SA Flyer Magazine December January 21/22

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FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

Edition 311 December / January 2021/22 Cover: Garth Calitz

Aeronautical Aviation: PC-12s get Garmin G600TXi

How much runway do you need?

Jim Davis –

Flies the JU-52!

SAAF SA AF –

share with neighbours?

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Flying the Boeing

747-400! Guy:

Looks back at 2021!

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

December / January 2021/22


p

F LY WITH THE LEADER – WE’LL WELCOME YOU INTO THE FAMILY When it comes to service, Pilatus’ reputation is unique. Being voted number 1 in customer support for 19 consecutive years is an award we never take for granted. The global network of Authorized Pilatus Service Centres have deep understanding of our customer’s needs and strive every day to exceed them. Come fly with Pilatus – we’d love to take you under our wings. pilatus-aircraft.com Contact Pilatus PC-12 Centre Southern Africa, your nearest Authorised Pilatus PC-12 NGX Sales Centre for further information on Tel: +27 11 383 0800, Cell +27 82 511 7312 or Email: aircraftsales@pilatuscentre.co.za



POSITION REPORT THE THING WE FEARED MOST – so much that we hardly dared talk about it – was a fourth Covid wave. As I write this, it has arrived early and with a vengeance, in the form of the Omicron variant. Our worst fears are coming to pass. Many aviation companies are still reeling under the repeated blows of the first three waves, so we have decided to give our hard pressed yet loyal advertisers a break by combining our December and January editions into one.

specifically commissioned interviews on the website and to market these via our market leading Facebook page. Thanks to Google and other search engines, and the reach of our Facebook pages, we are driving new readers to SA Flyer and FlightCom. But we haven’t forgotten our loyal core of long-time followers and subscribers. We are still reaching our long-standing readership base through ‘pushing’ a downloadable pdf version of the magazine to them by email. Furthermore, we have teamed with key industry organisations such as the Commercial Aviation Association of South Africa (CAASA) to email the magazine to all their members.

THE AVIATION Despite the indefatigable INDUSTRY efforts of our Wayne Wilson, our advertising revenues WILL BOOM are under pressure, so we accelerated the natural AS IT MAKES move away from print and into the digital-only space. UP FOR LOST This has had tremendous The digital version of the GROUND and unexpected benefits – magazine has had other most notably the circulation of SA Flyer and FlightCom has increased almost ten times, as people around the world access our unique and original content via our website, through search engine optimisation. Thanks to a partnership with Robin Rabec, we are also able to add benefit from the swing to a digital publication platform by including

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great spin-offs, especially for advertisers. Most notably; we are able to include links to their marketing video material and have live website links to take readers directly to the advertiser’s website. In this way the reach and effectiveness of the clients’ adspend is vastly more efficient. But no matter how much better we have become at delivering value to our advertisers, the heart of any publication is always its content. Despite the sea change in the publishing industry, we remain true to our foundational


value - of making sure we produce a publication people want to read – which fulfils our key objective of entertaining and informing our readers. Fortunately, we have been blessed to have developed a core of contributors that make SA Flyer unique. I am most grateful to Jim Davis, who 14 years ago, approached us, as he was unhappy with the aviation magazine he was at. And I am thrilled that, despite the continuing weakness of the Rand, we continue to have the incomparable Peter Garrison’s regular thought provoking columns. For the past five years we have been privileged to have Darren Olivier’s expert analysis on African defence. And I now have a PhD on the challenges faced by African airlines in providing essential air connectivity. The spin-offs from this study, and in particular with the CEOs I interviewed as part of the primary research, have provided many fascinating industry insights.

In this issue we feature Airlink CEO Rodger Foster – who has used the inherent strength of his business to take full advantage of the dire straits his competitors find themselves in. Newly emancipated from his relationship with SAA, Airlink is free to grow – and is already the second largest African airline in terms of movements. Our regular contributors form the core of SA Flyer, and I am grateful for their commitment to quality writing and fresh insights. With them, and the topical articles we provide, I am confident that we have indeed fulfilled our mandate to entertain and inform our readers and provide the best channel for our advertisers to reach their market.

WE HAVEN’T FORGOTTEN OUR LOYAL CORE OF LONG-TIME FOLLOWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS

I am honoured too to have excellent access to the key leaders and decision makers in the aviation industry. I am grateful to all airline CEOs who always take my calls at any time of the day, no matter how busy they are. I find the insights provided by these industry leaders fascinating and wonderfully informative. And I trust our readers do too. Which makes SA Flyer and FlightCom a key source of reliable industry intelligence.

I am grateful to my wonderful small back-office team that regularly gets the sales traffic and layout and invoicing done without last minute panic.

From the low point of this fourth wave, I feel that the only way out is up. The aviation industry will boom as it makes up for lost ground. There is a lot to be hopeful about and I wish all our readers and loyal advertisers a wonderful festive season and a happy and prosperous new year.

j

Guy Leitch December / January 2021/22

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UR IENTS FOR YO L C R U O L L A THANKING PPORT AND CONTINUED SU EFUL HOLIDAY! A PEAC WISHING YOU

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December / January 2021/22


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Carpe secundum. The new 911 GT3. Time is precious. The 911 GT3 steps up everything that makes a sports car fit for the race track: With a swan neck rear wing for optimised aerodynamics and more downforce, a 4.0-litre, six-cylinder high-speed naturally aspirated engine and 375 kW (510 hp) for 0 to 100 km/h in just 3.4 seconds. Carpe Diem? This sports car squeezes the most out of every second. Discover more at www.porsche.com/911GT3

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COLUMNISTS SA FLYER

18 Guy Leitch - ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE 26 George Tonking - HELI OPS 34 Peter Garrison - TABULATING TAKEOFF 40 Jim Davis - PLANE TALK 44 Johan Walden - TIES, BUTTONS AND BARS 92 Jim Davis - ACCIDENT REPORT 104 Ray Watts - REGISTER REVIEW

FLIGHTCOM

06 10

Bush Pilot - HUGH PRYOR Airlines Ops - MIKE GOUGH

FLIGHT TEST: BOEING 747-400

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FC 28

Edition 311

CONTENTS


SANSA MONITORS SPACE WEATHER

2021 CHILDREN’S FLIGHT

December / January 2021/22


Edition 311

CONTENTS FEATURES SA FLYER

48 MAKING PC-12S YOUNG AGAIN! 46 FLIGHT TEST: Boeing 747-400 78 2021 CHILDREN’S FLIGHT 72 EAA SUN ‘N FUN 2021 112 BOOKS BY PETER GARRISON 118 ALGOA FLYING CLUB 124 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES

FLIGHTCOM

16 Defence - Darren Olivier 22 Face to Face: Rodger Foster 28 Dubai Airshow 2021 36 SANSA Monitors Space Weather 42 Denali - First Flight

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REGULARS 16 Opening Shot 108 AFS Register Review 114 SV Aviation Fuel Table 116 Aviation Direct Events Calender

FLIGHTCOM

43 AME Directory 46 Starlite Flight School Listing 47 Atlas Oils Charter Directory 48 AEP AMO Listing 50 Aviation Directory



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BENTLEY JOHANNESBURG • BENTLEY CAPE TOWN Power: 485 kW (659 hp); Torque: 900 Nm; 0-100 km/h: 3.6 seconds; Maximum speed: 335 km/h. Priced from R4 945 000 with a 3 year/100,000 km Driveplan Model shown: New Continental GT Speed


This month’s striking Opening Shot was taken by our Middle East Correspondent Hannes Meyer. Hannes is former South African Flight dispatcher who lives and works in Dubai. He reported on the huge Dubai 2021 Air Show and captured this remarkable image of an UAE Boeing C-17 discharging its IR flares. He used his trusty Canon 5D MkIII with a Canon 400 mm lens. Exposure was 800th second at F6.3 at ISO 100.

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Send your submissions to guy@saflyermag.co.za

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ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE: GUY LEITCH

Each year I try hand out light-hearted Oscar awards for the best and worst actors and performances in aviation over the past year. But 2021 was for many just a re-run of the 2020 nightmare. I reckon we as an industry, and indeed the whole world, are the walking wounded from the Covid-19 pandemic. THE HUMOUR THAT I TRY inject into this column is hard to find or make, as the longawaited recovery has tested everyone’s fortitude. This column is therefore a more sober assessment of what the new normal is that we are having to come to terms with.

The Airline Industry

the aviation industr y leads a recession and lags its recover y

The much hoped for recovery of the aviation industry has been patchy at best. Incredibly, some airlines have done well out of Covid. In Africa, Ethiopian deftly switched to cargo flying and this got it through the worst of the protracted, and repeated, lockdowns. In South Africa, Airlink has done amazingly well, newly emancipated from its odious and toxic SAA licence agreement. This is largely due to two things: First: Airlink management’s prudent commitment to investing

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in building a strong balance sheet during the good times. Second: management’s use of its strong balance sheet to take advantage of the gaps in the market created by the failure of the weaker airlines, most notably SAA, Comair/ kulula and Mango. It is a clear indication of how inefficient the other SA domestic airlines had become that Airlink can successfully operate its smallgauge Embraer E190s on the low-cost carrier routes. CemAir too is to be commended for surviving a sustained and attack from the CAA which seemed determined to drive it into bankruptcy. But instead, SA Express failed and CemAir is being allowed to get on with being a great little airline. Like Airlink, it is growing well on the strength of solid management and good decision making. For the African air transport industry as a whole, 2021 was also just a long drawn-out


In many ways 2021 was just a continuation of the Covid tribulations of 2020.

continuation of the agony of 2020. The bald numbers are scary, but still hide the shocking hardships of thousands of high value job losses. IATA calculates that African airline seat demand (RPKs) was 66.6% down in 2020. In 2021 it recovered a bit, but to a still disastrous 57.7% down. IATA says that it is expected that African carriers will see a very slow pace of recovery from a $1.9 billion loss in 2021 to a $1.5 billion loss in 2022.

cargo. This has meant that there has been more than enough demand to keep the pure cargo operators happy – and indeed, making super profits (except SAA Cargo of course).

IATA reckons that low vaccination rates across the continent are expected to severely dampen demand throughout 2022. An expected slight improvement is built on the expectation of some recovery in intra-Africa travel and travel to those tourist destinations with relatively higher vaccination rates.

There has been an ongoing struggle to get the airlines to take delivery of their 737 Max orders. They are barely delivering 30 new aircraft a month, whereas they had geared-up to produce 57 each month. But at least there seems to be very little resistance from passengers to flying the Max. Boeing is also having big problems with 787 Dreamliner production. Boeing’s much hoped for certification of the 777X has still not happened, but the 777X did at least put on a spectacular display at Dubai.

The retarded recovery has had a widespread impact. The consequences of the breakdown in air connectivity are severe: five million African jobs are at risk and aviation-supported GDP could fall by as much as U$37 billion, which is a 58% drop. Still, it’s not all doom and gloom. If you look hard enough you can always find a few silver linings. The air freight industry has done well, simply because, without passenger airliners flying there has been a chronic lack of belly space for

Both Airbus and Boeing have taken great financial strain, but Boeing in particular has had a torrid time. The bad news just never seems to end, and Boeing's revenue has shrunk by 19% on average each year over the past three years.

General Aviation Big news was that the long-awaited first flight of Textron’s Beechcraft Denali finally happened – on 23 November. The first flight of an allnew airframe with an all-new engine is hugely December / January 2021/22

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significant. Much is hoped for from this ambitious project which has the categorydominating Pilatus PC-12 firmly in its sights. Some months ago I earned the ire of Textron by pointing out the challenges faced by the Denali in taking on the PC-12. I await with interest the results of the flight tests – to see whether it will improve on Beechcraft’s projected performance numbers. The biz-jet operators are doing pretty well. Those who can afford not to have to mix with the germ-infested lumpen proletariat have used biz-jets to lord it above the hoi polloi. This has meant biz-jet pilots being stretched to flying the full 1,0000 hours allowed in a year. Interestingly, the glut of experienced pilots that should have been available from the collapse of airlines such as SAA and Mango has not been of much use to general aviation. It costs more than half a million Rand to convert an Airbus Captain onto a business jet. And perhaps surprisingly, many seem to battle to cope with the extra workload of flying smaller jets. The unexpected realisation is that airline pilots are spoiled in that they have a flight operations department behind them to do the grind work, such as calculate weight and balance, file flight plans and get over-flight clearances and book hotels and arrange ground transport. So, the much-vaunted SAA pilots have been by and large a disappointment for the rest of the industry. Perhaps surprisingly, many of the better Aircraft Maintenance Organisations also report good business. It would seem that aircraft owners have taken the opportunity to get expensive new avionics installed, longstanding maintenance snags addressed, and new interiors and paint jobs. Another surprise is that the price of old general aviation aircraft seems to be skyrocketing. A rough guess seems to indicate that owners are now asking as much as 33% to 50% more for their planes than they were BC (Before Covid). If the sellers are getting their prices, some people

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Is SAA killing off Mango airlines in favour of Lift so it can get into bed with Harith?

must have done well out of the pandemic. Perhaps they had shares in Pfizer or J&J. But these are the exceptions – and it’s worth restating what I have said before: the aviation industry leads a recession and lags its recovery. It will therefore take longer than the rest of the economy to recover. For the operators of the high-end game lodges, international tourism is not expected to recover much for the 2021 yearend. A significant recovery in 2022 assumes that the major sources of overseas tourists can agree the elaborate two-step dance required to comply with both origin and destination health protocols. The hugely important and long awaited first flight of the Denali - with an all new engine and airframe.


Sling Aircraft's High Wing made it as an Innovation of the Year with Plane & Pilot - thanks to Guy's pilot report - which made the cover.

Recreational Aviation In 2020 in general aviation (GA) we saw evidence that flying a light aircraft is actually not that easy and that it takes practice to stay current. As people stated flying again in the second half of 2020 the accident rate shot up. This year the accident rate seems to be back to more normal levels. And good news – at least for industry watchers – is that, after a twenty year wait, the CAA has finally produced figures for accident rates – that is per hundred thousand hours flown. Recreational aviation within South Africa was dealt a further blow by the continued impoverishment of South Africans through the weakness of the Rand, thanks to a full tri-fecta of junk status ratings. Once again, new aircraft have become all but unaffordable and a review of Ray Watts’ Register Review shows far more aircraft leaving the country than new ones arriving. Thus, the fleet of GA aircraft within South Africa continues to both shrink and age. The splendid Sling Aircraft company is one of the few beneficiaries of the weakening Rand. The company rather belatedly changed its name from the anodyne ‘The Airplane Factory’ to just ‘Sling Aircraft’. This change recognises that the Sling has become a worldwide success story as a brand. 85% of all its new sales are made outside South Africa, with half to the USA – which is a notoriously tough market to crack. As a side note I was personally very chuffed that the huge Plane & Pilot magazine ran my Sling High Wing report plus Bruce Perkins’ great air to air pictures as a key cover feature. And then, based on that report, they made the Sling High Wing a ‘Plane of the Year’. It made up for the unaccustomed inability of the Sling boys to pull off another of their world-shrinking flights to the Oshkosh Airventure; not due to any shortage of commitment on their part, but due to the impossibility of timeously arranging Covid clearances through the many Caribbean states they would have to stage through.

Good progress was made with electric planes, although personally I remain deeply sceptical about their real ability to compete with fossil fuel burners. As a publicity stunt, Rolls Royce put a 550 hp electric motor on the front of a tiny Formula 1 racer and claimed it to be the fastest all-electric vehicle ever – at 387 mph. Even Sling Aircraft have an all-electric Sling 4 being developed by ETH University in Switzerland as well as a Hydrogen Fuel cell version being developed by Delft University in Holland.

SAA I would love not to have to say anything about the protracted death of South African Airways as it is unspeakably tragic. But, like a slowly unfolding horror movie, SAA holds a morbid fascination for all South Africans. The double-whammy of both Covid-19 and the maladministration of SAA has taken a huge toll on personal lives. I know of pilots’ wives December / January 2021/22

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To promnote electric propulsion Rolls Royce reached 387 mph with this electric racer.

working nights as hotel receptionists and of 20,000 hour Captains driving TLB back-actors and busses. As a group, the greatest victims are Senior First Officers, aged around 40, who have 15 or more years of service, but who were stuck at First Officer due to the lack of SAA growth. As the airline industry recovers, these SFOs, who have mortgages and children in expensive schools, will have to compete against 28-yearold Captains with 1000 hours of command, who have a low cost of living and can therefore accept much lower salaries. Our young airline columnist, Dassie van der Westhuizen, qualified as a Airbus A320 pilot but has had to go back to being cabin crew.

ever find a ‘Strategic Equity Partner’. Yet in June 2021, the South African government seemed to have pulled a rabbit out of the hat when it announced that, “after extensive talks with potential investors, they selected the Takatso Consortium. The Consortium will own 51% of the airline, while the government maintains a 49% stake. The Consortium involves Harith General Partners and Global Airways”. As a dowry, Pravin Gordhan, the Public Enterprises Minister, said that SAA will receive a R3.5 billion cash injection in the form of running costs from Harith. But now, five months later, they deal has still not been consummated and increasingly difficult questions are being asked about the true source of funding for the Taktso Consortium and the role of Gidon Novick as the CEO of the consortium with his Lift Airline. In November this year it seemed certain that Mango was to be sacrificed in favour of Lift with the loss of an important and by and large well-run domestic airline with 900 direct jobs.

SAA pilots turned out to be almost unemployable in the char ter mark et.

We know that things will never be the same again, but what will the new normal be? Full-service airlines have traditionally relied on the fat profit margin from business class, yet the number of business travellers has been reduced by as much as half due to the widespread adoption of webinars and online conferencing, instead of face-to-face meetings. SAA finally emerged from Business Rescue in June. There had been huge scepticism from commentators (me included) that SAA would

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The South African government is like the physics conundrum of an irresistible cannonball hitting an immovable post. The cannonball is


The CAA finally released it long-awaited licence card system.

their commitment to notion that SAA can ever run profitably under government control – even at 49%. The immovable post is the sheer impossibility of the SA government being able to run anything successfully. It has destroyed all its state owned enterprises and the ANC cannot even pay its own salaries. The big issue is once again the ANC government's insistence – at all costs – for racial transformation of the pilot body. This is evidently an objective that has no limits when it comes to spending the public's hard-earned taxes. The SA government seems oblivious to the enormous resentment against its airline amongst its voters. And like it or not, if pilots are promoted on the basis of race, rather than on skill or experience, the faith that passengers have in SAA’s safety will be irretrievably damaged. People will rather book on other airlines making the long term viability of SAA even more impossible.

The SAAF In 2021 the South African Air Force continues to operate as an air force, but with the budget of an air wing. Our expert Defence columnist, Darren Olivier, reports that the SAAF is already cannibalising its Hawk Mk120s and Gripen fighters for spares. Thus is an once world class and proud air force brought to its knees.

The CAA Pilots either hate the CAA or just ruefully shrug their shoulders and say, “This is Africa”. Thus, some accepted that it takes months to renew basic aircraft documentation. Others remember the good old days when you could

get documentation done while you had a cup of coffee. Thanks to Covid-19, CAA staff have been allowed to work from home. It seems that much of the work was not done, perhaps because they did not have access to a working enterprise management system, even though the CAA spent upwards of R90 million on one a few years ago. So the endless checking and double checking of signatures and box ticking was not possible, and Certificates of Registration and Authorities to Fly took months. Nonetheless, to give the CAA its due, it seems to have tried its best to sort out the backlog, and as we head into the end of the year, the situation has become tolerable for most users. A noteworthy step forward has been the longawaited ditching of the terrible licence books with not so clear plastic sleeves in favour of a simple wallet sized licence card.

Conclusion And thus ends another extraordinarily bleak year. From this low point, things can only get better. I still believe that; “This too shall pass” and, “It’s always darkest before the dawn”. With these cliches, let me vacate this page and wish all our loyal advertisers and readers a much more prosperous 2022.

j

guy@saflyermag.co.za December / January 2021/22

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A super sports car soul and the functionality typical for an SUV: this is Lamborghini Urus, the world’s first Super Sport Utility Vehicle. Identifiable as an authentic Lamborghini with its unmistakable DNA, Urus is groundbreaking: the extreme proportions, the pure Lamborghini design and the outstanding performance make it unique. Powered by a 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 engine producing 650 hp and 850 Nm of torque, Urus accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in just 3.6 seconds and reaches a top speed of 305 km/h. The design, performance, driving dynamics and driving emotion flow effortlessly into this visionary approach to Lamborghini DNA.

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HELICOPTER OPS: GEORGE TONKING

GIVE THAT MAN

A BELL

I know it’s clichéd, but where has the year gone? December, the busiest month in our profession, is upon us. And it’s busy, not only because the security industry is on high alert, but because many pilots, like normal people, go on holiday with their families, leaving a gap for extra charter work. I RECENTLY COMPLAINED to a colleague about how tired I was before the silly season had even started. He was having none of it and clearly told me to wind my neck in and to remember how privileged I was to have the job I do. Too often, in our short-sightedness, we don’t recognise what’s obvious to others. In my case, this includes the fact that I get to fly diverse machines, compared to many of my peers in the helicopter industry worldwide who tend to fly one specific type, basing their careers on it.

pointed out, my line of work allows me to stay relatively fresh on a high number of the types on which I’m rated. A closer look at my logbook revealed just that, with fluctuating numbers during different seasons. At the time of writing this column, I am current on 6 of the 13 types I hold a rating for. That’s something. It doesn’t mean that I’m superskilled, just that the variety of jobs I’m called to do regularly requires choppers with distinct personalities.

Ev e r y helicopter is a di ff e r e nt t ype

In the helicopter world, unlike aeroplanes, we don’t have many series-type aircraft. Every helicopter is a different type on which to be rated. And once rated, you need to stay “current” on each type, lest you lose your rating. Fortunately, as my good friend and colleague

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One of those, which I first learned to fly many years ago, is the beautiful, sleek Bell 407. In helicopter development, one of the costliest outlays is the testing process and type certification. It is, therefore, far more cost effective to develop on a proven design platform than to start a clean-sheet design. The Bell


407 had its origins in the Bell 206 Jet Ranger – retaining many of the hard-fought typecertifications of both the Jet Ranger and the Long Ranger (itself a derivative of the “Jetty”). But the 407 is no Jet Ranger, if that’s what you’re thinking. For one, the 407’s fuselage is wider, its windows bigger, and its cabin roomier – allowing for two crew and five passengers.

The basic layout of the main rotor and mast attachment uses a composite hub assembly damped by elastomeric cushions, similar to the Airbus H125 design from the early ’70s. The efforts proved successful, not only in increasing aircraft speed and improving performance but also in decreasing vibration, leading to an exceptionally smooth-flying helicopter.

