affordability issues. • We support ongoing legislative efforts to adapt local land use strategies to allow communities to address affordable housing needs. • We support ongoing funding for public awareness efforts regarding Utah’s housing gap and the need for positive, responsible growth so Utah residents have housing choices.

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


TRANSPORTATION • We support transportation policies and plans that support a high quality of life by promoting good health, better mobility, a strong economy, and connected communities. • We support continued investment and long-term funding solutions for our state’s multimodal transportation network in order to expand capacity to accommodate growth in travel demand; provide choices for driving, transit, and active transportation; as well as maintain and safely operate Utah’s transportation system. • We support users bearing the primary responsibility for funding Utah’s transportation infrastructure, including the expansion of the road usage charge program. • We support programs that provide technical assistance to local communities as they plan for growth, specifically the connection between transportation, land use, and transit-oriented development. • We support encouraging local governments to plan and zone for mixed-use, multifamily housing in coordination with high-capacity transportation and transit service. ENVIRONMENT • We support investment in the continued development of key energy infrastructure to facilitate greater use of diverse energy technologies. • We support advancements in infrastructure and market access for Utah’s abundant energy and mineral resources. • We support maintaining Utah’s diverse energy portfolio, including working towards greater energy efficiency and the development of new energy technologies. • We support targeted efforts to assist home and building owners to become more energy efficient. • We support data-driven legislative efforts and Chamber partnerships to improve air quality. • We support deterring wood burning through increased enforcement on mandatory non-wood burning days and investment for wood burning change outs specifically targeted to geographic areas that are disproportionately affected by air pollution. • We support advancements in technology, infrastructure and market access for Utah’s water – including for conservation and efficiency. • We support water policies that focus on state-wide, long-term plans that incorporate stakeholder input and support. • We support educating the public on their secondary water use through metering and pricing based on usage. HEALTH CARE • We support reforms that apply market principles to contain currently unsustainable costs and improve health. Such reforms require bold action to increase transparency and quality, as well as foster private sector innovation leading to better outcomes. • We support improving price transparency to better inform Utahns on health care costs. • We support policies that encourage best practices for addressing mental health issues and suicide prevention. • We support efforts to increase access to care and services for mental health treatment. COMMUNITY • We support the development and funding of Utah’s recreational assets, including additional facilities to meet growing demands, while improving outdoor access for residents and addressing infrastructure needs. • We support funding for public transit solutions to ski resorts and mountain communities. • We support directing state funds to promote Utah tourism products and assets where there is capacity for growth; this includes state parks, winter sports, cultural assets and other attractions. • We support funding to advance the development of the Downtown Public Market. • We support improving the system for providing shelter and services for people experiencing homelessness and addressing issues related to street camping. • We support initiatives that will assist in curtailing aggressive panhandling.

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C H A M B E R M E M B E R S U R V E Y R E S U LT S H I G H L I G H T S

Q5- RATE THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS REGULATION ISSUES. Extremely Important Very Important Moderately Important Slightly Important

Costs related to regulation Complication of regulation Time required for licensing Number of regulations

Not at All Important 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Q38- HOW IMPORTANT ARE ISSUES RELATED TO CHILD CARE? Extremely Important

25.84%

Very Important

38.76%

Moderately Important

23.92%

Slightly Important

8.61%

Not at All Important

2.87% 0

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10

20

30

40

50

60

70

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Q39- DO YOU SUPPORT A TAX CREDIT FOR EMPLOYERS FOR CHILD CARE INVESTMENTS? 30.95%

Definitely Yes

36.19%

Probably Yes 21.43%

Might or Might Not Probably Not

9.05% 2.38%

Definitely Not 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Q40- DO YOU SUPPORT REQUIRING EMPLOYERS TO PROVIDE CHILD CARE SERVICES? 6.67%

Definitely Yes

9.52%

Probably Yes

20.95%

Might or Might Not Probably Not

31.90% 30.95%

Definitely Not 0

10

20

30

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40

50

60

70

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C H A M B E R M E M B E R S U R V E Y R E S U LT S H I G H L I G H T S

Q42- DO YOU SUPPORT LEGISLATIVE EFFORTS AIMED TO DECREASE THE GENDER WAGE GAP THROUGH MANDATING BEST PRACTICES?

Yes

47.62%

Maybe

26.19%

No

26.19% 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Q43- DO YOU SUPPORT LEGISLATIVE EFFORTS TO DECREASE THE GENDER WAGE GAP THROUGH REQUIRING EQUAL PAY?

45.93%

Yes Maybe

26.79% 27.27%

No 0

10

25

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

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Q50- RANK YOUR TOP FIVE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUES FROM THE LIST. 130

120

110

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

er Oth ial Soc

tice Jus

ry ato gul te Re ma Cli e orc rkf Wo bor a &L e orc nt rkf me Wo op vel De re ctu tru ras

Inf

es Tax ic t nom men Eco elop v De re Ca alth He ent nm viro En n atio ort nsp Tra ng lity i usi Ho rdab o Aff tion uca Ed

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SA LT L A K E C HA M B E R


PUBLIC POLICY COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Amanda Covington EVP Communications & Government Affairs Larry H. Miller Group of Companies

Jonathan Hafen Shareholder Parr Brown Gee & Loveless

OUR POLICY TEAM

Jacey Skinner General Counsel and Executive VP of Public Policy Salt Lake Chamber 801-328-5071

Max Backlund Director of Utah Community Builders Salt Lake Chamber 801-328-5069

Kaitlyn Pieper Director of Community Policy Salt Lake Chamber 801-328-5056

jskinner@slchamber.com

mbacklund@slchamber.com

kpieper@slchamber.com

Special thanks to Editor and Director of Marketing and Communication Marisa Bomis and Graphic Designer Bianca Yardley.

2020 PUBLIC P OLI C Y G U I DE

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1 7 5 E. U N I V ER S IT Y BLVD . (400 S.) SUIT E 600 S A LT L AK E C IT Y, UT 84111 801.364.3631 S L C H AM BER.C OM / POLIC Y

A special thank you to our policy committees for their guidance and help in shaping our legislative priorities.

Profile for Salt Lake Chamber

2020 Legislative Priorities  

As Utah’s Business Leader, there are thousands of issues of importance to our economy and business community. This document serves as the Sa...

2020 Legislative Priorities  

As Utah’s Business Leader, there are thousands of issues of importance to our economy and business community. This document serves as the Sa...