SA Flyer Magazine June 2022

Page 1

FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

Edition 316 June 2022 Cover: Bruce Perkins

FLIGHT REPORT:

The SkyReach

BUSHCAT!

JOHN BASSI: Surviving the lockdown!

How flutter will kill you! PRESIDENTS’ TROPHY – Full Report! PETER GARRISON: Movie Planes

JIM DAVIS – choosing not to fly! GUY: Can Takatso save SAA?

1) GRAND CENTRAL AIRPORT – AVIATION COMPANIES GUIDE 2) MAINTENANCE / REFURBISHMENT & AVIONICS / INSTRUMENTS GUIDE 1

June 2022


p

I S THERE A CLOSER AIRPORT? YES, BUT ONLY YOU CAN ACCESS IT! The world’s first Super Versatile Jet takes off! Don’t be limited to pristine, lengthy runways with hours of driving after you land. Go where no jet has gone before! The PC-24’s short and unpaved runway capability gets you to your ultimate destination faster than ever before. With this jet, you call the shots. Explore more with a PC-24 – contact us now! pilatus-aircraft.com Contact Pilatus PC-12 Centre Southern Africa, your nearest Authorised Pilatus PC-24 Sales Centre for further information on Tel: +27 11 383 0800, Cell +27 82 511 7312 or Email: aircraftsales@pilatuscentre.co.za



POSITION REPORT IT IS SAID THAT AVIATION leads an economic downturn and lags the recovery. The South African economy may be getting over the disaster of the Covid pandemic but the general aviation industry is still lagging the much awaited bounce back. The relatively low turnout of just 35 entrants for the President’s Trophy Air Race is a good indicator. For this reason it is not surprising that the two key aircraft builders in South Africa are exporting almost all their production. Sling Aircraft have done a magnificent marketing job, not just in South Africa, but internationally. It is therefore not surprising that almost 90% of their new sales are now outside South Africa.

It is significant that it is the non-type certified light sport aircraft that are achieving success in South African operations. This is thanks to the enlightened regulatory regime created by the then Commissioner of Civil Aviation, Colin Jordaan, back in 2007. It would be reasonable to think that demand for the more modern and affordable NTCAs is rapidly overtaking non-type certified aircraft. However there has been a remarkable bounce back in demand for classic type-certified single engine aircraft and we have seen asking price rises of as much as 30 to 50% on the more popular types.

90% OF NEW SALES ARE NOW OUTSIDE SOUTH AFRICA

There is another significant aircraft manufacturer based inside Africa, and it too was started by Mike Blyth and grew in the fertile ground of Springs Airfield. This aircraft builder is Rainbow SkyReach, which has quietly got on with the job of achieving significant worldwide sales with its development of the original tube and fabric Cheetah microlite into the current BushCat.

The original Cheetah has evolved into a very capable little aircraft that is finding a niche in bush flying operations and is proving particularly useful for game patrol work. This month's flight test is of a BushCat that is being used with great effect in the Hluhluwe and Imfolozi game reserves.

4

June 2022

Of concern though is that it would it appear from looking at the advertisements that far too many aircraft are now being sold by people who are hanging up their headsets and getting out of flying.

The key problem must obviously be operating costs. Leading the list of high costs is Avgas at over R30 per litre, and of course the weakness of the Rand has made replacement parts prohibitive. It is therefore perhaps natural that we see in the aircraft register review yet again a significant component of our fleet being exported. It is also noteworthy how few aircraft are actually changing hands. All of this indicates a significant downturn in the general aviation industry. But as always, there will be a recovery. It may seem all doom and gloom now, but it is worth remembering that the industry has recovered from greater setbacks in the past.

j

Guy Leitch


P P L T O AT P L T R A I N I N G A N D E V E RY T H I N G I N B E T W E E N SA Flyer 2022|06

T R A I N O N T H E M O ST M O D E R N F L I G HT S I M U L AT O R AVA I L A B L E I N S O UT H A F R I C A • Now certified for TCAS training . • R N AV a n d G N S S Certified on all flight models from single engine to turbine.

W IT H N E W V F R L E V E L

TERRAIN GRAPHICS

Pilotsn Planes

SA Flyer 2022|06

CONTACT US OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION: Tel: 011 701 3862 E-mail: info@aeronav.co.za Website: www.aeronav.co.za SACAA ATO No: SACAA/1110/ATO

PLACE YOUR ORDERS ONLINE NOW AT www.pilotsnplanes.co.za

A20 AVIATION HEADSET

Acclaimed noise reduction for pilots – 30% greater active noise reduction than conventional headsets.

EMAIL ORDERS TO

orders@pilotsnplanes.co.za

June 2022

5


More pulse. More grinning. More heart racing. More of what you love. The Cayenne GTS models. Fascination wants to be experienced, to always adopt a more exciting form. Which is precisely the inspiration for the Cayenne GTS models. We have honed its design, improved its agility, and increased its sportiness with even more passion and precision. With 338 kW (460 hp) and 620 Nm of torque, the 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 engine exudes an exhilarating drive for longer-lasting goosebumps and more butterflies in your stomach.

Porsche Centre Johannesburg Corner Witkoppen and Wroxham Road, Paulshof Telephone 011 540 5000 www.porschejohannesburg.com

Porsche Centre Cape Town Corner Century Avenue and Summer Greens Drive, Century City Telephone 021 555 6800 www.porschecapetown.com

Porsche Centre Umhlanga 49 Meridian Drive, Umhlanga Ridge Town Centre, Umhlanga Ridge Telephone 031 514 3000 www.porscheumhlanga.com

Porsche Centre Pretoria 452 Botterklapper Street, Off Lynnwood Road, The Willows Telephone 012 816 7600 www.porschepretoria.com

Cayenne GTS: Combined fuel consumption: 13.3 l/100 km; Power: 338 kW (460 hp); Torque: 620 Nm; 0-100 km/h: 4.5 sec; Top speed: 270 km/h Priced from R1 759 000 including a 3 year/100,000 km Driveplan.



Edition 316

CONTENTS FLIGHTCOM

SA FLYER

16 24 28 74 80 82

Guy Leitch - ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE Peter Garrison - GERMAN AEROPLANE

Bush Pilot - HUGH PRYOR Pilots - LAURA MCDERMID

SAF 80

COLUMNISTS

06 16

George Tonking - HELI OPS Jim Davis - PLANE TALK Jim Davis - ACCIDENT REPORT Ray Watts - REGISTER REVIEW

FLIGHT REPORT: TH E B US H CAT 8

June 2022


PRESIDENTS’ TROPHY RACE

A FALLEN ALBATROSS

LOCKDOWN JOHN BASSI

LESSON FROM UKRAINE

June 2022


Edition 316

CONTENTS FEATURES SA FLYER

42 FLIGHT REPORT - SKYREACH BUSHCAT 54 THE GREAT ‘GATE GUARD’ MOVE 58 PRESIDENTS' TROPHY AIR RACE 66 QUEENSTOWN FLY-IN FESTIVAL 73 UITENHAGE WINGS AND WHEELS 88 THE PARYS AIRSHOW FLIGHTCOM

14 Defence - Guy Leitch 22 John Bassi - Lockdown Part 3 26 News - Flight Inspection Symposium 29 News - Bombardier’s Global 8000

REGULARS 14 Opening Shot 86 AFS Register Review 94 SV Aviation Fuel Table 96 Aviation Direct Events Calender

FLIGHTCOM

21 AME Directory 30 ALPI Flight School Listing 31 Atlas Oils Charter Directory 32 AVES Technics AMO Listing 34 Aviation Directory 10

June 2022


LEARN TO

Dale de Klerk Cell: +27825563592 Fax: 0866058948 Skype: dale_de_klerk Email: dale@alpiaviation.co.za

FLY WITH

FROM NPL

THROUGH

US

TO CPL

WE NOW OFFER TA I L W H E E L TRAINING

w w w. a l p i a v i a t i o n . c o . z a

Bill Harrop’s ‘Original’ Balloon Safaris Breathtaking views! PACKAGES: • Magalies River Valley Scenic Balloon Safari • Game viewing at Mabula Private Game Reserve • Groups • Team Building • We fly from the beautiful Magalies River Valley in the Cradle of Human Kind World Heritage Site.

n We now do balloo

pilot training

+27 83 457 3402 or +27 83 443 2661 / 2 • email: website@balloon.co.za • www.balloon.co.za


Switch into thrill mode. New Continental GT Speed.

Discover pure exhilaration at BentleyMotors.com/Continental Contact Bentley Johannesburg on 010 020 4000 or Bentley Cape Town on 021 000 2100.

12

June 2022

The name ‘Bentley’ and the ‘B’ in wings device are registered trademarks. © 2022 Bentley Motors Limited.


BENTLEY JOHANNESBURG • BENTLEY CAPE TOWN Power: 485 kW (659 hp); Torque: 900 Nm; 0-100 km/h: 3.6 seconds; Maximum speed: 335 km/h. Priced from R4 945 000 with a 3 year/100,000 km Driveplan Model shown: New Continental GT Speed


This month’s Opening Shot was taken by Robin Malherbe, who has been a steady yet often unseen contributor of excellent photos for George Tonking’s helicopter column. Robin took this perfectly exposed picture of an Alouette III against a dramatic sky with building Charlie Bravos shortly after lift-off from Steyn City north of Joburg. He used his Nikon Z5 mirrorless camera with an 70-200mm f/2.8 lens @ 200mm. Shutter speed was 1/60 second.

14

June 2022


15 June 2022 Send your submissions to guy@saflyermag.co.za


ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE: GUY LEITCH

SAA

- Parsing the Takatso deal

Like watching reruns of a disaster movie, SAA has a ghastly fascination for most South Africans, especially the taxpayers. Latest estimates reckon the airline has blown over R50 billion, so we are all thoroughly invested in the success or failure of our once proud national carrier. THE CURRENT SLOW MOTION train smash is the sale of a majority share to a strategic equity partner – the Takatso Consortium. The more time passes the greater the criticism of the deal. Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan is trying hard to make us believe that the ‘strategic equity partner’ (SEP) he has conjured up will finally put an end to this gross abuse of the taxpayer. I have my doubts.

ingredients: the airline operational know-how of Global Airways with the deep capital from Harith Partners and SAA’s remaining route network and assets.

SAA is going to break Go r d h a n ’ s promise of no more money

The Takatso saga began a year ago. Gordhan was under great pressure to produce the long promised SEP to buy into what should be an unsellable asset – and much to my surprise, he did.

At face value the Takatso Consortium looked like a workable solution in that it combined three key

16

June 2022

Over the past year the criticism of the deal and the clamour for answers has grown into a cacophony. It has also caused open strife in government between the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Public Enterprises.

To help unpack the complex cloud of half-truths and accusations around the issues I will try answer the key questions:


When the Takatso deal was announced many dared hope it would plug SAA's losses.

Why does government need to sell SAA? Since 2007 the airline has cost the fiscus around R50 billion – which should have been used to supply services to the poorest and not for a subsidy of wealthy airline travellers. Then there is still the R16 billion worth of liabilities. Government would rather have this debt off their books and on a private entity’s. As long as the airline is a going concern, government does not have to find this R16 billion for a few more years.

Since SAA was created by an Act of Parliament, this Act will have to be changed to permit a majority private ownership. Then there are the onerous licensing requirements, particularly getting an Aircraft Operators Certificate from the Civil Aviation Authority, which normally takes two years. Fresh applications will have to be made to the Air Services Licencing council – which has a massive backlog. And the deal is expected to require Competition Board approval – a submission which has yet to be made.

How long can SAA wait for the deal to be done? What still needs to be done before the deal can be finalised? The due diligence has been completed and the deal signed off. However there are still many tough regulatory hoops to be jumped through.

SAA is haemorrhaging money at an appalling rate. The problem is - the airline is 20% of its former size, but is selling less than 10% of its pre-business rescue seats – and at questionable yields. June 2022

17


Can we believe that SAA really will no longer require taxpayer bailouts?

If it takes another year for the deal to be done, SAA is going to break Gordhan’s promise of no more money for it, by coming with begging bowl back to the taxpayer.

Harith Partners to access Public Investment Corporation funds and the Government Employee Pension Fund to mobilise cheap money for further bailouts. There is however at least some comfort that we have been assured that that this is not going to happen.

Why does Takatso want this deal? The key reason is almost certainly because the airline has billions of Rands worth of assets, yet is being sold to Takatso essentially for free. Yes, Takatso promised to contribute R3 billion towards operating costs. But this is almost certainly not going to be sufficient to get the airline to a sustainable going concern condition. This has naturally given rise to accusations of an asset raid and the family silver being sold off to cronies. There is also the concern that Takatso may use

18

June 2022

What are the billions of Rands in assets SAA has? In the face of mounting criticism that SAA was being given away, DPE issued a press release which claimed the airline was worth zero. Then the government appointed a private consultant to do a valuation, and they came up with a value of R859 million – which is a whole lot more than the notional R51 that Takatso is paying for a 51% share. But even R859 million may be far too low.


SAA has billions of Rands worth of tangible and intangible assets. Tangible assets are its land and hangars, and the airliners it owns. The land and hangars are on the 2018 balance sheet at R2.2 billion, others claim a more realistic valuation is around R10 billion. SAA leases most of its aircraft, but unfortunately it still owns eight A340s outright. To replace the A340s with new aircraft would, at list prices, cost U$ 350 million dollars each – more than R5 billion apiece or R40 billion. However these old four-engine jets are no longer in demand, so all eight are worth perhaps U$ 20 million - or just R300 million. Less easy to value are the routes and landing rights. SAA still has slots at Heathrow and these slots have been sold for as much as U$75 million (say another R1 billion) in 2016. However, the market has changed and it's now far harder to trade slots at Heathrow – or any other airport.

consortium essentially gets the asset without any bank or finance debt. However, SAA still has payables of R3 billion, and these are increasing daily as the airline continues to operate at a loss. There is an additional large unflown ticket liability, plus the R900 or so million claim from Airlink for money payable to Airlink for ticket sales during the business rescue. Add all the assets up and you get a value of around R3 – R10 billion with perhaps the same for the liabilities. So perhaps it really is worth nothing.

there has be e n li tt le talk of recapitalising the airline

SAA's regional route rights are coveted by its rapidly growing competitors: Airlink, CemAir and Safair, so they must have significant value. However, they are supposed to have been allocated on a ‘use it or lose it’ basis and if SAA does not use them soon, then the Air Services Licensing Council may allocate them to SAA’s competitors anyway.

What about SAA's debt? As noted, the government is committed to pay off R16 billion of SAA's historic debt, so the

Takatso will be paying R3 billion over two years to cover operational losses. Could Takatso and Harith Partners get away with simply borrowing this R3 billion against SAA's balance sheet?

Remember that no South African banks were willing to lend to SAA without state guarantees before the business rescue. (This may be one of the key reasons for the delay in finalising the deal.) SAA may eventually present financial statements which show a positive net asset value, but if the assets are in property and intangibles they are not realisable and that is what lenders will be looking for. Furthermore, Harith already has billions of dollars under its control so they should have plenty of resources to fund SAA's ongoing operations without having to leverage SAA’s non-existent balance sheet. So yes – Takatso will have to pay its promised R3 billion.

June 2022

19


What of the future? Can we expect Takatso to rebuild the airline into a profit-making entity that we can be proud of?

entertainment. These have uncompetitive operating costs and a poor passenger experience – which is not a recipe for success.

It is an impossibly tall order. There are many reasons: A primary one is that the airline has shrunk to a shadow of its pre business rescue size. Further, it has lost many of its most valuable routes to competitors.

Where SAA V2 will get R50 billion to replace its fleet is thus an open question, as aircraft lessors may be understandably shy to finance SAA’s fleet after their last haircut. So SAA will have to continue to operate fuel hungry aircraft with a poor passenger experience, particularly for in-flight entertainment.

Then there is the actual shareholding: government claims it still has a ‘golden share’ which enables it to impose its own development agenda on the airline. This could involve a repeat of other failed attempts to use SAA as a tool to develop South Africa's trade (such as the Beijing route which lost R1 million every time it flew.)

much vaunte d pilot standards having been compromised for political reas ons Even though the Takatso consortium has promised R3 billion to fund operating costs, there has been little talk of recapitalising the airline – and lack of capital was claimed to have been one of its biggest weaknesses over the past 15 years. With an insolvent balance sheet the airline is not going to be able to replace its obsolete fleet of aircraft. In particular, it is yet to restart long haul flying. Part of its problem must be that it has a fleet of gas guzzling four engine dinosaur aircraft with obsolete in-flight

20

June 2022

Then there is public perception. There is very real resentment against the enormous bailout costs carried by the taxpayer so far. And unfortunately there are concerns about safety, as pilots are now promoted on the basis of their socio-economic background and not on skill or experience. There are already countless examples of SAA’s once much vaunted pilot standards having been compromised for political reasons: The Chief Pilot very nearly crashed after takeoff on the infamous Brussels vaccine flight. The newly appointed Head of Training is not qualified to instruct. A co-pilot who failed two breathalyzer tests at Heathrow has just been promoted to Captain. Given these safety concerns and the intense competition for passengers, it is hard to imagine SAA being able to attract the loads and the ticket yields it needs to compete with the global airlines. The fear therefore is that Takatso will operate the airline for as long as they can while cannibalising the assets. And then, in a few years’ time they will simply walk away and leave the mess once again to the South African taxpayer.

j

guy@saflyermag.co.za


1974 Cessna Citation 500 ±10310 Hours TTSN on Pratt & Whitney JT15D-1A

Registration Number: ZS-SGT

1982 Hawker HS-125-700A

1981 Hawker HS-125-700A

±11098.4 Hours TTSN on Honeywell TFE-731-3DR-1H

Registration Number: ZS-WJW

±9074.4 Hours TTSN on Honeywell TFE-731-3R-1H

Registration Number: ZS-SOI

1985

Bell 206 L3 Long Ranger II Helicopter Registration Number: ZS-HXN

1977 Beechcraft Baron B58 ±5818.4 Hours TTSN on Continental IO520-CB

Registration Number: ZS-KCA

Date: 19 to 21 July 2022 www.maskell.co.za

1978 Beechcraft Baron B58

1958 Cessna 175 (MOD M/79/40)

±9029.6 Hours TTSN on Continental IO520-CB

Registration Number: ZS-LXO

±3323.41 Hours TTSN on Lycoming 0-360 -3A

Registration Number: ZS-CIL

Cell: 082-604-0866/082-809-0188 Email: astyn@maskell.co.za Office: 033-397-1190 “Above subject to change without prior notice” “E & O e” June 2022

21


Introducing the Huracán Tecnica. The purest Lamborghini driving experience combined with the freedom of everyday use: a bridge between past and future, lifestyle and performance, road and track. Huracán Tecnica brings out a pilot’s attitude in every driver, delivering the most rewarding performance and the ultimate fun-to-drive experience – simultaneously. Aerodynamic efficiency and lightweight engineering energize every element while retaining a distinct elegance. The naturally-aspirated 5.2-litre V10 engine produces 640 hp and 565 Nm of torque and reaches 0-100 km/h in only 3.2 seconds. Unleash the unique character of the most versatile Huracán yet.

22

Sold with a 3 year/100,000 km Driveplan at no additional cost.

June 2022


LAMBORGHINI JOHANNESBURG

LAMBORGHINI CAPE TOWN

Authorised Dealer

Authorised Dealer

Cnr Melrose Boulevard & Corlett Drive, Melrose Arch, Johannesburg Phone 010 020 3680 / 082 907 0222 www.johannesburg.lamborghini

Showroom C, Matrix Building, No. 8 Bridgeways, Bridgeways Precinct, Century City Phone 021 419 0595 / 076 611 2437 www.capetown.lamborghini

June 2022

23


PETER GARRISON

My son Nick, who was screening a series of classic films for his friends, put on the 1981 Spielberg pulse-pounder, Raiders of the Lost Ark, which came out in the year he was born and therefore stood to him, in terms of the history of film and the decline of taste, as Casablanca does to me. FOR MOST PEOPLE, THE MOVIE’S most memorable scene was the encounter between our bullwhip-wielding archaeologist hero and an Arab swordsman in a Cairo marketplace. After the would-be assassin puts on a menacing display of fancy samurai-style scimitar-waving, Indiana Jones, who has no time to waste, sets aside his usual sportsmanship and casually dispatches the black-clad virtuoso with a single revolver shot. Persons of unusually persistent memory may recall, however, that one of the film’s many other climaxes involved a fistfight between Jones and a gigantic shirtless Nazi – or Nazi employee, just following orders, since his party affiliation remained unspecified – underneath a big German aeroplane. That encounter ends when the certain victor in the unequal contest (that is, the giant) backs into a whirling propeller.

My son, showing that when it comes to a fondness for using big words – sesquipedalianism, I almost said – the fruit does not fall far from the tree, texted me: “Is the plane whose prop eviscerates a large bald man in raiders of the lost ark a real plane or is it a contrivance?”

it looked more or less air wor thy

24

June 2022

No, I replied, the aeroplane was not real. But it was interesting nonetheless.

The plane was dreamed up by production designer Norman Reynolds. Designing a historically plausible and yet dramatic-looking Nazi aeroplane was not difficult, since the German aircraft industry was by far the most innovative of its time and came up with many strangerthan-fiction designs. It has been a fathomless


The German Aeroplane in Raiders of the Lost Ark.

mine of aeronautical nonce-formations, together with some remarkably prescient concepts. The Reynolds aeroplane, a flying wing, seems to have been inspired by both an early Northrop prototype, the N-1M, and an abortive German project of a twin-engine fighter, tagged Li P.04106, conceived by the extremely smart and inventive Alexander Lippisch. The downwardturned wingtips of the Reynolds creation probably came from the original configuration of the Northrop aeroplane, the final version of which, with unbent wings and a brilliant yellow paint job, may today be found in the fabulous Udvar-Hazy annex of the National Air and Space Museum near Washington, D.C.. The strange dihedral joggle in the centresection, on the other hand, must have responded to some requirement that actors be able to jump onto, or from, the wing. Otherwise, it makes neither historical nor aerodynamic sense. For the eponymous Ark of the Covenant, production designers had only to consult the Old Testament, which gives detailed instructions for its construction. I must have been getting popcorn when the reason for the Nazis’ interest in acquiring the Ark, or the Allies’ in retaining it, was explained. Generally speaking, the Germans displayed little interest in Hebrew memorabilia; nor did the Allies,

until it was far too late, in rescuing European Jews. Screenwriters, however, are paid not to reproduce dismal reality, but to create alternative, and more interesting and uplifting, versions of it. Apart from the strange centresection and the structurally unlikely placement of the vertical fins atop the engine nacelles, the Reynolds design, or contrivance, looked more or less airworthy. Needless to say, it never flew, nor was it intended to. It suffered, instead, the unseemly fate of most large movie props. Exposed like Ozymandias to the elements on the abandoned Tunisian set, pillaged by souvenir-hunters, it was finally demolished, after ten years, by a bulldozer. But that was not the end of its story. About a decade after the release of the film, the German Aeroplane and its associated fistfight became part of a show called “The Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular” at the Disney World Resort in Florida. At this point the original prop already was, or was soon to become, dust in Tunisia, and at any rate it was probably too big to fit in the new show’s stage. A fresh, more conveniently proportioned German Aeroplane was required, and, incidentally, it needed to have tractor rather than pusher propellers and a June 2022

25


The final concept of the plane featured in Raiders of the Lost Ark had four engines. By the time it hit the screen, it was down to just two.

To the occasional bemused specialist, however, the natural question occurred: Could these confectionery German aeroplanes have flown, and if so, which would have been the better design?

much larger cabin, so that human actors could still climb into and out of the much smaller craft and could conduct their fight – which ended with the improbable disappearance of the large German in an antiseptic puff of red mist – in the space between the aeroplane and the audience. A revised version was duly produced, with a bulging greenhouse cabin reminiscent of the famously asymmetrical Blohm & Voss BV 141, and with tractor nacelles elongated into booms supporting two vertical fins. The shape of the original wing, which with its sagging centresection, uplifted middle and downturned tips resembled an arthritic seagull, remained. Thanks to the general insensitivity of the non-specialist public to the appearance of technical things, many visitors to the Florida show probably left unaware that they had seen not the original, grand and now pulverized German Aeroplane, but a shrunken impostor – a nachgedunkelte Schrumpfgermane, as they used to call Josef Goebbels.

26

June 2022

The two wings were broadly similar. Cribbed from real flying-wing designs, they were tapered and swept, as is usually done in the absence of an empennage, to allow not only roll, but also pitch attitude to be controlled by what would be the ailerons of a conventional aeroplane. The placement of the vertical fins atop the engine nacelles of the original version was structurally tricky, but not impossible. It was aerodynamically senseless, however, because, to the extent that the vertical surfaces were to have any stabilizing effect, they ought to have been as far aft as possible, and therefore to have been placed near the wingtips. A more serious difficulty – and this is a challenge for any tailless design – was the position, rather far aft, of the engines themselves. Tailless aeroplanes have narrow CG ranges and require careful balance. Placing the engines too far from the centre of gravity makes balance impossible. The Northrop aeroplane solved the problem by burying its engines within the wings and driving the propellers through extension shafts.


The Mark II German Aeroplane, although differently arranged, was little better in this regard. Its engines were too far forward. The aft extensions of the nacelles put the vertical fins in a much more favourable location, but could not have been heavy enough to balance the engines unless some massive fixed equipment had been installed in them – perhaps two remotelyaimed gun turrets.

pusher debate is of course an endless one. The tractor propeller operates in undisturbed air, but drives accelerated air back over the aeroplane, increasing its drag, and the fuselage or nacelle disturbs the path of the slipstream. The pusher propeller operates in disturbed air, but air that has slowed down with respect to the aeroplane; the slowing, in principle at least, improves the propeller's efficiency. The distortion of the approaching flow field, however, impairs it. The choice is commonly dismissed as “a wash,” but the great majority of designers have preferred tractor installations, usually for secondary reasons like engine cooling, ground clearance, or the harsh noise that pusher propellers operating in an aeroplane’s wake inevitably produce.

Ta i l l e s s aeroplanes have narrow CG r a n g e s

By the same token that a wing-only aeroplane – in German, a nurflügel – has a narrow CG range, it has relatively weak longitudinal stability. Tractor propellers are destabilizing: When the nose comes up, tilting the propeller, the stream of air passing through the propeller is bent downward. The resulting equal and opposite reaction pulls the nose up farther. Tractor props are therefore not a good choice for a flying wing, especially one with powerful engines like the 1,200-hp Daimler-Benz V-12s that would have been the Luftwaffe’s likely choice, had this aeroplane really existed. Apart from stability considerations related to this particular style of airframe, the tractor vs.

Were these German Aeroplanes aeroplanes, or just contrivances? All things considered, it’s probably best that no one tried to take to the air in either of them. But, to be fair, they served their purpose, and, after all, it’s not so bad to be a mere contrivance. Aeroplanes are contrivances too. j

The Northrup N-1M is on display at the Udvar-Hazy Museum.

June 2022

27


HELICOPTER OPS: GEORGE TONKING

NOSE LEFT, LOW RPM HORN SCREAMING Since the beginning of powered flight, pilots have had one unifying dread – a dead stick landing. I’VE READ MANY ACCOUNTS of the perilous early days of United States airmail flying in the 1920s like how Charles Lindbergh would have to land his de Havilland DH-4 on a short stretch of open land in the backcountry of the Midwest after his Liberty engine gave out. Lindbergh eventually earned the name Lucky Lindy after his several nearcatastrophic moments, including twice bailing out from a dead-in-the-air bird. But we must remember that, by all accounts, it was more skill than luck for this pioneer. Out of pure necessity, Lucky Lindy had developed a sixth sense, a little voice that reassured him: about the health of his bird’s powerplant while flying over hostile land and water, through bad weather and in the dark of night.

during which time he mastered the risks of flight, including the famed 30-hour Atlantic crossing in a single-piston-engine plane. He knew stuff. But how does Lucky Lindy relate to helicopter flight and what can we process and learn through his life?

engine failures rarely happen the way they we r e t aught

He also taught himself to fly with a bit of “money in the bank” – altitude. As the adage goes, “Airspeed is life, Altitude is life insurance.” He may not have said it that way, but he sure lived it. And long he lived – to the ripe age of 72,

28

June 2022

I’ve mentioned engines being naughty in some of my previous columns – like dropped valves, rocker shafts falling out… even Carl’s engine-coughing impressive 157-metre slide on landing in a crippled R44. All positive outcomes that produced Mount Everest shaped learning curves.

This time around, I would like to talk about some of the telltale signs of engine failures, how to avoid them firstly, quickly identify them if warranted, and finally how to deal with them safely. At the end of the day, a confident pilot will not neglect to listen to that little voice that we all develop over time with experience, like Lucky Lindy.


The first thing to keep in mind as a pilot is that no engine is infallible. But like a human being, engines live and breathe and talk to you when you fly. As long as you listen. A small stutter from your engine in the night demands a pilot’s immediate and full attention, followed by what seems like a longer-than-usual flight back to base, as every small vibration and sound is earnestly dissected by your jacked-up-onadrenaline mind. Thankfully, engines, in general, do give fair warning of impending misery. Engine temperature and oil pressure instrument trends are not to be ignored. You should also carefully consider oil consumption, mag checks and engine performance during a flight. A common misconception is that in helicopters, turbine engines are less prone to stoppage than reciprocating engines. This may be true to some extent, but they remain intricate mechanisms that can fail because of their many components and accessories.

Training is pertinent to a successful forced lob. In flight school, engine ‘failures’ are plentiful, as your instructor regularly snaps the throttle shut with a smirk and a swift left hand, sometimes with a “3-2-1 … Fail!” At other times, with no warning, the instructor tests the hapless student, hopefully in a safe flight regime, just to keep him or her sharp. Straight in, 180, 360, backwards, and side slip autos are to be mastered if there’s any hope of passing. But the truth about real-life engine failures in general and on piston-powered Robbies in particular, is that they rarely happen in the way they were taught in flight school. On more than one occasion, my trusty Lycoming engine has dropped a valve into a cylinder and continued to run on the remaining 5 or 4 (the opposite cylinder is often also affected), albeit at a reduced power output. How does that look and feel? Of note is how fast it happens.

The moment the engine fails.

June 2022

29


The results of a dropped valve, now inbedded in the cylinder head - no engine is infallible.

30

June 2022


Always have some "money in the bank".

Two immediate tell tales are how the nose deviates left and the sound of the Low RPM horn squealing, “PEEEEEEEEEEE!!!” The nose drifts left because of the torque reaction pedal position (rudder pedals, if you will, for the plank drivers) being set for cruise power. With the engine problem, less torque is produced and there she swings!

More times than not, a real-life engine failure autorotation is successful, as long as the collective is lowered without delay and the rpm is stabilised into a smooth, steep glide. In fact, many more helicopter accidents occur with autorotations in the training environment than in actual engine failures.

no engine is infallible

The Low RPM horn sounds and illuminates as the rotor tachometer passes below 97% rpm. This is not of too great a concern as you can recover the needed revs easily before 85% critical rpm. So, what do you do in the moment? Instinctively, in this situation, you would lower the collective, recovering the lost 5 per cent rpm and straighten the heading with the pedals set to less-to-the-left. And, of course, your head would be craned over to find the field you noticed as you whizzed past 30 seconds before.