The biggest difference, however, lies in the design of the dynamic components or rotor system. All previous civilian Bell designs used a teetering or see-saw type of semi-rigid twobladed rotor with traditional metal greased bearings. In 1993, when development began, Bell took the main rotor design of the military OH-58D (model 406) helicopter – which was also a descendant of the 206 – and adapted it for the new 407.

True to form, Bell didn’t leave it there – they also approached Allison Engines to produce a powerful Model 250 turbine engine to bring the 407 to life – the Allison (now Rolls Royce) 250-C47B. At 813 shaft horsepower, if you can close the doors, you can fly. Its ease of use is enhanced with dual-channel FADEC redundancy, which includes a one-button start sequence. Bell also debuted the 407 with a full digital engine-monitoring instrument panel – a first for helicopters.

1995 saw the first flights of the Bell 407 prototypes and production model, with a 4-bladed “Soft-in-Plane” main rotor assembly.

The 407 has come a long way in its almost three decades of evolution, with one of the

An IMC capable Bell 407 G1000 safely through the weather.

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Bell 407 GXP on the Fireblade Aviation Apron.

The 407 ready to depart Ellisras 45deg C, no problem.

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most recent iterations being the 407GXP. A few months back, adding to my evolution as a pilot, I was given the opportunity to fly one, which is operated by Bastion Aviation, out of Fireblade Aviation’s immaculate facility at OR Tambo. An exciting new feature in the GXP is Garmin’s G1000H flight deck, which makes for a more compact cockpit layout, with all the traditional “steam-powered” gauges replaced by twin 10.4-inch, high-resolution LCD, multifunction displays. These MFDs display all the critical flight data in easy-to-understand flat glass format, allowing for seamless scrolling between engine, map and primary vehicle attitude data. The big three engine parameters, namely torque, engine speed and turbine temperature, are incorporated into a single synthetic first-limit indicator to reduce pilot scan when operating

in high engine-output flight environments. The primary flight display incorporates real-time traffic awareness as well as terrain warning via Garmin’s Helicopter Synthetic Vision Technology (HSVT) which adds a third dimension to GPS. The display even has a rear-view camera to watch the tail during confined landings! The addition of Bell’s two-axis autopilot allows the 407 to have a true single-pilot IFR capability. What a machine! Learning to fly modern helicopters has become easier as aircraft systems have been developed with ease-of-use in mind. The skill stays the same, but pilot workload is certainly reduced, allowing for safer cockpits and easier conversion between types. Hopefully the future may even have place for a single-engine helicopter series rating!

j

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LEARN TO

Dale de Klerk Cell: +27825563592 Fax: 0866058948 Skype: dale_de_klerk Email: dale@alpiaviation.co.za

FLY WITH

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A ONE-OF-A-KIND

REFURBISHMENT Most people know about chartering private planes or yachts for luxury travel, but how much do you know about the purchasing of helicopters for personal travel use? For decades, travel enthusiasts have searched for new and exciting ways to expand on their current mode of transport. In recent years the purchasing of helicopters for personal use has skyrocketed. Now more than ever the use of helicopters for private leisure travel has aviation enthusiasts itching to invest. Taking on the refurbishment of any machine is no easy task, but the Capital Air team has proven that the conceptualization and undertaking of an elite customization on one of the world’s most powerful single engine helicopters, can, and will be done.

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December / January 2021/22

Based at Rand Airport, a team of over 200 dedicated individuals, including highly experienced pilots, instructors and engineers have guided aviation enthusiasts in their dream of conquering the skies for over 3 decades. In association with its subsidiary companies, Capital Air offers bespoke, one-stop security, surveillance, and air charter services, however it’s their one-of-a-kind helicopter maintenance service solutions that has proven to be a cut above the competition with this helicopter transformation. Earlier this year Capital Air’s Chief Pilot JP Vinagre was approached by a client, initially seeking to build on his existing flight hours. The conversation soon developed into that of sourcing a bigger machine and upgrading from his current 4-seater Robinson R44. The search for the perfect machine initially saw a possible procurement in the USA, but after the original purchase agreement fell through, it was an Airbus AS350 B3 from Cape Town which made the cut.


transformation experience that is suited to their every need, saving them time and money, getting them into the skies as soon as possible.” With the procurement of a new helicopter, so came the desire to train under one of the countries top helicopter pilots. The final ground runs and first flight tests were conducted in November with Captain Vinagre being the first to test the waters in this newly upgraded, oneof-a-kind AS350 B3.

“I had heard from a long-standing contact within the industry, about this machine that was currently for sale. After an initial discussion with the Seller, we decided to take the opportunity to showcase this machine to the client, to which he accepted the deal. Its important for our clients to understand that we are not a sales team, our advice on purchasing the best helicopter, suited to your needs is based on years’ worth of experience from both our engineering teams and pilots, we would never recommend a machine to a client in which we wouldn’t purchase ourselves”.

“Advice and support during the procurement process is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the services we offer. Our engineers offer 24-hour support, with clients being able to contact us at any time, and whether we need to give advice over the phone or go out to assist, we are always available.” Remarked the project Engineer. Capital Air prides itself on not only offering their clients a professional, holistic approach to helicopter aviation but is recognised as the leading all-in-one service provider that transcends their customers’ needs and wants within the industry. With a proven track record of being one of Africa’s top aviation companies, Capital Air’s level of workmanship and quality is unmatched. So, whether its sophistication or adventure you’re searching

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purchase and apart from the cosmetic and engine upgrades needed, the helicopter was in a suitable airworthy condition to fly through to the Capital Air offices in Johannesburg, where the rebuild would take place. The project re-build commenced in early September, with a full overhaul of the helicopter beginning soon after arrival. “It was a full tear down. Basically, everything came out, from the engine, interior and just about every nut and bolt, we started from scratch.” said JP. When it comes to purchasing a helicopter there are various things to consider, cost being one of them. On average a new Airbus AS350 B3 could be purchased for approximately

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PETER GARRISON

TABULATING

TAKEOFF If the runway’s too short, at least it’s virtual. GALEN HANSELMAN, who has published several guidebooks and charts for pilots interested in landing on something other than 5,000-foot paved runways, sent me his twovolume flyer's guide to Utah and the associated "Supplemental World Aeronautical Chart," which resembles a WAC chart but includes a slew of backcountry airstrips not on the WAC. The quality of his productions and the amount of effort that he has put into them are impressive. One volume of each set covers the airstrips themselves in great detail, with frank and often rather disconcerting comment about their condition and risks; the other concerns why you would want to go there – history, lore, hikes, scenery, fishing and so on.

Mountain Flying Bible, which is, if you’ll pardon the redundancy, the bible of mountain flyers. I responded that I had a computer program for calculating takeoff distance that incorporated those variables and more, and I ought to be able to come up with something. Ah, the vanity of human wishes! It turns out that takeoff distance is very difficult to calculate with anything like precision. And, for that matter, how would you know that you had the answer right? The best you can hope for is to simulate a few existing aeroplanes and see how well your results match the POHs.

Ru n n i n g u p to full power agains t t he brak es .

I exchanged a few emails with Hanselman, and at one point he commented that he wished he had something more to tell his readers about effects on takeoff performance of wind, altitude, runway gradient and surface and so on than just the rules of thumb found in the late Sparky Imeson's

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Here’s how the program works. At intervals of a tenth of a second it calculates thrust from a few known – or guessed – propeller characteristics. From this it subtracts resistance due to friction, drag and runway slope, and applies what’s left to the mass of the aeroplane. This results in an acceleration and a certain distance travelled. The process repeats itself, reporting speed, distance, acceleration,


lift, and so on at one-second intervals – that is, every ten cycles – until the virtual aeroplane reaches its takeoff speed. The procedure is pure physics and ought to work fine. What goes wrong is the data. Garbage in, garbage out. Thrust and friction cannot be known with precision; each type of propeller has its own quirks, each backcountry airstrip surface is unique, each pilot handles his aeroplane in his own way, and many of the doubtful variables influence one another.

seconds no matter what you do with the throttle. A rolling takeoff may help you avoid getting bogged down in soft soil or sucking up pebbles into your prop, but it won’t make a noticeable difference in where you leave the ground. Running up to full power while standing on the brakes allows you to adjust the mixture for best power at high altitude, but it does not materially affect the length of the takeoff roll.

It often happens, however, that even when a computer simulation gets the wrong answer it may still teach us something new or call our attention to something we’ve overlooked.

Since the aeroplane is moving fastest at the end of the takeoff roll, the takeoff distance is going to depend heavily on the liftoff speed. For instance, rotating a Skylane at 60 knots rather than 55 (those are calibrated airspeeds; the Skylane’s ASI is way off) lengthens the takeoff roll by 25 percent.

For example, if I vary the time to full power between zero and, say, seven seconds, I see very little difference in takeoff distance. Why? Well, it’s common sense, really: The aeroplane is moving very slowly at the start of the takeoff roll, and so it doesn’t roll very far in the first few

The influence of aerodynamic drag is relatively small. Thus, delaying flaps until late in the takeoff roll doesn’t make much difference. Surprisingly, too, although there is an “optimum” compromise between increased drag and reduced friction when you hold the nose up for

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December / January 2021/22

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a “soft field takeoff,” the effect on distance is again small, except to the extent that holding the nose up tends to get you airborne at the earliest possible moment.

for example, shows the aeroplane rotating 5 knots slower at 2,400 pounds than at 2,950 and getting off the ground, at sea level, in 440 feet rather than 705.

The thing to bear in mind about getting airborne at a very low speed is that you may be unable to climb until you have gained more speed in ground effect. The takeoff roll may be shorter, but the distance to clear an obstacle is no different.

The Skylane POH says that every 9 knots of headwind reduced takeoff distance by 10 percent. That’s a useful rule of thumb, but couldn’t they both be 10? Either way, the rule goes astray in really strong winds, since in a 55-knot wind a Skylane’s takeoff distance would be zero, not two or three hundred feet.

The big factors in takeoff distance are the ones you’d expect: density altitude, weight, wind, surface condition and gradient. For unturbocharged aeroplanes, density altitude reduces the power and thrust available and therefore the rate at which the aeroplane accelerates. According to the program – your results may vary – takeoff distance increases by about 8 or 9 percent for every 1,000 feet of density – not pressure! – altitude. You can find presumably exact information about density altitude and weight in the POH, so it’s not necessary to memorise any rules of thumb. Weight is a critical factor because it affects both acceleration and liftoff speed. The Skylane POH,

Tailwinds are a more sensitive matter, since they increase the liftoff groundspeed and so make the aeroplane eat up more runway at the departure end of its roll. The Skylane book says to add 10 percent for every two knots of tailwind, which seems extreme; a Mooney 231 chart shows a 26% increase for a 10-knot tailwind. My program predicts a 34 percent increase for a 10-knot tailwind for a hypothetical Skylane-like aeroplane. So you see we’re all over the map. Various kinds of runway surfaces present different resistances to the rolling aeroplane, but it’s impossible to categorise surfaces in any precise way. My program, whose surface

Downhill and downwind - or uphill and into wind?

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options extend from concrete to quicksand, shows a 50% increase in takeoff distance for a “soft” field, and 20 percent for “grass” – not to be confused with “turf” (around 5 percent). But how soft is soft, and how tall is grass? (In quicksand, the aeroplane does not move at all.) Unlike surface condition, runway gradient can be specified very precisely. Hanselman has personally measured the slopes of all sorts of godforsaken landing strips, some no more than paler places in the sagebrush, and reports them to two decimal places. But then what? And, more troublingly, what if the wind is blowing downhill?

When you take off with a tailwind your climb gradient will be unexpectedly shallow. Be aware of obstacles ahead that you would normally expect to clear; a tailwind may carry you into them. A simple rule to remember – call it the two-thirds rule – is that the second half of your takeoff distance will take half as long to cover as the first, but you’ll travel twice as far gaining the second half of your takeoff speed as you did the first half. For example, if your takeoff roll is 600 feet and you lift off at 50 knots, you will have reached 25 knots in only 200 feet; but if it takes you 8 seconds to reach the 300-foot halfway mark, it will take only another four seconds to cover the remaining 300 feet.

how s oft is s oft , and how tall is grass?

Well, here’s what the computer has to say. If you’re taking off with a 5-knot wind at your back, you’ll need a 5-percent downslope to get off the ground in the same distance as you would from a level runway with no wind. Oddly enough, it works the other way around too: a 5-knot headwind cancels the effect of a 5-percent upslope. This can’t be a rule of thumb, though; it’s too simple.

Admittedly, that is hard to understand and even harder to remember. That is why some pilots use a simple go/no go rule for tight takeoffs. If you don’t already have more than two-thirds of your liftoff speed when you reach the midpoint of the runway, abort the takeoff. At that point, there’s not enough time left for thinking it over. j

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PLANE TALK - JIM DAVIS

THE T YPE

HOG

I have just taken off from Plett in my magic little Grob G109B and I’m turning out for a flight along the coast back to my base in George. There’s someone with a very scratchy radio who seems to be calling George from a jackhammer testing ground called ZS-AFA. Interestingly, this establishment claims to be passing Plett at 1,500’ on its way to George. The occasional words that I catch sound almost like Scully’s voice. THEN IT ALL COMES TOGETHER – my longtime mate is taking a bunch of Germans around the country in a bloody Junkers JU52. Now, this is an excellent aeroplane for building hours – it’s slightly slower than a VW Combi going up a hill in a headwind. As far as I can guess Scully must have around 30,000 hours, so I don’t suppose he’s doing this to build command time. The bugger is just having fun.

keep station, so I ask him to slow down a tad. When you are flying in formation it’s polite for the leader to fly slow enough so the others have scope for a bit of throttle jockeying. Scully knows this as well as I do, but he pretends not to understand. “What’s the matter – can’t you keep up with old Auntie Ju?”

t he ae r ial e quivale nt of a pie ce of r olling-s tock

I tell George that I would like to chat to AFA and they give us a frequency. I ask Scully if he is happy for me to formate on him. He’s delighted and we both take photos of each other. But I am having to use almost full throttle to

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“Come on Scully, be nice man, or I won’t play with you.”

“What is that thing anyway?” he asks, because my Grob is the first one in the country. Now I know I have bargaining power – Scully and I are both exceedingly conscientious Type Hogs. I must break off for a moment to explain this to newer pilots.


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Aviators have a code of conduct which prevents them from inquiring about the number of hours, or types, that another pilot has logged. In the same way one businessman will never ask of another, “I say Frubshaw, how much money have you got?" It’s just not British is it? Codes of conduct, like rules, are there to be broken, especially when you are having a couple of snorts with an old mate. And so it was with my ex-boss Zingi who wanted to tell me how many types he had flown. He eased the conversation round to the number of types in my logbook. This was a tactical error; he was talking to the original type-hog. Of course I had to concede that there were a few small gaps in my logbook where the words "Spitfire", "Hurricane", “Miles Master” and "Sopwith Pup", appeared in his. It’s a pity that I did not then have the experience that was now almost within my immediate grasp. I had just worked out how to put the words “Junkers JU52” in my logbook.

The Junkers seemed to stop in the air – it almost looked as if it has hit a brick wall. I had to yank on a handful of spoilers, otherwise I would have overshat. I knew we had struck a bargain. That afternoon Scully and I had fun in my superb little German motor-glider. We took off on 18 and stopped the engine at 300’ to glide gently round a lowish circuit and land back on the same runway. Then we headed a couple of miles south and stopped the engine over Herald’s Bay. We feathered the prop, and taking advantage of a light onshore wind, spent half an hour playing in the rising air over the beach and the cliffs – in complete silence.

you ar e f l y ing t he e ngine

“Scully, slow down a bit man, and perhaps we can negotiate a ride-for-a-ride.”

If I could have back just two of the aircraft I have sold over the years, they would be my Tiger Moth and my Grob. Two aircraft that could hardly be more different, but both have that wonderful ability to potter slowly over the morning countryside and smell herds of black and white cattle on their way to the milking shed. Or climb up high and make gentle patterns amongst the clouds. My reward came the next day in the left hand seat of the aerial equivalent of a piece of rollingstock.

A wonderful photo of the JU52 ZU-AFA in formation with a Beech 18 Staggerwing and a SAAF Harvard. Photo by Herman Potgeiter.

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The cockpit of the JU52 is like flying a locomotive with lots of large levers and stop cocks.

Once, as a small boy, my Dad lifted me into the cab of a steam engine. That memory flashed through my mind as I entered the frontoffice of the Junkers. There seemed to be little difference. The big pressure gauges, copper pipes and red-handled valves were all there, as were the large wood-rimmed wheels and coloured levers. I like to sit in a new cockpit for a long time and absorb its nature, its ambiance and its layout. When you need the throttles your hand must go there without thinking about it, and when you want to set the manifold pressures you eye must go to the right gauges. Scully gives me plenty of time for this – he is messing around outside with the engineers and pouring about a bakkie load of 120 into the oil tanks. The cockpit is mostly very old but it’s partially updated by the insertion of new avionics and flight instruments. If you are looking for some sort of pattern in the layout you will be mightily disappointed. Chaotic would be a charitable

description. Nothing comes to hand easily, and some things are almost impossible to find without help. For instance, there are no pitchchange levers - the props are controlled by fiddling with spring-loaded electric switches. For rudder-trimming you use gigantic levers situated either side of your legs and labelled "left engine" and "right engine" - for which one has failed. To the right of your seat there is a huge wooden wheel that operates the elevator trim. If you scriggle your hand amongst the spokes you will feel a lever which has to be pulled up in order for the wheel to operate the flaps and the trim simultaneously. I have said before that flying behind a radial always feels as if you are flying the engine, and the rest of the aeroplane just comes along for the ride. Well taxying a JU52 is like taxying a braking system – you just have to get the brakes to the destination and the rest of the aircraft will join you. Actually it’s not just the brakes – it’s the whole December / January 2021/22

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The Grob 109B - one of the two planes that Jim regrets selling. Photo by Ian Howat on AirHistory.net.

bloody undercarriage. You see, the air around us hasn’t changed much since the 1930s – so the flying bit of the aeroplane is fine. But the advent of runways – instead of nice open grass fields – has caused all sorts of problems for the bits of the aeroplane that interact with the ground. The wheels, the tyres, the brakes, the suspension – just kidding there isn’t any. The silly marie biscuit tyres were meant to absorb all the bumps. When the Junkers was designed you taxied a short distance in a straight line to your takeoff point and then turned into wind. Same when you had landed – a straight line taxy to your parking spot. With the advent of runways things became complicated. You have to taxy a hell of a long way on a hard unforgiving surface, and you have to keep turning on to different taxiways. Nothing about the structure below the wings was designed to cope with such things. There are no toe brakes - simply massive rudder pedals with leather straps over your feet. The straps serve two purposes, they help you keep your feet on the rudders in turbulence, and they enable you to shove with one foot and heave with the other. Almost everything on the aircraft

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December / January 2021/22

requires massive physical strength. There’s no power steering or fly by wire – you physically push and pull things that are connected via railway fixings to other things. My mate “Squintin” – Mike St Quintin – says, “The JU bounced along during taxi, it had no oleos, springs etc. The bouncing came from the tires acting like a spring with no shock absorber. This, I believe, is what caused a loosely fitting tire to come off the rim.” Except it didn’t just happen once – it was a reasonably common event. Mike goes on to say, “I never had trouble with the air brakes other than they were unpredictable in how effectively they would work. They could be a bit grabby and equal pressure applied to both brakes was never guaranteed to cause equal braking. Actually it very seldom did. The brakes are powered by a compressed-air bottle under the co-pilot's feet. This air is fed through a mass of pipes, valves and pressuregauges, to… guess where… the throttle levers. Throttle back the left motor and you have left brake. The right throttle will do the same for that brake, while the centre throttle works both binders.


With long distance taxying two major problems arise, the brakes quickly overheat and stop working, but worse still, every time you throttle back there’s a hissing of compressed air, like the old steam trains, and the pressure gauge reminds you that you only have a limited number of shots till the bottle is empty and that was your braking allowance for the day. Another interesting system supplies oil (but not fuel) to a failed engine. If one packs up there is no way to feather the prop - it just keeps windmilling, and therefore needs to be fed with oil, but not fuel. All very complicated. Start-up is typical for round engines - plenty of wobbling wobble-pumps, winding up and meshing of inertia-starters, and billowing clouds of blue smoke. Everyone enjoys that.

and pressures at your peril. The whole lot thunders along at a stately 90 knots. Sir Isaac Newton – had he been there – would have applauded the manner in which the Junkers obeys his law about things carrying on doing what they were doing, until acted upon by an external force. With the JU-53 the external force is supplied by the pilot. It takes massive physical muscle to make this aircraft do anything. The elevator is heavy and slow, the ailerons are heavier and produce more adverse yaw than roll, while the rudder requires such brawn that even the master-race had difficulty populating these cockpits with adequately strong-legged pilots. Unfortunately we had a dozen pax, so steep turns and stalls were not on the menu and I had to content myself with doing pansy turns and fighting the turbulence caused by a mean burg-wind which had just sprung up. All too soon it was time to return to base. The engineer opened a hatch in the roof, climbed on a wooden box, head-and-shoulders in the slipstream, and wiped the oil from the windscreens so we could see the runway.

get t he brak es to t he des t inat ion

Take-off is a stately affair. The tail comes up as soon as you have full power. The engines bellow and trail smoke while she lumbers forward. After about 200m she drifts gently into the air and climbs with more dignity than spirit. Perhaps like an elderly butler carrying a silver tray with a whisky and soda up the mansion’s sweeping staircase. This lack of urge is to be expected as our three Pratt & Whitney Wasps – borrowed from Harvards – push out a total of 1800HP. This is 600HP shy of the 2400HP developed by the original BMW motors. Once settled in the air you realize you are surrounded by glass. Strangely that doesn’t make for good visibility but it does mean you can keep a close eye on those thundering oil splattering engines. At least for a while until the centre engine chunters out enough smoke to cover the windows with an ever-thickening film of oil. These engines make their presence known. The bellow of open exhausts only feet from your eardrums, and a rumbling vibration combine to let you know that you are being dragged through the atmosphere by radials. Ignore their temps

With a strong, gusty, 90 degree crosswind, the landing was interesting. Scully used most of the two kilometres of runway to battle the blasts and avoid taxying too far, while gently feeling for the ground with one wheel. I kept thinking of what Mike had said about tyres coming off the rims. We taxied in with huge bursts of power and much puffing of brake-pressure as he wrestled the squalls of hot air. As we were shutting down Derek Dumbleton, a local crop-spraying pilot, stuck his head into the cockpit. “I don't know how you lot keep three of these engines going - I have enough trouble with one of the bastards." So there you go Zingi, my long deceased friend, how much time do you have on a JU52? j

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JU52/3 Specs and Performance First produced: Number built: Original engines: Max speed: Cruising: Time to 6 560’ : Service ceiling: Range at 3 000’: Max range: Max weight: Empty weight: Wingspan: Length: Height: Wing area:

1932 3E234 3 x 830 HP BMW 132A air-cooled radial 180 mph at 6 560’ (2 000 m) 154 mph at 8 200’ (2 500 m) 10.2 mins 19 000’ 546 miles 994 miles 23 200 lbs 12 550 lbs 25’ 10” 62’ 96’ 1190 sq’

Grob G109B Specs and Performance Crew: Length: Wingspan: Height: Wing area: Airfoil: Empty weight: Max takeoff weight: Fuel capacity: Powerplant: Propeller: Cruise speed: Stall speed: Never exceed speed: Range: Service ceiling: G limits: Maximum glide ratio: Rate of climb: Rate of sink: Wing loading: Power/mass: Take-off run: Landing run:

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December / January 2021/22

2 8.1 m (26 ft 7 in) 17.4 m (57 ft 1 in) 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in) 19 m2 (200 sq ft) Eppler E 580 (16.1%) 620 kg (1,367 lb) 850 kg (1,874 lb) 100 l (26 US gal; 22 imp gal) 1 × Grob 2500E1 4-cylinder piston engine, 71 kW (95 hp) 2-bladed Hoffmann HO-V 62 R/L 160 BT 3-speed variable-pitch 205 km/h (127 mph, 111 kn). Max 180 km/h (110 mph; 97 kn) 73 km/h (45 mph, 39 kn) 240 km/h (150 mph, 130 kn) 1,500 km (930 mi, 810 nmi) at economical cruise with max fuel 6,000 m (20,000 ft) +5.3 -2.65G 28 at 115 km/h (71 mph; 62 kn) 3.3 m/s (650 ft/min) 1.1 m/s (220 ft/min) at 105 km/h (65 mph; 57 kn) 44.7 kg/m2 (9.2 lb/sq ft) 0.079 kW/kg (0.048 hp/lb) 196 m (643 ft) 200 m (656 ft)


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special deal for flying schools phone Avril at 076 732 3392 or visit www.jimdavis.co.za December / January 2021/22 47


REFURBISHMENT

AERONAUTICAL AVIATION

– MAKING PC-12s YOUNG AGAIN! By Guy Leitch

Lanseria based avionics specialist Aeronautical Aviation has just completed its first upgrade of a Pilatus PC-12 to the latest Garmin G600TXi and GFC600 suite. This brings the older PC-12 up to date yet saves millions of dollars on the cost of a new PC-12 NGX. GARMIN AND PILATUS received a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) to install the Garmin G600TXi avionics system in all pre-NG PC-12s, that is, those produced between 1994 and 2008. A key improvement is the integration of the Garmin GFC600 autopilot. Aeronautical Aviation is leading the way, being one of the first in the world to successfully integrate the GFC600 into the PC-12.

Key abilities of the GFC600 autopilot are its ability to fly coupled approaches (but not full Autoland) and the many other benefits that spin off from this. This includes the invaluable safety aid of an emergency auto descent system. If the system detects a loss of cabin pressure it emits a loud aural warning for a minute. If there is no response from the pilots the emergency descent system engages and immediately turns the aircraft left 90 degrees to exit the airway and start an emergency descent. It switches the autopilot to Indicated Airspeed Mode, pushes the nose down and pegs the speed at Vne less 10 knots. It then automatically levels out at 15,000 feet, a naturally breathable altitude. It

AN EMER GENCY AUT O DE S CENT S Y S T EM

Improved Safety The GFC600 is for many the gold standard in autopilots – especially when integrated with the huge capability of the whole Garmin avionics suite.

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Upgrading the PC12-45 to a Garmin 600 brings the aircraft up to date and makes it safer - for far less cost than a newer model.

also considers the terrain, should the MSA be higher than 15,000 ft.

plus protection against stall and excess pitch and bank angles.

With the G600 installation the aircraft gains many new operational capabilities including coupled VNAV descents and fully coupled missed approaches, as well as Garmin’s ‘Smart Glide’ which can automatically pitch the nose angle for the aircraft’s best glide speed while simultaneously navigating within the vicinity of the selected airport so the pilot can execute an approach and landing.

A key factor in making decisions in avionics investments is maintenance, especially in the light of the current semi-conductor shortage, as the support for the original Honeywell avionics may become limited due to parts availability and supply chain issues. Being the most modern state-of-the-art system, the G600Txi installation can be expected to be well supported and updated for a lengthy period.

The installation of modern avionics enables the pilots to use the increasingly common GNSS approaches, plus it reduces pilot workload and improves situational awareness. The GFC also provides lifesaving flight envelope protection – on par with the most modern Airbus airliners. Garmin calls this Electronic Stability Protection (ESP) and it includes a stick shaker

In the Cockpit The Garmin G600TXi New Perspective for the PC-12 combines both the primary flight display (PFD) and the multi-function display (MFD) into a single 10-inch wide flat-panel LCD screen that is readable in direct sunlight and has touch screen controls. December / January 2021/22

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The original PC12-45 panel is busy, heavy and has limited functionality.

The G600TXi comes with a large menu of valuable standard features. Key amongst these are: Garmin SVT Synthetic Vision Technology, TAWS-B terrain alerting, FliteCharts and SafeTaxi. The G600TXi comes standard with full colour 3D synthetic vision. For added situational awareness and to get the aircraft certified for GNSS approaches there is an optional Terrain Warning (TAWS B) function. Instead of gyros with high maintenance moving parts, the G600TXi uses the solid-state GRS77 attitude and heading reference system (AHRS). As a key safety feature, the installation displays the PC-12’s angle-of-attack on the G600TXi PFD. Optional inputs make it possible to overlay onboard radar, traffic alerts, XM satellite weather (for the USA) and other inputs such as Satphones. Support for an optional radar altimeter control/display is provided and there’s also a video input option that enables the G600TXi MFD to function as a live-cam

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video monitor. A popular option is to unlock the Chartview on the G600TXi, which with a Jeppesen charts subscription, gives the pilot the capability to fly precision Required Navigation Performance (RNP) approaches with augmented GPS accuracy. The complete G600TXi New Perspective system also includes the Garmin GI 275 Electronic Standby Instrument, making the PC-12’s panel a low maintenance, full-glass, setup.

Installation In South Africa, Aeronautical Aviation has just completed its first PC-12 upgrade, to a 2003 PC-12/45, ZS-MSF. The CEO of Aeronautical Aviation, Clinton Carroll said, “Upgrading the older PC-12s to modern Garmin avionics is an unbeatable proposition. The aircraft’s capability is much improved, particularly its ability to meet the standards of GNSS-RNP approaches,


plus have the legally required updates such as ADS-B in and out.” Clinton continues, “The new G600TXi installation transforms the capability of older PC-12s, bringing them to a level comparable with the latest PC-12 NGX that costs many millions of Dollars more. Yet we can upgrade older PC-12s with our labour and other inputs denominated in South African Rands and this means the owner gets a Dollar based improvement paid for in Rands,” he says.

Honeywell avionics is still good, over time it is natural that it may take longer to obtain parts. In addition, the new features and ease of use of modern avionics make this upgrade a no-brainer. It’s like comparing a 20 year old Nokia 5110 1998 cellphone to a modern smart phone,” Clinton says.

ONE OF T HE F I R S T S UCH I NS TA L L AT I ONS I N T HE WOR L D

“The older PC-12s are approaching thirty years of age and eventually the question will arise as to their support by the original avionics manufacturers. While support for the original

This is just a tantalising taster to what can be accomplished with the modern Garmin suite. An STC that is being eagerly awaited is the expanded engine monitoring capability with the TXi Engine Indication System (EIS) display. This upgrade offers a complete package that includes the G600 TXi flight displays, GTN Xi Series navigators and a GI 275 electronic flight instrument configured as a standby flight instrument.

Upgrading the PC-12 requires extensive gutting of the interior fittings and the entire instrument panel.

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Pilatus PC12-45 ZS-MSF on the spotless floor of Aeronautical Aviation's spacious hangar.

A key advantage of the upgrade is that it removes legacy avionics and wiring, creating weight savings. Other optional upgrades include an audio panel, ADS-B transponder, Iridium datalink, weather radar, datalink SiriusXM weather, and for the cabin as well as the cockpit, Garmin Connext connectivity via the Flight Stream 510 wireless gateway. Another popular option that is both simple and inexpensive is the MD93 USB charger/clock so that the pilots can charge their iPads and smartphones during flight.

Cost and Downtime So what does it all cost, and how much downtime will there be? Clinton Carroll explains that a typical cost could be budgeted between R2.5 to R4 million, depending on options. “The integration of the GFC600 autopilot has

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been a steep learning curve as it integrates with many of the aircraft systems and thus has many complex relays. This is one of the first such installations in the world and Garmin and Pilatus worked closely with us to make it all come together. The downtime for the ZS-MSF upgrade was just 3-months and I reckon I can get it down to two months, now that the initial steep learning curve has been accomplished,” Clinton explains. Pilatus fully supports the STC upgrade. When it was announced, Thomas Bosshard, the CEO of Pilatus, said; “We were looking for a way to enable legacy PC-12 owners to realise continued value in their PC-12 investment. With the Garmin G600TXi avionics suite they will be able to update their aircraft with many of the features available in today’s aircraft and lower their ongoing maintenance costs. It is one of the many ways Pilatus strives to support our customers above and beyond the initial sale.” j


December / January 2021/22 www.aeronautical.co.za

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JOHAN WALDEN

TIES,

BUTTONS AND BARS

- PART

2

With only one more flight lying between me and a Blue Book, I strapped myself into the seat for the last time and prepared to take on the CPL Checkride. THEY WARNED ME that the examiner didn’t speak much – unless something was wrong of course. Although disconcerting, according to them it was nothing to worry about and just the way he was on a test. The thought of a stern, seasoned captain scrutinising my every move was unsettling. But a silent one was downright frightening. A few deep breaths as I did my seatbelt. While I was at it, I tried to work up some gob in my bone-dry mouth before I’d have to talk, but to no avail.

Breathe in… and out… full power. “Airspeed alive… temps and pressures in the green…. 50kt, rotate.” In Sling fashion we sprang into the air in a Vx climb until clear of the simulated obstacle at 500ft. So far so good. I departed the circuit to the north and set the nose on my first aiming point en-route to Saldanha.

I K NE W T HE ‘ I NT ER E S T I NG’ S T UF F WA S S T I L L ON I T S WAY.

The intention was to have tested in a Cessna 172 (we got on quite well). Unfortunately it had been sold just a few days earlier, so I now found myself back in the Sling. The upshot was I had done far more forced landing practice in the Sling than the 172 and knew its glide much better. After the navigation exercise, the test would no doubt include a forced landing or two along with all the other air work.

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After stuttering through the crew briefing I started up and taxied to Morningstar’s Runway 20. I said all my checks and everything I did out loud. The designated flight examiner (DFE) sat silent and watched.

December / January 2021/22

I settled in for the nav – this was the first portion of the check flight, but I knew the ‘interesting’ stuff was still on its way. Sure enough, eventually the DFE informed me that the navigation part of the test was now over and told me to chuck my nav-log in the back. Stalls, steep turns, and spin avoidance were next on the agenda: I managed to pull these off


well within the required tolerances I had practically memorised from the test forms. But the real test was still to come – the forced landing.

There aren't many landing options out over the dunes.

A few days earlier I really stuffed up a simulated forced landing when I went up with an instructor for some test-prep (you may have read about it). I asked him to throw every trick in the book at me before I tested for real, and the forced landing was a given. He had explained that when the DFE ‘failed’ the engine, he’d want to know exactly what my descent plan was – fair enough. But when we practised it, my instructor tried to get the plan out of me while I was still coming up with one. The result was a lot of backwards and forwards between us over the choice of field, while the aircraft gracefully floated closer and closer to the earth... until it decided for me. The solution, we discussed in our debrief, was that I should have the plan clear in my own head before it could be communicated to the DFE… I just hoped that he would give me the time I’d need. I mean, if I couldn’t pull off a forced landing, I was sure to be deemed unworthy of a Comm. Back in the air, I rolled out of the last steep turn the DFE wanted me to do. Then I heard the engine wind down and felt the accompanying forward lurch. This was it. He had failed the engine in literally the worst place on the route he could have. Floating powerless over the Atlantis sand dunes there was almost nothing but thick bush in all directions, well beyond our best gliding distance. This however turned to my advantage. Few choices are sometimes (I say again, sometimes) better than having too many. I had often felt lost and unsure of where to go when surrounded by a patchwork of fields. But with limited options less filtering was required and I

found it easier to narrow down on the best one. So, with the area void of cultivated fields or ‘aeroplane-friendly’ surfaces, I had three options to work with: The Delta 200 airstrip 5nm away, a tar road, and the beach. Now his silence was welcome: he didn’t interrupt my thoughts or push for answers – he just let me get the hell on with it till I was ready to talk. The airstrip was tempting – very tempting. Five miles was probably doable… but the thought of stretching the glide to almost the horizon must’ve triggered an alarm circuit somewhere in my brain, because I soon found myself scanning around for a better spot. Not to mention when I saw the double row of power lines running between me and the airstrip, I knew that if the headwind was only slightly stronger it was tickets. December / January 2021/22

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Wires can be almost invisible, so I crossed at the highest point - above the pylon.

Again, the coast was too far to judge properly – and were there people, rocks? It was a stretch too. The only place I was sure to make was the road. There was no traffic, and it ran straight for miles and miles. I was basically lined up with it on a long final already. All I had to do was make S-turns to lose the height. Feeling much calmer now, I performed the emergency drills and engine restart attempt, dummy Mayday call, and passenger briefing. I briefed the DFE on my descent plan and he was satisfied. But, he told me, in real life if there are cars it’s a no-go. Of course, being an active road, we couldn’t go through with the exercise fully. So he switched things up and told me to head for a dirt off-shoot road that appeared on my right. Once again I made the plan and joined on a left down-wind – just like a normal circuit. The ‘KISS Model’ just works so beautifully sometimes: Keep It Simple Stupid!

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It's a pass! DFE Francois Naude congratulates Johan.


With the 'field' made, my most dreaded exercise was finally over and soon we were on the climb again. The climb was cut short though as the DFE told me to level off at 1000ft – a simulated low cloud base. I knew what that meant: time for a precautionary landing. This time, with engine power, I could go for the Delta 200 strip. I set the Sling up in a low safe cruise configuration at 80kt and first stage of flap. I set course for the airstrip, still about 5nm to the south. But as we approached, I realised those power lines were taller than they looked. Even at 1000ft they were still an obstacle to be reckoned with. I started searching for a safe place to cross. I aimed to fly directly over the pylon, instead of the cables. Even though the cables were lower, they can be extremely difficult to see until it’s too late, and I’d read too many accident reports to try it. So by flying over the pylon I could safely cross, knowing that that was the highest point on the whole line. We finally made it to the airstrip where I did a high pass and low pass field inspection, followed by a touch and go. After a surprise simulated engine failure after take-off I was relieved beyond words to hear that we could head home. After landing and the debrief he asked me if I had any questions. I had only one. Did I pass? In disbelief that I somehow passed a CPL Checkride I found myself shaking hands with the DFE and signing the papers. I had expected to feel a wave of elation upon passing, but funnily enough it didn’t come – it was more like relief that it was finally over. But over the next few days the stress of being under constant scrutiny slowly relaxed its painful grip and I allowed myself to unwind. One of the most exhausting parts of this whole thing was the constant self-scrutiny: How were my forced landings? How was my knowledge here? And

I collected my Blue Book - the feeling was indescribable.

was my radio work up to scratch? This constant ‘self-checking’ was a tiring but essential part of my Comm at every stage. But it was finally over. A record three days later, the CAA had processed the CPL and soon I was on my way to the flight school to collect my Blue Book. The feeling was indescribable. I owed so much of it to the people who had gone out of their way to see me succeed, and especially my mentor. Owen was a tall, grey “aviation Gandalf” if you like, and had been with me every step of the way. Since then he had 'flown West' into the wild blue yonder leaving the last bit to me to figure out – but he had left me the tools too. There are so many people out there with a lifetime of experience and knowledge who would like nothing more than to help a newbie find their feet in flying. If you’re one of those who haven’t got it all figured out (join the club!) find yourself a mentor – someone to give you a nudge in the right direction where needed, and who’ll look out for you. Aviation is hard, and never straightforward – which is one of the reasons I’m ending this column. I haven’t got it all figured out, and I

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don’t know what more I could tell you. In fact, I probably have more questions now than I did when I just started learning to fly! But such is life: the more you know, the more you realise you don’t know. The hardest part is to get the snowball rolling. But once it is, the answers will come. And when you finally do pop out the other side, you’ll have

made some friends for life. Don’t worry too much about everything: If you’ve started the journey, learn to savour and enjoy every moment – wherever in that great adventure you are. Thank you to all the special people who have helped me along the way. You know who you are. j

Flying is an adventure - to be enjoyed!

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FLIGHT TEST: BOEING 747-400

THE MAGNIFICENT

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A SAA Boeing 747-400 touches down on 03R at ORTIA in January 2007. Image - Montague Smith.

In the 1960s Boeing bet its survival on the huge gamble that was the 747 jumbo jet. But they thought it was just a stop gap until the Boeing Supersonic Transport hit the market – which would make subsonic airliners obsolete.

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HOWEVER, THE 747 ‘CLASSIC’, being the 100 – 300 series, turned out to be huge success. And after 30 years Boeing knew that they needed to update it, which led to the -400. For many airline pilots it’s their favourite plane of all. To find out why the pilots (and airline managers) liked the -400 so much we asked Captains Scully Levin and Karl Jensen – as some of the most experienced on SAA’s -400 fleet, what they thought of the big Boeing. But first, for those not familiar with this long reigning queen of the skies, some background.

Development The first 747-400 was rolled out on January 26 1988 and made its maiden flight on April 29, 1988. Type certification was received on January 9, 1989 and the rest is history.

Given the huge success of the Classic Jumbos the -400 is very much an evolutionary step – but what a difference the new technology made. By early 1984, Boeing had identified five development objectives for the upgrade from the -300: new technologies, an enhanced interior, a 1,000 nautical miles (1,900 km) range increase, more efficient engines, and a 10 percent reduction in operating cost. The 400 retains the 747-300 stretched upper deck. While the fuselage remained largely unchanged, the -400 received a new wing which was 6,000 pounds lighter. The horizontal tail was redesigned to hold 3,300 USG fuel. The noticeable external difference are the 6 ft winglets. Performance to fractions of a percentage are important to airline accountants and the winglets gave a 3-percent increase in long-range cruise, improved takeoff performance, and higher cruise altitudes. One of the key technological developments over the 30 years of the classics was the development of more powerful and efficient engines. The 400 offered a choice of three:

Sporting its iconic orange tail, ZS-SAV is seen at Miami in February 1998. Photo Remi Dallot.

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The -400 is easily distinguished from earlier models by its winglets.

the Pratt & Whitney PW4000, General Electric CF6-80C2 or Rolls-Royce RB211-524. The new engines featured full-authority digital engine control (FADEC), which was a key in making flight engineers redundant. On ultra-long haul flights, a back-up Captain and First Officer are carried.

high ops and ultra-long range flights. By the late 2010s, the -400 was being phased out by airlines in favour of the Boeing 777, 787, and Airbus A350. Cargo airlines have embraced the 747 in the ever expanding global trade economy. Well cared for used -400s are now cheap to acquire and can move large volumes of cargo at the right price.

The 747400 owne d t he s k ies .

The 747-400 owned the skies. Typical carrying capacity is 416 passengers in a three-class layout. And it could haul them 7,285 nm (13,490) km with an almost 400 ton takeoff weight. A total of 694 were delivered from 1989 to 2009, making it the best-selling 747 model. It may be argued that the -400 was so good that its replacement, the 747-8, could not improve on it enough to attract many sales. In the end the 747 and the Airbus ‘quads – the A340 and A380 were rendered obsolete by the massive improvements in engine power that made large twin jets viable even for hot and

In the cockpit

The step up to a two-pilot glass cockpit was a huge evolutionary change. The complex flight engineer station was gone and the new EFIS displays and simplified layout yielded a 67- percent reduction in switch gear, lights, and gauges versus the Classics. The new Flight Management Computers (FMC) made it easy for the pilots to calculate optimal altitudes and routes, and a Rockwell-Collins central maintenance computer (CMC) automated troubleshooting. December / January 2021/22

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A crew rest area is located on the upper deck behind the cockpit for pilots and the cabin crew got a cramped eight-bunk space in the roof above the aft cabin. Pilots report that they soon got used to the massive size of the 747; “At maximum takeoff weight the sensation of power and control transmitted to the pilot during the initial climb is one of the most gratifying sensations an airline pilot can experience.” A reviewer remarked: “The 747 has a massive operational envelope. When flown at or near maximum gross weight it doesn’t reveal much in the way of strain or being at the edge of its performance capabilities. The biggest difference you notice from the cockpit during these takeoffs is that you don’t rotate until very near the end of most runways. While that’s certainly an eyeopening experience the first time you see it, decision speed (V1) has happened much further back on the runway. So no matter what happens after that point, you’re taking the airplane flying

and you have to trust that the good folks at Boeing got their performance data correct, which I absolutely do.” “We also have occasion to fly the airplane at very low weights and on very short flights. In most of these cases, we use a heavily reduced takeoff thrust setting. This has the advantage of reigning in any excess thrust that might otherwise speed the takeoff sequence up to an uncomfortably rapid set of tasks, and also reduces wear on the engines which are incidentally the most valuable part of the airplane. That’s the recurring theme of this airplane: Heavy or light, crossing continents and oceans or just taking it for a short jaunt down the road, it’s simply a wonderful airplane to fly manually. “A pilot’s airplane in the truest sense of the term. Honest and forgiving handling with extremely positive control authority, and of course no shortage of power when you ask for it. In fact,

The cockpit of ZS-SAV has been converted to a simulator - at Cardiff in the UK. Photo - Phil Woods.