In essence, flying has changed little in a century. The same perils that Charles Lindbergh faced are still relevant today. They may seem milder from the modern helicopter pilot’s point of view, but that perspective changes as soon as the engine quits. Wisdom says to prepare well and to fly within your margins. Just like Lucky Lindy, who relied less on luck perhaps than his nickname suggests.

j

June 2022

31


32

June 2022


June 2022

33


PLANE TALK - JIM DAVIS

VICTOR DOESN’ T GO FLYING,

AND I SAVE 20 LI VES - WITHOUT REALLY TRYING I am not one for bragging – well unless I have something pretty impressive to tell you, but how many pilots have got Victor Smith listed in their logbook? FOR THOSE WHO DON’T KNOW, Victor was a former version of Chalkie Stobbart – a setter of record-breaking flights between Cape Town and London. You can read all about it in his fascinating autobiography, “Open Cockpit over Africa.” I flew with Victor a number of times – sometimes to brush up his instrument flying – but mostly just for fun, in his magnificent 400 Comanche. However, this story is about a flight of his that fortunately never got off the ground.

sw inging a brak e les s , chock les s and s t ar te r les s air craft

Victor and the Runaway Moth Victor was a supremely practical man; he was also endowed with that wonderful South African characteristic of being able to ‘make a plan’. When things go wrong in your life just look for the nearest Saffer and he or she will produce a bit of bent fence wire and a pair of pliers and you will be back in business before you can say ‘dankie’. He showed up at the hot and dusty Worcester

34

June 2022

airfield at around noon one day just in time to exercise his plan making skills. He was greeted by a distressing, but not uncommon scene: A sweaty and bedraggled individual was restraining one wing of a Gypsy Moth while the biplane circled around him. This sort of insanity was always the result of swinging a brakeless, chockless and starterless aircraft, without competent assistance. There are many ways of initiating this circus-act, but here is the most popular method.

The pilot would set the throttle and switch on the mags. He would then go round to the front, reach up to clasp the wooden blade firmly with both hands, and start swinging. If, after a while, nothing interesting happened, it would occur to him that the reason for the engine's reluctance to fire was insufficient fuel. He would advance the throttle a little and try again without the desired effect. A little more throttle might produce the odd "pfoof" by way of encouragement. And so he would use a fraction more throttle, and so on.


June 2022

35


The Cessna Bird Dog was a classic forward air control aircraft.

You and I, sitting comfortably at home, perhaps with a liquid restorative on hand, have the advantage of a calm mind – we have time to reflect upon the probable outcome of his actions. We suck in an anxious breath as we speculate about the outcome of such activity. Our perspiring aviator seldom takes time to reflect – his mind is focussed on the refreshing breeze that will soon be tugging at his jacket and cooling his bod as he climbs into the cockpit. He is more concerned with action than logic. Eventually it happens. The engine fires. There is a splutter of blue smoke. A moment of satisfaction. Another moment of uncertainty. And finally the awful horror of the situation as the engine roars with way too much power and the aircraft bounds towards him. Our hero leaps back in terror. He makes a dash for the wingtip, en–route to the cockpit. As he reaches this turning–point it becomes apparent that events are moving faster than anticipated. His intended destination is unattainable. His only hope of maintaining contact with the aircraft is to grab the wing–tip or strut. And so we find our hapless aviator as the pivot–point of this circling insanity.

36

June 2022

Victor was no stranger to such events. He quickly realised that this carnival had been going on for some time. The restrainer was in a miserable state of exhaustion and close to collapse. He leaped from his car and, carefully timing his entry between circling wings, tail and thrashing propeller, sailed into the battle field. His plan was to head for the rear cockpit and switch the mags off. This would have proved effective, had our knackered instigator simply persevered for another two seconds. But such was not the case. Some readers may be familiar with the habits of the African sausage–fly. This harmless nocturnal creature, which is about the size and shape of a fat dragonfly, but possessed of considerably more energy, spends its evenings on the floor, buzzing and spinning round in one spot. Occasionally it pauses to reset its gyros, and then shoots off in a straight line with the intention of becoming airborne. The Gipsy Moth followed this procedure and was transitioning from the circling, to the straight–line mode at the very moment when Victor dived for the rear cockpit. This


unexpected development forced Victor to alter his strategy. The rear cockpit was no longer an option, and the situation seemed hopeless, but Victor's quick thinking, and smart footwork just allowed him to make it to the tail. The perceptive reader, while admiring Victor’s efforts, might question the benefit to be gained by reaching the tail of a runaway aircraft. Such a reader underestimates Victor’s ability to make a plan. We therefore soon see him seated on the tailplane, using one hand on the front of the fin to steady himself, and the other on the rear of the rudder to control the aircraft’s direction.

improve on the one that Victor made on that hot and dusty day at the Worcester Airfield.

A Black Hole at Gariep Dam I told you recently about Bertus and his lunatic prop swinging. Well this was at the same Commando camp.

it mak es t he e ne my ex t r e mel y cr os s

Speed control is less precise. Travelling in a straight line allows the speed to increase to the point where there is a danger of becoming airborne. Victor slows things down by directing the Moth through the long grass and undergrowth that surrounds the field.

Again I crossed swords with our boss, the famous, red faced, Commandant Bob Kershaw, who got a DFC for flying his mate out of the desert, in a Hurricane, while under enemy fire.

Bob was much into this whole military thing. Hugely enthusiastic about saluting and foot stamping. Not to mention publicly, and unnecessarily, shouting at people who had perfect hearing – me for instance. Let me tell you about the night I became target, the shoutee as it were, of one of these outrages.

Obviously there is a limit to how long this sort of nonsense can go on. From Victor's slipstreambuffeted and uncomfortable position he is able to view the fuel gauge, a cork and wire contraption on the tank in the centre of the top wing. It told him that he would continue with this depressing activity until well after sunset. The prospect held little appeal.

It was getting towards the end of one of those long, hot, dusty days of messing around with aeroplanes, supposedly on urgent military missions. We had flown ‘generals’ to grid references, done reccies of secret nuclear installations, and even flown troopies to military hospitals to have their ingrowing toenails mended.

Victor formulated a new plan. He abandoned his seat on the tail plane, straddled the fuselage, like a jockey, and worked his way forward, towards the rear cockpit. The result was a frightening increase of speed, and a lifting of the tail, so he had to hastily reject the new scheme.

Finally we had got caught up in FAC work. That’s military talk for Forward Air Controller. No, it has nothing to do with being an air traffic controller – it’s all about controlling army people. One needs a sort of mental code book to untangle all these TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) and MLAs (Multi Letter Acronyms) which are so revered by the military mind.

Eventually Victor realized that, sadly, he had only one option left. He headed into a patch of young thorn trees which smashed the wooden prop and brought the aircraft to an otherwise undamaged standstill. It is not always easy to make a plan while under severe time constraints but it would be hard to

WARNING – when confronted by a chunk of this military shorthand do not, under any circumstances, try to guess what it means. You will not only get it wrong but almost certainly embarrass yourself in the process. The following samples will give you the idea. June 2022

37


PMS – Professor of Military Science MANPADS – Man-Portable Air-Defence System MANCOC – Manoeuvre Advanced NCO Course DICC – Defence Intelligence Collection Cell DISCO – Defence Industrial Security Clearance Office FARP – Forward Area Refuelling Point Anyhow, practicing being a Forward Air Controller is huge fun. One has to imagine that our jolly decent, and morally upright army, is trying to blast the hell out of the disgusting, malodourous enemy who are cowering behind a ridge, and therefore cannot be seen. The idea it that you fly above the ridge and tell the goodies where the baddies are, so that the former can lob mortars on to the heads of the latter. Whenever one explodes you are meant to call the good guys, on the radio, that they need to send the next one 50 metres to the right and 100 metres further on to cause maximum grief amongst the baddies. It's all rather fun in theory – like playing battleships and cruisers. But in practice it makes the enemy extremely cross. They realise that your silly little aeroplane – probably a Piper Cub – is causing no end of discomfort so they lay into you with everything they’ve got including small arms fire and some really nasty things called 14.5s

work, and a relaxing ale awaited us. You can imagine my dismay when, as I was putting my aircraft to bed for the night, I heard foot stamping behind me followed by Commandant Kershaw’s sergeant-major voice bellowing, ‘Don’t bother with that, Davis, you have got night flying tonight.’ Some people have a gift for stuffing up one’s day. When Bob said I have night flying he meant that, as the instructor and Flight Safety Officer (sorry FSO) I had to organise it and brief all the pilots. And, as I was not happy with more than four aircraft in the circuit at the same time, we were going to be doing night flying till close on midnight. First, the erks had to put out the flares – which were paraffin burning hurricane lamps, then, when it was properly dark, I would do a circuit so I could brief the guys on what sort of horizon they could expect, and what lights they would be able to see from the parks-board camp, and whether the flares would be visible all the way round the circuit. Each lamp had a small wick which supported a yellowy-blue flame about an inch high.

he pr e par e d to be llow at me

Of course if you try to avoid this unpleasantness by ducking down behind the ridge then you can’t see where the mortars are landing and everyone on your team gets cross with you. Fortunately this was all play-play, and even when defending our borders against Castro and the naughty communists, I didn’t have to do it for real. Anyhow, as the sun was setting, we all landed back at base, dusty and tired but happy in the knowledge that we had put in a good day’s

38

June 2022

Soon after sunset a high haze of cirrostratus moved over – cutting out all starlight. The moon would not rise until after midnight. It was a black hole takeoff, meaning that I had to lift off at about 10 knots above normal speed and then firmly resist the temptation to lower the nose as one would normally do to gain airspeed. For those not familiar with night flying, or perhaps not current, there are four demons which conspire to kill you immediately after lift-off. The first is part of the artificial horizon’s acceleration error. It causes the horizon bar to tip down to the left which presents the pilot with a picture of right bank. Obviously you are tempted to level the model aircraft against the horizon bar, but this will put the left wing down –


Victor Smith's book has become a classic.

something you really don’t want to do when you are that close to the ground. The second demon augments the first. It’s the aircraft’s tendency to turn left – caused by slipstream effect. This takes you to the left of the runway and you lose sight of the flares on your side. Then we have the third demon which is also part of the AH’s acceleration error. This drops the horizon bar which makes it look as if the nose is too high. So there’s a strong tendency to lower the nose below the level flight attitude. Obviously that’s a very bad move just after liftoff. Finally, demon number four is one that’s hard to ignore. The aircraft’s acceleration pushes you into the back of your seat – exactly as if you had the nose too high. So this reinforces the AH’s incorrect message that you need to lower the nose. All this happens as you leave the ground – you don’t have time to settle down on instruments – you have got to get it right immediately. And it must be exactly right – your instrument flying must be accurate – there’s no room for error at naught feet. There is also, horrifyingly, no requirement that you must have an instrument rating. So if your instrument flying is not current, you are in an incredibly dangerous place. Be afraid – be very afraid. I should mention here that most night flying accidents happen before you reach your first turn on to crosswind, and they are almost invariably fatal. This is not the time to give a detailed night flying briefing. All I can say is that if you are not current and it’s a black hole takeoff – with little or no horizon, and takeoff is away from the town’s lights – it’s actually time to open a can of beer and call off any thoughts of night flying. So that’s what I did – well in the reverse order. I called the Ops tent, and ATC, and told them that I was cancelling night flying and they could send

the bakkie out to bring in the flarepath. Of course as I walked into the mess tent to grab that long awaited ale the boss spotted me from his position at the bar on the far side. Even at that range I could see the colour rise in his cheeks as he prepared to bellow at me. ‘Davis, what the bloody hell are you doing here? Why aren’t you flying?’ I am not normally good on such occasions, but this time I kept my calm, knowing that I had done the right thing. I marched up to him, and said quietly, ‘Perhaps we could have a word in private?’ We walked out of the tent into the dark night where he could see that there was no horizon, no stars, no moon and no lights – nothing. Then I quietly told him that this was an instrument flying night – not a night flying one. He stared at me in the dark for a long time then he clapped me on the shoulder and thundered, ‘Bloody good decision lieutenant – let me buy you a drink.’ j June 2022

39


THE BEST BASICS BOOK EVER

L VO T

8 ALT 6

mb

5

4

2

1015 1020 1025

3

60

KNOTS

140

120

20

80

20

33

N

7

6

5

10 VERTICAL SPEED

5

10

W

USH

P

25

PUSH

T

100 FEET PER MINUTE

0

12

2 MIN

NO PITCH INFORMATION

FEE

CALIBRATED TO 20 000 FEET

5

24

R

1 000ft

8 ALT

20

3

0

100

20

E

. U.S

J4im 5 ’s P

50 40

55 45

20

. l l l l . l l l l . l . l l l l l l l l l l . l ll l. ll ll . l

0

18

5

10

19 20

DE

ll

NS I

25

GA

L.

35

60

25 D EE SP

15 80 C T 4.0l 60 l l l l . l l l l . l l l l . l l l OA 0. l .2l .0l . l . l. l l l l . 30 35 40 l . l l l l l .l

17

TURN COORDINATOR

1015 1020 1025

10 10

100

L

QNH

10 10

30

7

CALIBRATED TO 20 000 FEET

160

1015 1020 1025

1

6

40

30 4

3

FEE

F

5

2

1015 1020 1025

IM P.G AL .

16

mb

0

AD

15

1

100

9

S

En d

.l

ll

50

F OF

20

.l

E UD TIT l l . A L l . l l 30 TYl . l l l 5 2

ET

ST SET R

R

IME

: 00

T FLT E

Y/T STB

19

.l

CALIBRATED TO 20 000 FEET

T

9

40

180 AIR SPEED

QNH

.l

30

FR Q

13

200

.l

FEE

FEET 3 5

8 ALT 6

18

12 14

l.l

0

17

11

l . l l l l . l l l

+ l l l l . l l l l . 40 ll l 0 5 10 15 l . l l l l 20 2 .l AIR 0

9

100

.0

10

e ILCC y th db e se ine Fre r o ffe Ca

7

BFO

9

puter

E

v Com

16

FM

Na

14

8.5

9.5

55

8

15

1hr

7.5

F AD

60

7

US

13

6.5

260

12

21

11

F AD

90

YARDS

15

m Ltr km 10

1 600ft

Common faults:

r. ABC

Using partial power and raising the flaps during an overshoot. Both are potentially dangerous, and will cause your instructor to raise her voice to a shriek. She may even cut you out of her will

D

600ft

Longitudin a

l axis

©J

im Davis

Ignition (Bang)

Exhaust (Blow)

Track

Wind

Late downwind

Headin

g

Downwind leg

Early downwind

Base leg

Compression (Squeeze)

Crosswind leg

Induction (Suck)

THE BEST BASICS BOOK EVER B

27

09

Final approach (finals)

© Jim Davis

600ft

Holding point

Holding point

Upwind (Australia)

Apron

h ort

le

Po

Control tower

Terminal building

N 600ft

st

Ea

© Jim Davis

N DIA RI E M

S IAN ID UDE R ME NGIT LO F O

W EN GR

t

s We

S EL DE LL ITU RA AT PA F L O

H IC

600ft

R

TO UA EQ

THE BEST BASICS BOOK EVER uth

So

A

© Jim Davis

40

+ ALL FLYING EXERCISES June 2022

le

Po

special deal for flying schools phone Avril at 076 732 3392 or visit www.jimdavis.co.za


Where romance meets nature

Located in South Africa’s Safari hub of Hoedspruit, Safari Moon is a boutique base from which to discover the wonders of South Africa’s Lowveld region. Explore a range of nearby attractions from the famed Kruger National park to the scenic Panorama Route, or simply chose to relax and unwind in nature, making the most of your private piece of Wildlife Estate wilderness.

CONTACT: bookings@safarimoon.co.za 083 449 5868

June 2022 FlightCom Magazine

41

35


FLIGHT REPORT: THE RAINBOW SKYREACH BUSHCAT Text – Julian Smith, Keaton Perkins, Guy Leitch. Pics – Bruce Perkins and Noel Sellick.

THE RAINBOW SKYREACH BUSHCAT 42

June 2022


“AN AFFORDABLE BUSH AIRCRAFT” Africa is a naturally strong market for a locally developed and built, yet thoroughly proven, light sport bush plane. The Bush Cat is one such aircraft that has evolved into what many consider the almost perfect, tough yet affordable, bush plane.

The BushCat has had the benefit of 20 years of development - making it an ideal African bush plane.

June 2022

43


THE SOUTH AFRICAN AVIATION INDUSTRY is blessed with a number of successful light sport aircraft manufacturers, either building foreign designs under licence, or entirely new aircraft. Rainbow SkyReach is one of the more successful of these manufacturers. Rainbow SkyReach has been producing the Cheetah, and its updated version, the BushCat, for over 19 years with over 200 now flying and many kits under construction. SkyReach is a SACAA approved aircraft manufacturing organisation and reassuringly, it meets international ATSM and CS-LSA standards.

known weight shift microlight supremo Mike Blyth, who founded Rainbow Aircraft at Springs airfield to develop the SkyRanger. (Mike went on to develop the fantastically successful Sling Aircraft). Under Mike Blyth, Rainbow Aircraft had developed the Safari, Echo, Safari and Cobra series of weight shift trikes, however a need for a cost effective and rugged 3-axis bush aircraft was identified in the late nineties. From the SkyRanger concept an entirely new design was created the Cheetah. The Cheetah is no longer manufactured, but the factory still supports the model and keeps a full range of spare components on hand. SkyReach now has 35 full time employees who do all composite work, sewing and machining in-house.

t hor oughl y deve lope d and tes te d

THE GENESIS OF THE BUSHCAT The BushCat can trace its origins back to a French design called the SkyRanger which achieved almost 1000 sales worldwide, with a number flying in South Africa. The simplicity and strength of the basic SkyRanger design was recognised by well-

The first flight of the Cheetah took place in 2001. It was originally known as the Rainbow Cheetah and through constant development and improvement became the Cheetah XLS. The latest generation of the aircraft is now known as the BushCat.

On the ground the taildragger version appears compact and purposeful.

44

June 2022


Under the cowl is the more than sufficient 100 hp Rotax 912 ULS.

The BushCat structure has been progressively developed to become a thoroughly tested aircraft certified to an ultimate load of +6G and -4G at its LSA maximum weight of 600kg (1320lbs). The design was handled by SkyReach's in-house aeronautical engineering team. The BushCat was then passed on to the test pilots at the Test Flight Academy of South Africa in Oudtshoorn, who were responsible for flight testing and post-design changes. Mike Blyth moved out of the business and it was eventually sold to the Maritz brothers with Mike Gill as General Manager, who led the development of the airframe into the BushCat – which is the subject of our test. The BushCat iteration of the Cheetah XLS incorporated significant design changes. The most important is the wing, which was changed from the original standard Clark-Y aerofoil to a

more symmetrical profile, which is identifiable by the convex camber of the lower surface. The other key improvement was to the empennage. The horizontal tail surfaces were made 50% larger and the vertical surfaces about 30% larger. Evident is the move away from the Cheetah’s large fixed ventral fin (under the tail) to a fillet along the top of the fuselage. The undercarriage was given a welcome clean-up with the complex steel tube structure replaced by a simple sprung aluminium landing gear with hydraulic disc brakes. As the BushCat, the design has achieved broad market acceptance, with many aircraft exported to Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Israel, Poland and the USA. The company is currently working with potential European distributors to expand its footprint into the EU. June 2022

45


Cockpit is large, wide and comfortable, with good leg room from the single central control stick.

Like all aircraft, the manufacturer is always improving as customers demand more and more, and in late 2021, further upgrades were made. SkyReach retains two aeronautical engineers on staff, so this really is a thoroughly developed and tested light sport aircraft. The subject of our test is the latest tailwheel version, ZU-IMS.

ON THE GROUND The BushCat’s primary structure is fabricclad aluminium tube structure construction. The aluminium tubes are bolted into welded stainless steel brackets. The factory says the reason behind this is that parts can easily be replaced and bolted on, should repairs be necessary. This is obviously helpful if stuck out in the bush. The simplicity of this design also reduces manufacturing cost and time.

46

June 2022

Unusual throttle placement on the end of both armrests.


Major developments have been an increase of up to 50% in empennage size - giving excellent controlability in all flight regimes.

The aluminium airframe is covered with a trilaminate composite rip-stop fabric, commonly used for racing yacht sails. It is strong and durable and has proved itself able to stand the test of time against the elements. SkyReach gives customers the choice of five colours in various pattens to form their own design for their aircraft covering. The composite parts of the aircraft can be painted – further making the exterior of the BushCat customisable. In its taildragger option the BushCat looks purposeful yet compact. The long landing gear legs are fitted with hefty 8.5 x 6 tyres and the enlarged empennage is evident – as is the sturdy Matco tailwheel assembly. The BushCat features easily removable doors which can be refitted in less than three minutes. This is especially useful for in-flight photography or game spotting. Standard engine is the 100hp Rotax 912ULS. SkyReach say it will have to fit the 912iS sometime in the near future, however the carburettor fed 912ULS fits in perfectly with he KISS ethos of the BushCat.

THE COCKPIT The panel is wide and shallow and filled with big old fashioned steam gauges – even for the secondary engine instruments. The only gesture to modernity is Garmin G5 which also operates as an EFIS PFD for those who prefer modern glass and airspeed in knots, but as we shall see, this is a mph aeroplane. Instrument panels are 100% customisable by the buyer/ builder to suit budget and mission, ranging from full 'steam' round gauges to the Garmin G3x.

t he Haw k e r Hur r icane ae r of oil

The engine is easily inspected with clamshell cowls that come apart in seconds. This particular aircraft was fitted with the larger radiator kit as used in Australian and Namibian aircraft. I am told it is not a necessity in South Africa. A carbon composite 3-blade prop finishes off the front end with a bright red spinner.

There is a single centremounted Y-shaped control stick between the seats. In order to accommodate the central control stick the designers created two interconnected throttles mounted at the end of the armrests. Both arm rests can be raised for exit and entry into the cockpit, without affecting the throttle position. Sticking to the simplicity ethos, the flaps are controlled by a roof-mounted lever.

June 2022

47


ABOVE: Heavy duty tyres give good ground ride but cost cruise speed. BELOW: Tailwheel has been strengthend to handle tail-first three-pointers.

48

June 2022


That this is a slow aeroplane is immediately evident from a quick glance at the big round air speed indicator. The white flap arc starts at just 45 mph. The green arc runs from 51 to 89 mph and the yellow arc runs from 89 – 105 mph – which is Vne. So it is clearly never going to do 100 KIAS– not even downhill. The fuel tank is located behind the seats and there is a generous sized baggage bay in the tail cone – accessed via sturdy zips from either side of the fuselage. Being able to zip open the fuselage also makes it easy to inspect the control runs.

Michael did the first takeoff from runway 08 as we had a crosswind from the right. Within 100 metres the tail was up and we were almost instantly airborne. No flaps were used on the first takeoff. Port Elizabeth has huge runways so to gain insights into real bush operations we chatted to Keaton Perkins who flies a BushCat on game patrols in the Hluhluwe-Imfolozi National Park. He says he prefers to takeoff using full flap – which is an arbitrary 29 degrees. Keaton runs it up to 4200 rpm against the brakes and the tail immediately comes up – even while stationary. This is indeed a plane with enough power. At brake release he pushes the stick and the throttle forward simultaneously as the natural tendency on brake release and the application of full power is for the nose to rise. Almost immediately you are indicating 45 mph (just 39 knots!) at which speed, with a bit of nose-up trim dialled in, it elevates off the ground.

50 mph acr os s t he f e nce

FLYING THE BUSH CAT Michael Paxton was the pilot for our test and he showed me the most recent aerodynamic updates. The aircraft now has vortex generators behind the wing leading edge, new Wig Wag LED landing lights in the wing plus new LED navigation and strobe lights. The wing struts attach behind the cockpit, so you approach from the front and duck under the wing. Swing the door up, then slide your behind onto the seat and lift your legs in. You do not have to carefully hoist a knee over a control stick. The seats are comfortable and there is generous headroom, making the cockpit big enough for almost all pilot sizes.

Flaps up, best angle of climb Vx, is just 50 mph, but that means you can see nothing but sky ahead, so a 60 mph climb is preferred. At that speed you will be going up at around 1000 fpm, depending on load.

Taxing is easy for a taildragger thanks to the large tyres and hydraulic disc brakes. The view forward across the engine cowling is sufficient so as to not have to weave to see ahead. Large fuel tank takes either Avgas or mogas to feed Rotax. Fabric is a ripstop tri-laminate.

June 2022

49


Baggage compartment accessed with zips on either side.

The BushCat can be flown happily with the doors off which makes it great for game work and aerial photography but speed is placarded to a 70 mph limit.This aircraft has a particularly coarse prop which limits the engine to about 5400 rpm in level flight. He says a 90-95 mph cruise may be expected, depending on tyre size. Slowing to 80 mph gives a claimed 5-hour endurance. This was well tested in 2016 when two BushCats took part in the epic 15,000 km Crete to Cape vintage air rally.

says that at times he has really abused his BushCat and tried to stall it at an 80-degree bank. There is a rumble felt through the control stick and then, if he just relaxes back pressure on the stick, the wing immediately unloads and it flies away happily at 55 mph. Interestingly, the seat squab can get in the way of full aft stick, so the pilot has to change his grip to get his hand fully in front of the stick.

The controls are somewhat heavy but well balanced, and they make the aircraft stable in all flight regimes. The single control stick falls readily to hand and fulfils the power in left hand, stick in right hand, preference of many fighter pilots. Despite the light 600 kg LSA limit and high drag design, the airframe holds its speed surprisingly well.

APPROACH AND LANDING

The BushCat feels sturdy and safe and the stall really is benign. There is no clearly defined break – the nose just mushes down. Keaton

50

June 2022

For our test assessment, returning back to PE we were given Runway 17 and on final slowed to 55 mph, with one notch (being 17 degrees) of flap. The removal of the Cheetah’s large ventral fin was evident in the cross-wind controllability. Keaton says that he prefers wheel landings and thus approaches at a faster 60 mph. For shorter strips a good approach speed is 55 mph but below that the ailerons are getting sloppy. A


Paint scheme is fully customisable.

true short field landing can be flown at 50 mph across the fence but with power on as it can be hard to arrest the descent without it. With its light weight and high drag and it will just drop out from underneath you without power. Thanks to the big increase in empennage size, the elevator maintains authority right through the stall and reducing the danger inherent in many high wing light sport aircraft of running out of up-elevator and so not being able to hold the nose up on landing. It is easy to get the BushCat down and stopped in 50 metres.

CONCLUSION – AND COST The BushCat is designed around four principles: simplicity, ruggedness, low cost and safe low speed handling. And it is, above all, affordable fun! It is available either as a kit, or as a complete ready-to-fly aircraft, and as either a taildragger or with a nosewheel. Buyers also have the option of floats or skis. A new BushCat with a navcom radio, transponder, custom colours, and MGL EFIS sells standard for about R1.2 Million, or you can order the firewall back kit for R325,000 excluding VAT. It’s a lot of fun for the money.

j

Two BushCats flew the 10,000 km Crete to Cape rally in 2016.

June 2022

51


Specifications and Performance SkyReach BushCat SPECIFICATIONS

Price Length Height Empty weight Maximum take-off weight Useful load Fuel capacity Wing area Wing span Aspect ratio Maximum wing loading Engine Maximum power Power loading Fuel type Cruise Speed Endurance Range Stall speed Takeoff roll Landing roll

52

June 2022

R1.3m ready to fly 5.7 m 2.3 m 340 kg 600 kg 260 kg 94 litres 13.58 m² 9.6 m 6.8 41.2 kg/m² Rotax 912 ULS 100 HP 5.6 kg/HP Avgas or mogas PERFORMANCE 90 mph 5 hours 450 sm 45 mph 100 metres 75 metres


From a Fantastic KIT build experience that leads you to a lifetime of adventure • Flight performance and structural testing proven to ASTM and CS-LSA standards • Quickest and easiest kit in its class to assemble (250 hours) • Extremely rugged construction • Low running costs • Widest cabin in class • Wildlife conservation organisations 1st choice for airborne observation platform • Excellent worldwide support via international distributor network

SkyReach Hangar 27 Springs Airfield Dal Fouche, Springs Gauteng, South Africa

+27 (0)11 817 2298 sales@fly-skyreach.com www.bushcat.aero June 2022

SkyReach is a SACAA approved manufacturing organisation - approval number M681

53


STORY - JULIAN SMITH

PICS - NOEL SELLICK

THE GREAT

‘GATE GUARD’

MOVE

For many years two aircraft have guarded the entrance to the Gqebetha International Airport (formerly Port Elizabeth). Then one fell off its plinth. The Impala on its plinth.

54

June 2022


The sorry sight of the Albatross fallen from its plinth and already missing bits.

Friday 7 May saw a new lease on life for the two gate guardians. After many years of standing outside on plinths, it was time for the aircraft to move to a new location. HISTORY The first aircraft to be placed on gate guard occurred on 27 May 1995. It was an Aermacchi MB 326 Atlas Mk1 Impala, tail number 507. This aircraft was a member of the Silver Falcons during its operational status, and wore the last colour scheme, when the Impala was the mainstay aircraft of the team. Through the years this aircraft had suffered badly from the harsh weather that the Eastern Cape experiences. The second aircraft to be placed on a plinth was the Piaggo P166 ‘Albatross’. This aircraft was donated by the late Mike Beachyhead (of Thunder City fame) and was built up using parts from two aircraft to make up the display. About two years ago the aircraft toppled off its plinth onto the rocks beneath it during a storm, causing significant damage to the horizontal and vertical stabilizer. During the past couple of

months vandals have also stolen the rudder and a baggage hatch cover. After many months of red tape, the SAAF Museum were finally given permission to move both aircraft. The current ACSA manager Claudia Daniels with Captain Mark Kelbrick were significant driving forces to ensure the removal and preservation of these iconic aircraft. On Friday, SAAF staff from 2 ASU (Aircraft Servicing Unit) Ysterplaat, under the command of Lt. Col. Zackery Khan arrived with local Museum staff to begin the delicate task of rescuing the aircraft. The flaps were first removed from the Albatross to prevent further damage when slinging the aircraft. Then in rain, both aircraft were loaded on the flatbed trailers. The Impala slipped in its sling and incurred canopy damage when it was lifted off the plinth. Local stalwart Stu Davidsons & Sons supplied two trucks and flatbed trailers free of charge, together with Samson Machinery Moving Equipment, who supplied the crane, cradles and gantry equipment.

June 2022

55


The SAAF team from Cape Town.

In the wet conditions the hoist unfortunately damaged the Impala's canopy.

56

June 2022


Traffic was stopped for the "abnormal loads".

The Nelson Mandela Traffic Department also volunteered their time and vehicles for both days. To all those involved, kudos. Once the aircraft were loaded onto the flatbed trailers, the convoy made its way to the Museum. This involved lifting the Impala to clear the airport perimeter gates. The Impala had been loaded sideways and suffered further minor damage to the rudder. Because the Albatross was loaded fuselage lengthwise on the flatbed it made the trip a bit easier. The gullwing design of the Albatross made the transition through the gates without a problem. Lastly, ACSA working with ATNS, temporary closed the active runway 08/26 to allow the convoy to cross to the SAAF Museum gates. Rudi Nelson and ‘Friends of the SAAF Museum’ were on hand to receive both aircraft for offloading.

It is planned to restore both aircraft to static display condition, with Impala 507 wearing the Silver Falcons blue/white blue scheme it wore during its service. The museum has a spare canopy that will be fitted during the restoration. The Albatross will be cleaned up and displayed in its present SAAF scheme. The Museum is looking for a rudder and rear left baggage compartment door. The SAAF Museum survives on donations, charity and volunteer work, so any help in funds and materials is always appreciated. Contact Details: Rudy Nelson Email: saafmpe@gmail.com Donation Details: Bank Name: ABSA Bank Account Name: SAAFM PE Account Number: 918 640 0565 Branch Code: 632005 Reference: Your own details.

j

The Albatross's high wing made it over the museum's gate.

June 2022

57


STORY & PICS - GARTH CALITZ

PRESIDENTS' TROPHY AIR

RACE 2022

– NEW TEMPE BLOEMFONTEIN The Presidents’ Trophy Air Race has been contested annually since 1937, baring the war years and 2020, which had to be scrapped due to Covid. Race winners Stefan Lombard and Martiens Marais in their very smart Piper Comanche 250.

58

June 2022


Day 1 had to be cancelled due to the rainy weather.