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The first widebody - the business class cabin on the -400 main deck.

the biggest challenge in flying this airplane is going down and slowing down. This occasionally creates conflict with ATC instructions when they need a speed and altitude restriction during an arrival, but we can usually accommodate them. Most ATC facilities understand the limitations of heavy jets like this and usually refrain from putting us in tight spots on our performance.

excessive thrust on airport ramps is a concern for any airplane, but especially on heavy jets like the 747. You can do a lot of damage or even get someone killed if you’re not careful with your thrust. In his excellent series on the 747 (to be found in https:// smokeongo.co.za/the-mightyboeing-747-400-part-one/), Scully Levin writes; “I cannot even begin to describe what it was like to fly these magnificent aircraft, as there was simply nothing else like them. Suffice it to say that I personally consider all the 747s, colloquially referred to as Jumbos, to be the most perfect of all the 200 or so aircraft types that I have ever flown.

it ’s s impl y a wonde r f ul air plane to fly

One of the biggest challenges has been taxying the plane when it’s heavy. At nominal weights, and on level surfaces, the 747 can start rolling only with idle thrust. That’s nice because all you have to do is manage the speed with regular brake applications. But I’ve already had a few situations where I’ve had to get the airplane rolling from a stop (including a few times on a slight uphill slope) when it was heavy, which required an unnerving amount thrust. Using

"The cockpit is eight metres above ground and so during taxi the aircraft appears to be moving slower than it is. A ground speed display December / January 2021/22

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provided by the inertial reference system and is continually checked to determine the actual taxi speed," Scully Levin says. Stopping 400 tons of plane ‘going like a Boeing’ requires something special in the brakes department. Each wheel has six brake discs and twelve sets of pads. With sixteen wheels across the four landing gear bogeys there is a total of 16×6 = 96 brake discs and 192 sets of brake pads. One of the more dramatic 747-400 operations anywhere was the SAA flight between New York’s JFK and Joburg’s ORTIA. Watching the SAA 747-400 thunder down the runway – right to the end – and then lumber slowly into the air elicited the comment that came to be standard use amongst the pilots at SAA. “Good job Springbok!” Scully writes; “For a ultra-long haul flights such as from JFK to ORTIA the -400 would be at its max weight of 394 625 kg. All eight fuel tanks

would probably be full, holding 215 558 litres. Once the thrust levers had spooled up and were producing the thrust required for takeoff, a glance at the primary engine indications would show that the fan speed and exhaust gas temperatures would be close to the limits. As you accelerate down the runway the groundspeed read-out on the navigation display increases towards the 195 knot tyre speed limit. “We needed a rotation speed of about 180 knots. On a warm day with light and variable winds, or if the airport was high above sea level, true airspeeds and ground-speeds higher than the 180 knots could easily occur. Converted to kilometres per hour, this equated to a astonishing 360 kilometres per hour! “ Such takeoffs never came cheaply. Operation of engines close to their limits is expensive in maintenance and fuel burn and the high groundspeeds threaten to throw the treads off the re-treaded tyres.

The rear bogey touches down first and the landing gear rotates, providing progressive smoothing.

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"Good job Springbok!" – the famous call from the JFK Tower as a SAA 747-400 lumbered into the air for a 17 hour flight to Joburg.

The loss of an engine after takeoff is always a critical event but the great advanatage of the 4-engine quads was that they only lost 25% of their power and thus did not suffer the more than 50% performance loss of the big twins. With an average consumption rate of about 10 000 to 11 000 kg per hour, it can take ten to eleven hours of flying to get down to max landing weight of 285 000 kg. So a fuel dump becomes necessary. Typical cruise was at a fast Mach .85.

"On an ultra-long-haul flight, such as New York to Johannesburg, we would divide the flight into four equal rest periods that were about three hours long. The relief Captain and First Officer would take the first rest period once the flight was under way. Just over three hours later, they would take over control whilst the primary Captain and First Officer went to the bunkroom for their three hours’ rest. This roster would be repeated for the next two rest sessions. Towards the end of the flight, the Primary Captain and First Officer, refreshed after some quality sleep would return to handle the approach and landing."

t he mos t pe r f e c t of all

In his series, Scully shares the experience of long haul flights in the -400; “Just aft of the flight deck, on the right, is a toilet and washbasin for the exclusive use of the pilots. On the left is a bunkroom that is sound and light proof. There is an upper and lower bunk and each have subtle reading lights and air vents." Flying long haul at night was wonderfully described by an SAA pilot as ‘being like a night watchman in a video arcade.’

"If the aircraft was really heavy the highest cruising level that we could climb to would be about Flight Level 280. At that altitude the fuel flow to each engine is high. As the aircraft became lighter it would be “step-climbed”, increasing its altitude bit by bit to achieve greater economy. Towards the end of the flight the aircraft would be cruising way up high in the late thirties to the early forties. The 747 series were restricted to a maximum altitude of 45 000 feet. December / January 2021/22

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There is plenty of redundancy. Thanks to four engines there are four independent enginedriven hydraulic systems to power the rudder, ailerons and elevators and systems such as the flaps, landing gear and brakes. There is no “manual reversion”, meaning that if, in the unlikely event of all four hydraulic systems having failed, the flight controls could not be operated manually. Therefore the rudder was built with an upper and lower half. The upper rudder is powered by hydraulic systems One and Three and the lower rudder by systems Two and Four. Similarly, the left elevator is powered by hydraulic systems One and Two and the right elevator by Three and Four."

One” decision height of 200 feet and a runway visual range (RVR) of 550 metres, to “Category Two” with a decision height of 100 feet and a RVR of 300 metres. Second: Automatic landings could also be done. However they lacked rollout capability and so the auto-pilots would disengage immediately after touch-down, so the pilot flying had to keep it on the runway centre line." Scully writes; “Despite the huge bulk and inertia of the -400, the landings are remarkably easy. Its nice and stable the whole way down the approach path and in the round out and fold off its not prone to “falling out of your hands,” It is very seldom that anyone puts down a “thumper” of a landing. I think the tilted undercarriage cushions the touch down; first the four aft wheels make contact and are then pushed towards the horizontal, when then the front row of wheels make contact.

‘going lik e a Boe ing’ r e quir es s omet hing s pe cial in t he brak es de par t me nt .

The -400 was not only a big leap forward in terms of performance and economy, but also in terms of technology. Scully writes: “The -400 had superb All Weather Operational capability and up to three separate autopilots. Just one auto-pilot was engaged from shortly after takeoff, and then for many hours, to the beginning of the final approach. From then on, the aircraft would either be flown manually, or a Cat-3 approach would be flown with the auto-pilot coupled to the Instrument Landing System (ILS).

“During the northern hemisphere winters, particularly in the early mornings when most of our flights arrived, we could often encounter low cloud bases and fog. This meant that the autopilot would fly the aircraft. Once the aircraft was established on the ILS localiser and glideslope a second autopilot could be coupled. This created for two advantages: First, the ILS minima could be reduced from a “Category

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“The funny thing is that once you have landed the 747 four or five times your backside, eyes and brain work in synch with each other and you can sense when you are a few inches from the ground. The landing roll can be extremely short as braking power from the 16 wheels is immense. And then there is the reverse thrust. Ground handling is also a treat as the main body steering from the two inside bogeys enables the aircraft to turn on a tickey. “These are just some of the many reasons why it is my perfect plane!” j


Specifications and Performance

Range Seating Length Wingspan Tail Height Cabin width (Interior) Freight (underfloor) LD-1 Typical Cruise Speed at 35,000′ Maximum Taxi Weight (MTW) Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW) Maximum Landing Weight (MLW) Maximum Zero Fuel Weight (MZFW) Maximum Fuel Capacity Engines and Thrust

Boeing 747 100

Boeing 747 SP

Boeing 747 200

Boeing 747 300

Boeing 747 400

6,100 Statute Miles 9,800 Km 3 Class 366 2 Class 452 231 Ft 10 In 70.6 Mtrs 195 Ft 8 in 59.6 Mtrs 63 Ft 5 in 19.3 Mtrs

7,650 Statute Miles 12,320 Km 184 Ft 9 In 56.31 Mtrs 195 Ft 8 in 59.6 Mtrs 65 Ft 10 in 20.06 Mtrs

7,900 Statute Miles 12,700 Km 3 Class 366 2 Class 452 231 Ft 10 In 70.6 Mtrs 195 Ft 8 in 59.6 Mtrs 63 Ft 5 in 19.3 Mtrs

7,700 Statute Miles 12,400 Km 3 Class 412 2 Class 496 231 Ft 10 In 70.6 Mtrs 195 Ft 8 in 59.6 Mtrs 63 Ft 5 in 19.3 Mtrs

8,354 Statute Miles 13,450 Km 3 Class 416 2 Class 524 231 Ft 10 In 70.6 Mtrs 211 Ft 5 in 64.4 Mtrs 63 Ft 8 in 19.4 Mtrs

20 Ft 6.1 Mtrs

20 Ft 6.1 Mtrs

20 Ft 6.1 Mtrs

20 Ft 6.1 Mtrs

20 Ft 6.1 Mtrs

2 Class 331

6,190 Cu Ft 173.3 Cu Mtrs 30 x TBA LD-1s

6,190 Cu Ft 173.3 6,190 Cu Ft 173.3 6,025 Cu Ft 170.5 Cu Mtrs 30 x Cu Mtrs 30 x Cu Mtrs 30 x LD-1s LD-1s LD-1s

Mach 0.84 555 MPH / 895 KPH

Mach 0.88 614 MPH / 990 KPH

Mach 0.84 555 MPH / 895 KPH

Mach 0.85 565 MPH / 910 KPH

Mach 0.85 565 MPH / 910 KPH

738,000 lbs

703,000 lbs

836,000 lbs

836,000 lbs

877,000 lbs

334,750 Kg

318,875 Kg

379,202 Kg

379,202 Kg

397,800 Kg

735,000 lbs

670,000 lbs

833,000 lbs

833,000 lbs

875,000 lbs

333,400 Kg

304,000 Kg

374,850 Kg

374,850 Kg

396,890 Kg

585,000 lbs

475,000 lbs

630,000 lbs

630,000 lbs

630,000 lbs

265,350 Kg

215,465 Kg

285,762 Kg

285,762 Kg

285,762 Kg

526,500 lbs

425,000 lbs

545,000 lbs

545,000 lbs

544,000 lbs

238,816 Kg

192,776 Kg

247,207 Kg

247,207 Kg

246,754 Kg

48,445 US Gal.

47,210 US Gal.

52,410 US Gal.

52,410 US Gal.

57,285 US Gal.

183,380 Litres

178,000 Litres

199,158 Litres

199,158 Litres

216,840 Litres

Pratt & Whitney JT9D7A Thrust 46,500 lb (20,925 kg) Rolls-Royce RB211524B2 Thrust 50,100 lb (22,545 kg) GE CF645A2 Thrust 46,500 lb (20,925 kg)

Pratt & Whitney JT9D7R4W Thrust 46,500 lb (206.8 kN) Rolls-Royce RB211524C2 Thrust 46,500 lb (206.8 kN)

Pratt & Whitney JT9D7R4G2 Thrust 54,750 lb (24,635 kg) Rolls-Royce RB211524D4 Thrust 53,000 lb (23,850 kg) GE CF650E2 Thrust 52,500 lb (23,625 kg)

Pratt & Whitney JT9D7R4G2 Thrust 54,750 lb (24,635 kg) Rolls-Royce RB211524D4 Thrust 53,000 lb (23,850 kg) GE CF680C2B1 Thrust 55,640 lb (25,040 kg)

Boeing 747 100

Boeing 747 SP

Boeing 747 200

Boeing 747 300

Pratt & Whitney PW4062 Thrust 63,300 lb (281.57 kN) Rolls-Royce RB211524H2-T Thrust 59,500 lb (264.67 kN) GE CF680C2B5F Thrust 62,100 lb (276.23 kN)

Boeing 747 400

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WHY I LOVE THE 747-400 Capt. Karl Jensen

To have flown the Boeing 747-400 is a privilege beyond description for any dedicated aviator and any report on this aircraft can only be a list of superlatives. I FLEW BOEING 747S of all marques (Classics 747/200 - 300 - SP and Combi) for 27 years, four years as a Co-pilot and 23 years as a Captain in the then functional SAA. I also flew them for airlines that had wet leased SAA’s B747s such as Lion Air, Air Mauritius, and Air Namibia. I was assigned for training as a Captain on the B747-400 in October 1992. This was to be a ‘Differences Course’ that involved technical training at SAA, by Willy Williams, a brilliant lecturer, as was the norm in the SAA Training Section. Willy was a big fan of the 400 - I remember him chirping that the aircraft was the most powerful machine in the world, except for his Chevvy.

literate, but I admit that I battled initially with the FMS (Flight Management System) and ACARS (Air Crew Alerting and Reporting System) by being too analytical. The change from a 3-man flight deck that included a Flight Engineer on the Classic 747s to 2-man flight deck without the FEO on the 400 was also a major adjustment. In SAA, the FEOs were dedicated Flight Engineers as opposed to many other airlines who had pilots act in this capacity. They were a wealth of information when needed. SAA’s Redifon Concept 90 B747-400 Full Flight Simulator was the first simulator I experienced where one carried out all the flight training, including circuits and landings, emergencies, and blind landings to CAT IIIB levels (no decision height and only 75m Runway Visual Range in the touchdown zone which was accurately measured by strobe lights).

imme ns e wonde r at t he powe r of t his air craft

Various other instructors covered Flight Planning, Emergency Procedures, Dangerous Goods etc. This was followed by 64 hours of simulator training in a Full Flight Simulator with a two-hour pre-flight briefing prior to four hours in the simulator and a two-hour debrief after each session. At the age of 49, I had to apply myself fully to absorb the mountain of information to be proficient. I regarded myself as reasonably computer

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After successful completion of the course, I stepped into the aircraft on a commercial flight with passengers. Of course, this was with a Training Captain in the right-hand seat. The Training Captain determined when a pilot was ready to do a check flight with a Check/


Karl Jensen and son Wayne who came to greet his Dad after shut down at JNB.

Supervisory Captain. The entire process in my case involved eight sectors under supervision and 34 flying hours. My first flight after the supervision stage was literally a baptism of fire. That particular aircraft had required a boroscope inspection of one of the Rolls Royce RB211 engines. The flight was scheduled to fly from Johannesburg to London. Naturally the aircraft was at maximum weight for the 10 hour 50 minute flight with a full passenger load for the high altitude take off (5575’ above sea level) on a hot summer evening in December 1992. We departed on time and as we became airborne, an engine fire alarm sounded with aural warnings and red lights. We carried out the appropriate Engine Fire/Failure Checklist and flew towards the east where we could jettison fuel down to the maximum landing weight of 287,400 kgs. The engine fire indication extinguished, and we returned to Jan Smuts, as the airport was then still called. A Welch plug used for the boroscope turbine inspection had not been refitted correctly and enough hot gas, at take-off thrust, escaped to set off the engine fire warning system. My great appreciation of the 400 reached a higher notch

through this incident. At maximum weight, the aircraft performance with the loss of a single engine at a critical phase of flight was quite manageable, as was the subsequent jettison of fuel while keeping ATC informed as well as our passengers and crew and the SAA Ops Centre. I must admit that it did generate a flood of adrenalin in my system. It took a mere 45 minutes on the ground to rectify the problem and refuel the aircraft before we could proceed uneventfully to London. With the computer assistance, the mass of the aircraft was always known, and jettisoning fuel to max landing weight could be carried out accurately so as not to waste fuel by dumping too much. When flying a loaded 747-400 at maximum weight, the amazing sensation flying this magnificent airliner, as so may have said, is one of immense wonder at the power of this colossal 394,600 kg aircraft in your hands, especially during takeoff where it seems that there is still such a reserve of power available. You are always aware of the immense machine. After a few years of flying airliners, they seem to shrink in size as you become familiar with the aircraft, but not so the Boeing 747, which to me has always been a massive machine of superb beauty. December / January 2021/22

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Another great thrill were blind landings – I guess in all I carried out about half a dozen at JFK, London, and Jo’burg. The elation and satisfaction of landing a massive airliner blind in all weathers on the other side of the world and parking it at the terminal building within millimetres of the required spot, takes some beating.

Redispatch A clever yet legal flight planning system that was used to operate extraordinary long distances is a process called ‘Redispatch’.

of those same winds. We operated the aircraft at normal economy cruise, taking a mere 12 hours and 7 minutes airborne time. A reporter on board suggested that this was probably a world record for the distance. I took a printout from the on board ACARS after parking at the Cape Town terminal. I submitted this to the Aero Club of South Africa who in turn passed it to the FAI (Fédération Aéronautique Internationale World Air Sports Federation). The FAI confirmed this as a ‘World Speed Record over a Commercial Air Route in excess of 6,500km’ at a speed of 1019.6km/hr. Of course, the Concorde could exceed double this speed, but not over that distance of 12,339 km. The official FAI and Aero Club of SA certificates hangs in my gallery at home. The airline management was not too happy about this award, as they claimed others might attempt to beat it at the cost of extra fuel burn.

The -400 is a magni f ice nt e ngine e r ing mar vel

This required the fuel flight plan to be calculated to an en-route airport, not more than 20% of the total distance from the destination airport. If weather conditions at the desired destination and performance were within limits, we then diverted to the required destination with less than normal but still legal reserves.

This enabled us to fly the JFK-JNB route nonstop in the -400 on redispatch, making this the longest non-stop scheduled service in the world. (This distance was later increased by nearly 600 km on the Atlanta- JNB service). Of course, nowadays this is old hat with the much more fuel efficient twin-engine wide body airliners such as the Boeing 777, 787 Dreamliners and Airbus A350. These modern twins were the demise of the B747-400, as they are able to carry similar loads, but with about 60% of the fuel burn of a B747-400. On 14 September 1996, I operated B747-400 ZS-SAY ‘Vulindlela’ from Miami to Cape Town. Due to prevailing westerly upper winds, this was the only occasion where the inbound flight from Cape Town could not make the flight non-stop and had to route via Ilha do Sal in the Cape Verde Islands for refuelling. The sector I flew back to Cape Town was of course the benefactor

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Flying the -400 How did I enjoy flying the 747-400? To sum it up in few words, it was a dream aircraft and very easy to fly: it seldom presented technical defects, and if handled accurately and with due care, was an unforgettable treat for all who flew as crew – and as passengers. The -400 is a magnificent engineering marvel and a very strongly built aircraft. Initially, there was no crosswind limit for landing, only a demonstrated crosswind capability of 44 knots – later reduced to a 35 knots crosswind limit. The five multi glass computer screens on the flight deck were inter-switchable. Due to SAA’s long-distance network, forward of the post 9-11 bomb proof flight deck entry door (this weighed 480 kgs) we had a double bunk crew rest cabin with its own environmental control, two First Class seats where the pilots could dine away from the controls and instruments location and the luxury of our own toilet.


We generally flew with a flight deck crew of Captain and Co-pilot on short sectors and with a Third Pilot, termed rather derogatorily the Boy Pilot, regardless of gender, on sectors of more than eight hours. On sectors of greater than about nine hours, an additional Senior First Officer enabled the primary crew to rest. Operating through Ilha do Sal, essentially at night, there was always a crosswind with very little peripheral reference from lighting in the village of Espargos, where the Amilcar Cabral Airport (GVAC) is located. This made landing there a challenge into what is termed ‘The Black Hole Syndrome’. This requires intense concentration to avoid spatial disorientation. My final flight in SAA was from Atlanta via Ilha do Sal to Johannesburg in 2003 when I was forced to retire at the then mandatory retirement age. I was presented with an embroidered towel at Sal with part of the inscription ‘…301 landings at Ilha do Sal’ SAA operated eight Boeing 747-400s: six custom-made to SAA’s specifications with Rolls Royce engines and two additional 747-400s that were built for Philippine Airlines who were unable to fund them when there was a financial problem in that country. The ex-Philippine aircraft were powered by General Electric CF6 engines In my time, I flew the SAA 747-400s to Luanda, Windhoek, Abidjan, Lisbon, London,

Manchester, Frankfurt, Zurich, Jeddah, Hong Kong, Perth, New York, Miami, Ft Lauderdale, Atlanta and to the major airports in South Africa. I crewed on a test flight from the Boeing factory in Seattle for testing and certification to Moses Lake in Washington State. This was followed by the actual delivery flight as far as Ilha do Sal where another crew took over the aircraft to Johannesburg. Flying on short sectors such as JNB to Durban or Cape Town and back was a special treat as we always used the minimum power required for takeoff yet the performance of the -400 would not be unlike that of a jet fighter. It is now more than 18 years since I had to retire and I regard myself as being hugely privileged to fly Boeing 747s, especially the -400. It is with sincere appreciation to Joe Sutter as the original design engineer of the 747 and to the wonderful airline SAA, where I flew for 36 years. I am often asked if I miss that pre-retirement life – I certainly do, despite the many challenges of the career, so much so that I often jokingly say that I regularly climb into my clothes cupboard with a vacuum cleaner to pretend I am in the crew rest of the Boeing 747-400. To add realism, my wife brings me cold tea every two hours after banging and crashing to simulate the galleys at full mealtime service tilt. They were the best of years – in the best of planes. j

Retired 747 Captain Karl Jensen has a hand-painted picture of the 747-400 on his hangar wall.

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AIRSHOW DISPLAYS AND

FORMATIONS

WITH THE

747-400 Guy Leitch

AN ESSENTIAL PART of displaying airliners is keeping the huge aircraft in front of the crowd. Flying an airshow in an airliner at its usual high speeds uses up much airspace and the crowd may lose interest if the aircraft disappears out of sight for too long. The higher the speed of the aircraft, the greater its radius of turn. The 747-400 was therefore displayed at airshows with 20 degrees of flap which made a relatively sedate 160 knots easily manageable – with still a good margin of safety over the stall speed.

Captain Flippie Vermeulen displayed an SAA 747-400 at the Yeovilton Air show with Scully Levin. Flippie describes how Scully is very focussed on providing the crowd with the best views of the aircraft. For this reason, the ideal viewing angle is considered to be a 125 degree arc in front of the crowd line. To remain within this arc it is always tempting to use tight turns, but that increases the G loading and airliners are very restricted in the amount of G-forces they may be subjected to, being 2.5-G in level flight with flaps up. With flaps deployed, the G-limit is even lower.

Scully Levin’s display of the 747-400 at Yeovilton in England is still talked about. Pic Paul Johnson - Flightline.

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Flippie Vermeulen explains that the bank angle at airshows is therefore limited to 45° and if necessary, the wing is unloaded by reducing back pressure of the stick. Yet the radius of turn is still tight enough for the constrained airshow environment and there is enough bank angle to provide for a really impressive presentation of the massive aircraft.

which was challenging with identical aircraft in the formation – but with the mixed formation with the Airbus A340-600 in the lead and two 747400s on the wing, the lower drag of the Airbus with Flaps 2 made it very much more tricky to maintain position accurately.

The 747 air show display ended with a low pass and then a full power spiral climb away. At a low aircraft weight this produced a spectacular vertical speed of around 5000 fpm. In less than a minute they had to dramatically throttle back to avoid exceeding the 4000 foot airspace bottom limit.

Displaying the 747-400 In the UK

Formation Fly-pasts

a f ull powe r s piral climb

Flippie Vermeulen also displayed the 747 in formation flights for a number of presidential inaugurations and fly-pasts. He describes how the procedure was to line up the pilots’ eye line with the two rear most points of the lead aircraft’s horizontal stabiliser. Then they would gradually move sideways until the two black rings painted on the two nearest engine nacelles lined up. They would then hold that position,

The 747-was only flown once at an airshow in South Africa but it caught the attention of British airshow organisers. SAA’s famous Springbok service used two SAA 747-400s daily on the London service and these aircraft sat on the ground at Heathrow during the day, so SAA was happy to arrange 747-400 displays for the British airshow organisers.

In just one year the 747-400 was displayed at Duxford’s Warbird Show, Goodwood, Farnborough and the Royal Navy Air Station at Yeovilton. Thousands of spectators were able to see the incredible spectacle of a 747 low and slow and the videos of the displays have been download countless times. These displays are still talked about with awe. j

Two 747s on the wing of an Airbus A340-600 for the presidential inauguration flypast in April 2004. Pic - Hannes Meyer.

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RECREATIONAL FLYING

2021

CHILDREN’S FLIGHT Garth Calitz

The 2021 edition of the Children’s Flight was hosted by the Magalies Flying Club which made their Orient airfield available to become a ‘Field of Dreams’. SINCE ITS LAUNCH five years ago the Children’s Flight has grown as more and more people are inspired to offer their time and resources. The Children’s Flight has, with the infectious enthusiasm of founder Felix Gosher, generated spin-offs such as an ‘Elders Flight’ and a Children's NAV flight to Margate.

commentary always adds magic to any aviation event and creates the ‘Airshow Feel’ that everyone is missing due to Covid restrictions. The first aircraft to get airborne was the huge Antonov AN2 belonging to Michelle and Heystek Pretorius. It carried a team of skydivers, of which Ralph Ridge flew the 82 kg South African flag, accompanied by the national anthem.

HEL I C OP T ER S T OP P ED OF F T HE F LY I NG E X P ER I ENCE

On the Friday morning it was an early start for all involved in making it possible for around 80 children to experience flight. The hugely experienced Francois Hanekom, the Safety Director, gathered all the pilots for the safety briefing to ensure that all the flying was done in the safest manner possible.

Airshow commentator Brian Emmenis made the journey from his home base in Welkom. His

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As the skydivers landed, the children were treated to a five-ship Vans RV flypast. The excitement amongst the children was building as they cheered the aircraft along.

Then it was time to fly. The first batch of children were ushered to the medical stand for a quick check-up and then to the aircraft for an experience of a lifetime. Initially, some of the younger ones looked a bit nervous but after the reassurance of the very professional pilots, they


Children's Flight organiser Felix Gosher with two excited children - pic Trevor Cohen.

Ralph Ridge skydived in with a huge flag. Pic Garth Calitz.

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Felix Gosher greets General Buthelezi. Pic Trevor Cohen.

boarded the aircraft. The absolute joy on their young faces is what makes these pilots come back year after year to share their love of flying. The children were then entertained by the Puma Energy Flying Lions who performed a flawless display of formation aerobatics in their Harvards.

When all the children had had their first taste of fixed-wing flight, the excitement was far from over. After lunch a fleet of privately owned helicopters, ranging from ex-military Alouettes to luxurious Bell 407s topped off the flying experience.

Airline pilot Grant Timms with young passenges - pic Trevor Cohen.

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What it was all about - Raptors pilot Ryan Beeton gives a child a ride in his RV.

The children also had the priviledge of a helicopter flight - pic Garth Calitz.

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The Puma Flying Lions gave a spectacular display. Pic Trevor Cohen.

The CAA's Gawie Bestbier gave a speech - pic Garth Calitz.

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Brian Emmenis provided the high standard airshow commentary. Pic Garth Calitz.

With the flying complete, every child was given a set of Children’s Flight 2021 wings. Deputy Chief of the South African Airforce, Major General Innocent Buthelezi, who had arrived in a SAAF Agusta A109, did the honours, a gesture that was greatly appreciated by all.

The pilots and crew also received wings, and the day was concluded with a speech by Gawie Bestbier from the Civil Aviation Authority. The key to the success of this remarkable outreach is Felix Gosher’s energies and the unstinting support of the many sponsors – who are too numerous to mention here. j

Sling Aircraft brought in their new High Wing. Pic Garth Calitz.

December / January 2021/22

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RECREATIONAL FLYING

EAA SUN ‘N FUN 2021

By Garth Calitz and Rob Jonkers

One of the highlights on the general aviation year is the EAA’s Sun ‘n Fun fly-in. This year it was hosted by the always welcoming Brits Flying Club on the weekend of 5 to 7 November. MIDRAND BASED EAA Chapter 322 started planning this year’s event early in the year. The Sun ‘n Fun weekend kicks off on the Friday when visitors begin to arrive. However, most of the 110 visiting aircraft arrived on the Saturday which kept the air traffic controllers busy but, as always, they did a great job.

proud owners awarded a certificate and prizes which are donated by the sponsors. James Bain’s Alouette II was adjudged the Best Warbird, while the Best Rotor Wing Prize went to Anton von Willich for his immaculate Aerospatiale Gazelle.

T HE F LY I NG L I ONS A R E A LWAY S A P P R E CI AT ED B Y E V ER YONE

Given the flyins closeness to Remembrance Day on 11 November, a poignant moment was arranged by Rodney Benn and Derek Hopkins who dropped 2000 paper poppies from Rodney's Donier Do-27. EAA Stalwart Marie Reddy had painstakingly made the poppies to release in remembrance of fallen soldiers.

Activities planned for Saturday included aircraft judging and the very popular Adventure Rally. Aircraft are judged in different categories and the

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Best Vintage aircraft honours went to Keaton Perkins for the beautifully restored American Champion Decathlon. Mike Davis and Tony van der Heuwel walked off with the prize for the Best Homebuilt – the Osprey GP4 which was the same aircraft Chalkie Stobbart shattered the Henshaw Challenge record in 2009. The Best Kit Built aircraft went to Derek Hopkins for “Mo” his RV8. The Puma Energy Flying Lions did their sponsor proud with their signature displays before heading back to Rand Airport. The Flying Lions have been to almost every flying event since the


Brits Airfield was busy with the more than 100 arrivals. In the foreground is an Aveko vl-3 sprint.

lock-down was lifted and are always appreciated by everyone. The Adventure Rally has become a draw-card at the annual Sun ‘n Fun Fly-in. This year

ten teams entered as the high temperatures experienced in at Brits may have deterred some of the hopefuls from entering. The mercury reached well into the high 30° on Saturday and pushed the density altitude up to very close to The ATC Team of Megan Evans, Benji Phukubje and Eugene Hlungwani.

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Rodney Benn in his Dornier Do27 about to drop paper poppys.

7000’, yet the elevation at Brits is only 3740’. The Adventure Rally is about teams enjoying the more relaxed and fun kind of flying, mostly involving observation of ground features and learning about the area being flown over. The format was in the form of a pre-defined route

map that was available prior to the event for everybody to either plan their route with traditional map plotting tools or to program their GPS’s – if they were more at home following the magenta line. Navigation accuracy was a criterion in the Brian Appleton arrives in his Citabria.

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It was a baking hot weekend.

DR OP P ED 2 0 0 0 PA P ER P OP P I E S F R OM R ODNE Y ' S DONI ER

scoring, where a 1 nm wide virtual corridor was established, which the teams had to make sure that they did not stray beyond as time penalties would be applied for the period outside the corridor. This year the format was made a little easier, and somewhat shorter at just under 60 nm, with all turn point photos shown as correct, and 4 photos provided along the last leg – which was a “follow the river” leg where the location Ellis Levin of the Flying Lions in a classic low pass.

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of these photos had to be marked on the map. A booklet was also provided with details of each turning point with a number of questions to be answered, some answers had to be found on the map, the remainder of the answers had to be found by looking out the window.

Derek Hopkins in his RV8 which won best kit built aircraft.

Neil Bowden in his Sling 2.

Helicopters were also part of the fun in the sun.

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On returning, the competitors had to carry out a spot landing where landing line judge Dave Lister and Kevin Marsden were on hand to adjudicate. First place in landing went to Fanie Scholtz in his Sling ZU-FZF, second place to Sean Cronin in his Bathawk ZU-IGI and in third place Neil Bowden in his Sling ZU-OSH. The Sling floating trophy was handed over to Pierre Dippenaar, this being the sixth event where this floating trophy has been awarded. j


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JIM DAVIS

Z S -EL K

CHER OK EE 180 • This report is to promote aviation safety and not to establish legal liability. • The CAA’s report contains padding, repetition, poor English and incompetence. So, in the interest of clarity and readability, I have had to correct and paraphrase extensively

Aircraft Registration: ZS- ELK Name of Owner/Operator: Botha P M Date of Accident: 23 December 2013 Time of Accident: 0643Z Type of Aircraft: Piper 28-180 (Aeroplane) Type of Operation: Private Pilot-in-command Licence Type: PPL Age: 48 Licence Valid: Yes Type endorsed: No Pilot-in-command Flying Experience Total Flying Hours: 144,75 Hours on Type: 67,55 Last point of departure: Private airstrip, Secunda, Mpumalanga Next point of intended landing: Private airstrip, Secunda, Mpumalanga Location of the accident: On a farm 500m from the end of a grass runway at GPS readings: (S26° 35'43.7", E029° 14' 41.0") Field elevation: 5 473 ft Meteorological: Wind: calm; Temp: 15°C; Viz: Clear; Dew point: 6,2°C Number of people on board: 1+0 No. of people injured: 0 No. of people killed: 0

History of Flight The pilot, the sole occupant, departed from a private airstrip on his farm for a cross-country flight with the intention of landing at the farm again. The pilot reported that the aircraft experienced a loss of engine power during takeoff. He executed a forced landing on an open field at the end of the runway.

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The aircraft landed hard, the right main landing gear broke off and the nose gear collapsed, and the propeller struck the ground. The aircraft sustained substantial damage to the right wing and left side window.


The Cherokee came to a stop with only one prop blade bent.

The aircraft came to rest approximately 500m from the end of the runway. The wreckage was recovered by the approved AMO at Wonderboom Airport.

The recovery crew informed the investigating team about their findings on the leaking fuel selector valve which was observed during recovery.

Airframe: Type Serial Number Manufacturer Date of manufacture Total Airframe Hours (At time of Accident) Last MPI (Date & Hours) Hours since Last MPI C of A (Issue Date) C of R (Issue Date) (Present owner) Operating Categories

PA 28-180 28-2893 Piper Aircraft Corporation 1978 4 380,75 3 July 2013 4357,26 23,49 17 October 2013 8 July 2013 Part 91

Engine: Type Serial Number Hours since New Hours since Overhaul

Lycoming 0-360-A4A L-12206-36A 6 118,25 33,49

Fuel System The PA-28-180 is equipped with aluminium fuel tanks, one placed in the inboard leading edge section of each wing. Each tank has a capacity of 25 gallons. A strainer is installed in the fuel outlet of each tank. From the tank outlet a fuel line is routed through the wings to the fuel selector valve located on the left side of the

cabin in front of the pilot's seat; from the fuel selector valve a line leads to the fuel strainer bowl mounted on the left forward face of the fire wall. The fuel line is routed from the strainer bowl to the electric fuel pump, engine-driven fuel pump and then the carburettor injector inlet port. Two electrical fuel quantity gauges are mounted December / January 2021/22

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within the instrument cluster. Each gauge is connected to a transmitter unit installed in the fuel tanks.

was not fully screwed in during connection. Only three threads were connecting the elbow, with evidence of a compound sealant that looked like dirt.

Investigation Findings

When connecting elbows to the fuel selector valve assembly, no synthetic sealant compound or O-rings are used. The connections use tapertype threads. When connecting the elbow to the selector valve, the seal must be watertight and the elbow aligned with the fuel feed line. The elbow in use was of the correct type and size.

The aircraft impact with the ground was at a low angle and high speed. The damage to the propeller indicates that the engine was turning at low power (windmilling or idling) or at a complete stop before impact. Only one blade of the propeller was bent backward during the accident sequence. During the recovery of the aircraft wreckage, it was reported that the fuel selector valve was found leaking. The fuel was leaking onto the sidewall insulation blanket installed on the aircraft, causing further damage. The selector valve was removed and inspected. During investigation it was found that the elbow

The position of the fuel selector.

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Fuel was leaking from an elbow connecting the engine feed pipe to the selector valve. The leak could not be detected during a preflight inspection because the leaking fuel was being absorbed by the insulation blankets and damaging them. The selector valve is mounted slightly below the fuel tanks and engine feed pipe, which allowed gravity to force fuel through the leaking elbow fitting.


During the pre-flight inspection, the pilot is required to inspect the fuel selector valve for functionality of the valve. The inspection method is limited; one is only required to check the valve’s smooth rotational operation. If the fuel selector rotates smoothly and supplies fuel to the engine, one would not expect a fuel leak. The pilot reported that the engine lost power during take-off. During take-off, the engine requires an increased fuel supply. The two fuel pumps exert a suction force on the feed pipe from the selector. If the connection is not properly sealed (leaking), air is sucked into the system, which will interrupt the fuel supply (air in the fuel system) causing a partial power loss or complete engine failure. JIM’S COMMENTS

As for the cause of the accident, it’s extremely unlikely that a small weep of fuel from the valve would cause fuel starvation. I have spoken to engineers about this and they all think it improbable. Further, it’s common on older Cherokees for the insulation material around the fuel selector to have green fuel stains. This is because, with the selector being below tank level, any work done on the selector or its connections will cause fuel spillage which permanently stains the insulation.

The w hole point of t he r e gulator is to mak e s af et y r e gulat ions

I have a personal interest in this accident. 56 years ago I bought this aircraft, brand new, from Placo in Pretoria, and flew it from Wonderboom to George on 20 April 1966. If the CAA’s report is to be believed I managed to do this 12 years before the aircraft was manufactured. Can’t they get anything right? CAA’s report states that at the time of the accident the engine had done almost 2000 hours more than the aircraft. Although this is remotely possible it sounds like more CAA bungling. There are more suspect figures in the report. It states that the engine was overhauled 33.49 hours prior to the accident. Then it had an MPI exactly (to a one hundredth of an hour) ten hours after the overhaul. This defies common sense. It seems more likely that the investigator botched the figures as well, and his superior, who is meant to check the report, was fast asleep.

Besides, if the minor leak had caused fuel starvation, then why was it only on this flight? And an alert pilot should have spotted low fuel pressure on previous flights. I think the fuel starvation theory is little more than a bad guess.

It’s my opinion there are two far more likely causes for the power loss – or possibly the failure to develop full power: • Carburettor ice picked up on the ground while taxying. Cherokees are very prone to this when taxying over grass during an early first flight in the morning. I see from the photos that the grass in the accident area is nice and green so I would expect reasonably high humidity. When the engine is cold, and idling during taxying, these are ideal conditions for this curious Cherokee anomaly. It generally goes unnoticed because as the engine loses power during taxying the pilot simply opens the throttle further. I recommend throttling fully back before takeoff to check for icing. If the engine wants to die you know you have ice. • A sticking valve. I have had it myself and seen other 180 Cherokees have it soon after overhaul. Typically the engine will run for five to ten minutes and then start losing power. Finally, the accident was unnecessarily damaging. This is yet another case of the pilot

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throwing the aircraft on the ground with undue haste. The report says: The aircraft impact with the ground was at a low angle and high speed. I completely agree. The photos also show that the pilot did not use flaps. It’s my guess that the aircraft could have come away undamaged if the pilot had used full flap and landed at minimum speed. A quick reminder that the energy to be absorbed in the accident is proportional to the speed squared. So if you land at 50 mph you will have (50x50) 2500 units. But let’s say you land at 80 mph, then you will have (80x80) 6400 units This is a massive difference.

Were loose connections to the selector really the cause of the power loss?

Jim’s Rant: Because this is an insignificant accident report – no one was killed, and we don’t really know why the engine lost power – CAA seem to have given the job to their most junior investigator. So does it really matter? Actually, yes – it matters a lot.

AMOs did not believe the not fully screwed in connectors were the culprit.

An engine stoppage like this could easily have killed four people in the aircraft, and possibly more on the ground. So the CAA do a crappy cut-and-paste job and put it to bed, without learning anything from the accident. My point is that, for all we have learned, they may as well have saved the money and simply not investigated it at all. Let me put it another way. When a low hour, VFR pilot flies into IMC and kills all on board, it hardly needs investigating. We are unlikely to learn anything from it. Certainly the flying community needs to be reminded of the dangers of mixing bravery with bad weather, but nothing new gets added to our bank of knowledge.

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Nothing goes towards saving more lives in the future. If we are looking to learn from accidents, then, amongst other things, we need proper investigation of mechanical failures, and maintenance problems. What is the basic role of the South Africa Civil Aviation Authority – and the Accident Investigation Department – as they are all under one roof? Let’s cut out all the rubbish about them being there to issue licenses and to regulate and oversee non-military aviation. Why would we want it licensed and regulated and overseen, any more than we would want riding a bicycle to be burdened like that?


The SACAA’s prime function – the actual core of their business – is to ensure the safe and expeditious flow of air traffic. (My definition.) Isn’t the CAA (and their associated bodies like ATC, airports, maintenance, and even to some extent the Met office) there to implement this ideal of the safe and expeditious flow of air traffic? So their main job is to ensure the avoidance of accidents. This should be the spearhead of the whole operation. When Wilber, Orville and the boys were beginning to kick-start aviation, the first thing that sprang to their mind was not, will it fly? But, will it fly safely? And when accidents did happen, the first question was, WHY did it crash?

operation is upside-down. They have the cart before the horse. Accident investigators should be the cream of the organisation. They must be at the top of the pyramid. Their opinions should guide the direction of all the other sections. Perhaps my emotional connection to the ELK got me thinking more deeply about the purpose of accident reports. And is our regulator meeting that purpose? Not by a thousand miles.

The whole point of the regulator is to make safety regulations. So they should be headed up by a department which understands safety better than any other. This is certainly not the case in South Africa. It seems that accident investigation is an annoying orphan who tags along behind and makes ineffectual bleats which are usually ignored by the autocratic, money-grabbing, license-issuing, stick-waving foster parents. As far as I know Australia is the only country that has got this bit right – at least in theory. They have the word safety in their name – CASA – Civil Aviation Safety Authority. The purpose of this rant is to point out the lunacy of having junior, and demonstrably incompetent staff operating the most important function of the regulator. When young, unqualified, underpaid, non-pilots are sent out to inspect and investigate the terrible site of an aircraft accident, this tells me that the whole

Jim has a personal interest in ZS-ELK.

Take home points • Most engine stoppages give you plenty of warning if you only watch for the signs – unusual temps and pressures on previous flights. Unusual noises and any changes in the usual parameters. • It’s a good idea to cycle the fuel selector during the preflight to make sure it operates smoothly and feels normal. • Engine failures after takeoff should not be a surprise if you expect them and practice them. • Use full flaps for off-field landings. Even a small reduction is speed makes a huge difference. • With Cherokees, throttle fully back before takeoff to check for carb icing.

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CHEROKEE FUEL SELECTOR VALVE OPERATION Information extracted from: Piper Cherokee service manual. Chapter 9. When the fuel selector handle is not in a positive selector detent position, more than one fuel port will be open at the same time. It should be ascertained that the fuel selector is positioned in a detent, which can be easily felt when moving the handle through its various positions. The following refers to another accident in the USA. (The accident investigator cut and pasted it into the ELK report – yet it has nothing to do with this accident. The following service bulletin (SB) was released by the aircraft manufacturer to improve the flight safety use of the aircraft. According to the recorded information, the SBs were never complied with by the maintenance organisations that carried out the aircraft services. Aircraft documentation such as maintenance records, certificates and service bulletin letters were studied and reviewed. Not all service bulletins published by the engine and aircraft manufacturers were complied with during aircraft servicing. The last mandatory inspection carried on the aircraft specifically stated that the inspection of the selector valve operation. The mandatory periodic inspection (MPI) work pack of the last service indicates that the service carried out on the fuel selector

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valve did not include disassembling and cleaning (refer to MPI 3H18 of 01/31/08). Service Bulletin Piper: PA28-180; Worn Fuel-select Valve; ATA 2823 of March 2012, AC 43-16A A general aviation mechanic writes, "When the fuel tank selector valve (P/N 756645) was rotated it was stiff to move, and the detents could not be felt at each position. A teardown showed the valve was very dirty inside, and the detent ring was worn. A review of Airworthiness Directives (ADs) and SBs revealed two bulletins that directly refer to problems with this valve. This defect (worn and dirty) led to improper fuel selection (position), greatly reducing fuel flow and causing stoppage of the engine. a.SB 0355: Fuel Selector Valve Lubrication. I was unable to locate a sign-off in the maintenance records of (compliance) with this bulletin. b.SB 0840: Fuel Selector Valve Cover Replacement. I was unable to locate a signoff in the maintenance records of compliance with this bulletin. This bulletin deals directly with preventing the pilot from inadvertently moving the valve to the 'off' position. Piper considers this SB to be mandatory. No AD was issued relating to the fuel selector valve" j


NEWS

MACK A I R

GR OWS

DESPITE THE LACK of international tourists, Botswana’s Mack Air has announced it is expanding its service between Botswana’s Kasane and Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.

and cross border transfer companies has been phenomenal,” said Michael Weyl, the Mack Air, Managing Director. “We ended up with two scheduled flights per day.”

With land borders remaining closed, the air connection between the two neighbouring countries has become popular. Mack Air launched its inaugural scheduled flights in May using a 14-seater Cessna Grand Caravan EX aircraft shuttling between Kasane and Victoria Falls.

Weyl said the airline was grateful for support from the Victoria Falls community, Zimbabwe Tourism Authority (ZTA) and other stakeholders. He said traffic is low at the moment as expected, especially going into the low season until around February. Presently, there is no link between Victoria Falls and Namibia after Air Namibia suspended flights last year. j

“Since borders were closed, we expected a dip, however support from the tourism industry

A Mack Air C208EX over the Victoria Falls.

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NEWS

CELER A

– PR OGR E S S The unusual looking Celera 500L has completed initial flight testing of 51 hours across 55 successful flights. THE CELERA IS DESIGNED to merge ‘the convenience of private air transportation but at a significantly lower cost and a dramatically reduced carbon footprint,’ according to its website. Citing expected fuel economy of 18-25 miles per gallon against a private jet’s equivalent three mpg and hourly operating cost under $330 an hour, Otto sees their plane as the future of green intercontinental private travel. With a 4,500 nm range, seating for six, first-class cabin accommodations and a maximum cruise over 460 mph at 50,000 feet, the Celera is shaping up to be a powerful contender if it can meet its targets.

quantifying the exact friction state of the aircraft to customise a series of tailored boundary layer rakes and find the cumulative effect of laminar friction in flight. The optimisations are important to reach their milestones, reaching similar performance figures to light jets using a liquid cooled, V12 with 550 horsepower. The Celera claims drag about 59% less than similar sized, conventional aircraft and a 22:1 glide ratio. The aircraft’s final Phase 1 test flight was flown entirely on sustainable aviation fuel, furthering the brand’s goal of sustainable but commercially viable business aircraft. Further development requires funding still to be raised. j

Phase 1 testing sought to compare the prototype against industry standards and refine the design of the Celera with real-world data. Throughout a few test flights, the team visualised The egg shaped V12 powered Celera 500L has flown 51 hours. the laminar flow state with a precision infrared camera mounted on a chase aircraft, quantifying extensive laminar flow capability over all external surfaces. Working with Cal Poly’s Boundary Layer Data System, Otto was able to go further than regular friction analysis,

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w w w. i n ve s m e n t a i rc r a f t . c o . z a Hangar 11, Rand Airport, Germiston, 1401. 1964 Piper Cherokee 235

1980 Beechcraft Bonanza A36 TC AFTT: 4,108 Hours SMOH: 656 Hours

AIRFRAME 1964 Piper Cherokee 235

FEATURES No Damage History

Aircraft Manufacturer:

Piper

Metal Panel

Aircraft Type:

PA28-235

of Manufacture: AFTT: 5,495Year Hours Airframe Total Time: TBO: 2,000 SMOH: 712 Hours

Good Paint & Interior Pilot Toe Brakes

Picture of what the new scheme will look like.