THIS YEAR THE WEATHER tried its best to cancel the race with South Africa plunged into extreme cold and wet by an unseasonable cutoff low system which fed icy cold wet weather into the interior of the country. The cold however did not dampen the spirits of the thirty-four teams that made their way to Bloemfontein’s Tempe airport. In the past, fields of 60-70 aircraft were the norm at PTAR but the tough economic conditions kept many of the competitors at home. Further, the fuel price had almost doubled since last year's event, pushing the cost out of reach of many hopefuls.

time in the illustrious history of the PTAR it may have to be called off entirely due to the weather. Saturday, being Race Day 2 arrived and with it came improved, but far from perfect, flying weather. The morning briefing was held at 8:30 and a decision was made for an 11:00 start, as a window of flyable weather was predicted until approximately 14:00. The customary starting grid was not possible as the airfield was waterlogged and a decision was made to let the teams taxi to the start from their parking positions once they collected their papers from the officials. As it sometimes happens, this method seemed to work better and will probably be used in future races.

calle d off e nt ir e l y due to t he weat he r

The poor weather that was forecast made its presence felt on Friday morning with the rain falling from 7:00 am non-stop until the early hours of Saturday morning. This cancelled all flying on what should have been the first day of the competition, raising fears that for the first

The first aircraft, the Sling 2 of father and son team of Hendrik and Juandre Loots got airborne right on time. On day 2 of the PTAR, the slowest aircraft lead the pack away with the faster June 2022

59


aircraft chasing them. Takeoff times are scheduled so that if all the aircraft fly a perfect round on their handicap speed, they should all cross the finish line at the same time. With the fastest aircraft still on the ground, the slower competitors started reaching the cross-over point which is more or less the halfway mark. Soon after the first aircraft passed overhead the Lancair Legacy 2000 of Dieter Bock and Brendan Boraine thundered down the runway and the full race was on.

The attentive audience at the pre-race briefing.

To make air racing a more spectator-friendly sport, twenty of the thirty-four aircraft were issued with live tracking devices so spectators could watch the action online and on the big screen in the briefing hangar. The first aircraft appeared exactly on time; it was the Bosbok of Apie and Frederick Koetzee, who were last year's The fastest aircraft was the Lancair Legacy of Dieter Bock and Brendan Boraine. joint winners, followed by the Piper Comanche of Stefan Lombard and Martiens Marais. For the next few minutes, there was a constant stream of aircraft all pushing as hard as possible to make up a few positions in the dying seconds of the race. Despite the timing of the takeoffs, crossing the finish line first does not necessarily mean that the team has won the race. Loggers have to be downloaded to see how accurately the course was

60

June 2022

Dion Raath and stalwart entrant John Sayers in John's T-6G Harvard.


flown as well as any takeoff delays factored in. The aircraft takeoff according to their handicaps, but sometimes there is more than one aircraft with very similar handicaps, they are then slightly delayed for safety reasons. Once the crews had parked their aircraft and handed in their loggers to the scrutineers, the long wait for the gala dinner began, as the results would only be announced then. The Bloemfontein Flying Club bar became the destination of choice to enjoy a drink after a long day of racing. Everywhere one could hear crews dissecting their flights and comparing notes with each other on the course.

2021's joint winners Apie and Frederik Koetzee.

That evening on arrival at the venue for the gala dinner, the Windmill Casino, the visitors were welcomed with a glass of sherry, which in the fridgid Bloemfontein temperatures, was most welcome. Franz Smit of Pilotinsurance reminded everyone that without the generosity of sponsors like Holborn Assets, DJA Insurance, Century Avionics and the Aircraft Finance Corporation, events like this would not be possible. Mr Heinrich Slabber from Holborn Assets group, the headline sponsor, announced that his company will not only be supporting the PTAR but will be the headline sponsor for the Speed Rally competitions as well. The Speed Rally format is now used at the PTAR as there are up to five Speed Rallies a year this is used as a testing ground for the PTAR.

Aircraft being scrutineerd after the race.

Rob Jonkers was the Race Director. June 2022

61


Group photograph PTAR 2022.

62

June 2022


June 2022

63


Race winners Stefan Lombard and Martiens Marais with their Piper PA-24 Comanche.

Leon Bottell, chairman of SAPFA, announced that Race Director, Rob Jonkers, would be stepping down and handing this responsibility to Iaan Myburgh. Rob took control of the PTAR at a very difficult time when the very future of the race hung in the balance. Rob managed to save the race with the help of the new format devised by himself and Jonty Esser. Rob took the opportunity to thank all those involved in the race organisation, particularly the Bloemfontein Flying Club under the key organiser Andre Grobler who had provided the ground marshals, turn-point marshals, and all the catering at the airfield. Nigel Musgrave as the Safety Officer with the ATNS team of Benji Phukubje and Ricardo Afonso, SA Weather Services, ARCC, Bloemfontein Emergency Services team of Braam van Zyl, the CAA Special Air Events team, the local Municipality & SAPS. At the prize giving 24 trophies were awarded, and finally it was time to announce the winners. Third was Johan van Zyl and Eric Addison. Dion Raath and 26 race veteran John Sayers collected the trophy for the second-placed

64

June 2022

aircraft in their North American T-6G Harvard “Mighty Mouse”. The winners the revered race winners black jacket went to the team of Stefan Lombard and Martiens Marais flying a beautiful Piper PA-24 Comanche. With the award ceremony done, there only remained the handing over of the Presidents’ Trophy Air Race flag to the host of next year's race. Deon Loots, the Chairman of Bloemfontein Flying Club called on Jock Nel, chairman of the Middelburg Aero Club to receive the flag and the responsibility of organising the 2023 PTAR.

j

David le Roux and Frans Smit during live stream.


Last years joint winners Leon Bouttell and Martin Meyer.

Race #4 Qunitin Kruger and Johan Whiteman.

Race #5 Hendrik and Juandre Loots.

Rob Jonkers, Race winners Stefan Lombard and Martiens Marais, Heinrich Slabber and David le Roux.

The full results table. June 2022

65


STORY & PICS - JULIAN SMITH

QUEENSTOWN FLY-IN

FESTIVAL

The remote but dynamic Queenstown Flying Club celebrated the 90th anniversary of the De Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth. THE QUEENSTOWN AIRFIELD was developed in 1920 and grew into a WWII training school for navigators, with most of the wartime hangars and camp buildings still existent today. Queenstown was home to 47 Air Navigation School which was part of the Joint Air Training Scheme (JATS). The air school's commanding officer was none other than Allister Miller, the founder of Union Airways and thus SAA. Queenstown's flying history is commemorated in the QFC club house by well-known resident Mark Sahd, the driving force behind the maintenance and upkeep of the airfield. Mark

is an avid De Havilland aircraft collector, and currently has the only flying De Havilland Rapide in Africa, plus his own personal Tiger Moth, and its successor, the De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk. Mark keeps his aircraft, including a Fairchild 24 and a Rutan Long Eze, with a few other resident aircraft in one of the remaining Bellman hangars. Remarkably, the Bellman Hangar was designed in 1936 as a temporary hangar capable of being erected or dismantled by unskilled labour with simple equipment and to be easily transportable. Five other Bellman hangars still exist, and are used by SAPS.

The 90th year of the Tiger Moth was an excellent reason for a fly-in.

66

June 2022


The De Havilland Dragon Rapide did not fly at the event and visitors had to be content with seeing it taxy to the memorial.

The weather was very poor that weekend with wind and rain on the days preceding the event, which dampened the hope that at least ten Tiger Moths would attend: from Stellenbosch, Port Alfred and Johannesburg. Jeff Earle flew in with his yellow Tiger ZS-BGN and Cliff Reynolds in ZS-ATO. Mark Sahd’s silver Tiger made up the third aircraft. It was lovely to see the Tigers all in the air together doing a trip around Hangklip Mountain and surrounding countryside. Hangklip Mountain was referred to as the “Navigators Friend” by the trainee navigators as the towering height features boldly on the horizon which made it easy to find Queenstown without a compass.

which joined the resident EC130 helicopter of local Queenstown businessman, Ken Clark. The visiting Auster is an ex- SAAF WWII veteran that served in the Italian campaign in 1945. A group of nine gyrocopters stopped in unannounced on their way through the Cape to Gariep Dam. Their uniqueness as flying aircraft and their various colours helped make this event a great success. The festivities of the event lasted into the evenings.

at least ten Tiger Mo t h s would a tt e n d

A few dozen aircraft flew into the event. Chalkie Stobbart’s former RV- 6, ZU-EAA was flown in by Horace Blok from Mossel Bay. Among the classics were a very neat Cessna 170, another Chipmunk, an Auster MkV and the only visiting helicopter, an all-black Allouette III

Being a country festival, motorcycles and vintage cars were in attendance. What was especially lovely was the number of vintage tractors on display. Numerous stalls and goods were available for visitors, and food and music livened up the event which was well attended by local residents. These types of events have a friendly and hospitable atmosphere that only small towns can achieve.

June 2022

67


The Rapide takes pride of place amongst the Tigers.

90 years of Tigers The Tiger Moth first flew in 1931, and entered service in the RAF in 1932. As an adaptation for the Royal Air Force trainer requirement, the wings were staggered and slightly swept back. Unlike earlier Moth biplanes, it used a metal fuselage frame and the inverted Gipsy Major engine. The Tiger Moth was also produced as a trainer for civilian flying schools and clubs Former 47 Air Navigational School Veteran, Bert Denman noted the layout of the aprons in the form of the King's Crown.

68

June 2022

and was first seen in South Africa in the late 1930s, playing a role in the SA’s government's Thousand Pilot Scheme. During World War II the Tiger Moth was used as an ab-initio trainer within the flying schools of the Joint Air Training Scheme (JAPTS), with dozens in use at several air schools. After the war, Tigers were sold off as war surplus and have remained part of the country's aviation scene ever since.


Jeff Earle attended the event in his Tiger Moth ZS-BGN.

A special item arranged for the celebration was a range of Tiger Moth wines produced by a local winery, Diemerskraal, which has its own airstrip. The attractively labelled bottles were for sale during the event and also featured in the generous "goody bags" handed to volunteer workers and the Tiger owners at the conclusion of the event.

Tiger formation flies past the face of Hangklip Mountain - the navigator's friend.

The Queenstown event was a joint venture by the Queenstown Flying Club, the Queenstown Motor Club (also based at the airfield) and the military veterans' organization, the M.O.T.H.’s (Memorable Order of Tin Hats). The Queenstown Flying Club is a very active, with regular flying activities. Stop by when in the area.

j

June 2022

69


STORY & PICS - JULIAN SMITH

PICS - NOEL SELLICK

UITENHAGE WINGS AND WHEELS 2022

The Klinicare Uitenhage Wings and Wheels Festival had the distinction of being one of two airshows held in South Africa on 2 April. AS IN THE PAST, the show was co-hosted with various other events such as 4x4 trails, rally car racing, motorbikes and model aircraft at the Uitenhage Airfield. This format gives the public greater choice and gets greater numbers through the gate. The Eastern Cape generally offers good all year-round flying weather; however, this year was almost a complete washout with rainy and wet conditions on the day. Many displays like parachuting, Hangar 51 jets and the Pitts aerobatic team had to cancel at the last minute due to low cloud cover. However, the organizers

are a resourceful bunch, and although the show started later than expected, and fly-in visitor numbers were low, the show did go ahead, albeit smaller. The flying started with two large radio control aircraft which attracted the public to the flight line. The Jora aerial display flown by Dirk Tromp was interesting, as this aircraft’s low speed requires a small display area, and Tromp took full advantage of this. Next up was a rather unusual display for an air show – the 1980 Piper Aerostar – flown

The Wings n Wheels show was opened by large radion control models.

70

June 2022


A highlight for many was Patrick Davidson in the Seafury.

by dentist Jurie Steyn. Aficionados will know this aircraft type from the Tom Cruise movie American Made. Jurie performed an impressive display and the sound of the twin 290hp Lycoming engines screaming in high pitch gave one goosebumps. Flying to Uitenhage from their private airfield, Seaview, in Port Elizabeth, Red Bull Air Race pilot Patrick Davidson flew in with his RV-7 to

check out the conditions. Later Patrick flew back to fetch the Hawker Seafury. The highlight of the day was the arrival of the magnificent Hawker Seafury, flown excellently by Patrick, proving why he is one the best aerobatic pilots in the world. The immensely powerful World War 2 fighter is powered by a 2,300 hp Pratt & Whitney radial.

June 2022

71


Shows like this build aviation enthusiasm from an early age.

The gliding club had a strong presence.

72

June 2022


An unusual visitor was this Kappa KP-2U Sabre.

The Eastern Cape offers excellent gliding weather, and although the weather was poor, the Eastern Province Gliding Club and many local aviators placed their aircraft on display for public viewing.

the arrival of t he magni f ice nt Ha w k e r S e a f u r y Other aircraft that flew in from surrounding towns included the ever-popular Cessnas and

Pipers, plus the odd Savannah and Jora. A rather unusual visiting aircraft was the Kappa KP-2U. Megan Evans, assisted by Benji Phukubje from Lanseria ATC and local based Samual Herman all from ATNS acted as very patient ATCs in the tower. Well known Rickus Erasmus from ASSA (Air Shows South Africa) acted as Flight Display Director, with Erika Lambrechs as Ramp Controller and Colin Dettmann as Safety Officer. Beer gardens, a music concert, potjies and lamb on the spit were provided into the night. All in all – a very festive family event.

j

The Aerostar watches the Jora go through its tight paces.

June 2022

73


JIM DAVIS

F LUT T ER - BE VERY AFRAID • •

This report is to promote aviation safety and not to establish legal liability. The CAA’s report contains padding, repetition, poor English and incompetence. In the interest of clarity and readability I have corrected and paraphrased extensively.

Aircraft: powered glider Pipistrel D.O.O Taurus Date of Accident: 10 August 2012 Time of Accident: 11:06Z Registration: ZU-GAN Pilot-in-command Licence Type: Glider / PPL Age: 55 Licence Valid: Yes Pilot-in-command Flying Experience: Total Flying 80.2 Hours on Type 80.2 Hours Last point of departure: El Mirador (FALQ) Next point of intended landing: El Mirador (FALQ) Location of the accident: Game reserve in Winterton. Meteorological Information: CAVOK wind 350/04 Number of people on board: 1 + 0 Number of people injured: 0 Number of people killed: 1

SYNOPSIS History of Flight Three witnesses all made substantially the same statements. They saw the wings of the aircraft flexing and oscillating up and down along the entire span and it was also longitudinally unstable. They also noticed the wheel bay doors opening and closing in time with the pitching oscillations. The chute was deployed but failed to blossom and appeared to suffer shroud line failure. The

74

June 2022

resultant drag appeared to pitch the aircraft’s nose up; it dropped its right wing and dived vertically into the ground. The engine, airframe and propeller had done only 15 hours since new. The pilot was fatally injured. The post mortem found multiple rib fractures, lacerations of the heart, fracture of the spine at three places, crushed cauda equine at lumbar spine No.2. Cause of death was a blunt trauma to the chest.


The Pipistrel Taurus exceeded Vne with flaps up and when flaps were selected it sealed the aircraft's fate.

JIM’S COMMENTS This accident is all about Vne and flutter which are both huge and complicated topics. I will keep it as short and simple as possible and stick to what pilots should know in order to recognise and avoid the conditions that can cause flutter. What is flutter? In its simplest form flutter is what a flag does in the wind – it doesn’t just stream out smoothly – it flutters. Sometimes in big waving movements, and sometimes in fast ripples. Actually, there are two types of flutter. The first is a very rapid twisting of the wing, around the main spar. As the rear rises the leading edge dips – and vice-versa, as shown

in the diagram. It is often so rapid that it is sometimes described as a buzz. The second type, called divergence, is most common with long, thin, glider-type wings. It’s a much slower, spanwise flapping of the wings, and this centers about their attachment points to the fuselage. This is what happened to this aircraft What causes it? It’s caused by the aircraft’s structure – particularly the wings and control surfaces, being a compromise between weight and structural rigidity. To keep the aircraft light, it sacrifices stiffness. This means that aerodynamic forces can make the wings twist around the main spar, as in the diagram, or they can make the wings flap like a bird – which happened to this aircraft. June 2022

75


The most common type is aileron flutter. The diagram shows how it works: A) A minor disturbance or gust lifts the wing and the aileron’s C of G gets left behind causing down aileron. B) As the wing twists about its tortional axis X, this deflects the aileron down further due to the ailerons C of G being left further behind. C) When the wing reaches its twisting (tortional) limit, the aileron’s C of G gets flung up. D) This causes the rear of the wing to move down and the whole process starts again more violently. E) The wing again twists to its elastic limit, and when it stops suddenly, the aileron’s C of G swings down, causing the wing to start twisting the other way.

f lutte r is r e lat ive to TAS and not IAAS Aileron flutter can start in a micro way as trim tab flutter. This happened in a catastrophic way in September 2011 when a P51 Mustang at the Reno air race had flutter on an elevator trim tab. The aircraft became uncontrollable and flew into the crowd, killing the pilot and ten spectators, and injuring another 64.

76

June 2022

A vicious cycle of wing twist and flap movements causes flutter.


Even though the parachute was deployed the aircraft was too fast and the chute malfunctioned.

The tendency to flutter increases with: Flap setting. The tracker shows the Pipistrel Taurus was doing 236 km/hr in the circuit, which was 11km/hr past the flapless Vne. However, when he extended the flaps, that put him 95 km/ hr past the new reduced Vne, and divergent flutter set in immediately. Increased TRUE Airspeed. Strangely flutter is relative to True air speed and not indicated air speed. This is because at high altitudes, TAS is considerably faster than the reading on your ASI, but the air is thinner and has less damping effect. On 1 April 2010 a young charter pilot was descending from FL95 towards Swakopmund

in a Cessna 210. Apparently, without warning the aircraft suddenly came apart and scattered itself over a massive area – the wings no longer being attached to the fuselage. The wreckage showed indications of flutter. I haven’t seen the accident report, but my guess is that the pilot simply allowed the airspeed to run away during the long descent. Low air density/high altitude. Your POH states the aircraft’s maximum certified altitude. As long as you stay below this, and your aircraft’s rigging is tight and in good condition, and you keep your IAS below the red line, in calm air, you should not get flutter. Above that height a slower red line would be needed. In fact, gliders, which can operate up to almost any altitude, do exactly that – they give you lower Vnes for each block of altitude. Here’s a chart for a Pipistrel Sinus powered June 2022

77


How much and where the Pipistrel exceeded Vne.

glider showing massively reduced indicated Vnes at altitude. So, in certified, powered aircraft, the FAA makes it easy by saying that in this aircraft’s block of air (say sea level up to 15 000’) the red line (Vne) will keep your TAS in safe limits. WARNING Some NTCA manufacturers test their aircraft as rigorously as normal aircraft, but many don’t. So not all NTCAs will give you the same flutter protection as a certified aircraft. A while ago a pilot and his navigator were descending their Flamingo (NTCA) towards an air-race checkpoint near Bella-Bella, when it broke up in flight. A witness said it looked like a quick puff of smoke and then the wings ripped themselves into what looked like little scraps of paper. Both occupants died.

78

June 2022

Balance weights. Balance weights are critical in limiting the tendency to flutter. I have just heard that the ex DCA (CAA) Beaver, ZS-CAJ, which was sold to a company in Canada, almost destroyed itself in a violent flutter while flying at normal airspeed in calm air. It was so badly damaged by the flutter that it was scrapped after landing safely. It turns out that during maintenance an aileron balance weight was left off. Some time ago a Cherokee in the USA fluttered itself into destruction at circuit speed because the little arm with a lead weight on it, at the outboard end of the aileron, corroded and broke. The pilot failed to spot this during his preflight.


And in April 2005 two pilots died near Stellenbosch when the wings were ripped off their Interavia, a tough aerobatic machine. It seems the spades had been removed from the ailerons, which altered their C of G and caused flutter way below the red line

any s lop in t he cont r ols w ill allow f lutte r

Worn hinges and slack cables. Any slop in the operating system will allow flutter to start at way below the red line. I looked at a C210 that was used by a parachute club. You could move one aileron up and down at least two inches before the stick, and the other aileron moved. It developed a flutter at just over 100 kts which ripped one aileron right off. Fortunately he managed to land safely.

TAKE HOME POINTS TO MAKE SURE IT DOESN’T HAPPEN TO YOU. 1. Start with a proper preflight. Pay special attention to the attachment of mass balance weights. Check the control surfaces for damage and all the hinges for excessive play. Trim tabs are just as important – flutter can start with a sloppy trim tab. Check the integrity of control surface operating rods, or cable attachments and tensions. Move one aileron up and down and see if the control column and other aileron move immediately. If anything has play, it’s potentially dangerous. 2. Plan your top of descent to be early rather than late. Descend for 50 miles at 150 KIAS rather than 30 miles at 170 KIAS. Air races are potentially dangerous if a checkpoint is just beyond high ground. 3. If there’s a chance of turbulence during the descent, keep the needle below the yellow. This is true even without flutter – gust loads at high airspeeds can break your aircraft without going the flutter route.

The effect of altitude on Vne.

4. If you feel a slight hum or buzz, take this as a serious warning that flutter could start at any second. Throttle right back and ease the nose up immediately – but not violently. June 2022

79


After the parachute deployed the nose rose and then it turned and spun into the ground.

5. Similarly if you get actual flutter, immediately throttle back and raise the nose. An increase in G and a reduced dynamic pressure may save you. But it often happens so quickly that you have no time to react before the aircraft disintegrates. 6. Don’t even think of modifying anything to do with the controls – or even painting them. 7. If your aircraft has a table of airspeeds and altitudes for Vne – pay very close attention. Remember that at high altitudes your mind is not that sharp – so even more reason to remember the table.

80

June 2022

8. If you operate outside the aircraft’s design parameters you are looking for trouble. 9. Turbo-charging or increasing engine power may not be smart. 10.When your aircraft was brand new it was tested to only 10% past the red line. After 40 years of wear and tear perhaps it’s not a good idea to find out if that is still valid? j


POSTSCRIPT - JIM DAVIS

POST SCRIPT:

YET ANOTHER FLUT TER CASUALT Y

FROM A CAA ACCIDENT report released on 16 May 2022: On 28 October 2021, the pilot of a Rand KR-2 two-seat high-performance aircraft with registration ZS-UKU took off on a private flight from Kitty Hawk Aerodrome (FAKT). Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the flight. According to the first eyewitness, the aircraft entered the aerobatic box situated west of FAKT; thereafter, the pilot executed a few aerobatictype manoeuvres before flying towards the south. A second eyewitness saw the aircraft make a high-speed left turn during which the right wing broke off in-flight. As a result, the pilot lost control and crashed approximately 0.57 nautical miles south of FAKT. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was fatally injured.

Contributing Factor The aileron was under balanced to the extent of 60 kilograms per millimetre (kg/mm) residual moment.

The KR2 was built small to go fast.

The remains of the KR2 wing after the spar broke due to aileron flutter

Post-accident examination of the failed right-wing aileron indicated that the right wing separation was triggered by the aileron aerodynamic flutter which was caused by the aileron that was not balanced in accordance with the Rand Robinson Engineering Build Manual. Probable Cause The pilot lost control of the aircraft after the right-wing broke off in-flight due to the aileron aerodynamic flutter. June 2022

81


REGISTER REVIEW: RAY WATTS 3D-AAC was a Gulfstream 1 operated by Anglo American - and which Guy Leitch got to fly in a number of times. She was ZS-AAC and ended up in the USA.

APRIL 2022 APRIL’S AMENDMENTS ARE VERY interesting. There was a total of seven Type Certified aircraft (TCA) registered, being seven fixed wing and two helicopters. One of the new registrations is ZS-AAC (5) a Kodiak 100. This has been operating in Botswana as N54KQ for some while now. The registration ZS-AAC has been used four times before. The first being an Avro Avion that was written off in December 1939. The second was Anglo American’s Gulfstream 1 which was re-registered in Swaziland during the apartheid years and then sold in the USA. Number three was a Beech Bonanza V35 which became ZS-WYN before going to the USA and the last one (number four) was a Cessna 180 which recently went to the Czech Republic.

Bombardier CL600. ZS-DBB was a DC3/C47 which ended her days in Cuba. ZS-FHG was a Cherokee 180 which was written off some time ago and ZS-FJA was a Cessna 172 that was scrapped a while back. The CL600 -2D24 is a new aircraft for Cemair and arrived in this country in April from Ireland. This is their second 900 series aircraft and I believe there is one more to come in the near future.

Z S -A A C h a s been used four times before

Other aircraft registered this month and using previously allocated registrations are ZS-CMR (3). This used to be a Cessna 175 and then a

82

June 2022

Two new Air Tractors have made their appearance, as has a brand-new Pilatus PC12. There is also an Embraer 145 and two helicopters. The Non TCA side is very quiet. There are two very interesting aircraft this month, being a new AHRLAC (the third one to be built) and a Piaggio P166 Albatross. Initially I thought this Piaggio would be an ex SAAF one but the manufacturers serial number was one allocated to the Italian Air Force as MM25161. I can’t trace


ABOVE: Another CRJ-900. EI-FPA has become ZS- CMR for Cemair. BELOW MIDDLE: Yet another addition to Cemair's fleet - ZS-DHJ is a DHC 8-Q400. Taken by Ray Watts at OR Tambo. BELOW BOTTOM: Ex Nationwide ZS-PKU a B737 has been exported to Zimbabwe.

June 2022

83


ABOVE: ZS-TAY is one of two PA46-500TP Malibus exported to Europe. Taken at Grand Central by Ray Watts. BELOW: The well known ZS-JSV, a Robin DR400-160, has been exported to Belgium.

and SAAF tail number for her. If anybody knows any better, please let me know. The number of drones as grown by fifty, with six withdrawn from use. Exports of aircraft continue at a pace – we’ve lost another seven this month. One of them is a very old, ex Nationwide Boeing 737-529 which has gone to Zimbabwe. I believe she’s been operating in Eastern Europe for many years and has now been sold off. The rest of the exports go to countries all over the world. Included in these are two Piper PA46 TP Malibus which have gone to Switzerland and Germany.

84

June 2022

Tail Piece Our first major post Covid airshow was held at Stellenbosch and was a huge success. The Aeroclub’s Air Week was held in April at Middelburg and was, by all reports, also a great success. Hopefully the season will open up even further. Stay safe and healthy.

j


ABOVE: ZS-HRT is a Robinson R66. Exported to the USA as N349BA. BELOW: ZS-NOX is a Cessna T303 exported to The Netherlands.

June 2022

85


African Fuel Services are the sponsors for our Register Review Page

APRIL 2022 REG

MANUFACTURER

TYPE NAME

SERIAL NUMBER

PREVIOUS IDENTITY / EXPORT COUNTRY

New Registrations ZSZS-AAC

QUEST AIRCRAFT DESIGN, LLC

KODIAK 100

100-0054

N54KQ

ZS-CMR

BOMBARDIER INC

CL-600-2D24

15398

EI-FPA, C-GWFX

ZS-DBB

AIR TRACTOR INC

AT-402B

1466

ZS-FHG

PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD

PC-12/47E

2180

ZS-FJA

EMBRAER EMPRESA BRASILEIRA DEAERONAUTICA EMB-145LR

145468

N14907, PT-SVN

ZS-TKZ

AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

EC 130 T2

9171

N929NP

ZS-XDX

AIR TRACTOR INC

AT-502A

502A-3351

407

53526

New Registrations ZRZT-RFM

BELL HELICOPTER

N143KT, C-GKLE

New Registrations ZUZU-MWA

MICHAEL LEVY

AHRLAC MK1

A-003

ZU-ORC

PIAGGIO

P166 DL3

NC483

MM25161

Aircraft Deleted ZSZS-HKM

AGUSTA WESTLAND S.P.A

AW139

31605

NAMIBIA

ZS-HRT

ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY

R66

0310

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

ZS-IMJ

PIPER AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

PA-46-500TP

4697493

SWITZERLAND

ZS-JSV

AVIONS PIERRE ROBIN

DR 400/180

1110

BELGIUM

ZS-NOX

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

T303

T303-00288

NETHERLAND

ZS-PKU

BOEING AIRPLANE COMPANY

737-529

25249

ZIMBABWE

ZS-TAY

PIPER AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

PA-46-500TP

4697304

GERMANY

African Fuel Services is based at Groutville Airfield just North of Ballito. AFS has Avgas and Jet-A1 available as well as offering a range of services.

For any information please call Willie Erasmus on 084 623 4879 or email to willie@africanfuels.co.za / accounts@africanfuels.co.za

86

June 2022


African Fuel Services AFS is based at Groutville Airfield just North of Ballito.

AFS has Avgas and Jet-A1 available as well as offering a range of services.

Services: • • • • •

Night Flying operations Radio Work Sling operations Hoist operations Berg flying operations and training • Fly in • Hot refueling

Deliveries areas: • Passenger handling and briefings for (hoisting, slinging, off shore and many more) • Cleaning of aircraft • Topping up lubricants and preflight’s on a number of aircraft • Any other assistance you need.

• • • • • • • • •

Margate Airport Ulundi Airport Hluhluwe Airport Vryheid Airport Ladysmith Airport Newcastle Airport Bergville Area Umtata Airport Port St Johns

For any information please call Willie Erasmus on 084 623 4879 or email to willie@africanfuels.co.za / accounts@africanfuels.co.za

BOOK S

by Pete r Gar r is on

June 2022

87


STORY - GUY LEITCH PICS - TREVOR COHEN AND PAUL LUDICK

THE PARYS

AIRSHOW

– A WONDERFUL NEW MODEL . The Parys Airshow held in the last weekend of May was an extraordinary event which looks set to define a new genre for country airshows. Ace pair Nigel Hopkins and Jason Beamish thrill with their precision high energy aerobatics in their Extras

88

June 2022


COMMENTATOR BRIAN EMMENIS of Capital Sounds waxed lyrical, saying that it was, “The best airshow he has seen in his 38 years of airshow broadcasting.” He says that the show was ground-breaking in that it was the first real digital airshow: where people could secure their place at an airshow with limited capacity by booking online.

t he s t andar d of t he air s how dis play s has impr ove d

The Goodyear Eagles putting on a "becuase I was inverted" display.

The gates had to be shut once the permit limit of 3500 had been reached.

After the long drought of airshows caused by the Covid pandemic, the need for an airshow was such that many people had to be turned away at the gate. Insurance requirements had limited the show to 3500 spectators and such was the demand, even from online bookings, that this was soon full. The spectators got more than their money's worth. The Making a welcome return to flying the L-39 is veteran display pilot Pierre Gouws.

June 2022

89


standard of flying and the range and variation in the performances was striking. The displays ranged from the Tiger Moths and Chipmunks all the way up to a Top Gun themed L-39 jet display. Perhaps just as importantly is that the standard of the airshow displays has improved during the long Covid lockdown. The quality of the flying was simply exhilarating. The standard that we have come to expect from the Puma Flying Lion Harvards is now matched by the incredible precision of the RV-Raptor formation team, the Pitts Specials of the Hired Gun team and the Goodyear Eagles, and the precision formation aerobatics of Nigel Hopkins and Jason Beamish in their Extras. Thrilling too were the skydivers, with a notable performance from Colonel Laurel Thatcher who wowed the crowd with his tiny 110 ft² high speed canopy.

The Raptors RV team just gets better and better.

Organiser Hayley Horan with the Capital Sounds team.

Another unusual performer was the jet powered JS-3 glider, ably demonstrated by gliding supremo Oscar Goudriaan. Helicopters are always a crowd pleaser and again there was wonderful variation, with displays by Juba Joubert flying a Gazelle, Andre Coetzee in a Bell 407, and Menno Parsons

90

June 2022

The Tiger Moth has now celebrated its 90th birthday. Image Dries Beetge.


in the Bell 222. Menno has become an airshow staple with his Mustang P-51 ‘Mustang Sally’ but unfortunately this was in maintenance. Due to the massive demand for the limited admission, the patience of airshow visitors who hadn't booked was tested to the limit with queues backed up all the way to the N1 highway and through the town of Parys. Many had to watch the show from outside the airfield boundaries as ‘roofkykers’. Despite the capacity crowd it was significant that none of the facilities were overrun and although the queues for food and toilets were long, they were tolerable. The show was the product of the vision, drive and determination of Haley Horan, with her team from ‘Smoke on Go’ at Creative Space Media. For Hayley, it was her first airshow, and she had to persuade many naysayers that a country airshow in Parys could be successful.