ENGINES

Robinson R44 Engine 770 Hours remaining 12 Year Inspection due 2026

1964 5,495 Hours

PROPELLER

Exceptionally neat little 235 with low time since engine Overhaul Top overhaul. Manufacturer: Hartzell Lycoming and a fresh engine

A 2005 model with approximately 270 Hours remaining.

Manufacturer:

1981000.00 Bell 206B-III Jet Ranger Price: R 2 850 +VAT (If Applicable)

Type:

Type:

O-540-B4B5

Total Time:

HC-C2YK-1B

Price: R 2 400 000.00 +VAT (If Applicable)

Price:5,495 R Hours 900 000.00 +VAT TBO:(If Applicable) 6 Years/ 2,000 Hours

TBO:

1988 2,000 Hours

SMOH:

712 Hours

Bell Long RangerSince III 206-L3 Mid Life:

1976 Beechcraft King Air 200 Blackhawk

45 Hours

Specification subject to verification upon or prior to purchase QUINTON WARNE | DAVID LEWIS Hanger 11, Rand Airport, Germiston, Gauteng, South Africa | P.O.Box 650, Lanseria, 1748

1981 Bell 206B-III Jet Ranger FEATURES Very Well Maintained New Generation Garmin Panel

SA Flyer 2021|12

Barrier Filter

AIRFRAME 1988 Bell Long Ranger III 206-L3

FEATURES

Aircraft Manufacturer:

Very Low Airframe Time

AIRFRAME

AFTT: 6,715 Hours Cycles since new:Aircraft 6,663 Cycles Manufacturer: Engine TBO: 6,715 Hours Aircraft Type:

Great Component Time

Bell 206B-III Jet Ranger

Date of Manufacture:

1981

Hobbs:

6,715

Cycles Since New:

6,663 Cycles

Recent paint and interior, good component times, Airframe Total Time: 6,715 Hours Garmin panel upgrade Price: R 6 800 000.00 +VAT (If Applicable)

Dual Controls

Aircraft Type: AFTT: 2,730 Hours of Manufacture: Engine TBO: Year 2,730 Hours

Van Horn TR Blades

Airframe Total Time:

Bell 206L-III Long Ranger 1988 2,730 Hours

1976 Beechcraft King Air 200 Blackhawk FEATURES

AIRFRAME

Total Time: 16,288 Hours Manufacturer: Total Cycles: 14,663 Cycles PT6A-61 Blackhawk Engines Type: Engine Total Time: 2,246 Hours Blackhawk Engine Instruments Full Set Extensive 6 Year Gear Overhaul done 2019

Raisbeck Quiet Turbo Fan Propellers 4 Blades

ENGINES

Great components. One of the lowest total time Long Ranger 3’s in the world.

Engine Manufacturer:

Allison/ Rolls Royce

Type:

250-C30P

Total Time: TBO:

Price: USD 850,000.00 +VAT (If Applicable) 2,730 Hours Modular

Quinton Warne | 0 8 2 8 0 6 5 1 9 3

Beechcraft King Air 200 Blackhawk

Total Time:

16 288.6 Hours

Total Cycles:

14 663 Cycles

Priced toAFTsell, Raisbeck Dual Strakescontact for more info. King Air 200 with Blackhawk engines. Ambulance interior (1x double and 1x single life port.) PT6ARaisbeck Ram Air Recovery Intake System 61 Floatation engines 2,300 New Passenger interior can be sourced. High Gear for landing onSince dirt runways Frakes Exhaust Stack with Butterflied hot lip DeIcing Mod

Price: USD 995 000.00 +VAT (If Applicable)

David Lewis | 0 7 6 8 2 4 2 1 6 9

Specification subject to verification upon or prior to purchase

ENGINE

PANEL

Specification subject to verification upon or prior to purchase QUINTON WARNE | DAVID LEWIS Hanger 11, Rand Airport, Germiston, Gauteng, South Africa | P.O.Box 650, Lanseria, 1748

QUINTON WARNE | DAVID LEWIS Hanger 11, Rand Airport, Germiston, Gauteng, South Africa | P.O.Box 650, Lanseria, 1748

Specification subject to verification upon or prior to purchase QUINTON WARNE | DAVID LEWIS Hanger 11, Rand Airport, Germiston, Gauteng, South Africa | P.O.Box 650, Lanseria, 1748

QUOTE OF THE MONTH Darren Olivier

QOM

Talking about the impact of the SAAF’s budget cuts, our Defence analyst Darren Olivier wrote:

“There’s also the possibility that the last Gripen flight in SA has already taken place.”

December / January 2021/22

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REGISTER REVIEW: RAY WATTS

N249CM is the DC-3 C-47 that was ZS-NTE.

NOV EMB ER 2021

FOR A CHANGE, I’m going to start out with a cancellation.

It’s not often in these articles that we get to talk about one of the icons of aviation, the Douglas C-47 or DC3. The cancellation of note is ZS-NTE. She started out life on 24 September 1943 when she was built at the Oklahoma City Douglas factory. This aircraft was delivered under the Lend Lease agreement, to the RAF Middle East as FL565 on 20 January 1944 and was immediately transferred to the SAAF as 6873 and remained with them until 1995 when she was sold to Aero Rebuilds at Rand airport.

Vermeulen’s company Flying Springbok. She was sold to Peter Adrian of Trier in Germany on 9 April 2015 and embarked on an epic fourteenday delivery trip to Germany starting on 25 May 2015. This aircraft was then painted up in Aer Lingus colours for an air show in Ireland and has retained this colour scheme. She’s now registered in the USA but remains in Germany. There are seven additions to the Type Certified register this month, five fixed wing and two helicopters. There are two Embraer 190s added for Airlink – although ZS-YAY has been in the country since February. The number of Air Tractors is still growing with another added this month and two more delivered in October but not yet registered.

number of cancellations is continuing to grow

She was registered ZS-NTE on 11 May 1995 and was rebuilt by Flippie

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December / January 2021/22


ABOVE: 2-HZPR - a Guernsey registration, is now ZS-YAK for Airlink. Photo Michael Combrink. BELOW MIDDLE: ZS-ZCB at Boeing Field 9-3-2019. Its first flight in full BA-Comair colours. The aircraft was not delivered due to the Max debacle. Now returned to lessor. BELOW BOTTOM: ZS-OFA Mooney M20K on the USA register. Taken at Grand Central by Ray Watts.

December / January 2021/22

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ABOVE: ZS-JMK Cessna 172 exported to Kenya. BELOW: ZS-DEN is a Beech A36 Bonanza exported to Argentina. Photo at Wonderboom by Dave Becker.

The Falcon 2000 has been around, having been registered in San Marino, the USA and Mexico. The PC-12 is one returning to our register from Namibia, but I can’t track a Namibian registration for her. The two helicopters registered are both brand new machines. The NTCA register is slow this month with only three aircraft being added.

December / January 2021/22

We see eleven cancellations from the TCA side with five aircraft having been re-registered in the USA. The number of cancellations is continuing to grow and this, to me, is a little worrying. Apart from the DC3 and Comair’s illtimed Boeing 737-8 Max, I’m wondering if the others have actually left our shores for the USA, or have they simply been re-registered in the USA to avoid our CAA and make life simpler for the owners.

to avoid our CA A a n d mak e life simpler for the owners .

The drone numbers just continue to grow with another twenty-six added, although there were

106

twelve deleted as scrapped.


ABOVE: ZS-JIK Cessna 510 Mustang. Exported to San Marino. BELOW: ZS-PUT Cessna 152 exported to The Netherlands. Photo taken at Brakpan by Ray Watts.

Comair’s second Boeing 737-8 Max ZS-ZCB has been returned to Boeing as N712BA. This aircraft was actually never delivered to South Africa. Their other one ZS-ZCA is stored at OR Tambo airport and has recently been test flown, presumably in preparation for her return to the lessor. Only one NTCA aircraft has been exported; a Jabiru to Zimbabwe.

Tail piece We lost Neville Ferreira, a well-known aerobatic pilot, in a horrible accident in a KR2 when the wing structure failed. RIP Neville. We’ve started the summer thunderstorm season with a bang – confer my gate motor – please be very careful out there folks.

j

December / January 2021/22

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African Fuel Services are the sponsors for our Register Review Page

OCTOBER 2021 REG

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TYPE NAME

SERIAL NUMBER

PREVIOUS IDENTITY / EXPORT COUNTRY

New Registrations ZSZS-DGN

AIR TRACTOR INC

AT-802A

802A-0077

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ZS-MVL

DASSAULT AVIATION

FALCON 2000

60

T7-LYM, N898CT, N524SA, XA-TYT, XA-GNI

ZS-SHP

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PC-12/47

690

V5-… , ZS-PRK, N690NG, HB-FRE

ZS-YAK

EMBRAER

ERJ-190-100 IGW

1900424

2-HZPR VH-ZPR, PT-TCG

ZS-YAY

EMBRAER

ERJ 190-100 IGW

1900170

N170NC, VH-ZPC, PT-SDF

New Registrations ZTZT-HZA

AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

AS 350 B3e

9118

Brand New

ZT-RRY

ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY

R66

1069

Brand New

New Registrations ZUZU-ACS

THE AIRPLANE FACTORY

SLING 4 Tsi

297S

ZU-IVM

Z.A SWIECK

SAVANNAH S

16-07-54-0488

ZU-ROY

EUGENE DAVID VAN DER WALT

GYRO TWO UTE

RIV-U-001-05/20

Aircraft Deleted ZSZS-AJW

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

T206H

T20608641

EXPORTED TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N6048U

ZS-DEN

BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

A36

E-2867

EXPORTED TO ARGENTINA

ZS-GDC

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION

C90GTI

LJ-1875

EXPORTED TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N1904A

ZS-JIK

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

510

510-0092

EXPORTED TO SAN MARINO as T7-BVR

ZS-JMK

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

172M

172-66499

EXPORTED TO KENYA

ZS-NLF

BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

B200

BB 914

EXPORTED TO BRAZIL

ZS-NTE

Douglas

C-47A Dakota

11926

EXPORTED TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N249CM

ZS-OFA

MOONEY AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

M20K

25-2023

EXPORTED TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N47KP

ZS-PUT

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

152

152-83367

EXPORTED TO NETHERLANDS

ZS-SWY

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

172RG

172RG0591

EXPORTED TO KENYA

ZS-ZCB

THE BOEING COMPANY

737-8

60434

NEVER DELIVERED - RETAINED BY BOEING AS N712BA

JABIRU J430

599

EXPORTED TO ZIMBABWE

Aircraft Deleted ZUZU-FBH

SHADOW LITE CC

! e season v i t s e f y d happ

afe an s a s t n e li all our c g n i h s i W

African Fuel Services is based at Groutville Airfield just North of Ballito. AFS has Avgas and Jet-A1 available as well as offering a range of services.

For any information please call Willie Erasmus on 084 623 4879 or email to willie@africanfuels.co.za / accounts@africanfuels.co.za

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December / January 2021/22


African Fuel Services AFS is based at Groutville Airfield just North of Ballito.

AFS has Avgas and Jet-A1 available as well as offering a range of services.

Services: • • • • •

Deliveries areas:

Night Flying operations Radio Work Sling operations Hoist operations Berg flying operations and training • Fly in • Hot refueling

• Passenger handling and briefings for (hoisting, slinging, off shore and many more) • Cleaning of aircraft • Topping up lubricants and preflight’s on a number of aircraft • Any other assistance you need.

• • • • • • • • •

Margate Airport Ulundi Airport Hluhluwe Airport Vryheid Airport Ladysmith Airport Newcastle Airport Bergville Area Umtata Airport Port St Johns

For any information please call Willie Erasmus on 084 623 4879 or email to willie@africanfuels.co.za / accounts@africanfuels.co.za

YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR ANYTHING NEEDED IN THE LIGHT AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY.

lients a Wishing all our c happy New Year!

We are able to help customers with an array of “hard to find” items which we import according to their requirements.

www.acgs.co.za Contact Eric or Hayley - 084 587 6414 or 067 154 2147 eric@acgs.co.za - hayley@acgs.co.za Situated in Building B7, Rand Airport. Next to Aviation Rebuilders.

December / January 2021/22

SA Flyer 2021|12

We are distributors of Aeroshell and stock a wide selection of oil and grease. We also carry alclad, tires, tubes, hose, 4130 tubing, aircraft sheet metal, bolts, nuts, rivets, air filters, oil filters, spark plugs, aircraft logbooks etc.

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NEWS

G A RMI N WI NS T R OPHY F OR

AUTOL A ND GARMIN HAS BEEN PRESENTED with In addition to being an aviator, humanitarian and sportsman, Robert Collier was a prominent the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for publisher whose family created the Colliers designing, developing and fielding Emergency Weekly. Robert Collier commissioned the Autoland, the world’s first certified autonomous trophy with an intent to encourage the American system that activates during an emergency to aviation community to strive for control and land an aircraft excellence and achievement without human interaction. The Collier Trophy in aeronautical development. - weighs 240 kg Robert J. Collier died in 1918 The award is for the year after completing his military 2020, since its value must service in World War I. be thoroughly demonstrated by actual use during the The Collier Trophy, which preceding year. Autoland was dates back to 1911, is awarded awarded FAA type certification annually by the National as standard equipment in Aeronautic Association for three Garmin G3000-equipped the greatest achievements in aeronautics in America, airframes, including the with respect to improving Piper M600, Cirrus SF-50 the performance, safety and Vision Jet (as Safe Return) efficiency of air or space vehicles. and the Daher TBM940 (as HomeSafe). There are Garmin joins NASA, Neil A. over 300 Garmin AutolandArmstrong, William P. Lear, equipped aircraft in service. Howard Hughes, Glenn H. Curtiss and Orville Wright (to “We all know that it’s not a name just a few) to receive the matter of ‘if’ Autoland will be Collier Trophy. The 525-pound called upon, but ‘when’ it will bronze trophy resides at be called upon,” said Garmin’s the National Air and Space Phil Straub after accepting Museum and was brought to the trophy on behalf of the the ceremony in Arlington. The company. To date there have been no Autoland trophy, commissioned by Baltimore sculptor Ernest Wise Keyser is said to represent ‘the activations outside of flight demonstrations. genius of Man (chief figure), which having Still, all three aircraft OEMs report brisk sales conquered Gravity (male figure) and Contrary of Autoland-equipped aircraft given its safety Winds (female figure) and having touched the backstop, particularly among older buyers and bird and found its secrets and soars from earth their families. The system is not yet available in a conqueror.’ j the aftermarket for retrofit.

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December / January 2021/22


SETTING UP AN

AVIATION BUSINESS

IN ZIMBABWE?

D

EALING WITH THE MANY regulators across the African air transport industry poses unique challenges. Fortunately, when dealing with the Civil Aviation Authority of Zimbabwe (CAAZ), specialist assistance is at hand. Many have the goal of starting an aviation venture with the purpose of moving people and freight but lack the specific knowledge, insights and connections on how best to implement the structure and administration of the business, as well as safety and quality standards. Each of these areas must be organised and guided by written reference, and when structured correctly, the documents become the operating life blood of the company. For investors in Zimbabwean aviation, both local or regional – whether providing transport for mining staff, holiday resorts or private corporate individuals, applying for the necessary licences and permits

and establishing the required manuals for Aircraft Operating Companies, Air Service Permits, or aircraft maintenance agreements, may be a daunting task. A frequently asked question is whether you can modify an aircraft for specific needs, such as passenger entertainment. Without a guide through the complex regulatory environment this can be a difficult questions to answer. In addition, selecting staff and fulfilling the mandatory legal requirements for effective long-term activity is a process which requires local knowledge. George Prentice is a Harare Zimbabwe based aviation specialist who is best able to assist with all the above requirements. You can find George Prentice on LinkedIn or he may be contacted by email on: georgep7@mweb.co.zw 

INTENT SKY CONSULTING PVT LTD.

Exceptional dedication and attention to detail! We offer:

 Assistance with Civil Aviation Authority of Zimbabwe Certification and Compliance in accordance with the relevant Statutory Instruments.  Construction of operation and procedure manuals.  Pre-buy inspection and reporting.  Verification of AD’s, SB’s and Mods state and verification of hours and cycles.  Avionics/Equipment, Compliance, Upgrades, and repairs.  Cost effective passenger entertainment.  Quality Assurance and Quality Control services.

Contact: George Prentice • georgep7@mweb.co.zw • +26 377 210 2162 December / January 2021/22

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Wishing you a wonderful Festive Season!

For all your SACAA approve

AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING

AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING

Cadmium Plate in Gold, Silver or Clear Passivation

AMO 506

For all yourAMO SACAA506 approved plating requirements Hard Chrome

all your SACAA approved plating requirements

Hard Silver Plate

Cadmium Pla Clear Passiv

Electroless Nickel

Hard Chrome We are at 30B, Buil Black Phosphating For all your SACAA approved plating requirements situated Hard Silver P Alodine Phosphating Call Des on 011 827 7535 or Cadmium Plate in Gold or or Peter on 081 775 2434 oN r Electroless are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Airmotive. Silver Passivation Des on 011 827 7535 or 063 150 1533 For all your Aircraft and Allie Hard Copper eter on 081 775 2434 or 083 208 7244 Hard Chrome all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating and queries. Hard Silver Plate Anodising in Hard Copper Plate

Anodising in Grey, Red or Black

Electroless Nickel

Hard Copper Plate

Anodising in Grey, Red or Black Black Phosphating Phosphating

Phosphating SA Flyer 2021|12

We are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Airmotive. Call Oliver on 011 827 7535 or Peter on 081 755 2534 or 083 208 7249 For all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating requirements.

Black Phosph

BOOK S

by Pete r Gar r is on

We are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Air Call Des on 011 827 7535 or 063 150 1533 or Peter on 081 775 2434 or 083 208 7244 For all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating and queries.

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December / January 2021/22


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g engines. and Lycomin n so lli A , ca sotho Turbomec babwe and Le im ntenance on Z ai a, m bi e lin am Z nd 0, Republic of ns” First and seco Vac Operatio s : SACAA # 83 CAA approval pter for Medi

SA Flyer 2021|07

elico 7 B2 model “H 11 K B e th rt o We now supp

Hangar 56, 10 Viking Way, Rand Airport Tel: 011 827 8632  Tino: 083 458 2172  Office: 083December 446 0066 / January 2021/22 Email: technical@heli-afrique.co.za and info@heli-afrique.co.za

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FUEL TABLE

SA Flyer 2021|12

www.sv1.co.za Fuel Prices Fuel Prices as at 01/10/2021 as at 01/10/2021

Fuel Prices Fuel Prices as at 02/11/2021 as at 02/11/2021

Pri cesPri i nclude ces i nclude VAT but VAT exclude but exclude any servi anyce servi feesce fees Ai rfi eld Ai rfi eld AvgasAvgas Jet A1Jet A1 Baragwanath Baragwanath R21,50 R21,50 Beaufort Beaufort West West R23,85 R23,85R15,00 R15,00 Bethlehem Bethlehem R 23,99 R 23,99 R 15,96 R 15,96 Bloemfontei Bloemfontei n n R20,17 R20,17R11,73 R11,73 Brakpan Brakpan R22,40 R22,40 Brits Brits R20,25 R20,25 Cape Town Cape Town R23,67 R23,67R10,65 R10,65 EaglesEagles Creek Creek R20,90 R20,90 East London East London R19,01 R19,01R11,05 R11,05 Ermelo Ermelo R21,33 R21,33 Fi santekraal Fi santekraal R24,50 R24,50 Fly-In Fly-In R20,50 R20,50 Gari epGari Dam ep Dam R22,50 R22,50R15,00 R15,00 George George R20,18 R20,18R11,97 R11,97 GrandGrand Central Central R21,85 R21,85R14,61 R14,61 Hei delberg Hei delberg R22,00 R22,00 Hoedspruit Hoedspruit R15,01 R15,01 Ki mberley Ki mberley R20,39 R20,39R11,98 R11,98 Kitty Hawk Kitty Hawk R23,40 R23,40 Klerksdorp Klerksdorp R21,14 R21,14R13,75 R13,75 Kroonstad Kroonstad R20,24 R20,24R12,65 R12,65 KrugerKruger Intl Nelspruit Intl Nelspruit R22,20 R22,20R14,00 R14,00 Krugersdorp Krugersdorp R21,30 R21,30 LanseriLanseri a a R22,20 R22,20R14,00 R14,00 Margate Margate R25,20 R25,20R15,20 R15,20 Middelburg Middelburg R21,85 R21,85R14,95 R14,95 Morningstar Morningstar R22,50 R22,50 Mosselbay Mosselbay R23,70 R23,70R14,40 R14,40 Nelspruit Nelspruit R20,24 R20,24R11,71 R11,71 Oudtshoorn Oudtshoorn R19,96 R19,96R13,01 R13,01 Parys Parys R21,14 R21,14R13,75 R13,75 Pietermaritzburg Pietermaritzburg R22,70 R22,70R15,10 R15,10 Pi etersburg Pi etersburg Ci vi l Ci vi l R21,65 R21,65R14,10 R14,10 Port Alfred Port Alfred R21,40 R21,40 Port Elizabeth Port Elizabeth R23,17 R23,17R15,66 R15,66 Potchefstroom Potchefstroom R21,14 R21,14R13,75 R13,75 Rand Rand R20,22 R20,22R14,85 R14,85 Robertson Robertson R21,90 R21,90 Rustenberg Rustenberg R20,98 R20,98R14,10 R14,10 Secunda Secunda R20,70 R20,70R12,76 R12,76 Skeerpoort Skeerpoort *** Customer *** Customer to collect to collect R18,90 R18,90R11,51 R11,51 Springbok Springbok R21,50 R21,50R14,56 R14,56 Springs Springs R21,50 R21,50 Not avbl Not avbl Stellenbosch Stellenbosch R23,50 R23,50 Swellendam Swellendam R21,90 R21,90R13,00 R13,00 TempeTempe R21,65 R21,65R13,43 R13,43 Thabazimbe Thabazimbe R21,64 R21,64R14,25 R14,25 Upington Upington R21,08 R21,08R12,67 R12,67 Vereeni Vereeni gi ng gi ng R21,34 R21,34R12,73 R12,73 Vi rgi niViargi ni a R24,47 R24,47R14,26 R14,26 Vryburg Vryburg R21,92 R21,92R14,51 R14,51 Welkom Welkom R20,24 R20,24R12,65 R12,65 Wi ngsWi Park ngsEL Park EL R22,25 R22,25 Witbank Witbank R21,30 R21,30 R19,40 R19,40R11,51 R11,51 Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester Worcester R23,94 R23,94 *** Heli *** copters Heli copters only only