Airshow Director Rikus Erasmus with Scully Levin. Pic Paul Ludick.

The Puma Flying Lions can be relied upon to bring the thrill of radials in formation to almost every air show.

In the end it was the people of Parys who contributed in a big way to making the airshow the success it was. Hayley Horan says, “The people of Parys were wonderful in the way they embraced the show. The spirit was fantastic; nothing was too much trouble and the crowd was wonderfully appreciative.” Gliding supremo Oscar Goudriaan enthralled in his jet powered JS-3 glider. Image Dries Beetge.

June 2022

91


Helicopter ace Juba Joubert putting the agile Gazelle through its paces.

92

June 2022


Airshow pilots Ryan Beeton, Ellis Levin and Menno Parsons respond to the photog!

The entire show went off without a hitch and this was to the credit of the professionalism of the pilots and in particular, air show director Rikus Erasmus who, with military precision, kept the airshow to within a minute of its time programme. There were no long gaps while everyone waited for the next display to arrive. It takes great skill to make sure that every airshow performer is ready and waiting to go at its appointed time and that the whole show finishes on time. This enabled all the performers to fly, and the show to be closed as agreed at 3.00 pm to give the crowds time to leave and get home.

Naturally there was the commentary from Bryan Emmenis and his Capital Sounds team, who had left their base and Welkom in the small hours to get to Parys by 5.00 am and, in the dark of the pre-dawn winter Highveld, to be set up and signed off by 8.00 am. Hayley Horan and her team from Smoke on Go at Creative Space Media have reinvented airshows – with a successful new formula for country airshows. j

June 2022

93


FUEL TABLE

SA Flyer 2022|06

www.sv1.co.za Prices at 26/04/2022 Fuel Fuel Prices as atas 26/04/2022

Prices at 27/05/2022 Fuel Fuel Prices as atas 27/05/2022

Prii nclude ces i nclude VATexclude but exclude any servi ce fees Pri ces VAT but any servi ce fees Ai rfi eld Avgas Jet A1 Jet A1 Ai rfi eld Avgas Beaufort R30,10 R19,35 R19,35 Beaufort WestWest R30,10 Bethlehem R 29,98R 14,99 R 14,99 Bethlehem R 29,98 Bloemfontei R26,45 R18,86 R18,86 Bloemfontei n n R26,45 Brakpan R27,00 Brakpan R27,00 R26,45 BritsBrits R26,45 R30,02 R16,62 R16,62 CapeCape TownTown R30,02 Winelands (Fisantekraal) R29,50 CapeCape Winelands (Fisantekraal) R29,50 Eagles R29,50 Eagles CreekCreek R29,50 London R24,91 R18,12 R18,12 East East London R24,91 Ermelo R28,63 Ermelo R28,63 Fly-InFly-In No No Fuel Fuel GariDam ep Dam R30,50 R19,00 R19,00 Gari ep R30,50 George R25,90 R19,18 R19,18 George R25,90 Grand Central R30,53 R20,76 R20,76 Grand Central R30,53 Hei delberg R28,50 Hei delberg R28,50 Hoedspruit Hoedspruit POAPOA Ki mberley R27,20 R19,09 R19,09 Ki mberley R27,20 R31,70 KittyKitty HawkHawk R31,70 Klerksdorp Contact Klerksdorp No No Contact Kroonstad R28,23 NoAvbl Jet Avbl Kroonstad R28,23 No Jet Kruger Intl Nelspruit R29,42 R21,81 R21,81 Kruger Intl Nelspruit R29,42 Krugersdorp R27,55 Krugersdorp R27,55 Lanseri R27,83 R20,93 R20,93 Lanseri a a R27,83 Margate Margate No No Fuel Fuel Middelburg R30,59 R22,65 R22,65 Middelburg R30,59 Morningstar R28,50 Morningstar R28,50 Mosselbay R29,75 R22,00 R22,00 Mosselbay R29,75 Nelspruit R26,45 R18,98 R18,98 Nelspruit R26,45 Oudtshoorn R28,52 R19,00 R19,00 Oudtshoorn R28,52 ParysParys POAPOA POAPOA Pietermaritzburg R30,20 R21,60 R21,60 Pietermaritzburg R30,20 Pi etersburg R28,80 R18,45 R18,45 Pi etersburg Ci vi lCi vi l R28,80 Plettenberg BayNEW*** *** NEW*** R27,50 R19,50 R19,50 Plettenberg Bay *** R27,50 Alfred R33,15 PortPort Alfred R33,15 Elizabeth R33,35 R23,26 R23,26 PortPort Elizabeth R33,35 Potchefstroom Potchefstroom POAPOA POAPOA R26,19 R21,60 R21,60 RandRand R26,19 Robertson R27,25 Robertson R27,25 Rustenberg R27,98 R20,65 R20,65 Rustenberg R27,98 Secunda R27,88 R21,05 R21,05 Secunda R27,88 Skeerpoort *** Customer to collect Skeerpoort *** Customer to collect POAPOA POAPOA Springbok R30,00 R20,64 R20,64 Springbok R30,00 Springs R29,10 Springs R29,10 Stellenbosch R30,50 Stellenbosch R30,50 Swellendam R27,30 R16,90 R16,90 Swellendam R27,30 Tempe Tempe No No Fuel Fuel Thabazimbe Thabazimbe POAPOA POAPOA Upington R27,91 R19,80 R19,80 Upington R27,91 R30,59 R21,46 R21,46 Vi rgiVi nirgi a ni a R30,59 Vryburg Vryburg POAPOA POAPOA Warmbaths ***NEW*** R30,00 Warmbaths ***NEW*** R30,00 Welkom R28,23 NoAvbl Jet Avbl Welkom R28,23 No Jet WiPark ngs Park R27,60 Wi ngs EL EL R27,60 Witbank R30,00 Witbank R30,00 POAPOA POAPOA Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester R27,77 Worcester R27,77

Prii nclude ces i nclude VATexclude but exclude any servi ce fees Pri ces VAT but any servi ce fees Ai rfi eld AvgasJet A1 Jet A1 Ai rfi eld Avgas Beaufort R30,85 R19,35 Beaufort WestWest R30,85 R19,35 Bethlehem R 31,97 R 23,81 Bethlehem R 31,97 R 23,81 Bloemfontei R29,32 R21,43 Bloemfontei n n R29,32 R21,43 Brakpan R32,00 Brakpan R32,00 R29,75 BritsBrits R29,75 R30,02 R20,39 CapeCape TownTown R30,02 R20,39 Winelands R30,50 CapeCape Winelands R30,50 Eagles Eagles CreekCreek No No Fuel Fuel London R26,85 R21,74 East East London R26,85 R21,74 Ermelo R31,51 Ermelo R31,51 Fly-InFly-In No No Fuel Fuel GariDam ep Dam R31,00 R21,50 Gari ep R31,00 R21,50 George R27,24 R22,36 George R27,24 R22,36 Grand Central R32,83 R22,25 Grand Central R32,83 R22,25 Hei delberg R31,50 Hei delberg R31,50 Hoedspruit Hoedspruit POAPOA Ki mberley R29,56 R21,65 Ki mberley R29,56 R21,65 R32,20 KittyKitty HawkHawk R32,20 Klerksdorp R31,00 R21,39 Klerksdorp R31,00 R21,39 Kroonstad R28,75 Kroonstad R28,75 Kruger Intl Nelspruit R29,42 R23,93 Kruger Intl Nelspruit R29,42 R23,93 Krugersdorp R29,95 Krugersdorp R29,95 Lanseri R31,40 R21,85 Lanseri a a R31,40 R21,85 Margate Margate No No Fuel Fuel Middelburg R30,59 R23,92 Middelburg R30,59 R23,92 Morningstar R28,95 Morningstar R28,95 Mosselbay R29,75 R23,00 Mosselbay R29,75 R23,00 Nelspruit Contact Nelspruit No NoContact Oudtshoorn R28,52 R19,50 Oudtshoorn R28,52 R19,50 ParysParys POAPOA POAPOA Pietermaritzburg R30,20 R23,60 Pietermaritzburg R30,20 R23,60 Pi etersburg R28,80 R21,95 Pi etersburg Ci vi lCi vi l R28,80 R21,95 Plettenberg R29,50 R20,50 Plettenberg Bay Bay R29,50 R20,50 Alfred R33,15 PortPort Alfred R33,15 Elizabeth R34,50 R23,26 PortPort Elizabeth R34,50 R23,26 Potchefstroom Potchefstroom POAPOA POAPOA R25,77 R21,60 RandRand R25,77 R21,60 Robertson R27,25 Robertson R27,25 Rustenberg R29,50 R21,95 Rustenberg R29,50 R21,95 Secunda R30,47 R22,42 Secunda R30,47 R22,42 Skeerpoort *** Customer to collect Skeerpoort *** Customer to collect POAPOA POAPOA Springbok Springbok POAPOA POAPOA Springs R32,50 Springs R32,50 Stellenbosch R33,00 Stellenbosch R33,00 Swellendam R27,80 R19,50 Swellendam R27,80 R19,50 Tempe R28,75 R21,39 Tempe R28,75 R21,39 Thabazimbe Thabazimbe POAPOA POAPOA Upington R30,27 R22,37 Upington R30,27 R22,37 R34,16 R23,58 Vi rgiVi nirgi a ni a R34,16 R23,58 Vryburg Vryburg POAPOA POAPOA Warmbaths R32,00 Warmbaths R32,00 Welkom R28,75 R21,39 Welkom R28,75 R21,39 WiPark ngs Park R27,60 Wi ngs EL EL R27,60 Witbank R30,20 Witbank R30,20 POAPOA POAPOA Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester R32,84 Worcester R32,84

Tel: +27 10 446 9666 Danielle: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015 Co-ordinates: S25°50’37 E27°41’28 94 GPS June 2022 Import/Export no. 21343829


SA Flyer 2016|11

• BRITS • HOEDSPRUIT • PARYS AIRFIELD • POTCHEFSTROOM AIRPORT • SKEERPOORT • THABAZIMBI • WONDERBOOM

Tel: +27 10 446 9666 Danielle: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015

WE ALSO HAVE AN ON-SITE HELI-PAD FOR CONVENIENT REFUELING. CALL US FOR A QUOTE OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

SEALED 200L AVGAS DRUMS • SEALED 200L JET A1 DRUMS • AVGAS 100LL • JET A1 • PETROL • ILLUMINATING PARAFFIN • DIESEL • LUBRICANTS

June 2022

95


Events by ZIMBABWE AIR RALLY 1-5 June

10TH NEWCASTLE AIRSHOW

SAPFA KRUGERSDORP ANR

4 June

4 June Jack Taylor Airfield, Krugersdorp

www.zimairrally.com Ctc Mel Cooper Tel. +263 77 3218 426 email: zimairrally@gmail.com

Contact Johan Pieters Cell: 082 923 0078 E-mail: Johan@champ.co.za

Frank Eckard Cell: 083 269 1516 E-mail: frank.eckard@mweb.co.za

FRANCE AIR EXPO

SAC NATIONAL AEROBATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

SAPFA RALLY NATIONALS

9-11 June Lyon Bron Airport

15 – 19 June Wingspark Airfield

16 – 18 June Brits Airfield

www.franceairexpo.com

Contact Annie Boon E-mail: chunge@mweb.co.za

Frank Eckard Cell: 083 269 1516 E-mail: frank.eckard@mweb.co.za

SACAA INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT INSPECTION SYMPOSIUM 20 – 24 June www.ifissa.co.za

96

Flying in Africa – that’s what we love June 2022

SAPFA SPEED RALLY 25 June Kroonstad Airfield David le Roux Cell: 073 338 5200 E-mail: david@pilotinsure.co.za


Flying in Africa - that’s what we love!

Comprehensive airfield information, up-to-date aeronautical data, friendly and efficient customer support, easy Flight Planning, electronic logbook, Inflight Navigation with EasyCockpit, real-time Weather overlays, Weather cams, Events notification, location link to Maps ... you have it all. www.aviationdirect.co.za • info@aviationdirect.co.za • +27 11 465 2669 • 072 340 994397 June 2022


LETTERS

PILOTS AND COVID VACCINATIONS I AM AN AVID READER OF YOUR OPINIONS, articles and commentary regarding aviation issues, mainly because I am very concerned father of a recently retrenched SAA pilot. Guy, you probably know much more than I do regarding all the happenings at SAA and the flight industry. And we are still waiting for somebody to account for the mismanagement and criminal activities that lead to the demise of this once proud and prestigious South African asset. You are also aware that 600+ white South African pilots are now trying to put their lives back together. Many of them are now applying for appointments anywhere and everywhere where they can at least regain some of their dignity again. But they are all asked whether they are vaccinated against Covid – even within South Africa. As a medical doctor myself I am still hesitant as I would like to see where this experimental substance is taking the world. I am too aware of slow but sure international resistance building up because of so many vaccination injuries encountered by my medical colleagues. The strange thing is that so many (including myself) encounter resistance when

98

June 2022

these cases are reported for registration with SA VAERS (South African Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System). The sequelae could be diagnosed hours, days, months or even years after being vaccinated. Because I respect your knowledge and opinion regarding all aviation matters, I would really like to know where you and your likeminded aviation family stand with regard to these mandates on all pilots. I am attaching an article sent to me by one of my London-based colleagues recently as well as ‘n clip of an affected USA pilot. Dr André Lötter

j


GRAND CENTRAL AIRPORT

– AVIATION COMPANIES GUIDE June 2022

99


Introduction

GR A ND

CENT R A L A I R P OR T

The Covid-19 pandemic hit general aviation hard and Grand Central airport was no exception. LAST YEAR THERE WAS REAL sense that 2021 would be the make-or-break year for Grand Central. The good news for Grand Central’s many users and the industry at large is that this resilient airport has survived and is bouncing back strongly. Grand Central, as the name suggests, benefits

from having an ideal location in the heart of Gauteng. It’s a quick hop from the apron to the highway to Johannesburg or Pretoria and the nearest Gautrain station is just 5 minutes away. The airport is operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and offers car rental facilities and a travel agency. An Executive Departures lounge

Grand Central is ideally located and has shown the resilience to survive the Covid-19 pandemic

100

June 2022


The Harvard Café located in the terminal building has a large seating area looking out over the apron where visitors can watch light aircraft and helicopters taking off. There is also a large outdoor children’s play area. Due to its central location, controlled airspace and non-cumbersome security protocols, Grand Central Airport is ideal for private aviation. The airport offers over 25 dedicated helipads as well as parking and hangars for private aircraft although hangarage is currently full to capacity. Initial projects & plans are underway to build four new hangars. Pilots will find a variety of aviation services companies located at the airport, should they need technical assistance.

Pilot training plays an important role in Grand Central Airport’s operations. Many young South Africans dream of becoming pilots when they grow up but few realise how achievable this dream really is. Whether flying for pleasure or pursuing a career in aviation, the diverse selection of flight schools based at Grand Central Airport allow students to train for any license in both the fixed wing and helicopter domain.

Introduction

provides the ideal location for passengers to relax before embarking on a flight. The airport also boasts a 16-seater boardroom facility on the first floor. The Airport now offers a hot desk office with two small 4-seater boardrooms & free wi-fi for non-office bound executives.

The newly appointed Air Traffic Service Provider, Indiza, offers students-friendly airspace environment making it the ideal training location for trainee pilots. Thanks to its location and facilities, Grand Central is one of the busiest general aviation airports in South Africa. Recognising this the owners made a significant investment in the airport’s infrastructure and facilities in 2014 which included having the runway redone. Unfortunately, in terms of future development, Grand Central can’t expand because the surrounding land is owned and managed by Old The imposing terminal building.

June 2022

101


Introduction

Mutual Properties.

Many service providers have established operations at Grand Central.

The airport may be key for Old Mutual Properties development of their multi-billion Rand Zonk’izizwe project. Pre-Covid-19 there were serious discussions with airport management to find out how best to use the land for offices, taking into consideration the aircraft movements. Like all other GA facilities Grand Central has been hard it by Covid-19. Part of the 2020 ‘master plan’ was to build hangars and do renovations on the southern end of the airport where aircraft currently park in the open. However, this idea will only see fruition once there is a recognised demand from enough charter companies to support a complete large scale building plan in order to prevent having to redo work at a later stage. The plan also has to be approved by the shareholders of the airport, a consortium of companies mainly with a property and investment background. In the current constrained environment this has to be considered unlikely. Tenant Relations A challenge for any airport is balancing relationships with tenants while remembering that an airport is ultimately a business. One of the biggest issues for the tenants has been the fees and rentals that Grand Central charges. But for the convenience of having a 1850 m tarred runway, air traffic control, fuel available seven days a week and maintenance staff on hand five days a week, the airport maintains that the rates are market related.

102

June 2022

Grand Central currently has a generator that powers the runway lights and control tower in the event of a power failure, but is looking at getting enough generators to power the entire airport. Security is another challenge. The airport is guarded 24/7 – but there is a crime problem outside the gates. There have reportedly been a number of incidents where cars parked outside the premises have been broken into or stolen, to the extent that there are now signs warning people who park their cars on the side of Grand Central Boulevard of the risk. This is largely due to the open land being used as a thoroughfare and the police refusing to enter into any joint venture patrols. Old Mutual has erected fences around some of the open land, and the airport has engaged with them about putting up more fencing. International status Grand Central has long hoped to regain its international status, which its lost in 1998, however the security requirements are considered too cumbersome for the diminished airport. j


Companies

AIRBUS SOUTHERN AFRICA (PTY) LTD AIRBUS IS A GLOBAL LEADER in aeronautics, space and related services. It has maintained a presence in South Africa since 1994. Airbus Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd is a one-roof entity (shared services), incorporating Airbus Commercial, Helicopters and Defence & Space and has its headquarters at Grand Central Airport in Midrand, South Africa. Airbus Helicopters provides the most efficient civil and military helicopter solutions to Southern African and Indian Ocean customers who operate an in-service fleet of around 350 turbine helicopters, to serve, protect, save lives and safely transport passengers in highly demanding environments. On top of the popular H125 & H130, the continent's sector accounts for a significant number of medium-lift helicopters and is regarded as a market ideally suited to the twin-engine H145, H175 & H225 aircraft. Airbus Southern Africa (AZA) boasts an award winning Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul (MRO) facility at Grand Central Airport hangars ranging from H120, AS350 series, H125, H130, H135 series, H145 series. From new aircraft assemblies and customisation, AZA also covers all types of maintenance, including the major inspections. As an OEM customer centre, AZA is recognised within the Airbus Group and has an excellent history with aircraft rebuilds, retrofits and Airbus approved modifications.

Airbus Helicopters offers a new support and services structure. Operators will be matched to the best combination of services according to their profile and fleet make-up, thanks to a logistic spare parts stock at AZA, covering Parts replacement for the Region. Simplified to just three flexible solutions, HCare is now composed of HCare Initial, HCare In-service, or a combination of the two, HCare Lifetime. For each, customers can opt for one out of three levels of material management performance. Still available for specific fleets will be the HCare First package for Airbus Corporate Helicopters (ACH) aircraft and HCare Classics for the out-of-production legacy fleet (H120, Dauphin, Puma and Gazelle). To find out more about Airbus Southern Africa’s products and services: www.airbushelicopters.co.za or www.airbus.com Contact: Telephone : +27 11 266 2600 Fax: +27 11 266 2628 Web: www.airbushelicopters.co.za / www.airbus.com j

AZA also provides training and assistance, and has trained civil, military and parapublic pilots in the H125 FNPT simulator in Johannesburg since 2016. June 2022

103


airbus.com

THE DIFFERENCE IS H E A R T B E AT

Seconds count when lives are on the line. It’s why every feature of the Airbus H145 has been designed for safe, effective, and fast operations. With easy patient loading, state-of-the-art avionics to reduce pilot workload and a safer working area on the ground, the H145 ensures people get the medical care they need as fast as possible. All of this has made the H145 one of the emergency medical services market leaders around the globe – helping people every single day and making sure the world remains a beautiful place.

104

June 2022


AT AVCON JET AFRICA we focus on our extreme professionalism and corporate culture. We are proud to be part of the Avcon Jet Group, allowing us to serve not only the national markets, but beyond; bringing an even higher, more diverse level of expertise. We offer Air Charters, In-House Simulators, Glass Cockpit Aircraft training, Aircraft Sales and Accounts Management, and advance flight training. Our Self Fly Safari’s are truly one of a kind, priceless experiences. Embark on an adventure touring our countryside with a birds-eye-view, in a way only aviators can.

See the world like never before, by booking your introductory flight. We strive to offer you the best with our modern facilities, passionate experienced instructors and our well-maintained private fleet.

Companies

AVCON JET AFRICA

Adventure is at your fingertips with Avcon Jet Africa by your side. Avcon Jet Africa, Main Terminal, Grand Central Airport, Johannesburg, South Africa. Tel: 011 312 5676 | Email: office@avconjet. co.za | Find us on: Facebook, Instagram & LinkedIn j

Take to the skies, with Avcon Jet Africa by your side.

What makes us stand out? EASA Examination Facilitation | Flight training, PPL to ATPL Flight Simulator (with initial turbine rating and MCC) | SA-CAA Exam Centre King Air 200 Ratings | Pilatus PC12 Ratings

T EL : ( 01 1 ) 3 1 2 - 5 6 76 EM A I L : of fi c e @ a v c o n j e t .c o.z a WEB : w w w . a v c on j e t .t r ai n i n g

June 2022

105


Companies

LANSERIA FLIGHT CENTRE LANSERIA FLIGHT CENTRE, established in 1989 offers professional flight training now located at Grand Central Airport. Our aim is to provide our clients with the highest standard of comprehensive training available and experience that you can draw on to plan your training and future in aviation. LFC is internationally recognised as a first-class flight school and aviation training organisation. We specialise in providing professional pilot training and private pilot training for domestic and international aviation students. LFC is the first choice among aspiring pilots for professional flight training; we cater for domestic & international students, and offer full-time or part-time training.

With his team and over 35 years’ experience, Ian Dyson looks forward to continuing a rich tradition of professional pilot training and flight services to the aviation industry. We have successfully trained both domestic and international airline pilots, hobby aviators, hourbuilding programs and supported advanced pilot training. Many of our students now fly for the world’s top airlines including British Airways, Qantas and Emirates. Contact: Grand Central Airport, Midrand +27 11 312 5166 www.flylfc.com j

ENROL NOW! PILOT TRAINING • AIR CHARTER

• PROFESSIONAL TRAINING • PPL, CPL • AIRLINE PILOT’S LICENCE • JET RATING SA Flyer 2013|02

• SIMULATOR • GLASS COCKPIT

Comme rcial Ground School Individu al subjects welcom e.

EAS Conve A rsions

Froz EASA A en TPL availablenow

• SUPERB FLEET info@flylfc.com www.flylfc.com GRAND CENTRAL AIRPORT TEL: 011 312 5166 or 011 659 2810 CAA0040

106

June 2022

LANSERIA FLIGHT CENTRE


Companies

PAMBELE AVIATION PAMBELE AVIATION (based at Grand Central Airport) is a dependable air charter company operating throughout Southern Africa providing light aircraft transport services. We have more than thirteen years’ experience providing charter flights for the private and business sectors, flying business leaders, tourists and VIP’s.

Pambele Aviation is the continuation of Jemax Aviation in a new guise and with a fresh “jacket” to align ourselves with the Pambele Africa group of companies. Pambele Aviation holds license N892D and a Part 135 AOC.

The primary aircraft being operated are a Beechcraft King Air B200 and a Cessna Grand Caravan 208B. A number of light piston engine aircraft are available for smaller group sizes, or for those who are budget conscious.

Contact Details: Tel: 011 805 0652 E-mail: fjoubert@pambele.aero

A satellite base of operation is located at Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport serving the Lowveld region of the country.

j

PAMBELE FONT: ITC Avant Garde Gothic PAMBELE FONT COLOUR: 60% Black PANTONE: Cool Gray 9c

Formerly known as JEMAX AVIATION License # N892D

LIGHT AIRCRAFT CHARTER OPERATOR www.pambele.aero c = 90 m = 50 y=0 k=0

SA Flyer 2022|06

Pantone 285c

info@pambele.aero TEL: (+27 11) 805-0652 / 82 | FAX: (+27 11) 805-0649

June 2022

107


Companies

FLIGHT TRAINING SERVICES

(PILOT FLIGHT TRAINING SERVICES)

FTS IS A FLIGHT SCHOOL that operates out of Grand Central Airport’s main terminal building. The company has an impressive fleet of over 10 aircraft which include Cessna 172s, Piper PA28s, Cessna 172RG and the PA-30 Piper Twin Comanche for advanced multi-engine training. These aircraft are all used for basic and advanced instruction.

For the forthcoming CPL & ATPL ground school contact FTS on: 011 805 9015 or Email: fly@fts. co.za to book your seat. For more information contact Amanda Pearce on: Tel: 011-805-9015/6 Website: www.fts.co.za j

Flight Training Services offers a comprehensive, state of the art, training service starting from entry level Private Pilot Licence (PPL) through to Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) licence. Browse through their site and have a look at the services on offer.

THE NEXT GENERATION OF PILOT & FLIGHT CREW TRAINING

108

June 2022


LOCATIONS

CLICK LOCATION TO LINK TO INTERACTIVE MAP

AIRBUS

LANSERIA FLIGHT CENTRE

FTS: PILOT FLIGHT TRAINING SERVICES

AVCON JET AFRICA

PAMBELE AVIATION

June 2022

109


BUMPPPFFF:

Waddell's Wagon, created to train pilots to taxi in the 747 before prototypes were completed.

Bizjets leaving Miami after the GP

110

June 2022

The cost of fuel measured in dollars


MAINTENANCE / REFURBISHMENT & AVIONICS / INSTRUMENTS GUIDE June 2022

111


Introduction

A I R CR A F T MA I NT ENA NCE

R EF UR B I S HMENT

A ND AV I ONI C S GUI DE South Africa still has a thankfully deep repository of skills in aviation maintenance and a thriving industry refurbishing old aircraft. IT IS NOT UNCOMMON to find 60 year old airframes being refurbished to genuinely better than new condition, thanks to engine improvements and updated avionics, particularly since ‘glass cockpit’ instrumentation has become far more affordable and easy to install – even in type certified aircraft.

The refurbishment industry has made it possible to own old aircraft that are as good as new. And you can also add a lot of sexy new avionics kit, such as terrain avoidance systems that a fifty-year-old piston single would have lacked because those systems had not yet been invented.

Older corporate aircraft have been excllent candidates for avionics upgrades such as this Garmin G1000 NXi for a King Air 200.

112

June 2022


a good and poor AMO is very noticeable in terms of aircraft availability and reliability. This was evident when we switched from the Rand Airport based agents to Ferreira Aviation in Bloemfontein.

the differences in maintenance between a good a n d p o o r A MO i s ver y noticeable

The leader in engine upgrades to the ubiquitous turboprops that are so popular in Africa is Blackhawk. The company has specialised in upgrades to the engines of the King Air range in particular, but also handle Cessna Caravans and Piper Cheyennes.

SA Flyer owned a Cessna 182 ZS-FPI for around seven years and then a complex turbocharged retractable Piper Saratoga ZS-OFH for four years. What we learned is that the differences in maintenance between

Introduction

These days a good used Cessna 182 with perhaps a midlife engine can be bought for around R1.3 million – which is a seventh of the price of a new plane. Not only have you saved millions but your insurance is much cheaper. Of course, maintenance will be a bit – but not that much – higher. And this is where a good AMO comes in.

Engine Upgrades

The engine upgrade that put Blackhawk on the map is its Beechcraft King Air 200 engine replacement. Blackhawk offers no less than three engine upgrade packages for King Air 200s. The three upgrades are the XP42, XP52 and XP61 and they all generate important performance and savings benefits, yet each package has distinctive characteristics to benefit

Innovative custom paint schemes such as for SA Flyer's Saratoga are increasingly in demand.

June 2022

113


Introduction

specific flight requirements and profiles. Some of the key benefits include: An increased rate of climb, higher single engine service ceiling and faster cruise speeds resulting in reduced time on airframe and engines and higher resale value (according to Vref). Blackhawk’s XP52 engine upgrade exchanges the B200’s original PT6A-41 or PT6A-42 engines for factory-new Pratt & Whitney PT6A52 engines. No major airframe modifications are required and some of the key benefits are for Africa’s hot and high operations: the extended maximum operating ITT to 820 C with a higher horsepower flat rating of more than 1346 shp which enables it to reach higher altitudes more quickly, fly higher and faster and thus reduces specific fuel consumption. It is calculated that this typically saves $38,000 per year in reduced operating costs.

Avionics Avionics are the field where the most progress has been made and this makes older charter aircraft excellent candidates for an avionics upgrade. Particularly popular are STCs for the installation of the industry standard Garmin G600 and G1000 and for those aircraft that have the performance – the installation of altimetry to meet RVSM requirements. Specialist avionics installers such as Century at Lanseria pioneered the installation of the industry standard Garmin G1000 into King Air 200s and these have now become a very popular upgrade across the industry. Typical installations include a dual air data attitude heading reference system, dual PFDs, a centre MFD with moving map, FMS, navcoms and WAAS GPS, radar display, and a pedestal-mounted FMS keyboard. Popular too are also numerous electronic engine instrument displays and a battery powered allin-one standby PFD.

has made it possible to own old aircraft that are as good as new

Bizjets, which tend to age quicker due to higher utilisation and faster obsolescence due to jet engine designs becoming more fuel efficient, are excellent candidates for refurbishment. This is especially evident in the re-engining of older airframes such as the HS125-400 with modern high bypass fan jets.

Even the basic jets with OEM fanjets such as Cessna’s Citation 501-SP are able to benefit enormously from engine upgrades. New engines such as the Williams FJ44-2As, which put out 2,300 pounds of thrust a side, provide a much needed performance improvement. At better than 400 knots TAS (50 knots faster than the original) and with a full fuel payload of 1,670 pounds, the Williams engine upgrade takes a well loved aircraft and makes it faster, stronger and gives it a 1,400 nm IFR range.

114

June 2022

A typical avionics selection for the upgrade of older piston singles involves a Garmin G600 glasspanel with synthetic vision as a PFD for the pilot’s side. This gets its data from a WAAS capable, TAWS-B certified Garmin GNS 530W and GNS 430W GPS/navcom that fits in the centre radio stack. On the right side of the panel a JPI EDM 930 engine-monitoring screen that displays all engine parameters including fuel flow, rpm, manifold pressure and electrical output is an ideal partner for GAMI injectors for better temperature control and lean of peak operation for fuel injected engines.


Introduction Instrument upgrades such as this to SA Flyer's C182 improve the aircraft's capability and safety.

Paint and Interiors It’s not just about engines and avionics – refurbishment customers want their planes to look like new. All good paint shops start with a complete paint strip and prime, followed by three coats of base paint with additional coats for the colour. Decals are becoming an increasingly popular option. Specialists can do you custom paint schemes as was the case with the yellow extremities we had for better visibility on our C182 and the ‘heart attack’ scheme on our Saratoga. This scheme was done by our artist Darren Edward O’Neil and we were so pleased we added his signature. Darren will propose a sketch layout and then, with painstaking attention to detail and proportion, make sure it is applied as intended to the physical requirements of the actual aircraft.