Pri cesPri i nclude ces i nclude VAT but VAT exclude but exclude any servi anyce servi feesce fees Ai rfi eld Ai rfi eld AvgasAvgasJet A1Jet A1 Baragwanath Baragwanath No NoContact Contact Beaufort Beaufort West West R24,90 R24,90 R15,00 R15,00 Bethlehem Bethlehem R 24,96 R 24,96 R 15,64 R 15,64 Bloemfontei Bloemfontei n n R20,41 R20,41 R13,42 R13,42 Brakpan Brakpan R24,10 R24,10 Brits Brits R20,85 R20,85 Cape Town Cape Town R23,90 R23,90 R12,14 R12,14 EaglesEagles Creek Creek R20,90 R20,90 East London East London R18,53 R18,53 R11,25 R11,25 Ermelo Ermelo R21,33 R21,33 Cape Winelands Cape Winelands Airport Airport (Fisantekraal) (Fisantekraal) R24,50 R24,50 Fly-In Fly-In R23,39 R23,39 Gari epGari Dam ep Dam R22,50 R22,50 George George R20,24 R20,24 R12,49 R12,49 GrandGrand Central Central R22,20 R22,20 R14,72 R14,72 Hei delberg Hei delberg R23,00 R23,00 Hoedspruit Hoedspruit R15,01 R15,01 Ki mberley Ki mberley R20,64 R20,64 R13,65 R13,65 Kitty Hawk Kitty Hawk R22,60 R22,60 Klerksdorp Klerksdorp R23,74 R23,74 R13,75 R13,75 Kroonstad Kroonstad R21,74 R21,74 R12,65 R12,65 KrugerKruger Intl Nelspruit Intl Nelspruit R22,50 R22,50 R14,50 R14,50 Krugersdorp Krugersdorp R22,50 R22,50 LanseriLanseri a a R22,20 R22,20 R14,82 R14,82 Margate Margate R25,20 R25,20 R15,20 R15,20 Middelburg Middelburg R22,43 R22,43 R15,93 R15,93 Morningstar Morningstar R23,75 R23,75 Mosselbay Mosselbay R26,70 R26,70 R14,40 R14,40 Nelspruit Nelspruit R20,24 R20,24 R11,71 R11,71 Oudtshoorn Oudtshoorn R22,97 R22,97 R14,98 R14,98 Parys Parys R23,74 R23,74 R13,75 R13,75 Pietermaritzburg Pietermaritzburg R22,90 R22,90 R15,20 R15,20 Pi etersburg Pi etersburg Ci vi l Ci vi l R21,65 R21,65 R14,10 R14,10 Port Alfred Port Alfred R25,12 R25,12 Port Elizabeth Port Elizabeth R25,18 R25,18 17.1817.18 Potchefstroom Potchefstroom R23,74 R23,74 R13,75 R13,75 Rand Rand R20,29 R20,29 R15,16 R15,16 Robertson Robertson R23,75 R23,75 Rustenberg Rustenberg R21,63 R21,63 R14,61 R14,61 Secunda Secunda R22,43 R22,43 R15,53 R15,53 Skeerpoort Skeerpoort *** Customer *** Customer to collect to collect R21,51 R21,51 R11,51 R11,51 Springbok Springbok R23,50 R23,50 R14,56 R14,56 Springs Springs R21,50 R21,50 Stellenbosch Stellenbosch R24,00 R24,00 Swellendam Swellendam R23,90 R23,90 R15,30 R15,30 TempeTempe R21,83 R21,83 R13,61 R13,61 Thabazimbe Thabazimbe R24,24 R24,24 R14,25 R14,25 Upington Upington R21,33 R21,33 R14,34 R14,34 Vereeni Vereeni gi ng gi ng R21,34 R21,34 R12,73 R12,73 Vi rgi niViargi ni a R24,47 R24,47 R14,26 R14,26 Vryburg Vryburg R24,42 R24,42 R14,51 R14,51 Welkom Welkom R21,74 R21,74 R12,65 R12,65 Wi ngsWi Park ngsEL Park EL R22,25 R22,25 Witbank Witbank R22,30 R22,30 R22,00 R22,00 R11,51 R11,51 Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester Worcester R23,40 R23,40 *** Heli *** copters Heli copters only only

Tel: +27 10 446 9666 Danielle: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015 Co-ordinates: S25°50’37 E27°41’28 114 GPS December / January 2021/22 Import/Export no. 21343829


SA Flyer 2016|11

• HOEDSPRUIT • KLERKSDORP • PARYS AIRFIELD • POTCHEFSTROOM AIRPORT • SKEERPOORT • THABAZIMBI • WONDERBOOM

Tel: +27 10 446 9666 Danielle: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015

WE ALSO HAVE AN ON-SITE HELI-PAD FOR CONVENIENT REFUELING. CALL US FOR A QUOTE OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

g you in h is w d n a s t r clien u o ll a o t u o y Thank 022! 2 e h t r o f t s e b all the SEALED 200L AVGAS DRUMS • SEALED 200L JET A1 DRUMS • AVGAS 100LL • JET A1 • PETROL • ILLUMINATING PARAFFIN • DIESEL • LUBRICANTS

December / January 2021/22

115


Events by EAA CHAPTER 322 MONTHLY MEETING

SECURITY DRONE CONFERENCE AT EMPERORS

STEADY CLIMB FLY-IN, EXPO AND FUNDRAISER

1 December Virtual and Moth Hall Neil Bowden 084 674 5674

2 - 3 December

4 December Rhino Park

Email: neil1@telkomsa.net

PALACE CONVENTION CENTRE

Virtual and Moth Hall

Tawanda Mandaza 063 580 6400 Email: info@12stonereality.co.za

David Le Roux 073 338 5200 Email: marketing@steadyclimb.co.za https://steadyclimb.co.za

SPORT AEROBATICS CLUB (ACE OF BASE)

SAC GAUTENG REGIONALS

SAPFA RAND AIRPORT CHALLENGE

4 – 5 December Baragwanath Airfield Annie Boon Email: chunge@mweb.co.za

22 – 23 January Venue TBA Annie Boon Email: chunge@mweb.co.za

29 January 2022 Main Terminal Building Frank Eckard 083 269 1516 Email: frank.eckard@mweb.co.za Cell: 083 269 1516

Flying in Africa – that’s what we love

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Flying in Africa it’s what we love!

© Nico Kohne

Best Wishes and A warm Thank You to all our customers and supporters! Let’s tackle this New Year with new energies.

Comprehensive airfield information, up-to-date aeronautical data, friendly and efficient customer support, easy Flight Planning, electronic logbook, Inflight Navigation with EasyCockpit, real-time Weather overlays, Weather cams, Events notification, location link to Maps ... you have it all. www.aviationdirect.co.za • info@aviationdirect.co.za • +27 11December 465 2669 • 072 2021/22 340 9943117 / January


RECREATIONAL FLYING

by Julian Smith

Although the Algoa Flying Club was officially formed on 26 November 1956, the club proudly claims to one of the oldest flying clubs in South Africa. It can trace its roots all the way back to 1929, when the Port Elizabeth Aero Club was formed. THE MODERN ALGOA FLYING CLUB is a registered NPO (not-for-profit) organisation made up of flying enthusiasts with the aim of promoting flying and flying training within a friendly environment. In 1971 a ground-breaking decision was made for the club to acquire its own aircraft and establish its own training centre.

2021 65th Celebration In 2020, due to Covid-19, no wings awards evening was held, so a double celebration was warranted this year for the 65th Anniversary and Wings Parade. On the evening of Saturday 20 November over 80 members arrived at the Walmer Golf Estate. As guests gathered on the balcony enjoying pre-dinner snacks, the festivities started with a sponsored flypast by Hangar51, using a L29 and Yak 52. The L29 Delfin was flown by Mike Weingartz and the lead Yak 52 by Koos Kieck. These two vastly experienced former SAAF fighter pilots had their hands full with the violently bumpy conditions from the famous windy city.

bumpy conditions from the windy cit y

Currently the club has a fleet of Cessna 152s, a Cessna 172, a Cessna 172 RG, a Sling 2, a Seneca, a Airvan GA8 and a SACAA Accredited Elite Evolution S812 (FNPT11) Simulator, which offers multi-engine piston training based on the Beech Baron B58 and single-engine piston based on the Cessna 172RG. The club offers training to local and international students.

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December / January 2021/22


Aircraft of the Algoa Flying Club taken either in 1956 or 1957.

A rare sight at Algoa Flying Club a J3 Cub with nosewheel.

December / January 2021/22

119


Founder Members, Bennie Bergmann and Chester Chandler.

Once the pilots were back on the ground, the Master of Ceremonies and Club Chairman, Gareth Godwin, introduced the evening’s guest speaker: Colonel H.J. (Koos) Kieck. Colonel Kieck entertained all with stories from his SAAF days and some excellent advice for new pilots. An excellent four course meal was served between the prize giving. Many prizes were L29 and Yak 52 flypast.

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December / January 2021/22

handed out to students: for both 2020 and 2021. Notable guests were Chester Chandler (a founding member) as the oldest surviving club member, with Bennie Bergmann being the second surviving oldest with 65 and 58 years of club membership respectively. A very popular award was to Bennie Bergmann for ‘Most Active Non-Flying Club Member’.


Tristan Botes won many awards including BEST ACADEMIC PPL STUDENT and the R29000 bursary

Patrick Davidson awarded "Best licenced pilot" 2021.

An award that surprised nobody was to ‘uber-pilot’ and former Red Bull Air Racer, Patrick Davidson, for ‘Best Licenced Pilot’. As a climax to the evening, Patrick Davidson, on behalf of Stu Davidson & Sons, donated two substantial amounts for flying development: a R29,000 bursary to Tristan Botes and R86,000 to Qhawe Nxumalo towards her Commercial Licence on completion of her PPL. The traditional ‘boat race’ drinking game between new pilots and the ‘ou-manne’ was won by the experienced ‘ou-manne’. j

Minutes of AGM 1936. December / January 2021/22

121


Gemair AMO 1003

YOUR PEACE OF MIND IN AVIATION MAINTENANCE Gemair is an SACAA Approved Maintenance

Organisation,

AMO

1003 with 5 other African AMO Approvals and has a team of 9 full time engineers who together have a combined total of over 50 years aviation experience. Gemair are able to perform all aviation maintenance requirements on a variety of NonType certified aircraft, light singles and twins up to turbo propellers and light jets. instrumentation approvals.

SA Flyer 2021|12

Gemair also holds electrical and

TEL: 011 701 2653 or 082 905 5760 Hangar 110, Gate 13, Turn right (old Pical hangar), located behind Spectrum Air Surveyors, Lanseria South Side, 1748

Big or small, Fire safety is for all Fire block safety bags can safely and effectively contain flames and toxic smoke from devices such as laptops, smart phones and tablets or any other powered devices that may occur in your aircraft From Lithium-Ion batteries to aerosol cans, many items used every day are regulated as hazardous materials (‘hazmat’ and ‘dangerous goods’).

These products may appear to be harmless, but when transported in an aircraft they can be extremely dangerous. Vibrations, static electricity, temperature and pressure variations can cause items to leak, generate toxic fumes, start a fire, or even explode. Many of the hazardous materials are allowed as carry on luggage and for this reason the Fire Block safety bag may prevent a dangerous situation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgaB388YChQ

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December / January 2021/22

Features: • An effective part of the Safety Management System (SMS) • Fully burn certified and fulfils all recommended perimeters • Conforms to FAA flammability standards and conforms to SACAA FAR 25.853 flammability standards • Can withstand temperatures as high as 1500°C Benefits: • Only four easy steps required to utilise the bag. • To improve the battery safety and prevent an incident, the Fire Block Safety Bag have can be used as a storage device. Prevents: • Prevents the risk of bodily harm and property damage. • Can prevent flight diversions due to smoke or fire.

SACAA AMO 620

Tel: (011) 659 1962 Cell: 076 810 9751 Email: sales@lanseriarefurb.co.za Hangar 107 C and D Gate 13, Lanseria Airport

www.lanseriarefurb.co.za


NEWS

T L A I R CR A F T ’ S

S PA R K ER

CZECH AIRCRAFT BUILDER TL Ultralight has worked with their American distributors, TL Aircraft, to release their newest sport plane – the TL Sparker. Power options include the Rotax 912 USL or the 915 iS. A choice of fixed or adjustable propellers are available, with TL’s top recommendations being a 3-bladed PowerMax or two-bladed DuoMax prop. Estimated (albeit optimistic) performance from TL Aviation gives the 915 iS Sparker a range of 1,000 miles, a cruise speed of 175 knots TAS and a fuel consumption of 7.5 gallons per hour. The launch marketing material claims, “Retractable landing gear with a steerable nose wheel make for easy taxi handling, with 24

cubic feet of luggage compartments hungry enough for a trip’s worth of luggage. The cockpit is where the aircraft shines, as the Sparker combines the sportiness of another of TL’s aircraft, tandem-seat, fighteresque Stream with the luxurious, spacious cockpit of a larger aircraft.” The Sparker is claimed to be “a sleek, aerodynamic build with a spacious, high-visibility panoramic canopy that promises at a glance will make the most of every bit of its power. The carbon and Kevlar shell provides maximum crew protection in case of rough off-airport landings should the worst occur, which, given the ballistic parachute recovery system, should be a rare occurrence.” j

The TL Sparker makes ambitious claims.

December / January 2021/22

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Where romance meets nature

Located in South Africa’s Safari hub of Hoedspruit, Safari Moon is a boutique base from which to discover the wonders of South Africa’s Lowveld region. Explore a range of nearby attractions from the famed Kruger National park to the scenic Panorama Route, or simply chose to relax and unwind in nature, making the most of 124 December / January 2021/22 your private piece of Wildlife Estate wilderness.

CONTACT: bookings@safarimoon.co.za 083 449 5868

FlightCom Magazine

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FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

1


INDEX: Aerocolour - Aircraft Refurbishment Aero Engineering & Powerplant - Engine Overhaul Aeronautical Aviation - Avionics / Electrical / Instrumentation / Autopilots Aeronav Academy - Pilot Training

Dennis Jankelow & Associates - Aviation Insurance Diepkloof AMO - AMO, aircraft maintenance DM Aviation Spares - Aircraft Parts and Consumables Dynamic Propellers - Propeller Specialists

Aerospace Electroplating - Material enhancement & restoration

East Coast Airways - Jet A1 Avgas

Aerotric P/L - Electrical, Ignition, Instruments

Executive Aircraft Refurbishment - Aircraft Refurbishment

AIFA - Flight Training

F Gomes - Aircraft Upholstery

Airbus - Aircraft Sales, MRO Completion, Support & Service and Training

Gemair - Aircraft Maintenance

Aircraft Assessing - Maintenance, Appraisals

Guardian Air (Pty) Ltd - Air Ambulance, Executive Charter

Aerios Global Aviation Adventure Air - Interior & Exterior refurbishment

Heli-Afrique - Helicopter Maintenance

Aero Engineering & Powerplant - Engine Overhaul

International Flight Clearances - Aircraft Handling & Clearance/Permit Specialists

Aircraft General Spares - Aircraft Maintenance

KZN Aviation - Executive Charters

Airlink - Airline

Leading Edge Aviation - Helicopter Firefighting and Heavy Lift Operations

Algoa Flight Club - Flight Training / Hire and Fly Alpi Aviation - Pilot Training APCO - Engine, components, overhaul. Ascend Aviation - Aircraft Sales

Litson & Associates (Pty) Limited - Aviation Safety Reviews/Aviation Classroom Training Litson & Associates Risk Management Services (Pty) Limited - Software / eSMS-S™

Aspire Aviation - Aircraft Maintenance

M and N Acoustic Services - Acoustics and Calibration

Atlas Aviation Lubricants - AeroShell Lubricant

Merchant West - Aircraft Finance

Avdex - Software Maintenance Tracking

Mistral Aviation - Wheels, Brakes and Landing Gears

Aves Technics - Aircraft Maintenance and Training

Nevergreen - Commercial Aircrafts Maintenance Facility and AMO

Aviation Direct - Airfield Information, Flight Planning & Navigation

Pambele - Air Charter

Aviation Rebuilders - AMO, Aircraft Maintenance

Property And Aviation Insurance Brokers - Insurance

AviSys - Aircraft Maintenance

Skyhawk Aviation - Flight Training

Avtech - Aircraft Maintenance

Skysource International - Aircraft Maintenance

Beegle Tracker - Tracking, Flight Following

Southern Mapping - Hangars and Maintainance

Benveroy - Fuel Protection and Enhancement

Starlite Aviation Aerosales - Aviation School, Medevac Contract

Blue Chip Flight School - Our Pilots become Captains! Border Aviaiton - Flight Training and Hire & Fly Cape Aircraft Interiors - Aircraft Maintenance, Refurbishment, Survival Equipment Cubby Aircraft - Plane sales CW Price & Co - Airport Support Equipment 2 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

Springbok Group of Companies - Charters, ATO, AMO. Titan Helicopter Group - Offshore Helicopter Operator Titanium Air - Aircraft Charter Velocity Aviation - Flight Clearances, Ground Handling, and Aircraft Parts


AEROCOLOUR Aircraft Refurbishment

AERO ENGINEERING AND POWERPLANT Engine Overhaul

Aerocolour cc. was founded in 2005 and has been based at Lanseria Airport, Hangar M5, South Africa ever since.

Based at hangar number four, at Wonderboom Airport, Aero Engineering’s services include the overhaul, maintenance, service, and repair of Lycoming and Continental aircraft piston engines and associated components.

We are a privately owned Aircraft Refurbishment facility in Southern Africa and have the confidence of a wide variety of Aviation Customers. Our hard-won reputation is built on excellent workmanship, after sales service and product support as well as personal customer relations, which have earned the confidence of manufacturers and customers alike. Our core business is made up of private and corporate general aviation aircraft owners as well as aviation service providers and sales companies to whom we provide aircraft refurbishment. We proudly provide the service that our clients have come to expect from Aerocolour cc. Aerocolour cc’s broad base of customers stretches throughout South Africa and Southern Africa, as well as UAE and certain Northern African countries. Aerocolour is a trusted service provider throughout the aviation industry for Respray of Complete Aircraft Exterior as well as panels / parts, touch up and repair of parts or specific areas on aircraft and various other refurbishment requirements. Please contact Alfred Maraun on 082 775 9720 for any queries and quotes.

Aero Engineering and Powerplant comprises of the following divisions: ENGINE DIVISION: Overhaul of Lycoming & Continental engines, Carrying out shockload inspections, Bench-testing of engines, Re-boring and honing of cylinders, Repair on starter clutch gears. COMPONENT DIVISION: The overhaul of all engine components, including: McCauley, Hartzell, PCU 5000 and Woodward Constant speed units(CSU), TCM & Bendix Fuel systems, TCM, Romec, Fuel pumps, Marvel Schebler carburettors, Garrett & HET turbocontrollers,Overhaul & servicing of magnetos. PROPELLER DIVISION: The supply of new & second hand Hartzell and McCauley variable pitch propellers, as fitted to piston & turbine engine aircraft, The supply of new McCauley & Sensenich fixed pitch propellers, Propeller dynamic Balancing. PARTS DIVISION: The parts division specialises in the sourcing of all piston engine, component, & propeller parts, either from local distributors or from overseas distributors & OEM. Their client base includes local & over-border operators, and owners, of piston & turbine engined aircraft, as well as local & overborder maintenance organizations. Tel: 012-543-0948 Email: aeroeng@iafrica.com Website: www.aeroengineering.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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AERONAUTICAL AVIATION Avionics / Electrical / Instrumentation / Autopilots Aeronautical Aviation, located at Lanseria International Airport, is an African Industry leader offering cost effective services from; Repairs, Installations, Aircraft Instrumentation Overhaul, Avionics, Electrical, Autopilots and Accessories. Our customers include Private Aircraft Owners, Charter Services, General, Commercial and Corporate Aviation, Medical Services, Helicopter Operations, and Government / Military Clients. Established in 2005, Clinton Carroll identified a gap in the market when it came to understanding Pilot’s needs, versus, realistic and economically viable options. As a pilot, aircraft owner and Charter outsourcer, and amongst other Dealerships, Garmin’s largest Accredited Distributor in Africa, Clinton fully understands the challenges in the cockpit, regulatory and certification requirements, and hidden costs associated with the operation of an aircraft. The Avionics Industry offers an array of technology, but what sets Aeronautical Aviation apart, is transparency, personal advice and reasonable costs without compromising on exceptional quality. Our clients success and safety is our priority. We pride ourselves on the fact that our Company Values are built on integrity, honesty, and service excellence. We offer our clients peace of mind, armed with the knowledge and all the relative information to enable them to make an informed decision. Contact us: Hangar 202, Gate 7 Lanseria International Airport Website: www.aeronautical.co.za Email: sales@aeronautical.co.za Tel: +27 11 659 1033 / +27 83 459 6279 4 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

AERONAV ACADEMY Pilot Training Aeronav Academy is committed to providing top-level flight training utilising the most modern equipment available. This not only gives our clients an enjoyable training experience but also provides Aeronav the ability to conduct flight training in a manner that ensures that student pilots will be ready and well equipped to enter the aviation industry of the future. Aeronav Academy is proud to offer a dynamic fleet of aircraft, including Diamond DA20s, Cessna 182s and the Diamond DA42 Twinstar Multi-engine trainer. The Academy’s latest acquisition is the impressive Alsim ALX-65 flight simulator. The amazingly realistic graphics feel of the controls and response make training in this flight simulator a truly first class experience. The school is based at Lanseria Airport. A controlled airspace provides students with an excellent grounding in procedures and gives them the experience needed to cope with operating in a busy airline orientated environment. Whether you choose to fly for pleasure or wish to make aviation your career, Aeronav can provide you with an approved course tailored to your needs. Tel No: + 27 11 701 3862 Email: info@aeronav.co.za Website: www.aeronav.co.za