A key point to remember when repainting aircraft is that it must be done by an approved maintenance organisation as the control surfaces have to be removed and then professionally rebalanced before installation. Interiors are another essential cosmetic item – most owners elect to use wool carpeting, and new padding and leather covering for seats. All material must have a fire certificate – so again this is not a job for non-aircraft approved suppliers, even if they are much cheaper. Another popular aftermarket option are airbags – built into the seat-belt for the front two seats, as well as new LED lights and new plastic window reveals. South Africa is blessed to still have such a deep legacy of aircraft refurbishment skills and it is the anti-dote to increasingly unaffordable new aircraft prices. j June 2022

115


Companies

AERO ENGINEERING AND POWERPLANT BASED AT HANGAR NUMBER FOUR, at Wonderboom Airport, Aero Engineering’s services include the overhaul, maintenance, service, and repair of Lycoming and Continental aircraft piston engines and associated components. Aero Engineering and Powerplant comprises of the following divisions:

D) PARTS DIVISION: The parts division specialises in the sourcing of all piston engine, component, & propeller parts, either from local distributors or from overseas distributors & OEM. Their client base includes local & over-border operators, and owners, of piston & turbine engined aircraft, as well as local & over-border maintenance organizations.

A) ENGINE DIVISION: •

Overhaul of Lycoming & Continental engines,

Carrying out shock-load inspections,

Bench-testing of engines,

Re-boring and honing of cylinders,

Repair on starter clutch gears.

B) COMPONENT DIVISION: The overhaul of all engine components, including: •

McCauley, Hartzell, PCU 5000 and Woodward Constant speed units(CSU),

TCM & Bendix Fuel systems,

TCM, Romec, Fuel pumps,

Marvel Schebler carburettors,

Garrett & HET turbo-controllers,

Overhaul & servicing of magnetos.

C) PROPELLER DIVISION:

116

The supply of new & second hand Hartzell and McCauley variable pitch propellers, as fitted to piston & turbine engine aircraft,

The supply of new McCauley & Sensenich fixed pitch propellers,

Propeller dynamic Balancing.

June 2022

The business was founded in 1996 and was taken over in 2006 by partners Andre Labuschagne and Derek van der Westhuizen. They have seven qualified engineers and a loyal clientele. Contact Andre Labuschagne on: Tel: 012-543-0948 Email: aeroeng@iafrica.com Website: www.aeroengineering.co.za

j


AMO 227

FLIGHT SAFETY THROUGH MAINTENANCE

Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines

Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 Tel: (012) 543 0948/51, Fax: (012) 543 9447, email: aeroeng@iafrica.com

June 2022

SA Flyer 2022|06

Overhaul Engine Components Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers

117


Companies

AERONAUTICAL AVIATION THE ALL NEW AERONAUTICAL AVIATION LASER DEPARTMENT Aeronautical Aviation, based at Lanseria International Airport, has been an African leader since 2005. Their reliable and cost effective services cover a broad spectrum within the aviation industry from; repairs, installations, aircraft Instrumentation overhaul, avionics, electrical, autopilots and other accessories. Their service offering has recently been improved with the addition of the all new laser department. Clinton Carroll and his professional team realised that there was a massive void in the panel refurbishment services in South Africa. On further investigation Clinton ascertained that it was not only a South African shortfall but an international one, only two companies were offering professional instrumentation panel marking and the refurbishment and repair of switch and circuit breaker lighting panels and they were both based in the USA and prohibitively costly. Aeronautical Aviation believe an aircraft owner that is about to embark on a costly avionics

118

June 2022

Beechcraft Baron panel in dark room with backlighting switched on.

State of the art software for panel design.

Laser-etched powder-coated panel.


The team have spent the last year developing and heavily investing in a process in which switch panels are completely digitally redesigned, back-lighting installed and then laser printed, offering the aircraft owner

Cessna 210 - BEFORE

refurbished switch and circuit breaker panels that look and feel brand new. Being a pilot himself Clinton understands the challenges in the cockpit, the Regulatory and Certification requirements associated with the operation of an aircraft and as a result he has developed the process to be completely compliant.

Companies

upgrade should have the choice to have the new avionics installed in a panel that looks as good as the new equipment, this was not available to clients until now. In addition many of the newer generation avionics require specifically labelled circuit breakers that are not incorporated on the original switch panel, this is normally achieved by simply adding printed stickers to the panel. With the process, that was developed by Clinton and his team, such labelling can be incorporated seamlessly into the panel and regain all the back-lighting capabilities which is critical for night flying operation.

A laser-etched circuit breaker panel in progress.

Baron 58 panel cut and marked and ready for installation.

Cessna 210 - AFTER

Aeronautical Aviation will in addition digitally redesign existing metal panels to house any upgraded equipment, once the design is approved the a new panel will be produced and powder coated. All labelling will then be laser etched into the panel, not printed, ensuring that it will never rub off no matter how often it is handled. June 2022

119


Companies

Aeronautical Aviation have always believed in holding the industry and themselves to a higher standard. No matter what the client requires from simple installation to complicated integrated flight decks they have the experience and expertise and the customer service culture to ensure all expectations are not only met but exceeded. Clinton and his team prides itself on having one of the largest and most comprehensive Instrumentation, Gyroscopic, Autopilot, Electrical and Avionics repair, installation and and overhaul facilities in Africa. With the addition of the of the laser department they are elevated into a new category of completely in-house service delivery. Aeronautical Aviation are approved dealers for the following: Garmin, Avidyne, McMurdo, Genesys Aero Systems/S-TEC, JP Instruments, Sandel Avionics, ACK Avionics, Flight Display Systems, Century Flight Systems, Cobham Satcom, Dynon Avionics, L-3 Avionics, FreeFlight Systems and Electronics International, Rockwell Collins, Bose and AeroLED's to name a few. Aeronautical Aviation are confident they have the expertise and products to meet any challenge.

Beechcraft Baron - BEFORE

Beechcraft Baron - AFTER

Kingair F90 - BEFORE MARKING

Aeronautical Aviation will be showcasing what their laser department can offer at AERO SA which will be held at Wonderboom Airport in July this year. j Kingair F90 - AFTER MARKING

120

June 2022


June 2022

121


Companies

AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING, SACAA AMO 506, has been operating at Rand Airport, Germiston since 1965 and has served the aircraft industry with distinction and produce high quality surface finished products. The company is owned by Mistral Aviation Services and managed by Oliver Trollope assisted by Mike Tolhurst and a highly professional and qualified team of electroplaters. Our highly qualified team are available to advise you on the perfect solution to all your electroplating plating needs and solutions to perfectly re-finish your aircraft components to the manufacturer’s specifications.

Our processes are approved by SACAA, Denel, Airbus Europe, Rolls Royce, Pratt & Whitney and Allison Doil. We offer a wide range of services for aircraft owners and general industry, and through our partnership with Mistral Aviation Services, we can offer engineering and NTD services. We look forward to the future with a range of innovative services to continue servicing the aircraft industry.

AEROSPACE ELEC

Tel: 011 827 7535 Email: petasus@mweb.co.za

j

AMO

For all your SACAA approve

AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING

AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING

Cadmium Plate in Gold, Silver or Clear Passivation

AMO 506

Cadmium Pla Clear Passiv

For all yourAMO SACAA506 approved Hard Chrome plating requirements We are For all your SACAA approved plating requirements situated at 30B, Buil Hard Chrome

or all your SACAA approved plating requirements

Hard Silver Plate

Electroless Nickel

Hard Copper Plate

Black Phosphating

Phosphating

e are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Airmotive. ll Des on 011 827 7535 or 063 150 1533 Peter on 081 775 2434 or 083 208 7244 r all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating and queries.

Hard Silver P Call Des on 011 827 7535 or or Pineter n 081 775 2434 oN r Cadmium Plate Goldoor Electroless For all your Aircraft and Allie Silver Passivation Hard Copper Hard Chrome Hard Silver Plate Anodising in Alodine

Electroless Nickel Hard Copper Plate We are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Airmotive. Call Oliver on 011 827 7535 or Peter on 081 755 2534 or 083 208 7249 For all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating requirements.

Black Phosph

Anodising in Grey, Red or Black Phosphating Black Phosphating Phosphating

SA Flyer 2022|06

Anodising in Grey, Red or Black

We are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Air Call DJune es 2022 on 011 827 7535 or 063 150 1533 122


HANGAR 13 AT RAND AIRPORT has housed AMKA Aviation, an Avionics AMO for many years and have just completed a makeover as part of our proud association with Nicholson Helicopters who share the facility. The facility houses Sales, Admin, Tech Records, Engineering offices as well as Radio, Instrument, Autopilot, Gyro, Installation and Battery workshops. AMKA represents many dealer principals including Collins Aerospace, Garmin, Avidyne, Trig, Genesys Aerosystems, Freeflight, Latitude, Flight Display systems, JP Instruments and others.

Repair and overhaul capabilities range from Gyroscopic Instruments, Electrical Instruments, Flight Instruments, Engine Instruments, Ni-Cad Batteries, Lead Acid Batteries, Comm Transceivers, Nav Receivers, HF Transceivers, GPS, ADF, DME, Transponders, Rad Alt, Audio Systems, ELT’s.

Companies

AMKA AVIATION

Flightline Maintenance capabilities include both Helicopters and fixed wing. Installation experience includes everything from Engine Monitors, Autopilots to full glass flightdecks, from Cessna 172’s to Corporate jets. Visit our website to see our installations and talk to our happy customers. j

LANSERIA AIRPORT FACILITY Hangar 109 B & C, Lanseria International Airport +27 (0) 11 701 2000

RAND AIRPORT FACILITY Hangar 13, Rand AirportRand: +27 (0) 11 824 5486

We have your maintenance needs covered

Specialists Avionics Engineers

June 2022

123


Aircraft Powerplant Co. (Pty) Ltd

AIRCRAFT POWERPLANT COMPANY (APCO) was born in 2001 as a result of the management buyout of the PLACO Engines Division. Under the guidance Tony Rodrigues and Henk Joubert, both equipped with wealth of experience and knowledge, APCO has earned a reputation for excellence within the aviation community. APCO’s Team of highly qualified factory and locally trained technicians have developed full in-house capacity to perform all required maintenance and turn key repair services, including bench testing on both Lycoming and Continental Engines. In addition APCO

have an in-house component division, engine hose shop, machine shop, aluminium welding shop and also offer cadmium engine plating. The newly introduced NTC engine shop specialise in the repair and overhaul of many brands of NTC engines including Gypsy, NTC Lycoming and Superior Kit Engines to name but a few. As an optional extra they offer a balancing and porting service as well as many types of corrosion protective applications, ranging from polyurethane base paints to the more lavish and durable ceramic coatings.

Aircraft Powerplant Co. (Pty) Ltd Tel: +27 12 543 0775 / 0181 Fax: +27 12 567 3630 Hangar 5A, Wonderboom Airport

ENGINE DIVISION

Complete overhaul facility with test bench

MACHINE SHOP

Machining, repair, modification o/h of cylinders and crankcases

TESTING

NDT, MPI, Dye Pen and Zyglo

COMPONENT DIVISION

Servicing, overhaul, repair

SUPPLIERS OF AIRCRAFT APPROVED ENGINE LUBRICANTS

• SHELL • Phillips • AVBLEND and Camguard

PLATING SHOP

Cadmium Plating

124

June 2022

tonyrodrigues@mweb.co.za Cell: +27 82 558 9388 henkjoubert@mweb.co.za Cell: +27 83 258 5272 www.apcosa.co.za


Companies

admin@aerotric.com or richard@aerotric.com

ELT’s

ARTEX 345 ELT ELT INCLUDING INSTALLATION, MODS, SHEET METAL

ADS-B

Install Garmin GTX 335 ADS-B Out Transponder with GPS & GAE 12 Altitude Encoder SACAA Mod approval estimation +/- 3 months. CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ON 2020 AD.

SA Flyer 2022 | 06

AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT PANEL REFURB & PRINTING IN HOUSE

Protect your engine, protect your pocket. Increase performance and decrease maintenance costs with the most comprehensive and proven range of aviation products. Atlas Aviation Lubricants is the proud Sub-Saharan macro-distributor for AeroShell, stocking a range of world class engine oils, greases and fluids. Contact us today and enquire about our range of AeroShell products. www.atlasaviation.co.za | sales@atlasaviation.co.za | (011) 917 4220

June 2022

125


We are qualified in Aircraft Maintenance, Airworthiness Management, Project Management, Quality and Safety Management.

Our capabilities are: B737 Classic / B737- New Generation / Embraer 135/145/170/190 Airbus A320 family

Aves Technics 126

AMO 1541

June 2022

D3 Building Denel Aviation Campus 3-5 Atlas Road Bonaero Park 1619

www.avesholding.com 2022


Aves Technics is an AMO company under the Nhlanhleni group of Companies. The AMO is managed and run by aviation expects who are passionate about aviation.

Companies

AVES TECHNICS We are based at Denel Facilities near O R Tambo Airport, with direct access to the OR Tambo flight line. We are also able to position our team at Customer’s facility or anywhere as preferred by the Operator/Customer.

We offer Aircraft Maintenance, Airworthiness Management, Project Management, Quality and Safety Management. We have full capabilities on B737 Classic/NG, A320 Family and Embraer 135/145/170/190

We also integrate with Local engineers rated by Local Civil Aviation Authority after they have undergone our quality system approval. Aircraft Maintenance is Our Passion. Aves Technics hold the SACAA approval AMO1541.

We have a team of that will tailor make the service to meet you require. Our current Customer include Operators, Owners and VIP Operators in the continent. We align our approvals to that of the client country regulations or use our approval as approved by local authority

Aves Technics, D3 Building, Denel Aviation Campus, 3-5 Atlas Road, Bonaero Park, 1619 Gauteng, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 568 7677 | Email: info@ avestechnics.com | Mobile: +27 82 216 3980

j

AVIATION REBUILDERS AVIATION REBUILDERS SACAA APPROVED Category B and X5, AMO 188, based in the Showroom, Rand Airport, Germiston. Established in 1997, we are celebrating our 25th anniversary this year. We hope to continue to support and service the general aviation industry for many more years to come. Our team is a family that have worked together to build and establish the reputation of our AMO over many years, each one invaluable for their contribution to the organisation.

We are proud to offer the services of our well established and equipped sheet metal workshop, approved aircraft welding facility, as well as our flight control cable assembly section. We look forward to welcoming you and your beloved aircraft to our family. Contact Aviation Rebuilders on: Tel: +27 (0)11 827-2491 Cell: +27 (0)82 872-4117 Email: lyn@aviationrebuilders.com

j

June 2022

127


Companies

SA CAA AMO 188

CEL

EBR AT

ING

IN A VIAT

ION

ASSEMBLY OF FLIGHT CONTROL CABLES • SHEET METAL REPAIRS • APPROVED AIRCRAFT WELDING

VISIT THE SHOWROOM @ RAND AIRPORT, GERMISTON

011 827 2491

082 872 4117

FAX

THANK YOU TO OUR CUSTOMERS FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT

BENVEROY (PTY) LTD – BIOBOR AFRICA BENVEROY (PTY) LTD, a privately owned South African company, based in Johannesburg, South Africa, focuses on developing environmentally sustainable solutions for fuel consumption reduction, and reduction of carbon footprint. Benveroy offers a complete fuel enhancement product package and the related implementation of product injection blending and product dosing systems, for individual aviation companies, and airport infrastructure. This includes high level fuel quality management. Biobor JF ® became the first biocide tested and approved by FAA, airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and aircraft engine manufactures, for the treatment and prevention of microbial contamination in aviation fuels, and aircraft fuel tanks. Biobor JF ® is also

128

June 2022

the only biocide that not only fights microbial growth, but replaces lubricity lost in ultra-low sulphur fuels. After 57 years, Biobor JF ® continues to be the most recognized and recommended biocide for all hydrocarbon fuels, bio fuels, transmission and hydraulic fluids, etc. Benveroy’s company directors have combined more than 60 years of experience in the Engineering, Petrol-Chemical, and Aerospace Industries. Contact Benveroy, a division of Khubenker Energy (Pty) Ltd for all BIOBOR family of fuel additives on: Tel: 011 726 7162 ben@benveroy.com / 071 453 1517 vernon@benveroy.com / 079 524 1461 www.benveroy.com j


BENVEROY – KHUBENKER ENERGY BENVEROY – A DIVISION OF KHUBENKER ENERGY (Pty) Ltd – BIOBOR AFRICA. Experience Counts Hammonds Fuel Additives, Inc. is an innovative, industry leading manufacturer of fuel biocides and additives serving some of the largest fuel users and industries worldwide. We as Benveroy have the privilege to represent and distribute Hammonds Biobor products here in Africa and Indian Ocean Islands. Our flagship product, Biobor®JF, continues to be one of the most trusted and widely used fuel biocides for preventing microbial growth and preserving fuel quality. With over 57 years of proven reliability in aviation, refineries, terminals, fleets and diesel end users. Our extensive pedigree of OEM approvals and effective use continues. Hammonds Biobor also offers a comprehensive line of aviation, gasoline and diesel fuel products to address all of your fuel quality needs and ensures that your equipment, aircrafts, vehicles, engines and facilities operate at peak efficiency, with the highest quality fuel.

Premium Products, Unmatched Pedigree Since 1965, we are proud to have earned a laundry list of recommendations and approvals from some of the largest turbine engines manufactures, airframe manufactures, diesel engine manufactures, and fuel users across the globe. Biobor®JF is mentioned specifically in numerous operation manuals for solving fuel contamination issues and is one of only two biocides approved for use in aviation jet fuel! The complete line of Biobor® products continue in this pedigree and provide the same level of trust and proven performance as expected from its long track record with Biobor®JF. So, when you are choosing a fuel additive, don’t take our word for it… trust the products proven at 36,000 feet and recommended by OEMs worldwide. Contact Benveroy, a division of Khubenker Energy (Pty) Ltd for all BIOBOR family of fuel additives on: Tel: 011 726 7162 vernon@benveroy.com – 079 524 1461 ben@benveroy.com – 071 453 1517 www.benveroy.com / www.khubenker.co.za

June 2022

129


Companies

CENTURY AVIONICS Excellence in Avionics Century Avionics specialises in Flightdeck- and Avionics upgrades for general aviation fixedand rotary-wing aircraft. Careful evaluation and planning of every project is essential – from the placing/positioning of glass displays and other avionics in the panel to enhance ergonomics and aesthetics to the final set-up and configuration of the installed equipment. Century Avionics excel in Avionics Sales/ Marketing, Upgrades/Installations, Repairs/ Maintenance, Support and Certification making us a convenient, knowledge based avionic retrofit facility. We are an in- and out of warranty service centre for Bose, David Clark and Lightspeed headsets as well as Garmin, McMurdo (Orolia/Kannad) ELT’s, and many other avionics manufacturers. We are approved dealers for a host of avionics manufacturers (Garmin, Honeywell, Bendix King, Avidyne, McMurdo ELT, Genesys Aerosystems and many others) and constantly aim to offer our valued customers the widest range of products and capabilities. Longstanding customers attest to our professional commitment, and fast and friendly service. Our AMO and Design Organisation is approved in South Africa, Botswana, Kenya, Namibia, Malawi and Zimbabwe. Century NAVCOM, our Design Organisation, along with our qualified and experienced Certification Department

130

June 2022

and SACAA appointed DAR will assist with Avionics STC Application/Development and/or Modification Approvals. Please contact us for all your avionic requirements. Tel: +27 11 701 3244 E-mail: sales@centuryavionics.co.za or marketing@centuryavionics.co.za Website: Avionics In South Africa | Century Avionics Instagram: Century Avionics (@century. avionics) Facebook: Century Avionics Century j Avionics | Facebook Linked In: Century Avionics Century Avionics: My Company | LinkedIn


June 2022

131


Companies

DIEPKLOOF AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE WITH 70 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE, Diepkloof Aircraft Maintenance (AMO SACAA 1398) are one of the leaders in aircraft maintenance as well as the preferred choice for many clients. Based at Diepkloof airfield, Malmesbury, Diepkloof Aircraft Maintenance is a South African Civil Aviation Authority approved AMO. It is your one-stop AMO facility that offers a wide range of services that include general aviation aircraft maintenance, Non-Type Certified maintenance as well as specialized services. General Aircraft Maintenance: • All single engine Piper & Cessna & Beechcraft series • All Air Tractor, Thrush, Dromader, AG Cat, Piper Brave & Piper Pawnee • All Lycoming, Teledyne Continental engines

• • • • • • • • • • •

All Pratt & Whitney -Turbine & Radial engines. Non-Type Certified (NTCA): All NTCA Aircraft work - Homebuilt, Ultralights etc… Specialist Services: Hartzell & Mc Cauley Propellers Licenced for complete rebuilds Specialised Sheetmetal work Fabric covering and interiors Aircraft weighing Welding Propeller balance

Contact details: E-Mail: diepkloofamo@gmail.com Nick Kleinhans: +27 83 454 6366 Pieter v Aswegen: +27 82 784 7133

j

at

E1 nger a H : rt AD Airpo s d NEW n a l Wine Cape isit us

S: V DRES

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE Approved SACAA AMO 1398

We offer General Aircraft Maintenance on all single Piper, Beech & Cessna series Aircraft. All Air Tractor, Thrush, Dromader, Ag Cat, Piper Brave & Piper Pawnee crop spraying aircraft. All NTCA Aircraft [Homebuilts, Ultralights etc.] All Lycoming, Telydyne Continental, Pratt & Whitney Turbine & Radial engines, Pezetel Radial engines. All Hartzell & Mc Cauley Propellers. We also are licenced to do rebuilds, sheetmetal work, Fabric recovering, Weighing of aircraft. All Engineers are SACAA Licenced Aircraft Maintenance Engineers as well as AP approved [NTCA Aircraft] [Combined experience of 70 years]. Please contact: Nick 083 454 6366 or Pieter 082 784 7133 or e-mail: diepkloofamo@gmail.com

132

June 2022


Companies

DYNAMIC PROPELLERS ESTABLISHED IN 2008, Dynamic Propellers specialises in the overhauling, repair and maintenance of propellers for commercial and privately owned aircraft. With a staff compliment with a total of around 130 years propeller overhaul experience, Dynamic Propellers overhaul and maintain all Hartzell, McCauley, MT, Hoffmann, Sensenich and Hamilton propellers and is the only enterprise in South Africa that provides comprehensive repair and maintenance services on Dowty and Whirlwind propellers. All of which is done to the highest standards as stipulated by the various propeller manufacturers.

Dynamic Propellers’ repair services are performed both in-house in a state of the art aviation engineering workshop, or in the field. Highly skilled engineers will travel domestically or to neighbouring countries and abroad to cater for customers’ propeller requirements. Dynamic Propellers is an SACAA Authorised Service Centre, AMO 1150, and is the sole McCauley Authorised Service Centre for the African continent. Contact Details: Andries Visser Tel: +27 82 445 4496 Email: andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za j

At Dynamic Propellers cc we overhaul and maintain all Hartzell, McCauley, MTPropeller, Hoffmann, Dowty, Sensenich, Whirl Wind and Hamilton standard propellers to include metal and composite blades. We do all maintenance procedures related to aircraft propeller overhauls as called for by the various propeller manufacturers including cadmium plating.

100 95 75

Everything is performed in-house, including cold compression rolling on Hartzell propeller blades, as well as dynamic balancing of propellers in the field. Dynamic Propellers cc is an Authorised Service Centre for MT-Propeller and Whirl Wind. Dynamic Propellers cc is also appointed as the sole McCauley Authorised Service Centre for the African continent.

25 5 0

SA Flyer 2022|06

We carry a large stock holding of fast moving propellers, hubs, parts, de-icing parts, overhaul kits etc. in our inventory to cater for Hartzell, McCauley, MT – Propeller, Hoffman, Dowty, Sensenich, Whirl Wind and Hamilton standard propellers. We do a huge amount of travelling to local, domestic and neighbouring countries as well as abroad to cater for customer’s propeller requirements.

www.dynamicpropellers.co.za • Tel: +27 11 824 5057 • Fax2mail: 086 548 2651 E-mail: andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za • Andries: 082 445 4496 June 2022

133


Companies

D.M. AVIATION SPARES AIRCRAFT PARTS AND CONSUMABLES D.M. Aviation Spares is situated on the north side of Lanseria, Unit 2, next to Century Avionics, Gate 5. The company stocks aircraft parts, aircraft consumables and general consumables. D.M. Aviation Spares was started in 2011 by Daniella Mawson who has been in aviation since 1980 and in the aircraft parts industry since 1990. She therefore has extensive knowledge of parts and their sourcing.

Daniella goes out of her way to source parts that others say are not available. D.M. Aviation imports parts as well as sourcing hard to find aircraft components. They provide clients with the best prices and service possible. Furthermore, they are agents for Aircraft Spruce and others. For more information, contact Daniella Mawson on: Tel: 082 576 8853 Email: dmaviationspares@gmail.com j

D.M. Aviation Spares’ aim is to make life easier for the smaller AMOs at the airport by holding fast moving stock.

m haWe ov ve ed !

“We Keep you Flying” 4 Source & Supply Aircraft parts & consumables for Fixed Wing / Beechcraft / King Air / Dornier 328 / Citation / Embraers / Learjet & Home Build Aircraft. All parts come with Approved Release Certificates. 4 Locate “Hard to Find” Aircraft Parts & consumables 4 Handle Component Repairs & Exchanges 4 Distributor for Professional Tooling 4 Agent for Aircraft Spruce 4 Based next to Century Avionics, Lanseria International Airport Contact: Daniella Mawson Mobile no: 082 576 8853 E-mail: daniellamawson@telkomsa.net / dmaviationspares@gmail.com

134

June 2022

UNIT NO 2, GATE 5 LANSERIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT


MAINTENANCE MATTERS: TOP TIPS FOR PROPER PROPELLER LUBRICATION

Propeller Owner’s Manual for detailed instructions for your propeller model.

WHEN TO LUBRICATE YOUR PROPELLER

WHICH PROPELLER GREASE TO USE

Much like propeller overhauls, the interval for lubricating your propeller is defined in terms of operating hours and calendar time. Use whichever occurs first for your specific situation. Remember, even propellers with low operating hours are subject to degradation and the breakdown of internal lubricants over time. Hartzell Propeller has published specific intervals for propeller lubrication in our Hartzell Owner’s Manuals.

At Hartzell, we have researched, tested, and approved specific brands and types of grease for our propellers. If you have a Hartzell prop, use only Hartzell-approved greases as defined in the Hartzell Standard Practices Manual. Mixing different specifications and/or brands of grease is generally not permitted and may require your propeller to be disassembled and serviced by a certified propeller repair station.

HOW TO LUBRICATE YOUR PROPELLER

DO YOU HAVE QUESTIONS FOR HARTZELL’S TECHNICAL TEAM?

Follow the specific lubrication practices published by your propeller manufacturer. If you have a Hartzell prop, refer to the Hartzell

Our experts are here to answer your propeller questions. Call 1 (800) 942-7767 or visit HartzellProp.com. j

TOP PROP PERFORMANCE CONVERSION PROGRAM FOR AFRICA

MOST RELIABLE PROPELLER FOR CESSNA AIRCRAFT

Companies

HARTZELL PROPELLER INC.

For Cessna 206, 208, and 210 Operating in Africa requires aircraft and products that are reliable and durable. Whether it’s an Air Safari to the remotest game preserve, or delivering critical medical supplies to an isolated village, you want a propeller that you can count on. Built on Honor for over 100 years, Hartzell propellers are backed by our industry-leading warranty through first overhaul up to 6 years/2,400 hrs.

Our Top Prop program offers proven 2-, 3-, and 4-blade propeller conversions featuring the latest in blended airfoil scimitartechnology for all single engine Cessnas.

+1 937-778-5726, Option 2 TopPropAfrica@HartzellProp.com HartzellProp.com/Cessna

June 2022

135


Companies

EXECUTIVE AIRCRAFT REFURBISHMENT “QUALITY IS OUR PASSION”, this is the mantra that we live by at Executive Aircraft Refurbishment. We are an Aircraft Interior and Exterior refurbishment facility, based at Lanseria International Airport, quality workmanship and service excellence, combined with knowledgeable staff has earned us the reputation of No.1 Aircraft Interior and Exterior refurbishment facility Complete aircraft exterior paint strip and resprays are done all under one roof, designing paint scheme lines, logo’s to customer specifications. We also offer a mobile touchup service to our customers ensuring their aircraft stays in mint condition. Our interior shop also specializes in complete interior refurbishments such as the refurbishment of overhead stowage bins and seating, Roof-liners, cockpit glare-shields, cabinets and galleys, wool carpets, textile and non-textile floor covering, refurbishment of seats and foam building in varying modern styles. We manufacture interior window sunshields and aircraft exterior ground covers, EAR also re-web and re-certify aircraft safety belts. Executive Aircraft Refurbishment are the right choice for interior and exterior refurbishments of your aircraft from interior refurbishment to exterior spray painting, we do it all.

136

June 2022

Entrust your fleet to Executive Aircraft Refurbishment for a new fresh look and we promise to have your aircraft ready and serviceable when you need it.

Tel: +27 (0)10 900 4149 Mobile: +27 (0)82 547 8379 Info@earefurbishment.com Francois@earefurbishment.com Hangar 11 (interior shop) and 31(paint shop) Lanseria International Airport South Africa, Gate 5, North Side j


COMFORT & QUALITY AIRCRAFT REFURBISHMENT

Tel: +27 (0)10 900 4149 Info@earefurbishment.com Hangar 24 (Interior Shop) Lanseria International Airport,

| Mobile: +27 (0)82 547 8379 | Francois@earefurbishment.com and Hangar 31 (Paint Shop). South Africa, Gate 5 North Side.

June 2022

137


Companies

F. GOMES UPHOLSTERS AIRCRAFT UPHOLSTERY F. Gomes Upholsters is a family based upholstery company. Established in 1979, the company specialises in aircraft, as well as motor vehicle, boat and furniture upholstery.

F. Gomes Upholsters provides an expert re-upholstery and upholstery service that caters to any upholstery need. No job is ever too small or too large. F. Gomes Upholsters is based in Johannesburg.

F. Gomes Upholsters will refurbish your aircraft interior to look like new, giving it the class it deserves. They use only the best quality materials, and their craftsmanship is outstanding. Mr Gomes, the founder of F. Gomes Upholsters, has been in the upholstery business for close on 40 years and as such brings many years of experience and professionalism to the company.

Landline: 011 614 2471 Mr. Gomes: 082 412 6669 Carla: 083 602 5658

138

June 2022

A Dynamic team to meet all your requirements. Refurbish your aircraft and / or helicopter. Best prices guaranteed

For exceptional craftsmanship at the best prices, contact F. Gomes Upholsters on: Tel: (011) 614 2471 Fax: (011) 614 9806 Email: gomesuph@netactive.co.za j


HELI AFRIQUE SPECIALIZES in general helicopter maintenance, upgrades, repairs, interior and exterior refurbishment and modifications, specialising in the Airbus Helicopter SA341, H125 (AS350/355 series), H120 (EC 120), H130 (EC 130), H135 (EC 135 series), BO105 and BK117 helicopters. We provide first and second line maintenance of TURBOMECA, Allison and Lycoming Engines and hold a service centre for Robinson R22 & R44 helicopters. Heli Afrique assist with inspections, C of Registration, Airworthiness formalities and have assistance from SACAA Inspectors to issue Certificates of Airworthiness and Certificates of Registration from abroad in foreign countries. Heli-Afrique facilitates the sale of used helicopters, carry out export/import, customs and

E – WE H E L I A F R IQ U ral helicopter

in gene We specialise

H AV E 40 Y

shipping formalities. We provide pre-purchase inspections of helicopters worldwide. Based at Rand Airport, Heli-Afrique holds a large range of spares inventory for the above mentioned helicopters and engines. Heli-Afrique holds the following CAA approvals: SACAA # 830, Republic of Zambia, Zimbabwe, Angola and Lesotho. We are the proven alternate ‘AMO’ to Airbus Helicopters and TURBOMECA in Southern Africa. Contact: Tel: 011 021 3866 Email: accounts@heli-afrique.co.za www.heli-afrique.co.za j

IE N C E IN T EARS EXPER

H E B U S IN E S

S.

ment. terior refurbish

terior and ex

, repairs, in , modifications

, upgrades

maintenance

Companies

HELI-AFRIQUE

• SA341 ries • AS350/ 355 se ries se 5 13 0/ 13 0/ • EC12 s rie se 5 • BO10 • BK 117 ouglas • McDonald D 2/R44 R2 on • Robins ice available rv se ge ra ga • Han

s. coming engine Allison and Ly , ca o ec th om so rb Le babwe and enance on Tu Zambia, Zim nd line maint 0, Republic of First and seco 83 tions” # A CA SA : s edi Vac Opera CAA approval icopter for M

t the BK 117 B2

or We now supp

model “Hel

Hangar 56, 10 Viking Way, Rand Airport Tel: 011 827 8632  Tino: 083 458 2172  Office: 083 446 0066 Email: technical@heli-afrique.co.za and info@heli-afrique.co.za June 2022

139


Companies

GARMIN INTERNATIONAL THREE THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN YOU’RE UPGRADING YOUR PANEL Whether you’ve just purchased your first aircraft, or your older panel needs some upgrades, deciding what to install isn’t always as simple as hitting “add to cart.” To help you make the best decisions, the Garmin Aviation sales team has some considerations to keep in mind as you’re mulling over your options.

1. Know your mission. How you use your aircraft will help you choose your new avionics. Is it for personal use, for work, or for a combination of both? What type of weather will you fly in? How frequently will you fly? With that mission in mind, you can identify what capabilities your panel needs.

2. Plan your budget. Knowing how much you’re comfortable spending helps you get the most bang for your buck. There are a several facets to think about. Hardware and labor costs are important pieces of the puzzle. Reliability can be, too. Did a legacy system — such as the vacuum system — fail, causing an unexpected expense? In many instances, you can not only replace that system, but also gain new capabilities. That’s money well spent.

140

June 2022

3. Identify your timeline. Many upgrades take weeks — if not months — to complete. If you fly for business, you may want to plan your install for a slower time of year. Talk with your local dealer to see what their schedule is like, and work with them to establish what you want so you can lock in your installation slot. And the Garmin team does recommend using a local dealer. For ongoing work, you’ll want to have that relationship so you can get back into the air quickly. Planning an avionics upgrade is an exciting adventure. By thinking through the process, you’ll have a finished panel you’ll enjoy flying behind for years to come. Website: www.garmin.com/aviation Email: aviation.sales@garmin.com.

j


WHERE WOULD YOU LAND IF YOUR ENGINE FAILED NOW?

SMART GLIDE ™ WILL HELP GUIDE YOU THERE. Automation that reduces your workload during an engine-related emergency with the press of a single button. Only from Garmin.

VISIT US AT AERO SOUTH AFRICA GARMIN.COM/SMARTGLIDE © 2022 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries.

June 2022

141


Companies

GEMAIR GEMAIR WAS STARTED IN 2007 by Andries Venter, a South African Air Force trained engineer with over twelve years of aviation maintenance experience. Since relocating to Lanseria International’s south side in 2009, the company has continued to grow and now looks after the maintenance needs of a full range of privately owned, training and charter operated aircraft. These range from Non-Type Certified Aircraft through light singles and twins and on to turbo-props and light jets. Gemair is a recognised CAA Approved Maintenance Organisation, AMO number 1003, and has a team of nine full time engineers who together have a combined total of over

142

June 2022

50 years of aviation experience. Backed up by the full time administrative staff, Gemair is able to perform all your aviation maintenance requirements. The company has expanded into aircraft interiors through the acquisition of Lanseria Aircraft Interiors and aircraft charter through the acquisition of Out of the Blue Air Safaris. Contact Andries Venter: Cell: 082 905 5760 Email: Andries@gemair.co.zaj


YOUR PEACE OF MIND IN AVIATION MAINTENANCE Gemair is an SACAA Approved Maintenance Organisation, AMO 1003 with 5 other African AMO Approvals and has a team of 9 full time engineers who together have a combined total of over 50 years aviation experience. Gemair are able to perform all aviation maintenance requirements on a variety of Non-Type certified aircraft, light singles and twins up to turbo propellers and light jets.

Gemair also holds electrical and instrumentation approvals.

? WE ARE ALSO LOOKING FOR LICENCED ENGINEERS

? TEL: 011 701 2653 or 082 905 5760

Hangar 110, Gate 13, Turn right (old Pical hangar), located behind Spectrum 143 June 2022 Air Surveyors, Lanseria South Side, 1748


Companies

M AND N ACOUSTIC SERVICES M AND N ACOUSTIC SERVICES (Pty) Ltd is a SANAS accredited laboratory and specialises in calibrations on acoustic, human vibration, vibration and DC/LF measuring equipment. The laboratory also operates according to the ISO/IEC 17025:2005 Specification for the competence of calibration laboratories. Our electrical calibration capabilities include:

SA Flyer 2022|06

Acoustics • Noise Exposure Meter • Sound Level Meters • Integrating Sound Level Meter • Dose Badges • Noise Dosimeters

Vibration • Human Vibration Meters • Vibration Meters • DC Low Frequency • Multi-Meters • Clamp Meters • Insulation Testers With a dedicated team, they will ensure excellent turn-around times and affordable prices, while never compromising on delivering an outstanding service. Your Calibration is our concern! For more information, contact: Amanda Naudé Tel: 012 689 2007 Email: admin@mnacoustics.co.za

usticLtd o c A M & Nices (Pty) Serv SANAS Ac credited 1302 & 14Laboratory 8 We perform SANAS certifications on all your: Acoustics ( eg. CEL 350 ) Vibration ( eg. Rion VA -11) Human Vibration ( eg. Quest Hav Pro) Electrical DC/LF Equipment – inhouse or on site (eg. Fluke Multimeters, Insulation Testers)

S Q U OTATI O N T ON REQUES Contact: Marianka Naude Tel: 012 689 2007 I Cell: 076 920 3070 Email: admin@mnacoustics.co.za

144

June 2022

j


AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

Contact Details:

Mistral Aviation was founded in 2002 with the aim of addressing the high cost of operating aircraft thousands of miles from the original equipment manufacturers. (OEM).

Telephone: (27) 81-755-2534 Fax: (27) 11- 395 1291 E-Mail: Peter@mistral.co.za Website: www. mistral.co.za

Mistral continues to add to its capability and has just added Machining and NDT.

Address Safair Campus Northern Perimeter Road, OR Tambo International Bonaero Park Kempton Park Gauteng South Africa j

SA Flyer 2022|06

Our experience has grown, and we are about to embark on training of our staff to take up the challenge of new generation equipment.

Companies

MISTRAL AVIATION SERVICES

WE OFFER THE INDUSTRY INTEGRITY, RELIABILITY, EXPERIENCE AND A DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE

Safair North Perimeter Road, OR Tambo International Airport, Bonaero Park, 1619 Tel: 081 755 2534 Fax: 011 395 1291

June 2022

145


Companies

PJ AVIATION TQ-AVIATION, A DIVISION of the TQ-Systems Group, Germany, has made the road towards ADS-B an easier transition for South African aircraft owners with their compact Mode-S transponder KTX2-Basic. With Mode-S requirements already upon us, the KTX2 Basic is just that – a Class 1 Mode-S transponder certified to 30,000 feet and 250 knots, at an affordable price, in compact 57mm or 160mm stack mount. You are not paying for anything more than what you need at present. But, the KTX2 is future proof, so that when ADS-B becomes a requirement, the owner simply enters a purchased code and has fully compliant ADS-B Out capabilities when adding a GPS source.

Just one module to mount, and two wires to connect, TQ’s KTX2 could not be easier to install and compliments its class leading KRT2 VHFCOM, featuring Dual Watch, RSA data base and VOX intercom. For more information visit www.pjaviation.co.za j

UPGRADE TO TQ-AVIONICS

www.pjaviation.co.za 083 265 0581 Stall OD5

146

June 2022


Companies

StandardAero StandardAero is one of the world's largest independent providers of engine maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services, providing OEM-authorized support for leading aeroengines and APUs including the AE 3007, APS 2300, CF34-3/-8, CFM56-7B, GTCP36, JT15D, PT6A, PW100, PW150A, PW901A/C, RB211-535 and RE220. StandardAero’s facility at Lanseria International Airport near Johannesburg is a fully authorized Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) Designated Overhaul Facility (DOF) for the PT6A engine family, and the world’s only independent service provider authorized to overhaul the PT6A-140. In addition, the facility provides full support – up to and including overhaul – for 41 other variants of the engine. The Lanseria facility also offers service center and mobile repair team (MRT) support for the PW100 turboprop and JT15D turbofan. With more than five decades of experience in repairing and overhauling P&WC engines, StandardAero has developed a reputation for quality workmanship, industry leading turnaround times, exceptional customer service and competitive pricing. Point of contact: Jason Gallant General Manager Office: +27 11 701 3035 jason.gallant@standardaero.com

PT6A FLAT RATE OVERHAUL (FRO)

No surprise pricing

No surprise pricing No compromise on quality No sweeping exclusions No sweeping exclusions

No compromise on quality

No wonder it’s so popular! No wonder it’s so popular! StandardAero Lanseria, a Pratt & Whitney PT6A designated overhaul facility (DOF) and the sole independent approved for&the PT6A-140, is StandardAero DOF Lanseria, a Pratt Whitney PT6A pleased to support across Africa designated overhauloperators facility (DOF) and the with sole P&W’s flat rate overhaul (FRO) which independent DOF approved forprogram, the PT6A-140, combines quality with is pleased OEM-level to support operators acrossguaranteed Africa with “not exceed” Meaningwhich that P&W’stoflat rate capped overhaulpricing. (FRO) program, combines OEM-level quality with guaranteed you can plan your maintenance expenses with “not to exceed” capped any pricing. Meaning that confidence, and without compromises. you can plan your maintenance expenses with

confidence, and without The FRO program doesany notcompromises. incur extra charges for typical corrosion, sulphidation or repairable The FROobject program does not incur extra foreign damage (FOD), and PMAcharges parts for typical corrosion, sulphidation or repairable are accepted.

j

foreign object damage (FOD), and PMA parts are accepted.

As the industry’s leading independent aeroengine provider, StandardAero is trusted As the MRO industry’s leading independent aeroby airline, governmental and business aviation engine MRO provider, StandardAero is trusted by operators worldwide for airline, governmental and responsive, business tailored aviation support solutions. Contact us today to learn more. operators worldwide for responsive, tailored support solutions. Contact us today to learn more.

www.standardaero.com

BIGGER. BETTER. BOLDER. www.standardaero.com

June 2022

147


Companies

Skysource INTERNATIONAL QUALITY IS OUR PASSION Skysource INTERNATIONAL South Africa, a South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) approved Aircraft Maintenance Organisation, as well as an approved USA FAA approved facility, situated at Lanseria International Airport, and strives to provide its clients with only the best quality service, ensuring a relationship with trust, confidence, integrity and peace of mind in a job well done. Specialising in turbo prop aircraft Skysource International SA deliver aircraft refurbishments with an excellent lead time and quality maintenance including, but not limited to phase 1-6 inspections, annual inspections, airframe, avionics and sheet metal repairs. With highly skilled and experienced and professional technicians, Skysource International SA strive to only deliver the best quality service beyond its client’s expectations. “As we have the knowledge of the time constraints involved in aviation, we work hard to ensure we keep to a reasonable timeframe to have your aircraft ready and serviceable when you need it,” said Manny Skysource International SA not only provides top of the line maintenance, but also offers reputable aircraft sales, and is partnered with Skysource International LLC, a USA based Sales Company that opens up the international market. In Addition we have a USA based Aircraft Maintenance Company Skysource Aviation LLC

148

June 2022

USA. Who delivers the equivalent service and professionalism According to Manny, “if we do not have an aircraft you require at the time in our fleet, we will source one for you.” Skysource International Group is a family owned and operated business that takes great pride and puts great emphasis on instilling family values into how it conducts business. Skysource International SA also offers; aircraft pre-purchase inspections, aircraft maintenance management, aircraft recoveries, and aircraft re-weighing. Contact South Africa Manny Farinha: +27 72 036 3433 Telephone South Africa +27 10 900 4300 Contact USA Luke Overstreet: +1 406-698-2413 E-Mail: info@skysourcesa.com j


AMO 1427

PTY

www.skysourcesa.com

South Africa

Skysource International SA, Hangar 203, Lanseria International Airport

AIRCRAFT MAINTAINENANCE AND REFURBISHMENT QUALITY IS OUR PASSION

FAA USA Worldwide Aviation Resources Aircraft Sales, Purchasing, Maintenance and Consulting.

WE SPECIALIZE IN: Beechcraft 90 Series Beechcraft 200 Series Beechcraft 350 Series Beechcraft 1900D Series Cessna Caravan C208 Series Aircraft

SOUTH AFRICA Aircraft Maintenance based at Lanseria International Airport South Africa. With Full Aircraft Maintenance and Refurbishment, Paint, Upholstery, Defect rectification, Pre-purchase Inspection Capabilities. Decades of experience! Sheet Metal + Avionics Maintenance + Installation

+27 10 900 4300 • +27 72 036 3433

CALL US NOW FOR ALL OF YOUR AVIATION NEEDS!

June 2022

SA Flyer 2022|06S

info@skysourcesa.com 149


Companies

uAvionix uAvionix was founded with the mission of bringing safety solutions to the unmanned aviation industry in order to aid in the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into National Airspace Systems. uAvionix offers low SWaP TSO certified and uncertified avionics for General Aviation, Airport Surface Vehicles and the UAS markets. The team consists of an unparalleled engineering and management team with a unique combination of experience within avionics, surveillance, airport services, UAS aircraft development, radio frequency and semiconductor industries. uAvionix now distributes the revolutionary tailBeaconX 1090 MHz ADS-B transponder. tailBeaconX is a highly integrated transponder that replaces a rear navigation light by combining it with ADS-B OUT / Mode S transponder, SBAS GPS, antennas, and rear LED position light. tailBeaconX is uniquely designed to meet the challenge of worldwide adoption of both ground and space-based ADS-B for Air Traffic Surveillance.

tailBeaconX

REDEFINING THE ADS-B TRANSPONDER tailBeaconX combined with the AV-30 or supported third-party EFIS elevates your cockpit functionality while future-proofing your ADS-B transponder to meet US, Canadian, and future ADS-B requirements. tailBeaconX replaces your existing transponder while upgrading your rear position light.

tailBeaconX

CONTROLLED WITH AV-30-C

NOT YOUR ORDINARY TRANSPONDER

uAvionix ships pre-orders in the US, Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Email: sales@uavionix.com Website: www.uavionix.com

AV-30-C ADDS: • PRIMARY AI • PRIMARY DG • PRIMARY SLIP • G-METER

j

• PROBELESS AOA • LIVE ADS-B TRAFFIC W/AV-LINK

+ MORE

uAvionix.com/tbx

150

June 2022


FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

Edition 162 | June 2022

John Bassi

Russia’s Ukraine

lessons

– surviving the lockdown

for Africa

1

Two stories from Sudan

FlightCom: June 2022


AMO 227

FLIGHT SAFETY THROUGH MAINTENANCE

Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines

Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 Tel: (012) 543 0948/51, Fax: (012) 543 9447, email: aeroeng@iafrica.com

SA Flyer 2022|06

Overhaul Engine Components Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers



CONTENTS

TABLE OF 06 12 16 21 22 26 29 30 31 32 34

Publisher Flyer and Aviation Publications cc Managing Editor Guy Leitch guy@flightcommag.com Advertising Sales Wayne Wilson wayne@saflyermag.co.za

JUNE 2022 EDITION 162

Layout & Design Patrick Tillman: Imagenuity cc

ADMIN: +27 (0)83 607 2335 TRAFFIC: +27 (0)81 039 0595 ACCOUNTS: +27 (0)15 793 0708

Bush Pilot - Hugh Pryor Defence - Guy Leitch Pilots - Laura McDermid AME Directory John Bassi - Lockdown Part 3 News - Flight Inspection Symposium News - Bombardier’s Global 8000 Alpi Aviation SA: Flight School Directory Atlas Oil Charter Directory AVES Technics AMO Listing Backpage Directory

© FlightCom 2021. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronically, mechanically, photocopied, recorded or otherwise without the express permission of the copyright holders.


A NOTE FROM

THE EDITOR: African airlines have been the slowest sector of the airline industry to recover from the Covid pandemic. IN ITS MAY INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL Report, IATA notes that airlines based in Africa experienced a 91.8% year on year growth rate in their international RPKs in March. Together with Asia, Africa's international RPKs lag more than the other regions in terms of recovery to pre-pandemic levels, which are currently still half of what they were in March 2019. Air travel demand is restricted by Africa’s low vaccination rates as well as rising inflation. Africa accounts for just 1.9% of the total global passenger air travel market and given its slow recovery, this share is likely to decline even further. It is therefore not surprising that that the larger international carriers are quickly moving into the space left by the African carriers. Most noticeably United Airlines is aggressively expanding into Africa.

Wesgro’s Cape Air Access Initiative is to be congratulated on promoting flights to Cape Town, which is a natural stepping-off point for the ultralong haul flights to the USA. Cape Town is rapidly cementing its position as the key hub for Southern African tourism, thanks in large part to the huge improvements in connectivity created by initiatives such as the Cape Air Access initiative. And of course, it has a major geographical advantage thanks to its sea level altitude.

Cape Town is the key hub for Southern African tourism

United already operates direct flights from the USA to four cities in three countries in Africa. The American carrier’s latest expansion has been at the expense of a still moribund SAA, as United has announced direct flights from Washington to Cape Town. This bypasses and thus further marginalises SAA’s Johannesburg hub. It is noteworthy that United only has to obtain approval from the United States Department of Transport for the thrice weekly nonstop flights between Washington and Cape Town. The airline has thus been able to bypass the logjammed South African International Air Services Licensing Council.

Another beneficiary of this new route will be regional powerhouse airline Airlink, which is United's partner in Southern Africa and this will enable the Cape Town flights to correct connect seamlessly with more than 50 destinations across Southern Africa. In particular, it will connect tourists directly from the Cape to the Greater Kruger Park game reserves.

In this issue I also explore the problems the South African government is having the strategic equity partner deal for SAA finalised. This must also be due in part to the seeming impossibility of the task of being able to make SAA competitive once again. SAA has had its lunch most thoroughly eaten during the eight wasted Zuma years of state capture under Dudu Myeni and the task of the airline ever being able to make up the ground it has lost to the mega international carriers must be seen as impossible. 


BUSH PILOT HUGH PRYOR

PAR T 2 IAN , TH E SU DAN AND MINISTER

C H R I S PAT T E N

The British Government wanted to look into the possibility of opening Suakin, (a port city in northeastern Sudan on the Red Sea) up again as the main port for another old British colonial project due for resurrection, namely the Tokar Delta Irrigation Scheme.

T

HE TOKAR RIVER IS SEASONAL . Twice a year rains fall for a couple of months on the high plateaux of Eritrea and the Tokar river goes into spate, sweeping nutrient-rich soil down onto the coastal plain of Sudan, close to what used to be the Ethiopian border. Soon after the rains stop, the Tokar Delta completely dries out and reverts to semi-desert. The British plan was to build substantial barrages to divert the torrent into large reservoirs, thus taming the river into supplying irrigation the year round. And it worked well, supplying copious quantities of high-grade, long-strand cotton for many years..... until independence, with its associated corruption and lethargy, put an end to it.

It is interesting how enthusiastic politicians in newly independent states are to eject their colonial masters and yet how happy they are to welcome them back if there is a sniff of Government aid in the air. We were treated like princes at Tokar. After landing the Islander in amongst the mouldering remains of some Soviet spray planes, we were ushered into the old administrative compound by an aged retainer. Accommodation was laid on in the old Tokar Delta Scheme Administration Head Quarters, a large crumbling porticoed monument to British entrepreneurial optimism.

We were treated like princes at Tokar.

Now Ian and the kindly Minister were looking into the possibility of reactivating the scheme with British private investment, guaranteed by Her Majesty's Government.

6

FlightCom: June 2022

The cook-cum-house-servant appeared to be roughly of the same vintage as the building, as did the mosquito nets. Unexpectedly he proved to be a magician who could conjure up fresh lobsters with a cheeky little mayonnaise sauce, spiked with interesting local spices from a soot-blackened hole in the wall euphemistically called "the kitchen". Haj, as our cook was called, assured us that he


FlightCom: June 2022

7


fully understood the workings of the Khawajah (European) alimentary system and promised us that nothing untoward from his department would disrupt our schedule in the coming days. He even told us that the ice was made from purified drinking water...ICE?...WHERE on EARTH do you get ICE from in this remote God-forsaken corner of colonial oblivion?! Incredible! So Ian produced a bottle of Mr. Walker’s Best, kindly freed of duty by the British embassy, and the three of us settled down to discuss the day's events, watching the sun sink behind the jagged silhouette of the Red Sea hills. The terrace of the old Admin Building was flanked by two enormous field guns which bore brass placards that announced that they had previously served as naval artillery aboard the German Battle-cruiser Konigsberg. She was eventually destroyed in the Rufiji River Delta, way down south in Tanzania, in the First World War, after a long battle, during which aircraft were used for the first time to spot for the navy. How they got to Tokar is a mystery. The lobsters were quite unforgettable in the nicest possible way and Mr. Walker's contribution to the evening's relaxed conversation did not go unappreciated!

as a hotel for visiting dignitaries, with its bar and easy chairs and piano, is guarded and preserved to this day. The runway is reputed to be mined in case the Feelthy Colonialists ever thought about returning there. I only found out about this after I had been landing there for several months, so either I was extremely lucky or the mines were a figment of the Propaganda Ministry's imagination. I tend to believe the latter! Upon arrival in Khartoum we hardly had a chance to change our underpants before rushing off into the impenetrable swamps of the Sud, so limited was the kindly Minister's time. It wasn't until we were well on our way south that Ian discovered that Mr. Walker's "brother" had inadvertently been omitted from the passenger manifest! It was going to be a long trip without his company, however limited the kindly Minister's time might be.

We spent three more nights in this nostalgic fragment of British colonial history

We spent three more nights in this nostalgic fragment of British colonial history before returning to Khartoum. Our flight took us past the old RAF base at Carthago, which was one of the first things to be destroyed by the paranoid Soviets who replaced the Brits in Sudan, rather as they had in Aden. The officers' accommodation for the base was built up in the Red Sea hills at Erkowit to the east of the aerodrome and the officers' mess, which doubled

8

FlightCom: June 2022

The Sud is a swamp of such enormous proportions that it actually provides two percent of the world's oxygen. During the rains it extends for three hundred miles north/south and east/west. In Sudanese Arabic the word "sud" means "barrier" and that gives some indication of what the Arabs of the north felt about it. It is an area dominated by malarial mosquitoes and tsetse flies which carry schistosomiasis, the killer "sleeping sickness". Then there's puff adders, spitting cobras and crocodiles, and if that lot doesn't get you, they do quite a nice line in Arachnida as well. The people of the Sud are Black Africans and mostly Christian or "Animist", which means that they don't really know what they are. The people of the north are Afro-Arabs and are mostly Muslim. This has led


to centuries of wars, the most recent of which is just about to celebrate its twenty-seventh anniversary. Around one point five million southerners have been killed since this last one started. Slavery is still rife, particularly in the western reaches of the Sud around the Bahr el Gazal, a tributary of the Great Nile. There's nothing else left to steal. The railway from Khartoum comes down through the area, two or three times a year, four trains at a time, on its way to Wau. The trip takes two months because they have to lift the tracks from behind the trains and lay them in front all the way because so many of the rails have been "borrowed" or blown up. The front train is full of cavalry from Dharfur who sanitise the area each side of the track, capturing slaves and anything else that they find on the way. The only pay they receive is war-booty and the region is becoming increasingly booty-free as the war takes its toll on the resident population. Famine is widespread and only one baby in three survives to the age of five years.

since then. I was enormously privileged to be able to rectify that situation, by bringing him a new pair of 3•5 dioptre reading glasses from Nairobi, on my next visit. At Billing the doctor, Elijah Makenda, studied medicine at Makerere University in Uganda before going on to Padua University Hospital to study orthopaedic surgery, obtaining his doctorate and continuing at the university as a professor for a further three years. With all that experience behind him, and so much potential ahead of him, he decided to go back to Billing and build a hospital for his people. He speaks fluent and colloquial Italian as does Julia, his wife, and his English, although accented, is word-perfect. Billing is a group of small thatched mud huts, some of which make up the hospital, in the middle of an immense area of mosquito-infested thorn bush. Elijah is an Albert Schweitzer in his own land.

Famine is widespread and only one baby in three survives to the age of five year

The British government feels a particular affinity with the tall pastoralists who inhabit the Sud. They are full of surprises. In a village where many of the younger people have never set eyes on a European, and hardly anyone wears any clothes at all, Abraham, the teacher turned out to have spent five years at the London School of Economics. He was easy to spot because he wore the remnants of an Austin Reed Harris tweed hacking jacket with trilby hat and spoke with the kind of English accent normally only heard in the corridors of the House of Lords. His Clark’s brogue Oxford shoes had finally collapsed about four years before I met him, but the ‘thousand-miler’ sandals, made from old car tyres, seemed to serve very well as replacements. His glasses had been smashed during a government bombing raid, some four years previously, and he had been unable to read

Our trip was to take us round some of the projects being funded by Her Majesty's Tax Payers. There was the small textile factory at Mongalla, a fish processing plant at Gondokoro and a Tsetse fly eradication project at Amadi. The Mango Juice processing facility at Iambio was ironically based on the thousands of Mango trees which line the old slave routes, where the slaves unintentionally planted them, having eaten the fruit which were originally imported from the east by the slave traders. Also at Iambio the British Government still funded the extensive acreages of old Colonial Forestry Commission teak forests. We would spend our first night in Juba, the capital of the South, on the Nile just north of the Uganda border. The second night would be at Iambio with the Catholic Fathers and the third night we would stay at the government rest house at Wau. FlightCom: June 2022

9


Wau is geographically about as close as you can get to the centre of the African continent. In colonial times, people unfortunate enough to be posted there used to joke that Wau was not the end of the world, but you could definitely see it from there! We were also hoping to get fuel there for our Britten Norman Islander.

jelabia and the only thing which differentiated him from the locals was his hair and that was mostly missing. The remainder was greasy, dirty and uncut.

I had been briefed that the local agent for the Shell oil company was a certain Greek gentleman whose name was Dimitri. He was apparently a bit of a "one-off", whatever that meant.

"I understand you're the Shell man around here."

So, while Ian and our Minister went off to do their thing, I set about finding Dimitri and getting the plane topped up. The people at the airport were most helpful. One of the Air Traffic Controllers who was going home for lunch offered me a lift into town on his ancient Raleigh bicycle, an offer I gratefully accepted. That was my first ride as a pillion passenger on a bike since my childhood. You would probably be jailed if they caught you doing that sort of thing in the European Community, nowadays. He dropped me off in a side street in town, at the door of a dilapidated mud hut with a tin roof. I pushed open the creaking door and entered. The shop appeared to be in pitch darkness, coming as I had from the blinding sunlight. My nostrils were immediately greeted by the ubiquitous smells of Africa; sweat, charcoal and E-Coli.

"Dimitri?" I enquired. He nodded his head suspiciously.

Again the surreptitious nod of the head.

he swept aside one of the sacks to reveal, not a beautiful young girl

As my eyes became accustomed, I noticed that I was in a large earth-floored room with a rough counter, stained by constant contact with the great unwashed, running round three of the walls. The walls themselves were hung with old sacks as if the proprietor did not want his customers to see what he had in stock. Suddenly a flap in the sacking quivered and a figure appeared as though he had materialised straight out of the wall. He wore a grubby off-white

10 FlightCom: June 2022

"I'm down here with a delegation from the British Embassy," I announced importantly, hoping to elicit some respect from this uncommunicative subject. "And we need Avgas 100 low lead fuel for our aircraft. I can pay in dollars," I added, baiting the hook.

Dimitri considered this problem at length and finally, coming to a decision, he looked me straight in the eye and said, "You like some whisky?" This question took me by surprise, particularly in this out-of-the-way spot in a Muslim governmentheld outpost and coming from a person who was supposed to be selling aviation fuel. There was no doubt though that, since Mr. Walker had been omitted from the passenger list, any addition to our liquid assets would be most welcome. "How much?" I muttered, as if conniving in an illicit deal. "You like her, you take as much you like." said Dimitri with the sly grin of a practised pimp. "She have very attractive price, special for you." And so saying, he swept aside one of the sacks to reveal, not a beautiful young girl, but floor-to-ceiling boxes of a brand of Scotch which I had never come across


before. Red Hackle was her name, whisky obviously being feminine in Greek. The price was indeed so attractive that I could only believe that Dimitri's stocks had fallen off the back of the proverbial truck. I swiftly calculated that I could afford to purchase eleven bottles. Dimitri seemed to think that was enough to warrant giving us our aviation fuel and his beaming smile indicated a satisfactory conclusion to the deal. "How can I get "her" down to the aeroplane?" I said, involuntarily adopting Dimitri's use of the feminine gender.

making the whole thing gel so well." Now it was Ian's turn to reply to the Minister's speech. "Yes Chris," he started. ‘It really went better than I could have hoped and it was very much appreciated that you managed to make time for the trip. There's nothing like first-hand knowledge and now you will know what we're talking about when we mention specific needs for specific projects. It has been great fun having you with us. Shame we don't have anything to celebrate with.”

probably the most successful and interesting tour I have made

"No problem." Dimitri assured me, "I take her with me in the truck with the fuel. No-one see her. No problem," he reassured me, patting my shoulder.

We duly loaded her into Dimitri's truck, discretely veiling her modesty from the lecherous attentions of the police behind the drums of avgas. Upon our arrival at the airport, we quickly transferred her to the lockable aft luggage bay of the Islander and Dimitri gave me a hand with the refuelling, I retained one bottle in my brief case so that I could introduce her to my friends at the rest house. When I got back to the rest house that evening Ian and our Minister were sitting on the veranda chatting about the trip. We were due back in Khartoum the following day. "That was probably the most successful and interesting tour I have made since being appointed." said the Minister. "We've achieved a lot and opened up a number of new ideas for future development. To be honest I've enjoyed this trip so much that I'm going to find it pretty mundane going back to work again. I'd like to thank you both very much for

And now it was my turn, "Well, gentlemen," I said, "I just happen to have invited a friend along this evening. Her name is Red Hackle and I think you will get along fine once you get to know her." So saying, I produced the bottle from my brief case. A small cheer rose from the assembled company and we soon forgot about the fact that there was no food left in the house.

------ooo------

Ian died recently, leaving a distraught and lonely Joyce to live on the memories of an eventful and happy past. Death is seldom kind to those that are left behind, but the reason why I can write this story is because Ian was alive and I had the privilege to have been with him for part of his fascinating trip through life. 

FlightCom: June 2022

11


DEFENCE GUY LEITCH

LESSONS FOR AFRICA FROM THE AIR WAR IN THE UKRAINE The Russian experience in Ukraine provides clear lessons for Africa in the effective use of fighters. Africa has proven itself better at buying expensive new fighters than maintaining them, and in particular, providing the logistical support for their effective deployment.

T

HE EVIDENCE FOR AFRICA’S propensity to buy new arms rather than maintain older systems is plentiful: the Su25s and Su-22s rotting at Catumbela in Angola, and the struggle to keep South Africa’s Gripens and Hawks airworthy. More remarkably, even when only low level technology is used, Nigeria has proved unable to maintain and operate its 60 ‘homebuilt’ RV-6A ‘Beetles’ for basic flight training. (These have now been purchased by private investors in South Africa who will rebuild them for sale around the world.)

high level experience and logistic skills, African air forces will, like Russia’s also be found to be weak in this key aspect of conflict management. The experience of the much-vaunted Russian air force in its invasion of the Ukraine is therefore instructive for African air forces.

It is these complex skills that African air forces lack

The serviceability of Africa’s air force fleet is often questionable. Fortunately, Africa’s military logistics have not been seriously tested by any major invasion with associated supply line challenges, but it is likely that given the lack of

12 FlightCom: June 2022

Writing in The Atlantic, Phillips Payson O’Brien and Edward Stringer note that on paper, “Airpower should have been one of Russia’s greatest advantages over Ukraine. With almost 4,000 combat aircraft and extensive experience bombing targets in Syria, Georgia, and Chechnya, Russia’s air force was expected to play a vital role in the invasion, allowing the Russian army to plunge deep into Ukraine, seize Kyiv, and destroy the


Ukrainian military. But more than three months into the war, Vladimir Putin’s air force is still fighting for control of the skies.” They argue that, “Air forces are dependent on an array of technologies that require highly trained personnel who can quickly set up what amounts to an airborne military ecosystem: airborne radar stations to provide command and control, fighters to protect and police the skies, refuelling aircraft to keep everyone full of gas, electronic-warfare planes to keep enemy defences suppressed, and a range of intelligence-gatherers and attack aircraft to locate and destroy enemy forces.” It is exactly these complex skills that African air forces lack.

O’Brien and Stringer write, “Unfortunately for the Russians, the recent modernisation of the Russian air force, although intended to enable it to conduct modern combined operations, was mostly for show. The Russians wasted money and effort on corruption and inefficiency. Though much was made of the flashy new equipment, such as the much-hyped SU34 strike aircraft, the Russian air force continues to suffer from flawed logistics operations and the lack of regular, realistic training. Above all, the autocratic Russian kleptocracy does not trust low-ranking and middle-ranking officers, and so cannot allow the imaginative, flexible decision making that NATO air forces rely upon.

“Everyone has a plan until they are punched in the mouth.”

African air forces were arguably acquired to provide corrupt politicians with hard to prove kickbacks and ‘commissions’ and are mostly for show. In South Africa’s case the infamous arms deal was, with hindsight, driven by corrupt kickbacks, and I have argued in the past that without an "eye in the sky" AWAC system, South Africa’s Gripen fleet is also restricted to a fraction of its true capability in terms of command and control and the exercise of true air superiority through data linking.

“All this meant that when the invasion started, the Russian air force was incapable of running a well-thought-out, complex campaign. Instead of working to control the skies, Russia’s air force has mostly provided air support to ground troops or bombed Ukrainian cities. In this it has followed the traditional tactics of a continental power that privileges land forces. Focusing on ground troops can work if you have almost endless numbers of soldiers and are prepared to lose them. But so wedded is Russia to its history of successes on the ground that it fails to understand the importance of airpower.”

Some of the many derelict Su-25s and Su-22s at Catumbela in Angola.

FlightCom: June 2022

13


A Nigerian Air Force Beetle at the NAF flying school in Kaduna.

David A. Deptula, a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant general, notes, “Russia has never fully appreciated the use of airpower beyond support to ground forces. As a result, Russia, in all its wars, has never conceived of or run a strategic air campaign.” “Russian aircraft are instead left flying their straightforward missions, many of which use single aircraft without the mutual support from combined air operations that would be expected in an advanced NATO air force. The pilots are given a target; fly in quickly to attack it, in many cases relying on unguided munitions to try to hit their target; and then fly out and try to not get shot down. They are not allowed to act flexibly within their commanders’ intent to achieve a mission. They have task orders and they execute them, come what may.” It is ironic that it is the classic challenges of asymmetric warfare that the Russians for long sponsored in Africa which have been their biggest problem in the Ukraine. O’Brien and Stringer note, “Of course, the most important reason for the failure of Russian airpower, and the evident caution of Russian pilots, has been Ukrainian opposition…. The Ukrainians have integrated a range of air and anti-air capabilities to stymie the much larger Russian air force. Starting with cheap, handheld,

14 FlightCom: June 2022

portable surface-to-air missiles, the Ukrainians have been able to restrict Russian airpower to a few eastern and southern areas, greatly limiting Russian freedom of manoeuvre. “The addition of much more potent, and longerrange, S-300 missile systems from Slovakia makes the Russians even more vulnerable. The threat of the S-300s forces individual Russian aircraft, which generally lack refuelling, electronic-warfare, and command-and-control support, to fly low to the ground to screen themselves from attack. This, in turn, makes them more vulnerable to the handheld surface-to-air missiles. Ukraine cannot target every Russian aircraft, but it has cleverly used what it has to ensure that Russian pilots worry they might be targeted anywhere, forcing them to behave more defensively and reducing their effectiveness. “Ukraine’s ability to contest its airspace has not only provided protection to its own forces, but also allowed it to occasionally go on the offensive. Early in the war, the Ukrainians were able to use Turkishmade Bayraktar drones to attack some high-value targets. The Ukrainians have also used drones to identify and destroy Russian ground-to-air missiles, making Russian ground forces more vulnerable to attack from above.”


A sorry sight - some of the NAF's un-maintained RV-6s.

Elsewhere in The Atlantic, in a fascinating classic lesson in military history, O’Brien and Stringer write, “Let me tell you a story about a military that was supposedly one of the best in the world. This military had some of the best equipment: the heaviest and most modern tanks, next-generation aircraft, and advanced naval vessels. It had invested in modernisation, and made what were considered some of Europe’s most sophisticated plans for conflict. Moreover, it had planned and trained specifically for a war it was about to fight, a war it seemed extremely well prepared for and that many, perhaps most, people believed it would win. “All of these descriptions could apply to the Russian army that invaded Ukraine last month. But I’m talking about the French army of the 1930s. That French force was considered one of the finest on the planet. Winston Churchill believed that it represented the world’s best hope for keeping Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany at bay. As he said famously in 1933, and repeated a number of times afterward, “Thank God for the French army.” “Of course, when this French army was actually tested in battle, it was found wanting. Germany conquered France in less than two months in 1940. All of the French military’s supposed excellence in equipment and doctrine was useless. A range of problems, including poor logistics, terrible communications, and low morale, beset an army in which soldiers and junior officers complained

of inflexible, top-down leadership. In 1940, the French had the “best” tank, the Char B-1. With its 75-mm gun, the Char B-1 was better armed than any German tank, and it outclassed the Germans in terms of armour protection as well. But when the Battle of France started, the Char B-1 exhibited a number of major handicaps, such as a gas-guzzling engine and mechanical unreliability. “Having good equipment and good doctrine reveals little about how an army will perform in a war. To predict that, you must analyse not only its equipment and doctrine, but also its ability to undertake complex operations, its unglamorous but crucial logistical needs and structure, and the commitment of its soldiers to fight and die in the specific war being waged. Most important, you have to think about how it will perform when a competent enemy fires back. As Mike Tyson so eloquently put it, “Everyone has a plan until they are punched in the mouth.” The lesson for Africa – particularly its oil-based economy states, is that having an expensive new air force is no guarantee of success if you don’t have the right training and support systems in place. These are not glamourous capabilities – and over time they are even more expensive than the acquisition cost of air show aircraft. 

FlightCom: June 2022

15


PILOTS LAURA MCDERMID

IRIS – IN THE SUDAN PART

TWO

Laura McDermid continues her stories of Iris McCallum’s flying exploits in East Africa

“Are you sure you wouldn’t like the rest of the day to think about it”? Asked Dave Leonard, the chief pilot at Safari Air.

I

KNEW THAT THE EXTRA 100 U$D per day offered by Dave to entice us had been unnecessary. I glanced at my best friend Heather Stewart. Her hazel eyes were twinkling with excitement and anticipation, a look that I knew all too well. “We’ve made up our minds Dave, we are going to Lokichogio,” I said. Dave had been approached by a branch of the United Nations called ‘Operation Lifeline Sudan’, who were interested in hiring our services. Safari Air was the first company in East Africa to acquire turbine aircraft and the U.N. needed fast planes and experienced pilots to assist with their missions into Sudan.

Lokichogio (Loki for short) is 16 NM from the international border with South Sudan and about 169 NM from the capital, Juba. It is close to the Nile, on which barges clustered like a flotilla of prehistoric reptiles. Due to land mines and rebel attacks, supplies often didn’t get through by road, making the barges a more reliable form of transport.

The sweat ran down her face, dripping into our dinner

What would come to be known as the ‘Second Sudanese Civil War’ had broken out in 1983 between the central Sudanese government and a guerrilla movement known as the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA). The country had declared

16 FlightCom: June 2022

a state of emergency and, as with any war, casualties were escalating.

Loki had an 800m airstrip, making it a strategic location for many NGOs. The Red Cross built its field hospital there and it was for these reasons that Operation Lifeline Sudan was setting up a base there.

Heather was the first to fly to Loki, in the company’s Cessna 402A 5Y-AMD, while I remained in Nairobi to help run our charter operations from the head office at Wilson Airport. It was decided that Heather and I would work in relays of ten days each, during which time we’d easily rack up 100 hours, after which we’d fly the


The floodplains of the Sudd.

planes back to Nairobi for their Mandatory Periodic Inspections (MPI), allowing us to catch up on muchneeded R&R. When it was my turn to relieve Heather I packed a kit bag, my trusty cooler box, and various supplies into the light twin C404 and covered the 491NM in a comfortable 2.3 hours. This was a brand new adventure for me as I’d never been so far north and I was fascinated by this country, that only 100 years ago had been part of the Ottoman Empire. Before Sudan had officially been divided into North and South it was the largest country in Africa. In my fertile imagination, Khartoum was the place of legends conjuring up scenes from Arabian Nights. The rust-red murram strip stood out in stark relief against the granite hillocks at whose foothills the ‘town’ of Lokichagio squatted. I parked the Cessna next to the sun-bleached

Bedouin tent that housed the Red Cross’s Twin Otter. While I waited for my lift, I refuelled, making sure that she was ready for Heather to fly back to Nairobi the following morning. “Welcome to the thriving metropolis of Shitville Iris,” Heather teased. The camp was rudimentary, to say the least. It consisted of a few canvas army tents dotted around a central mess tent. Scrawny goats and chickens were scratching in the dust, oblivious to their fate. The heat was a stifling 45 degrees Celsius. I gratefully sipped on an ice-cold amber brew while slumped in a fold-up canvas chair in the mess tent. I was hypnotized by the Turkana cook who was vigorously stirring the standard fare of cabbage and beans over glowing coals in a three-legged cast-iron pot. She was not a small woman, her thick arms wielded a wooden spoon almost as tall as her. The sweat ran down her moon face in rivulets, dripping into our dinner. She caught me looking at her and grinned until her eyes disappeared in folds of flesh.

FlightCom: June 2022

17


PILOTS My reverie was broken by a radio operator who came running in. “Heather, sorry for interrupting but we have lost contact with our convoy.”

Heather skilfully followed the twists and turns of the road below her. She turned to me, a massive grin splitting her face. “Isn’t this fun Iris!”

That morning a Land Rover and two heavily laden lorries had left to take supplies up north. “Please will you look for them as we fear that they may have been ambushed.”

The exhilaration on my face said it all. Goats scattered in every direction, the small boys herding them running away from the aeroplane as though their lives depended on it, which a few months ago they had, as this area had been attacked by aerial cluster bombs, decimating everything in their path.

We sped back to the airfield. Heather took the left seat in 5Y-AMD whilst I settled in the right. Despite my 3000 hours, I always felt more like an apprentice when flying with Heather – like a bright but inexperienced student in the shadow of a master. This was a good opportunity for her to show me the area. There was only one Jeep track that wound its way north out of Loki which Heather now followed. She stayed 30’ above the ground, skimming the tops of the acacia trees. This was a tactical decision as it was a lot more difficult to shoot at an aircraft so low. The higher up you were, the easier to see and hear from further away. A huge herd of Ugandan Kob antelope plunged in flight before the shadow of our wings. As the herd ran, it became a moving carpet of russet.

Torit is a typical Sudanese town.

18 FlightCom: June 2022

Twenty minutes into the flight we spotted the convoy. The men were standing on the roofs of the lorries, frantically waving their arms. We circled overhead and radioed back to camp reporting that we had found them. It transpired that the local Taposa tribes had mistaken the convoy for rebels and had fired at them with AK47s. They had shot out the windshield of the Land Rover but the brave driver merely ducked below the dashboard and maintained his path by looking through the front grille, guiding them safely out of range. Fortunately, no one was harmed Heather left the next morning as scheduled and I was now PIC. I was given instructions to fly north into Sudan to Pibor Post to take some U.N. delegates to


meet with Commander Ayun - a power-hungry, ruthless despot who despised foreigners.

The pilot’s Handbook of Sudan strips.

I spent a few hours planning my flight, neatly drawing the route on my map. The flight time was 1hr 30 minutes at 180KT - presuming no major head or tailwinds. I added the 3 degrees of variation. Admittedly not much, but it was the difference between success or failure in the absence of modern aids. The route from Loki to Pibor was flat, swampy, and featureless with absolutely no land marks to time myself by. This meant that I had only my compass and my watch; maintaining the correct heading would be critical. We were issued with a photostatted directory of the airstrips in Sudan compiled by pilots over the years. They were crudely drawn pictures of the runways with bearings and a few annotations - basic but indispensable. It was disconcerting before a proposed flight to find that in many cases the bulk of the terrain over which you had to fly was marked ‘uncharted’. This made it essential for a pilot either to develop an intuitive sense to the highest degree, or to adopt a fatalistic philosophy towards life. The things an instructor is unable to teach beyond the simple mechanics of flying are those things that have not lent themselves to words. Intuition and instinct are mysteries still; and are the subtleties that separate pilots from aviators. Flying over The Sudd is unforgettable. You cannot appreciate the scope of the swampy, floating islands, unless viewed from above. My flight time had almost elapsed before I spied the stones marking the pitch-black landing strip. Even from up high it looked treacherous, and as I lowered the undercarriage I prayed that it would be strong enough. The seasonal April rains had begun and the black cotton soil could be spongy and clingy. And as I was on final approach, I realised that the runway condition was far worse than I’d anticipated.

Being unfenced, cattle congregated there in the evenings, their legs sinking into the black soil up to their fetlocks, leaving divots in their wake. The incredible heat had leached the moisture out of the soil and hardened it to the consistency of cement. I took three notches of flap and slowed to just above stall speed. Despite my gentle landing, the Cessna bucked and bounced over the pock-marked ground like a wild bronco, before finally shuddering to a halt. I helped my passengers disembark and they left for their meeting. I checked the undercarriage, which incredibly was still in one piece. Then I began to walk the length of the strip, looking for a better line for takeoff. This is where your skill as a bush-pilot matters, as the takeoff rolls from bush strips are often more difficult than landings. Added to that, I had to learn how to perfect bush flying with a sleek, non-bush aircraft.

FlightCom: June 2022

19


PILOTS When the passengers returned, I performed my checks and guided the plane to the starting point I’d identified. I opened the throttles and the C402 gamely bounced over the ground once more. From Pibor I flew directly north to Nasir. The crumpled skeleton of a MiG gave the location of the runway away. By now it was mid-day and vapours rose upwards in visible waves from the rocky airstrip, making the landing very bumpy again. Whilst the delegates were whisked away, I decided to fill in some of the deeper holes and clear as many stones as I could from the runway. Within minutes hundreds of emaciated locals materialised out of thin air, clamouring around me. Many of them were adorned with pieces of metal crudely fashioned into ornaments. It slowly dawned on me that the unfortunate Russian fighter plane had been repurposed into jewellery!

Before I departed, I covered the floor of 5Y-AMD with sheets of plastic. This was to protect the plane from fluids that leaked from the diseased and the wounded. The route was to the west, over a range of mountains cloaked in gigantic mahogany trees. Having flown over flat swamps until now, the change in scenery was spectacular; however, I had to stay well clear of the highest peak, which was over 10,000 ft. The mission was built in a valley and the approach to runway 33 was tricky. Once above the strip, I circled overhead to indicate that I was ‘friendly’. There were five wounded, one of which was an old woman. Her skin had shrunk tightly over her skull and her eyes sunk into the sockets, resembling a desiccated mummy.

The stench of gangrene overwhelmed the cockpit

Nothing in the world could cause me the agony I felt when the beseeching eyes of starving children looked to me for help. This was without a doubt the worst part of my job. I vented my impotence by vigorously hurling stones aside. The locals began emulating me and within minutes the strip was cleared of obstacles. As I headed to the plane a wave of nausea washed over me. My unruly curls were plastered flat against my scalp and I realised that I was dehydrated. I was shaking so violently that I knew I needed water before I passed out. I hastened the departure and on the climb I reached for my thermos-flask, adding a sachet of electrolytes. I took a deep gulp, it mattered little that the water was tepid and brackish, at that moment it was the best thing I’d ever tasted! A few days later I flew to a mission station at Torit which had been bombed by the SPLA. I was to collect the wounded and fly them to the Red Cross hospital.

20 FlightCom: June 2022

I tried not to recoil from her damp, feverish skin as I helped her into the aircraft. The stench of gangrene overwhelmed the small space, making me gag. I dug in my pocket for the small tin that all rescue pilots couldn’t be without, and rubbed some Vicks under my nose. It didn’t entirely obscure the smell, but it made it bearable. A week later I visited the patients in the hospital. I’d expected to be told that the old lady had died, but she was very much alive and was in her twenties! Her skin had regained its ebony sheen and her brown eyes, which were previously listless, now held a spark of hope. Her leg had been amputated, but at least she was finally free of the terrible pain. What struck me with each rescue mission is that even in this crucible of human depravity, some measure of hope survives. I knew I’d probably never see the woman again, but at least she had a second chance at life. I didn’t know their names and often couldn’t speak their tongue, but we all shared the common thread of humanity. And that was enough for me. 


BUMPPPFFF:

When clearing the runway during the wildbeest migration becomes a problem

Other countries

E-MAIL

EASA registered

TEL NO

FAA registered

LOCATION

Off-site Specialist tests

FIRST NAME

On site Specialist tests

SURNAME

Regular Class 2, 3, 4

AME Doctors Listing

Senior Class 1, 2, 3, 4

Thought for the day - regulatory compliance is more real than God.

✗ ✗ ✗ ✗

Britz

Rudi

Wonderboom Airport

083 422 9882

rudiavmed@gmail.com

Church

Belinda

Valhalla

079 636 9860

churchbs@live.com

Du Plessis

Alexander

Athlone Park

031 904 7460

dex.duplessis@intercare.co.za

Erasmus

Philip

Benoni

011 849 6512

pdceras-ass@mweb.co.za

Govender

Deena

Umhlanga Rocks

031 566 2066/7 deena@drdg.co.za

✗ ✗

Ingham

Kenneth

Midrand

011 315 5817

kaingham@hotmail.com

✗ ✗

Marais

Eugene

Mossel Bay

044 693 1470

eugene.marais@medicross.co.za

✗ ✗

Opperman

Chris

Pretoria Lynnwood

012 368 8800

chris.opperman@intercare.co.za

✗ ✗ ✗

Tenzer

Stan

Rand Airport & JHB CBD

083 679 0777

stant@global.co.za

✗ ✗ ✗

Toerien

Hendrik

White River, Nelspruit

013 751 3848

hctoerien@viamediswitch.co.za

✗ ✗ ✗

Van Der Merwe

Johann

Stellenbosch

021 887 0305

johann.vdmerwe@medicross.co.za

✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗

✗ ✗

✗ ✗

FlightCom: June 2022

21


BY JOHN BASSI: PART

3

HOW LIFE CHANGED FOR ALL HUMANS.

Those first 14 days of the lockdown were filled with confusing silence and uncertainty, waiting and hoping for some kind of respite.

S

OMEHOW THE SACAA’S total ban on aviation, along with the conflicting messages about who can fly and how to get clearances for essential services, drove the reality of imprisonment home deeper. My Bell 206 JetRanger Romeo Kilo Papa, taunted me, I felt sorry for her sitting outside getting blasted by the South Easter through rain and sun, but she was there. A piece of something real to remind me of who I was. During that time, keeping RKP serviceable by oiling the blades and engine components, lubricating and cleaning, smelling the familiar smell of Jet A1 and leather seats, kept me going. Then, the ultimate high, pressing the start button to lubricate bearings, hearing the compressor whine, ignitors clicking. Feeling her come alive, with a vigour and energy, fed my soul.

The solitude and silence weighed heavier. By day 20, I was completely over the endless bombardment of lies which got worse with hyped Covid 19 disinformation through media disinformation, itself becoming a disease. I was fatigued by the stream of over used jokes and desperate humour on WhatsApp, and done with the expressionless zombie people with masks standing metres apart in queues at the shops. I hated the shops with cordoned off sections and streams of danger tape denoting all the banned “non-essential” items, and I felt like swearing at the police lurking around every corner. This new world around me rapidly stoked my inner desperation into a furnace of mindnumbing anger.

I eyed the Jet Range r longingly

Hilariously, I expected the police to suddenly appear. I had feelings of guilt that fluttered over feelings of defiance.

22 FlightCom: June 2022

Hanging, trapped, my paradise became my enemy, dread engulfed me, how to face another day, another night, each blending into more nothingness. Wall’s closing in on me, pacing like a caged animal, my brain imploding. Despair swamping my soul, incredulous that the entire human race was locked up. Everywhere had fallen silent.


Lockdown blues with RKP, just itching to escape but grounded by CAA.

My thoughts ran wild; how I had gone from an active and involved helicopter pilot, out there, free, flying without a second thought, criss-crossing the country, part of a team, part of a machine with so many vital people supporting and working together for such (seemingly) important duties. Conservation projects plan ahead. Wildlife crimes and projects don’t care about lockdown. The freedom of being out and away for months at a time, working, living; how can that all just stop?

The novelty of so much free time at home to indulge myself in nourishing my soul with whatever I wanted was wearing thin. I had binged on Netflex, painstakingly painted and assembled Airfix plastic models of the Douglas DC3, Bell 212, P51 Lightning and a huge De Havilland Mosquito.

the lies became tr uths and the tr uths became lies .

My purpose, my reason for being, my identity… gone, taken away by something unknown and invisible. How could I go from being so incredibly active… to nothing? No more point to anything?

My garden was as trim as a woman fresh from the hairdresser and my home was as clean and shiny as a hospital surgery.

I eyed the JetRanger again, longingly, my freedom, but even that was taboo and taken away. A lifeless metal object, sitting on skids, but her sleek lines and little pointy nose a reminder of the aircraft’s abilities. The SACAA had still not lifted the blanket ban on all aviation.

FlightCom: June 2022

23


Acting like a criminal, I decided to hover for a while. I felt like a naughty child untying the main rotor blade, removing the covers and performing a pre-flight. Then, sitting in the pilot’s seat I found myself switching over to instinctive pilot mode, yet with a guilt that probably felt like it must feel if one had just murdered somebody. I kept glancing around half expecting Zuma’s security police to surround me with automatic weapons.

Passing the days building model aeroplanes.

I pressed the start button, the ignitors clicked as the compressor whined. I may as well have been injecting my veins with a drug, my nostrils flared and my lungs desperately breathed in the Jet A1 fumes as the turbine came back to life. For a moment I was free again and felt purpose flowing through my body. I opened the throttle to full power and every cell in me came alive, the urge to escape into the sky almost overwhelming. Instead, I let the machine run long enough to recharge the battery and lubricate all the bearings and O-rings to keep the helicopter in running condition. Reluctantly I shut down. Elation slipped away as the silence returned. I looked back at the now sleeping, tied down and closed up machine. Back to the nothingness. Every day I wandered off “illegally” into my back garden, into the mountains, into a world of surreal silence, the only sounds were my own footsteps, my own breath and the chirps, whistles and rattles from 24 FlightCom: June 2022

birds whose songs would be intermittently blanked out from the rustling fynbos in the wind. Each day I ventured out searching for and collecting a wild flower. Each one was a priceless treasure that I would rush home with and paint, adding it to a page that became more alive with colour each day. This was my way of ticking away days, like a prisoner marking lines on his cell wall. Measures were finally being put in place for “essential services”, however attempting to motivate flying permits from an inoperative CAA with rigor mortis was pathetic. To this day I doubt that anyone managed to get an answer or information from the SACAA “hot line contact”.


Miraculously, the Government allowed conservation and wildlife management services to continue as essential services.

down. How could this be possible? The conspiracy theories began and the lies became truths and the truths became lies.

Receiving my Government Permit felt like a stay of execution, the smallest glimmer of hope to hang onto in the form of a piece of paper, even though there was no sign of flying duties. This permission was followed by the usual CAA paper monster in the form of compiling a Covid 19 Compliance Company Operations manual and a set of new operating rules.

My phone rang, I pounced on it like a hunting spider attacking its prey, a familiar name flashed on the screen, “Hello John, are you available and can you fly?”

Thirty six days. Marking off lines with painted flowers had by now long ended. Romeo Kilo Papa sat there clinging to the ground through the worst South Easter winds, a motionless silver grey and white object, almost as dead as my own heart. Was this all a dream? I had to keep pushing my brain to comprehend that the entire World had shut

I burst out laughing with incredulous disbelief, then realised I was standing blankly, I needed to gather myself and get my act together. It took a while for me to mentally go through the necessary actions to get going, but instinct soon took over. Muscle memory is an incredible thing, however I soon realised the importance of merging the mental present and the conscious seriousness of focusing on the task ahead. I double checked myself, then with such elation and sense of purpose, gently raised the collective releasing the throbbing beast back into the freedom of the sky. The beautiful blue sky, heading directly for Cape Point. 

Cape Point at lockdown, just me and the sky. Looking north imagining the world of people locked away was incomprehensible.

FlightCom: June 2022

25


NEWS

FLIGHT

INSPECTION SYMPOSIUM –

AFRICA’S FIRST

For the first time the International Flight Inspection Symposium (IFIS) will be hosted on the African continent. The South African Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is the host for this prestigious event. THE IFIS IS A BIENNIAL SYMPOSIUM which draws top flight inspection specialists from around the world. This year it will have a truly African feel. The South African CAA is managing the event, to be held in Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal over five days from 20 to 24 June 2022. Director of the CAA, Ms Poppy Khoza said, “We are honoured to have been selected to host this prestigious symposium. IFIS brings together major stakeholders in global aviation in one event. It is the

26 FlightCom: June 2022

perfect platform for leading organisations to spread their footprint across the African continent through networking opportunities.” “This will be the first aviation event that the city of eThekwini hosts that brings attendees from around the world together. Such aviation events and exhibitions could become an annual event in the future to the great economic benefit of the City,” Khoza said.


NEWS SACAA Director Ms Poppy Khoza is hosting the biennial IFIS symposium.

Flight Inspection technology is advancing at a rapid pace – particularly with the development of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and recent interference with GNSS signals. WHAT IS IFIS? The IFIS is primarily a communications mechanism that promotes a better understanding of the technologies and environmental issues that impact global flight inspection operations. IFIS also serves as a means to enhance the international credibility of the International Committee for Airspace Standards and Calibration (ICASC) as the only truly representative body that coordinates and safeguards the interests of the global flight inspection community. The IFIS provides a credible international forum that highlights the interests of the international flight inspection community and promotes the free exchange of ideas relating to flight inspection in general. The IFIS provides a means for the orderly dissemination, retention and safekeeping of relevant flight inspection information that is made available during the biennial meetings. The IFIS also provides a forum for the exchange of highly specialized technical information dealing with aviation systems operations and their impact on flight safety.

The discussions and presentations, concerning procedures, techniques, training, equipment etc., that focus on the calibration and maintenance of the navigational signals and procedures, aim to promote a better understanding between the various industry stakeholders. The ICASC must therefore secure a viable cadre of volunteers who understand the purpose of the IFIS event and have the requisite knowledge, skills, leadership, resources and determination to host such a professional international seminar. The SACAA plays key in this regard, in addition to providing all the key organisational services to host the symposium. 

FlightCom: June 2022

27


INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT INSPECTION SYMPOSIUM

20–24 J U N E 2 02 2

International Convention Centre, Durban, South Africa Join us for this global event, hosted by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)! IFIS provides a platform to exchange information on technological and environmental issues that impact Global Flight Inspection Operations. We will explore various topics presented by renowned speakers across the Aviation Industry, and you can be part of this exciting symposium. Some of the focus areas are: • Influence of New 5G Communication Interference on Flight Inspection - Mr. Rolf Seide (Germany) • Human Factors and CRM: Increasing efficiency and managing errors within flight inspection mission by improving non-technical skills - Ms. Andrea Gioia (Italy) • Reducing the risk of bird strikes for low-level Flight Operations Ms. Isabel C Metz (Switzerland), Mr. Markus Schwendener (Germany) • Flight Inspection crew safety and emergency procedures training -Mr. Vincent Rocchia (France) • Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) - Euiho Kim (South Korea) And many more… To register for IFIS, go to the IFIS website at https://ifissa.co.za. For General or Technical Enquiries, contact Mr Christo Van Straaten on VanStraatenC@caa.co.za or Contact Mr Nishan Singh on Singhs@caa.co.za for sponsorships and exhibition opportunities.

IFIS 2022 is here … REGISTER NOW!!!

MEET OUR SPONSORS SIGNATURE SPONSOR GOLD SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

Host:

28 FlightCom: June 2022

In collaboration with:


NEWS

BOMBARDIER’S GLOBAL

8000 CONFIRMED

AT EBACE 2022 BOMBARDIER announced that it is going to build its long-awaited Global 8000. This Global 8000 is claimed to be the fastest and longest-range purpose-built business jet in the industry with the capabilities to fly 8,000 nm and a top speed of Mach 0.94, although not at the same time. An upgrade on the Global 7500, the Global 8000 will use the same fuselage as its predecessor, which it will eventually replace. The $78 million Global 8000 will have entry-intoservice in 2025. The upgrades will be available to Global 7500 customers beginning in 2025. Flight testing is being performed with a Global 7500 flight test aircraft, FTV5, with the call sign “the Masterpiece.” The programme is developing as planned, the company says. “The Global 7500 has done everything we promised and much more, and we’re not stopping here,” Bombardier president and CEO Eric Martel said at the launch announcement.

The Global 8000 will compete with Dassault’s Falcon 10X and Gulfstream’s G800. The Falcon 10X has a 7,500-nm range and a top speed of Mach 0.925, while Gulfstream’s G8000 has an 8,000-nm range at Mach 0.85 and a top speed of Mach 0.925. The company announced the Global 8000 at the same time as the Global 7500 but Bombardier said at the time that they would wait until after the Global 7500 was in service to move forward with the Global 8000. “Today, Bombardier solidifies once more its position as the leader in business aviation with the newest member of the industry-leading Global family,” Martel said. “The Global 8000 aircraft leverages the outstanding attributes of the Global 7500 aircraft, providing our customers with a flagship aircraft of a new era. We remain unmatched, which for an innovation-focused team like us is great.”

The aircraft will be able to fly nonstop from Dubai to Houston, Singapore to Los Angeles, London to Perth, Australia, and Bombardier is going ahead with its Global 8000. other destinations.

In a demonstration and test flight to take the aircraft beyond its limits for certification, test pilots repeatedly broke the sound barrier with speeds of more than Mach 1.015, key to enabling the aircraft to reach its maximum Mach operating speed, the company says. The flights took place May 18, 2021, in Santa Maria, California. The aircraft was accompanied by a NASA F/A chase aircraft confirming the performance. The supersonic flight was flown using sustainable aviation fuel, a first for a Transport Category aircraft, the company says. “The Global 8000 will be the fastest civil airplane since the Concorde,” the company says.

The Global 8000 will have a low cabin altitude of 2,900 ft. when flying at 41,000 ft. It also will be equipped with Bombardier’s Pur Air and advanced HEPA filter technology. The aircraft will feature a four-zone cabin with personalized suites and incorporate features found in the Global 7500, including Soleil circadian lighting to help combat jet lag, Nuage seats with zero gravity positions, and, in the En Suite, a full-size bed and stand-up shower. The cockpit will be equipped with the Bombardier Vision flight deck with fly-by-wire technology and a blend of avionics with “exceptional ergonomics and aesthetics for remarkable comfort and control.” 

FlightCom: June 2022

29


FAX NO

TO CPL Accommodadtion Aircraft/Heli Sales Club Facilities Drones

CODE TEL NO

THROUGH

Single Engined Multi Engine Night Rating IF Rating Instructors Rating Simulator Training Conversions CPL Theory CPL Practical Helicopter Training Tail Draggers Pilot Shop Conferences Hire and Fly Charters Aerobatic Training Beginners/Advanced Gyro-Copter Training

NAME OF SCHOOL

Turbine - GS Training Ab-Initio Training

FROM NPL

Dale de Klerk Cell: +27825563592 Fax: 0866058948 Skype: dale_de_klerk Email: dale@alpiaviation.co.za

Microlights & Ferry Flights

W WE NO OFFER EEL TA I L W H NG I N I A TR

BEAUFORT WEST AIFA

(044)

272 5547

info@aifa.co.za

j j jjjjjjj j j

(058)

050 0493

info@flyparamount.co.za

j

(011)

914-5810

083-292-0978

(021) (021)

935 0719 934-7431

934-7435

(031)

573-2995

(031)

571-6600

www.starliteaviation.com

(043)

736-6181

086-516-8475

AIFA

(044)

272 5547

info@aifa.co.za

Savannah Helicopter Training

(044)

876-0096

jjj

Flight Training Services Superior Pilot Services

(011) (011)

805-9015/6 805-9018 805-0605 805-0604

j jjjjjjj j j j j j jjjjjjj j jj

Alpi Flight Academy Aviatech Flight Academy

(082) (082)

556-3592 303 1124

BETHLEHEM Paramount Aviation

jjjjjjj j j

jj j

j

j

BRAKPAN BENONI FABB Titanium Air

j

j

j

j

jj

j

jj j j

j

CAPE TOWN Aviation Pilot Training Era Flug DURBAN Durban Aviation Centre Starlite Aviation Training Academy

j j jjjjj

j

jj

j jjjjjjj j j j j jjjjjjj j j

j

j

j

j

j j jjjjjjj j jjjjj j jjj

jjj j

EAST LONDON Border Aviation Club

j jjjjjjj j jj

j

j

j

j

GEORGE AIRPORT j j jjjjjjj j j j

j

j

jj

jj

j

GRAND CENTRAL KRUGERSDORP

LANSERIA AIRPORT / RANDBURG

086-605-8948 www.aviatech.co.za/

j jjjjj j

j jj

jj j

jjj

jj

j

jj

jjjjj j j

jj

j

j

j j jj j

jj j

Aeronav Academy Skyhawk Aviation Vulcan Aviation (Pty) Ltd MOSSEL BAY Starlite Aviation Training Academy

(011) (011) (087)

701-3862 701-2622 265-7150

701-3873 701-2623

j j jjjjjjj j j j j jjjjjjj j j j jjjjjjj j j

(044)

692-0006

www.starliteaviation.com

j j jjjjjjj j jjjjj j jjj

Johannesburg Flying Academy

(064)

756 6356

Algoa Flying Club

(041)

581-3274

086-461-7067

j jjjjjjj j j

Johannesburg School of Flying (011) U Fly Training Academy (011)

827 9827 824-0680

info@jsf.co.za 390-1738

j jjjjjjj j j j j jjjjjjj j j

Richards Bay Air Carriers

(035)

786-0146/7 786-0145

Rustenburg Flying Club

(082)

821 1690

082 619 8633

Bird Aviation

(016)

556-1007

info@birdaviation.co.za

Desert Air (PTY) LTD

+264

61 228101

+264 61 254 345

j j jjjj

j

j

Blue Chip Flight School Loutzavia Legend Sky Powered Flight Training Vortx Aviation Training

(012) (012) (083) (078) (072)

543-3050 567-6775 860-5225 460-1231 480-0359

543-1826 543-1519 086-600-7285 086-666-2077 086-524-0949

j j jjjjjjj j jj j j j j j jjjjjjj j j jj j j j jjjjjjj jjj j j j j j jjjjj j jj jjj j j j jjj j jj jj

j j j j j

PANORAMA

PORT ELIZABETH RAND AIRPORT

RICHARDS BAY RUSTENBURG

VEREENIGING AIRPORT

WINDHOEK - EROS AIRPORT

jj

jjj

j jjjjj

jjjj

jjj

j

j

j

jj j

j

jj j j jj

j j

jj

j

jjj

jj

jj

j

j jj j

j j j

j

jjj j j

j j j

j

jj

j jjjjjjj j j

WONDERBOOM AIRPORT / AEROPARK / RHINO PARK - PRETORIA

30 FlightCom: June 2022

j

j j

j

w w w. a l p i a v i a t i o n . c o . z a

jj

j

jj

jj

jjj jjj jj j j j j


Dangerous Goods

Hangarage

Export Docs & Clearing

Lodge Transfers

(armed)

Line Inspections

Security Based

Aircraft Leasing

Aerial Photography

Maintenance

Surveys

Aircraft Sales

Contracts

Safari Charters

Special Events

Helicopter

Freight

FAX NO

V.I.P

TEL NO

Biz-Jets

CODE

> 20 pax

NAME OF CHARTER

< 20 pax

CHARTER DIRECTORY

Long-Range

+27 (0) 11 917 4220 www.atlasaviation.co.za

BRAKPAN FABB Titanium Air

(011)

914 5810

083 292 0978

j

jjj

ExecuJet South Africa

(021)

934 5764

934 2087

jjjjj

jjjj

Streamline Air Charter

(011)

395 1195/8

jjjjj

jj

(031)

564 6215

564 6222

j

(011)

805-0652/82

805-0649

j

Batair Cargo

(011)

659 2000

701 2253

ExecuJet South Africa

(011)

516 2300

659 2520

Majestic Air Charters

(018)

632 6477

Out of the Blue Air Safaris

(011)

701 2653

j

CAPE TOWN jjj

jjjj j

DURBAN KZN Aviation

jjjjjj

j

j

jj

GRAND CENTRAL Pambele Aviation

j

j

j

LANSERIA AIRPORT j jjjjj j 082 905 5760

j

j jjjjj

jjj

jj

jjj

j

j

jjjj

j

j

jjj

jjj

j

jj

j

j

OR TAMBO INTERNATIONAL Fair Aviation (Pty) Ltd

(011)

395 4552

395 4244

jjjj

Federal Airlines

(011)

395 9000

086 667 1789

jjjjjjjjjj

jjj

Streamline Air Charter

(011)

395 1195/8

jjjjj

j

(012)

566 3019

j

jj

RAND AIRPORT FlyFofa Airways

www.flyfofa.co.za

jj

jj

j

WINDHOEK - SWAKOPMUND Scenic Air (Pty) Ltd

(+264)

6440 3575

info@scenic-air.com.na

j

j

j

WONDERBOOM AIRPORT - PRETORIA Alpha One Aviation

(082)

301 9977

Flyjetstream Aviation

(012)

543 0060

(083) 279 7853

jjjjjjjjjjjj

Maverick Air Charters

(012)

940 0320

086 648 2690

jjjjjjjjjjj

Powered Flight Charters

(078)

460 1231

086 666 2077

j

jjjj

j

j

jjjjjj

j

j jjj jj jj

j jjjj jjj jj

j

If it can’t stand the heat, get it out of the engine. Higher tempretures and faster degradation can cause unwanted carbon to accumulate, which blocks filters and oil tubes. Modern turbine engines require hard working oils that can withstand these temperatures and improve performance. Can your oil beat the heat? Contact us today and enquire about our range of AeroShell Turbine Engine products: www.atlasaviation.co.za sales@atlasaviation.co.za (011) 917 4220

FlightCom: June 2022

31


AMO LISTING

FAX NO

Sheet Metal Rebuilds Overhauls Electrics NDT Testing Refurbishments Structural Repairs Inspections NTCA Aircraft Seat Belts Instruments

CODE TEL NO

CAPE TOWN

Interior

NAME OF AMO

Fixed Wing Helicopter Avionics Piston Engines Turbine Engines Propellers Weight / Balance Paint

SPONSORED BY Aves Technics - Qualified in Aircraft Maintenance, Airworthiness Management, Project Management, Quality and Safety Management.

Cape Aircraft Interiors

(021)

934 9499

934 2022

ExecuJet South Africa

(021)

934 5764

934 2087

j

Placo

(079)

674 8351

076 901 6780

j j j j j j j j j j j j j j j j j j jj

BAC Aviation Greystones Aviation Components

(035) (031)

797 3610 569 2614

797 5341 569 2630

Astwood Aircraft Electrical

(011)

315 9605

315 0094

Superior Rotorworx

(076)

595 2120

(082)

346 0150

086 697 9096

j

ExecuJet South Africa

(011)

516 2300

011 659 1071

j

Gem Air

(082)

905 5760

011 701 2653

j

Integrated Avionic Solutions

(082)

831 5032

012 567 7320

Lanseria Aircraft Interiors

(011)

659 1962

Plane Maintenance Facility

(011)

659 2204

SkySource International SA

(011)

900 4300

The Propeller Shop

(011)

701 3114

086 543 7988

Tynay Aviation

(082)

088 6663

011 659 1157/8 j

Diepkloof Aircraft Maintenance

(083)

454 6366

jj

jj

j j

jj

jjjj

Aircraft Maintenance International Leading Edge Helicopters cc

(013) (013)

741 8221 j082 787 0415 741 5582 741 8188

jj

jj

j j

jjj

jjjj

Ferreira Aviation Flightdeck Instrument Systems Westline Aircraft Maintenance

(051) (073) (051)

451 1682 513 3205 451 1717

j

Aves Technics Nevergreen Aircraft Industries Star Air Maintenance

(011) (010) (011)

568 7677 003 3747 395 2201

43 Air School

(046)

604 3686

(084) (011) (011) (011) (082)

710 0864 827 7535 827 2491 383 2024 445 4496

DURBAN

j

j j jj j

jj

jjj j j j

j

jjjjjj

j

jj

j j

jj

jj

j

j

jj

jj j

jj

j

j

j

GRAND CENTRAL AIRPORT j jjjj

j j j jjjjjjjj

jj

KRUGERSDORP Skyworx Aviation

j

j j j jj

jjjj

LANSERIA AIRPORT

CAPE WINELANDS AIRPORT NELSPRUIT

NEW TEMPE BLOEMFONTEIN

OR TAMBO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PORT ALFRED

RAND AIRPORT

j

jjj j j j

j

jjjj

j

451 1683

j

j

j

j j

j

j

jj

jj pmf@myconnection.co.za

jjjjjj

jj

j

j

j

j

jjj

j

jjjj

j j j jj

j

jjj

j

j

j

jj

j j

j

j

j

jj

jj

j j

j

j

jj

j

j

jj

jj

j

451 1641

j

jjjj

j manager@nevergreen.co.za

j

973 4761

j

jj j j

j

jj

jj

j

j

jj

jjjjjj

jj

jj

jjjjj

j

jj

j j j jjjj

j

j j j j jj

1

AMKA Aviation Pty (Ltd) Aerospace Electroplating Aviation Rebuilders CC Clifton Electronics Dynamic Propellers

32 FlightCom: June 2022

j

827 9896

jj

lyn@aviationrebuilders.com

j

086 689 5645 086 548 2651

j jjj

j

jj

jj j

jj j

j

j j


Composite Manufacturing

Structural Repairs Inspections NTCA Aircraft Seat Belts Instruments

FAX NO

Sheet Metal Rebuilds Overhauls Electrics NDT Testing Refurbishments

CODE TEL NO

Interior

NAME OF AMO

Fixed Wing Helicopter Avionics Piston Engines Turbine Engines Propellers Weight / Balance Paint

SPONSORED BY:

RAND AIRPORT CONTINUED Emperor Aviation

(082)

497 1701

FLYONICS (Pty) Ltd

(082)

686 2374

michael@flyonics.co.za

Heli-Afrique cc

(011)

827 8632

086 503 1870

Placo (Pty) Ltd

(011) 827 9301

jjjj

j j j jjjj

j j

j jj

j

j jj

jj j

jj

j j

j

827 3801

j

jjjjj j j jjjjj j jjjjj

(035)

786 0146/7 786 0145

j

jj

jj j j jjj

(083)

736 3969

j

jj

jj j j

RICHARDS BAY Alton Aero Engineering

j

SPRINGS AIRFIELD Legair Maintenance

086 508 6010

jjjj j jjjjj

WONDERBOOM AIRPORT - PRETORIA

208 Aviation Aerocore Aircraft Maintenance @ Work Pty Ltd We are qualified in Aircraft Adventure Air Aerotric Aero Engineering & Powerplant

Alpha One Aviation

AviSys Aviation Systems APCO Pty Ltd AVIA Instruments Breytech Aviation cc

jj j j (083) 744 3412 086 613 9922 j j j j (012) 110 4033 082 565 2330 j jj j jj j (012) 567 3443 Maintenance, Airworthiness Management, Project Management, j j j j j (012) 543 3196 543 2323 Quality and Safety Management. j j j j j aerotric@aol.com (087) 802 1347 j j (012) 543 0948 543 9447 jj j j j (082) 301 9977 j jj (083) 442 5884 086 618 6996 j j j j j (012) 543 0775 567 3630 j j j (082) 464 7130 086 602 6171 j j j

(012)

567 3500

086 643 0122

jj

j

Sport Plane Builders cc

(083)

361 3181

086 514 5066

j

jj

TAM Interiors

(083)

455 0215

jj j j

jj

jjjj

j jjj

jj

j jjj

j

j

j

NIGERIA - MURTALA MUHAMMED INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ExecuJet Aviation Nigeria Ltd

+2341 295 5110

j

j

j

j

jj

jj j

jj

j

JOHANNESBURG F Gomes Upholsters

(011)

614 2471

614 9806

jj

j

j

Comporob CC

(012)

940 4447

086 502 3689

jj

j

jj

M&N Acoustics Services Pty (Ltd)

(012)

689 2007

086 211 469

jjjjjjj

j

PRETORIA j

jj

j j

Our capabilities are: B737 Classic / B737- New Generation / Embraer 135/145/170/190 Airbus A320 family

Aves Technics AMO 1541

D3 Building Denel Aviation Campus 3-5 Atlas Road Bonaero Park 1619

www.avesholding.com 2022 2021 FlightCom: June 2022

33


BACKPAGE DIR DIRECT ECTORY ORY A1A Flight Examiner (Loutzavia) Jannie Loutzis 012 567 6775 / 082 416 4069 jannie@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za

Algoa Flying Club Sharon Mugridge 041 581 3274 info@algoafc.co.za www.algoafc.co.za

Adventure Air Lande Milne 012 543 3196 / Cell: 066 4727 848 l.milne@venture-sa.co.za www.ventureglobal.biz

Alpha One Aviation Opelo 082 301 9977 on@alphaoneaviation.co.za www.alphaoneaviation.co.za

Chem-Line Aviation & Celeste Products Steve Harris 011 452 2456 sales@chemline.co.za www.chemline.co.za

Comporob Composite Repair & Manufacture Felix Robertson 072 940 4447 083 265 3602 comporob@lantic.net AES (Cape Town) Alpi Aviation SA www.comporob.co.za Erwin Erasmus Dale De Klerk Corporate-Aviators/Affordable Jet Sales 082 494 3722 082 556 3592 Mike Helm erwin@aeroelectrical.co.za dale@alpiaviation.co.za 082 442 6239 www.aeroelectrical.co.za www.alpiaviation.co.za corporate-aviators@iafrica.com www.corporate-aviators.com AES (Johannesburg) Apco (Ptyd) Ltd Danie van Wyk Tony/Henk C. W. Price & Co 011 701 3200 + 27 12 543 0775 Kelvin L. Price office@aeroelectrical.co.za apcosupport@mweb.co.za 011 805 4720 www.aeroelectrical.co.za www.apcosa.co.za cwp@cwprice.co.za www.cwprice.co.za Aerocore Aref Avionics Jacques Podde Hannes Roodt Dart Aeronautical 082 565 2330 082 462 2724 Jaco Kelly jacques@aerocore.co.za arefavionics@border.co.za 011 827 8204 www.aerocore.co.za dartaero@mweb.co.za Atlas Aviation Lubricants Aero Engineering & PowerPlant Steve Cloete Dart Aircraft Electrical Andre Labuschagne 011 917 4220 Mathew Joubert 012 543 0948 Fax: 011 917 2100 011 827 0371 aeroeng@iafrica.com Sales.aviation@atlasoil.co.za Dartaircraftelectrical@gmail.com www.atlasoil.africa www.dartaero.co.za Aero Services (Pty) Ltd Chris Scott ATNS DJA Aviation Insurance 011 395 3587 Percy Morokane 011 463 5550 chris@aeroservices.co.za 011 607 1234 0800Flying www.aeroservices.co.za percymo@atns.co.za mail@dja-aviation.co.za www.atns.com www.dja-aviation.co.za Aeronav Academy Donald O’Connor Aviation Direct Dynamic Propellers 011 701 3862 Andrea Antel Andries Visser info@aeronav.co.za 011 465 2669 011 824 5057 www.aeronav.co.za info@aviationdirect.co.za 082 445 4496 www.aviationdirect.co.za andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za Aeronautical Aviation www.dynamicpropellers.co.za Clinton Carroll BAC Aviation AMO 115 011 659 1033 / 083 459 6279 Micky Joss Eagle Aviation Helicopter Division clinton@aeronautical.co.za 035 797 3610 Tamryn van Staden www.aeronautical.co.za monicad@bacmaintenance.co.za 082 657 6414 tamryn@eaglehelicopter.co.za Aerotric (Pty) Ltd Blackhawk Africa www.eaglehelicopter.co.za Richard Small Cisca de Lange 083 488 4535 083 514 8532 Eagle Flight Academy aerotric@aol.com cisca@blackhawk.aero Mr D. J. Lubbe www.blackhawk.aero 082 557 6429 Aircraft Assembly and Upholstery Centre training@eagleflight.co.za Tony/Siggi Bailes Blue Chip Flight School www.eagleflight.co.za 082 552 6467 Henk Kraaij anthony@rvaircraft.co.za 012 543 3050 Elite Aviation Academy www.rvaircraft.co.za bluechip@bluechip-avia.co.za Jacques Podde www.bluechipflightschool.co.za 082 565 2330 Aircraft Finance Corporation & Leasing info@eliteaa.co.za Jaco Pietersen Border Aviation Club & Flight School www.eliteaa.co.za +27 [0]82 672 2262 Liz Gous jaco@airfincorp.co.za 043 736 6181 Enstrom/MD Helicopters Jason Seymour admin@borderaviation.co.za Andrew Widdall +27 [0]82 326 0147 www.borderaviation.co.za 011 397 6260 jason@airfincorp.co.za aerosa@safomar.co.za www.airfincorp.co.za Breytech Aviation cc www.safomar.co.za 012 567 3139 Aircraft General Spares Willie Breytenbach Era Flug Flight Training Eric or Hayley admin@breytech.co.za Pierre Le Riche 084 587 6414 or 067 154 2147 eric@acgs.co.za or hayley@acgs.co.za Bundu Aviation 021 934 7431 info@era-flug.com www.acgs.co.za Phillip Cronje www.era-flug.com 083 485 2427 Aircraft Maintenance @ Work info@bunduaviation.co.za Execujet Africa Opelo / Frik www.bunduaviation.co.za 011 516 2300 012 567 3443 enquiries@execujet.co.za frik@aviationatwork.co.za_ Celeste Sani Pak & Inflight Products www.execujet.com opelonke@aviationatwork.co.za Steve Harris 011 452 2456 Federal Air Aircraft Maintenance International admin@chemline.co.za Rachel Muir Pine Pienaar www.chemline.co.za 011 395 9000 083 305 0605 shuttle@fedair.com gm@aminternational.co.za Cape Aircraft Interiors www.fedair.com Sarel Schutte Aircraft Maintenance International 021 934 9499 Ferry Flights int.inc. Wonderboom michael@wcaeromarine.co.za Michael (Mick) Schittenhelm Thomas Nel www.zscai.co.za 082 442 6239 082 444 7996 ferryflights@ferry-flights.com admin@aminternational.co.za Cape Town Flying Club www.ferry-flights.com Beverley Combrink Air Line Pilots’ Association 021 934 0257 / 082 821 9013 Fireblade Aviation Sonia Ferreira info@capetownflyingclub.co.za 010 595 3920 011 394 5310 www.@capetownflyingclub.co.za info@firebladeaviation.com alpagm@iafrica.com www.firebladeaviation.com www.alpa.co.za Century Avionics cc Flight Training College Airshift Aircraft Sales Carin van Zyl Cornell Morton Eugene du Plessis 011 701 3244 044 876 9055 082 800 3094 sales@centuryavionics.co.za ftc@flighttrainning.co.za eugene@airshift.co.za www.centuryavionics.co.za www.flighttraining.co.za www.airshift.co.za Chemetall Flight Training Services Airvan Africa Wayne Claassens Amanda Pearce Patrick Hanly 011 914 2500 011 805 9015/6 082 565 8864 wayne.claassens@basf.com amanda@fts.co.za airvan@border.co.za www.chemetall.com www.fts.co.za www.airvan.co.za

34 FlightCom: June 2022

Fly Jetstream Aviation Henk Kraaij 083 279 7853 charter@flyjetstream.co.za www.flyjetstream.co.za Flying Frontiers Craig Lang 082 459 0760 CraigL@fairfield.co.za www.flyingfrontiers.com Flying Unlimited Flight School (Pty) Ltd Riaan Struwig 082 653 7504 / 086 770 8376 riaan@ppg.co.za www.ppg.co.za Foster Aero International Dudley Foster 011 659 2533 info@fosteraero.co.za www.fosteraero.co.za

Gemair Andries Venter 011 701 2653 / 082 905 5760 andries@gemair.co.za GIB Aviation Insurance Brokers Richard Turner 011 483 1212 aviation@gib.co.za www.gib.co.za Guardian Air 011 701 3011 082 521 2394 ops@guardianair.co.za www.guardianair.co.za

Heli-Afrique cc Tino Conceicao 083 458 2172 tino.conceicao@heli-afrique.co.za Henley Air Andre Coetzee 011 827 5503 andre@henleyair.co.za www.henleyair.co.za Hover Dynamics Phillip Cope 074 231 2964 info@hover.co.za www.hover.co.za Indigo Helicopters Gerhard Kleynhans 082 927 4031 / 086 528 4234 veroeschka@indigohelicopters.co.za www.indigohelicopters.co.za IndigoSat South Africa - Aircraft Tracking Gareth Willers 08600 22 121 sales@indigosat.co.za www.indigosat.co.za

Integrated Avionic Solutions Gert van Niekerk 082 831 5032 gert@iasafrica.co.za www.iasafrica.co.za International Flight Clearances Steve Wright 076 983 1089 (24 Hrs) flightops@flyifc.co.za www.flyifc.co.za Investment Aircraft Quinton Warne 082 806 5193 aviation@lantic.net www.investmentaircraft.com Jabiru Aircraft Len Alford 044 876 9991 / 044 876 9993 info@jabiru.co.za www.jabiru.co.za Jim Davis Books Jim Davis 072 188 6484 jim@border.co.za www.jimdavis.co.za Joc Air T/A The Propeller Shop Aiden O’Mahony 011 701 3114 jocprop@iafrica.com Kishugu Aviation +27 13 741 6400 comms@kishugu.com www.kishugu.com/kishugu-aviation


Kit Planes for Africa Stefan Coetzee 013 793 7013 info@saplanes.co.za www.saplanes.co.za

MS Aviation Gary Templeton 082 563 9639 gary.templeton@msaviation.co.za www.msaviation.co.za

North East Avionics Keith Robertson +27 13 741 2986 keith@northeastavionics.co.za deborah@northeastavionics.co.za www.northeastavionics.co.za Landing Eyes Orsmond Aviation Gavin Brown 058 303 5261 031 202 5703 info@orsmondaviation.co.za info@landingeyes.co.za www.orsmondaviation.co.za www.landingeyes.com Kzn Aviation (Pty) Ltd Melanie Jordaan 031 564 6215 mel@kznaviation.co.za www.kznaviation.co.za

Owenair (Pty) Ltd Clive Skinner 082 923 9580 clive.skinner@owenair.co.za www.owenwair.co.za Lanseria International Airport Pacair Mike Christoph Wayne Bond 011 367 0300 033 386 6027 mikec@lanseria.co.za pacair@telkomsa.net www.lanseria.co.za Lanseria Aircraft Interiors Francois Denton 011 659 1962 / 076 810 9751 francois@aircraftcompletions.co.za

Legend Sky 083 860 5225 / 086 600 7285 info@legendssky.co.za www.legendsky.co.za

PFERD-South Africa (Pty) Ltd Hannes Nortman 011 230 4000 hannes.nortman@pferd.co.za www.pferd.com

Litson & Associates (Pty) Ltd OGP, BARS, Resources Auditing & Aviation Training karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 21 8517187 www.litson.co.za

Pipistrel Kobus Nel 083 231 4296 kobus@pipistrelsa.co.za www.pipistrelsa.co.za

Litson & Associates Risk Management Services (Pty) Ltd. eSMS-S/eTENDER/ eREPORT/Advisory Services karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 8517187 www.litson.co.za Loutzavia Aircraft Sales Henry Miles 082 966 0911 henry@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia Flight Training Gerhardt Botha 012 567 6775 ops@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia-Pilots and Planes Maria Loutzis 012 567 6775 maria@loutzavia.co.za www.pilotsnplanes.co.za Loutzavia Rand Frans Pretorius 011 824 3804 rand@loutzavia.co.za www@loutzavia.co.za Lowveld Aero Club Pugs Steyn 013 741 3636 Flynow@lac.co.za Marshall Eagle Les Lebenon 011 958 1567 les@marshalleagle.co.za www.marshalleagle.co.za Maverick Air Charters Chad Clark 083 292 2270 Charters@maverickair.co.za www.maverickair.co.za MCC Aviation Pty Ltd Claude Oberholzer 011 701 2332 info@flymcc.co.za www.flymcc.co.za MH Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd Marc Pienaar 011 609 0123 / 082 940 5437 customerrelations@mhaviation.co.za www.mhaviation.co.za M and N Acoustic Services cc Martin de Beer 012 689 2007/8 calservice@mweb.co.za Metropolitan Aviation (Pty) Ltd Gert Mouton 082 458 3736 herenbus@gmail.com Money Aviation Angus Money 083 263 2934 angus@moneyaviation.co.za www.moneyaviation.co.za

Plane Maintenance Facility Johan 083 300 3619 pmf@myconnection.co.za Precision Aviation Services Marnix Hulleman 012 543 0371 marnix@pasaviation.co.za www.pasaviation.co.za PSG Aviation Reon Wiese 0861 284 284 reon.wiese@psg.co.za www.psg aviation.co.za Rainbow SkyReach (Pty) Ltd Mike Gill 011 817 2298 Mike@fly-skyreach.com www.fly-skyreach.com Rand Airport Stuart Coetzee 011 827 8884 stuart@randairport.co.za www.randairport.co.za Robin Coss Aviation Robin Coss 021 934 7498 info@cossaviation.com www.cossaviation.co.za SAA Technical (SOC) Ltd SAAT Marketing 011 978 9993 satmarketing@flysaa.com www.flysaa.com/technical SABRE Aircraft Richard Stubbs 083 655 0355 richardstubbs@mweb.co.za www.aircraftafrica.co.za SA Mooney Patrick Hanly 082 565 8864 samooney@border.co.za www.samooney.co.za Savannah Helicopters De Jager 082 444 1138 / 044 873 3288 dejager@savannahhelicopters.co.za www.savannahhelicopters.co.za Scenic Air Christa van Wyk +264 612 492 68 windhoek@scenic-air.com www.scenic-air.com Sheltam Aviation Durban Susan Ryan 083 505 4882 susanryan@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com Sheltam Aviation PE Brendan Booker 082 497 6565 brendanb@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com

Sky-Tech Heinz Van Staden 082 720 5210 sky-tech@telkomsa.net www.sky-tech.za.com Sling Aircraft Kim Bell-Cross 011 948 9898 sales@airplanefactory.co.za www.airplanefactory.co.za Solenta Aviation (Pty Ltd) Paul Hurst 011 707 4000 info@solenta.com www.solenta.com Southern Energy Company (Pty) Ltd Elke Bertram +264 8114 29958 johnnym@sec.com.na www.sec.com.na Southern Rotorcraft cc Mr Reg Denysschen Tel no: 0219350980 sasales@rotors-r-us.com www.rotors-r-us.com

Unique Air Charter Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Unique Flight Academy Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Van Zyl Aviation Services Colette van Zyl 012 997 6714 admin@vanzylaviationco.za www.vanzylaviation.co.za Vector Aerospace Jeff Poirier +902 888 1808 jeff.poirier@vectoraerospace.com www.vectoraerospace.com Velocity Aviation Collin Pearson 011 659 2306 / 011 659 2334 collin@velocityaviation.co.za www.velocityaviation.co.za

Sport Plane Builders Pierre Van Der Walt 083 361 3181 pmvdwalt@mweb.co.za

Villa San Giovanni Luca Maiorana 012 111 8888 info@vsg.co.za www.vsg.co.za

Starlite Aero Sales Klara Fouché +27 83 324 8530 / +27 31 571 6600 klaraf@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Vortx Aviation Bredell Roux 072 480 0359 info@vortx.co.za www.vortxaviation.com

Starlite Aviation Operations Trisha Andhee +27 82 660 3018/ +27 31 571 6600 trishaa@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Wanafly Adrian Barry 082 493 9101 adrian@wanafly.net www.wanafly.co.za

Starlite Aviation Training Academy Durban: +27 31 571 6600 Mossel Bay: +27 44 692 0006 train@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Windhoek Flight Training Centre Thinus Dreyer 0026 40 811284 180 pilots@flywftc.com www.flywftc.com

Status Aviation (Pty) Ltd Richard Donian 074 587 5978 / 086 673 5266 info@statusaviation.co.za www.statusaviation.co.za

Wings n Things Wendy Thatcher 011 701 3209 wendy@wingsnthings.co.za www.wingsnthings.co.za

Superior Pilot Services Liana Jansen van Rensburg 0118050605/2247 info@superiorair.co.za www.superiorair.co.za

Witbank Flight School Andre De Villiers 083 604 1718 andredv@lantic.net www.waaflyingclub.co.za

The Copter Shop Bill Olmsted 082 454 8555 execheli@iafrica.com www.execheli.wixsite.com/the-coptershop-sa Titan Helicopter Group 044 878 0453 info@titanhelicopters.com www.titanhelicopters.com TPSC Dennis Byrne 011 701 3210 turboprop@wol.co.za

Wonderboom Airport Peet van Rensburg 012 567 1188/9 peet@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za Zandspruit Bush & Aero Estate Martin Den Dunnen 082 449 8895 martin@zandspruit.co.za www.zandspruit.co.za Zebula Golf Estate & SPA Reservations 014 734 7700 reception@zebula.co.za www.zebula.co.za

Trio Helicopters & Aviation cc CR Botha or FJ Grobbelaar 011 659 1022

stoffel@trioavi.co.za/frans@trioavi.co.za

www.trioavi.co.za

Tshukudu Trailers Pieter Visser 083 512 2342 deb@tshukudutrailers.co.za www.tshukudutrailers.co.za U Fly Training Academy Nikola Puhaca 011 824 0680 ufly@telkomsa.net www.uflyacademy.co.za United Charter cc Jonathan Wolpe 083 270 8886 jonathan.wolpe@unitedcharter.co.za

www.unitedcharter.co.za

United Flight Support Clinton Moodley/Jonathan Wolpe 076 813 7754 / 011 788 0813 ops@unitedflightsupported.com www.unitedflightsupport.com

FlightCom: June 2022

35