For all your SACAA approved plating requirements

Hard Silver Plate Electroless Nickel Hard Copper Plate

Anodising in Grey, Red or Bl Black Phosphating Phosphating

We are situated at 30B, Building 98, Rand Airport. Next to Fields Airmotive. AEROSPACE ELECTROPLATING Call Des on 011 827 7535 or 063 150 1533 Material Enhancement & Restoration or Peter on 081 775 2434 or 083 208 7244 Aerospace Electroplating, SACAA AMO For all your Aircraft and Allied Electroplating and queries. 506, has been operating at Rand Airport, Germiston since 1965 and has served the aircraft industry with distinction and produce high quality surface finished products. The company is owned by Mistral Aviation Services and run by Oliver Trollope and a highly professional and qualified team of electroplaters. Our highly qualified team are available to advise you on the perfect solution to all your electroplating plating needs and solutions to perfectly re-finish your aircraft components to the manufacturer’s specifications. Our processes are approved by SACAA, Denel, Airbus Europe, Rolls Royce, Pratt & Whitney and Allison Doil. We offer a wide range of services for aircraft owners and general industry, and through our partnership with Mistral Aviation Services, we can offer engineering and NDT services. We look forward to the future with a range of innovative services to continue servicing the aircraft industry. Tel: 011 827 7535 Email: petasus@mweb.co.za

AEROTRIC Electrical, Ignition, Instruments

Aerotric (Pty) Ltd is based at Wonderboom Airport and has grown from strength to strength since opening their doors in May 2012. The Company prides itself on providing quality and reliable services such as overhauling, installing and repairing all electrical, ignition, instruments and avionics that is efficient and at an affordable rate. Aerotric is a small company with big heart that strives to maintain relationships with all customers. Consisting of seven staff members Aerotric maintains a policy of high standards and keeping up with the latest technology and trends in aircraft maintenance. Contact Aerotric on: Office Tel: +27 87 802 1347 Email: admin@aerotric.com or Richard@aerotric.com

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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AIFA Flight Training AIFA is the AVIC International Flight Training Academy (Pty) Ltd. AIFA is accredited with both the SACAA and the CAAC (China) as a Part 141 Air Training Organisation. The School provides world-class training from modern facilities on a modern fleet of aircraft, state-of-the-art aircraft simulators and operates from three training bases in South Africa, namely George Airport in the Garden Route, Oudtshoorn in the Little Karoo and Beaufort West in the Great Karoo. AIFA was formed after the acquisition of the former Cape Flying Services during April 2011. AIFA is backed by AVIC-International, a large scale state-owned conglomerate with aviation products and technology import and export as its core business. Headquartered in Beijing. With its total assets of up to RMB 24 billion and accumulated import and export volume of US $24 billion thus far, AVIC-International ranks among the first 20 of China’s top 500 enterprises for import and export. Test Flying Academy of South Africa (TFASA) is our other shareholder, a company with long and successful business relationships with AVICInternational and COMAC in China. AIFA combines the experience of world-class instructors, the beauty of our surroundings, excellent South African weather and the passion for aviation of our personnel to afford our students a modern learning experience which will open doors to an exciting career in the aviation industry anywhere in the world. Our commitment to upholding a very high standard of aviation safety is one of the cornerstones of AIFA. Contact: Oudtshoorn Base: Tel: +27 (44) 272 5547 George Base: Tel: +27 (44) 876 9217 6 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

AIRCRAFT ASSESSING COMPANY Certified Fixed Wing & Rotor Wing Appraisals & Valuations Aircraft assessing Company (AAC) was registered in 2002 in response to a growing need for the regional and international aviation industry for unbiased and professional evaluations of fixed wing and rotor wing Aircraft. In satisfying the industry’s needs, AAC’s significant client base has further grown to include local, regional and international fleet owners, airlines, government agencies, corporations, Insurers, legal practioners, financial institutions, individual aircraft owners and other interested parties. All Appraisals are carried out to Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) standards by AAC’s owner and Senior Certified Aircraft Appraiser, Paul Leaker NSCA PSCA who has carried out in excess of 4000 appraisals on Aircraft ranging from narrow body airliners, heavy lift helicopters and everything in between. In addition to certified appraisals AAC provides a broad range of technical and associated services to the industry which include pre, post and mid lease aircraft assessment, maintenance oversight , maintenance record and log book audits, post repair assessment, cost review, legal expert witness services and aircraft acquisition and disposal. Aircraft Assessing Company remains the only company in Africa specializing in its chosen field. Contact Paul leaker on: 083 310 8588 paull@aacglobal.co.za www.aacglobal.co.za


AIRBUS Southern Africa (PTY) Ltd Aircraft Sales, MRO Completion, Support & Service and Training Airbus Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd has maintained a presence in South Africa since 1994 and is headquartered at Grand Central Airport in Midrand, South Africa. The Grand Central base is home to the company’s regional Helicopters and Defence & Space businesses. As a world-leading aerospace company, Airbus offers the most comprehensive range of passenger airliners, military transport and special mission’s aircraft, helicopters, rocket launchers and satellites. It also provides a comprehensive array of aviation, space and geo-intelligence systems and solutions to government and civilian customers. Airbus Helicopters provides the most efficient civil and military helicopter solutions to Sub Sahara Africa customers who operate an in-service fleet of around 350 turbine helicopters,to serve, protect, save lives and safely transport passengers in highly demanding environments. Airbus Defence and Space is responsible for sales and support of military transport aircraft in service with the SA Air Force and other armed forces in the SADC region. It also supplies satellite images, geo-intelligence and space data solutions to government, research and commercial customers. Worldwide, including South Africa, Airbus employs a workforce of around 130,000 people. Contact: contact.marketing.ahza@airbus.com Telephone: +27 (0) 11 266 2600 Fax: +27 (0) 11 266 2628 Web: www.airbushelicopters.co.za www.airbus.com

AIRCRAFT GENERAL SPARES Aircraft Maintenance Eric Erasmus, the owner and founder of Aircraft General Spares, gained extensive experience in the industry as a parts sales manager at Placo. When the company closed in 2017 Eric bought the entire inventory and Aircraft General Spares (AGS) was born. We currently have quite a variety of spares including hardware, tyres, tubes, hoses, 4130 Chromoly tubing, rivets, filters, gaskets, and generally anything else needed in the light aircraft industry. We also specialise in assisting customers with hard-to-find items which will be sourced and imported according to the customers’ requirements. AGS has also opened another sector- AGS Bearings and Transmissions. Our qualified team in this division specialises in bearings, transmissions, seals, fasteners, belts, and gearboxes for any industry and any use. AGS is conveniently situated very close to the main entrance to Rand Airport (Next to Aviation Rebuilders) in Building B7: Rand Airport, Germiston. Call Eric or Hayley on Tel: 067 154 2147 or 084 587 6414 Email: eric@acgs.co.za or hayley@acgs.co.za For AGS Bearings and Transmissions Division call Dean on Tel: 067 154 2147 Email: dean@acgs.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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AIRLINK Airline Airlink is Africa’s second largest airline measured by flight movements. This dynamic privately owned premium, full-service regional airline operates to more than 45 destinations in 13 African countries and St Helena Island. Airlink is ranked as South Africa’s most punctual airline, with its fleet of more than 50 modern jetliners achieving a 97% average on-time performance year to date, illustrating its laser-focus on providing customers with excellent and reliable service. Airlink is an International Air Transport Association (IATA) member and accredited under its safety audit IOSA (IATA Operational Safety Audit) program. The airline’s Leadership and Management has steered a prudent course through Covid and is now expanding rapidly to service more regional African destinations. The Airlink Training Centre of Excellence situated in Bonaero Park includes two state-of-the-art full-flight simulator training devices, one of which is the Embraer 190 simulator owned by Embraer and operated by Airlink on Embraer’s ATO Operations Specification and Airlink’s state-of-the-art Embraer 145 simulator. The facility enables Airlink to provide the best in-class training for its airline pilots, maintenance engineers and flight attendants. Head Office Tel. +27 11 451 7300 Website: www.flyairlink.com

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ALGOA FLYING CLUB Flight Training / Hire and Fly We provide all forms of flying training and self-fly hire with the specific goal of making flying accessible to as many people as possible, within a friendly environment where members, students and their guests can relax after their flights. The Algoa Flying Club is a not for profit organisation of flying enthusiasts with the aims and objects of promoting flying and flying training in all its facets and to the highest standards. It’s the shared experience that helps to make the Algoa Flying Club the right place to earn your wings. We boast a fleet of Cessna 152’s, Cessna 172’s, a Cessna 172Rg, a Sling 2, a Piper Comanche and a SACAA Accredited Elite Evolution S812 (FNPT 11) Simulator, which offers Multi Engine Piston based on the Beech Baron B58 and a Single Engine Piston based on the Cessna 172RG. Contact: Telephone +27 41 581 3274 Email info@algoafc.co.za


ALPI AVIATION Pilot Training Not ‘just another’ flying academy. A childhood dream and a great passion for all things aviation led to the founding of this company. Alpi Aviation is headed by avid aviation enthusiast, Dale de Klerk, who is an accomplished hangglider, microlight, glider and fixed-wing pilot. Dale has won several regional and national competitions, becoming world Rally Flying Champion in 2003. Dale also earned his Springbok Flying colours in Rally and Precision flying from 1995 through to 2004, and continues to challenge his considerable aviation capabilities in a wide range of aviation techniques, styles and aircraft. ALPI Aviation SA was established after the demand arose for an accredited training organisation to cater for those who don’t want to be, ‘just another pilot’. The intention was to build an accredited Flight School, certified to CAA standards, using experienced instructors with an ethos of respect toward all their students. At Alpi Aviation, we value the individuality of each student, and we will do our utmost to hone their capabilities and enhance their passion. No one is ‘just another student pilot’. It is with this credo in mind that we invite you to personally experience how our broad background of solid aviation experience and expertise can take your flying career to new heights. Contact Alpi Aviation on: Tel: +27 82 556 3592 Email: dale@alpiaviation.co.za Website: www.alpiaviation.co.za

AIRCRAFT POWERPLANT COMPANY Engine, Components, Overhaul Aircraft Powerplant Company (APCO) was born in 2001 as a result of the management buyout of the PLACO Engines Division. Under the guidance Tony Rodrigues and Henk Joubert, both equipped with a wealth of experience and knowledge, APCO has earned a reputation for excellence within the aviation community. APCO’s Team of highly qualified factory and locally trained technicians have developed full in-house capacity to perform all required maintenance and turn key repair services, including bench testing on both Lycoming and Continental Engines. In addition APCO have an in-house component division, engine hose shop, machine shop, aluminium welding shop and also offer cadmium engine plating. The newly introduced NTC engine shop specialise in the repair and overhaul of many brands of NTC engines including Gypsy, Lycoming and Superior Kit Engines to name but a few. As an optional extra they offer a balancing and porting service as well as many types of corrosion protective applications, ranging from polyurethane base paints to the more lavish and durable ceramic coatings. Hangar 5A, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria North tonyrodrigues@mweb.co.za +27 82 558 9388 henkjoubert@mweb.co.za +27 83 258 5272

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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ASCEND AVIATION Aircraft Sales ‘Trustworthy Sales, Airworthy Excellence’ With 25 years of experience in aircraft sales Maartin Steenkamp established Ascend Aviation in early 2014. Aviation sales specialists must not only possess an exceptional understanding of their field and products, but also of the customers’ needs and experience in aviation. Acquiring an aircraft is an emoti ve as well as a practical decision. Maartin’s market knowledge and track record is greatly respected in the industry and Ascend Aviation’s customers can be assured that they are getting the most honest, independent, objective solutions to their present and future requirements. Ascend Aviation has assembled a team with the experience and abilities to streamline the entire process for buyers, from selection, budgeting and finance, through longterm performance and cost expectations, to ongoing advice and support, thereby making aircraft acquisition and ownership a rewarding and pleasing experience. Ascend Aviation believes personal attention, relationship building and integrity is key to service excellence, and provides a comprehensive range of services to the aviation industry: • Aircraft Sales • Acquisition mandates • Aircraft Valuations • Aircraft Management • Aircraft Finance • Aircraft Insurance • Aircraft Ferry including Importation and Exportation Contact Ascend Aviation on: Tel: +27 (0)11 064 5624 Email: sales@ascendaviation.co.za Website: www.ascendaviation.co.za 10 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

ASPIRE AVIATION Aircraft Maintenance Based at Lanseria International Airport, Aspire Aviation (Pty) Ltd is an innovative, progressive South African Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) organisation. Aspire Aviation is the only authorised service centre on the African continent for Embraer executive and commercial aircraft that is focused on delivering a personalised experience to aircraft owners and operators, ensuring the continued safe operation of customers aircraft assets with the aim of becoming the preferred MRO. Aspire Aviation holds approvals to maintain aircraft on the National Regulatory registers of South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Ethiopia and Bermuda with more certifications to follow as the company’s team of Aviation Maintenance Engineers (AME’s) are certified to carry out maintenance on aircraft airframes, engines and avionics for a range of aircraft, including Bombardier, Dassault, Cessna, Embraer, Beechcraft, Hawker, Raytheon Premier and MC Douglas DC 3 types. Contact Details: Office Hours (T) +27 (11) 659-2150 Maintenance After Hours: (M) +27 (0) 62 850 6059 E-mail: talktome@flyaspire.africa Website: www.flyaspire.africa SACAA AMO 1135 Hanger 201, Lanseria International Airport, Lanseria South Africa


Atlas Aviation Lubricants

ATLAS AVIATION LUBRICANTS AeroShell Lubricants Atlas Aviation Lubricants is the macro distributor for AeroShell Lubricants in sub-Saharan Africa. We distribute AeroShell lubricants, greases and fluids throughout South Africa, Namibia, Botswana Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique, and more recently Mauritius, Reunion and Madagascar. We also supply approved aircraft cleaners and degreasers. Our team offers personalised face to face service and support locally as well as internationally. Shell Aviation, one of the biggest aviation lubricants manufacturers in the world are constantly investing in research and development to stay the market leaders in advanced Aviation Tribology, by offering world class AeroShell Lubricants to the market. Our offices are in Boksburg, Gauteng, 8 km from OR Tambo International Airport. Contact Tel: +27 11 917 4220 Email: sales.aviation@atlasoil.co.za Website: https://atlasoil.africa/aviation/

AVDEX Software Maintenance Tracking Avdex currently renders two leading services: the maintenance tracking of aircraft and management of the administrative functions of any AMO. Our products are user friendly and full training and support are provided. With more than 25 years of experience in the industry and staffed by committed aviation professionals, Avdex strives for nothing less than service excellence. AMP is an online aircraft maintenance tracking service. It has a central aircraft maintenance scheduling system, which means no schedule building required on the client’s side. AMP’s accurate usage tracking means less down time for the aircraft and more productivity for the AMO. AMP offers a variety of helpful features: • Full aircraft status reports based on live maintenance data • Work packs • Tracking of component movement • SBs, ADs and Manual Revisions tracked by Avdex and notified to client when the AMP Schedule is updated • Tracking usage of an aircraft • Online recording of maintenance compliance AMS is a feature rich AMO administration programme, which takes care of the administrative tasks, such as: • Purchase orders, Inventory control and traceability • Labour and time sheet control • CAA and statutory reporting • Tracking cost of sales Contact Avdex on: Tel: (011) 954-1536 Email: info@avdex.co.za Website www.avdex.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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AVIATION DIRECT (PTY) LTD Airfield Information, Flight Planning & Navigation AVES TECHNICS Aircraft Maintenance and Training Aves Technics is an AMO company under the Nhlanhleni group of Companies. The AMO is managed and run by aviation expects who are passionate about aviation. We offer Aircraft Maintenance, Airworthiness Management, Project Management, Quality and Safety Management. We have full capabilities on B737 Classic/NG, A320 Family and Embraer 135/145/170/190. We have a team of that will tailor make the service to meet you require. Our current Customer include Operators, Owners and VIP Operators in the continent. We align our approvals to that of the client country regulations or use our approval as approved by local authority. We are based at Denel Facilities near O R Tambo Airport, with direct access to the OR Tambo flight line. We are also able to position our team at Customer’s facility or anywhere as preferred by the Operator/ Customer. We also integrate with Local engineers rated by Local Civil Aviation Authority once approved by Aves Technics quality system. Aircraft Maintenance is Our Passion. Aves Technics hold the SACAA approval AMO1541. Aves Technics, D3 Building, Denel Aviation Campus, 3-5 Atlas Road, Bonaero Park, 1619 Gauteng, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 568 7677 Email: info@avestechnics.com Mobile: +27 82 216 3980

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The internet has opened the world, but for many of us it is still preferable to talk to someone who has the experience and knowledge of local conditions, right? Well, AviationDirect has been around for over 20 years, and we are in the forefront of providing airfield and aeronautical information for Southern Africa within our various products. We have the most comprehensive database of airfields for this part of the world, receiving first-hand information from active pilots and operators in the field. Our exciting range of products for pilots flying in Southern Africa are designed to make the pilot’s task easier, safer and more comfortable. Added to that, we provide excellent customer support. Products that we are particularly well known and respected for are: • The Airfields Directory for Southern Africa and • Africa, available in printed and electronic format • EasyPlan, the flight planning software for desktop/ laptop PC with Win OS, an easier way to do flight planning, print out flight logs and maps • EasyCockpit, Southern Africa’s most used in- flight navigation app for Apple or Android Mobile Devices, there to enhance situational awareness, and, together with Easy-Weather overlays of radar, satellite and winds, to provide additional safety and peace of mind • Logbooks (electronic and printed) which have been devised according to SACAA requirements. Contact Andrea Antel on: Tel: +27 11 465 2669 Mobile: (0)72 340 9943 Email: info@aviationdirect.co.za Website: www.aviationdirect.co.za


AVIATION REBUILDERS AMO, Aircraft Maintenance Aviation Rebuilders SACAA approved Category B and X5, AMO 188, based in the Showroom, Rand Airport, Germiston. Established in 1997, Aviation Rebuilders will be celebrating our 25th anniversary in 2022. Our team is a family that have worked together to build and establish the reputation of our AMO over many years, each one invaluable for their contribution to the organisation. We are proud to offer the services of our well established and equipped sheet metal workshop, approved aircraft welding facility, as well as our flight control cable section. We look forward to welcoming you and your beloved aircraft to our family. Contact Aviation Rebuilders on: Tel: +27 (0)11 827-2491 Cell: +27 (0)82 872-4117 Email: lyn@aviationrebuilders.com

AVISYS AVIATION SYSTEMS Aircraft Maintenance AviSys Aviation Systems is an established Maintenance Organisation (AMO 1089) with SA CAA, and other African CAA accreditation to perform component maintenance and overhaul capabilities under its Category B rating. Currently, AviSys is equipped to cater for our clients’ needs as per the SA CAA Approved Capability List and Operational Specifications on the following: • Aircraft Braking Systems repair and full overhaul capability with SA CAA Component • Release to Service (Authorised Release • Certificate) on the following OEM Makes; • ABSC, Honeywell / Bendix, Goodrich and Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems. • Aircraft main and nose wheel assemblies for the above makes, to repair and overhaul. • Landing Gear Repair and Overhaul • Helicopter Servo Actuator Repair and Overhaul • Flexible Hose Build-up • Engine Fire Bottles HPT, Service, Fill and Re- charge AviSys Aviation Systems is committed to deliver service excellence and quality workmanship at market related prices, carried out with years of cumulative aviation experience in our field by means of dedicated hand-picked staff members. AviSys looks forward to establishing long and just relationships with our client base, in order to meet our high standards of customer satisfaction. Hangar 17 Wonderboom Airport Email: dewald@avisys.co.za Phone: +27 (0) 83 442 5884 Fax: +27 (0) 86 618 6996 Website: www.avisys.co.za AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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AVTECH AIRCRAFT SERVICES Aircraft Maintenance Avtech Aircraft Services based at Wonderboom National airport maintains Beechcraft, Piper, Cessna, Bellanca and Aerostar aircraft. With over 28 years of operation, the family-owned business has a vast experience in aircraft maintenance and meets the highest standards, still under the guidance of Riekert, Sr. Avtech Aircraft Services component shop specialises in the overhaul and repairs of Continental fuel systems, carburettors and constant speed units, which include Woodward, McCauley, Hartzell & PCU5000. This division is run by Andre Botha, AKA Proppie, who also has many years’ experience in his field. The Avtech team have collectively over 170 years of experience, between just four people. Avtech is therefore a wise first stop for all your general aircraft maintenance requirements. For more information contact PJR Stroh, Sr, on 082 555 2808 or PJR Stroh, Jr, on 082 749 9256. Visit them at Hangar 6 Wonderboom Airport. Email: avtech1208@gmail.com

BEEGLE TRACKER Tracking, Flight Following Designers and manufacturers of Iridiumbased satellite tracking solutions since 2002. Our devices are used for a wide range of applications, including aircraft, watercraft, vehicles, birds, animals, personnel and bespoke applications. Our customers include governments, conservation organizations, aircraft charter companies, aviation schools and private pilots. Beegle aviation trackers are battery powered and fully automatic. They are placed on the dashboard and require no pilot input to turn on or off. Position update frequency is done automatically depending on the phase of flight so that an accurate trace of your flightpath is recorded. The battery lasts for approximately 40 flight hours before recharging is required. Ground personnel are kept up to date with real- time flight progress using our online tracking portal, and optionally via text message for take-off, landing and emergency events. This assists customers in effective trip planning, whilst providing an important safety function by drastically reducing the time to locate an aircraft, especially in remote areas without cellphone reception. Furthermore, our trackers can easily be moved from one aircraft to another as needed. www.beegletracker.com info@beegletracker.com +27 (0)21 438 1888

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FROM PPL TO ATPL ONE ON ONE TRAINING DEDICATED GROUND SCHOOLS STATE OF THE ART SIMULATOR 012 543 3050 marketing@bluechip-avia.co.za www.bluechipflightschool.co.za @bluechipflightschool.co.za WATO CAA 0056 PART 61 (A)ur d i t lit !

BENVEROY (Pty) Ltd – Johannesburg SA. Fuel Protection and Enhancement Official distributors for BIOBOR products for Africa and Indian Ocean Islands. BIOBOR products have been serving the entire aviation industry since 1965. Fighting microbial growth in all aviation fuels and ground support equipment, Biobor JF is the most recognized fuel biocide in the world. Biobor additives protect and improve the performance of all diesel and gasoline powered equipment used throughout the aviation industry. Biobor JF®.is the original aviation fuel biocide designed specifically for the aviation environment. There have only been two approved biocides in the history of aviation fuels. Now, only Biobor JF® is available, Biobor JF® is the only available fuel biocide around the world. Biobor JF® not only became the biocide of choice for aviation, but has dominated the marine, stand-by power, agricultural and construction equipment industry since its inception in 1965. After all these years, Biobor JF® remains the leader in protecting hydrocarbon fuels and lubricants. Biobor JF was the first and is still the best. BIOBOR EB, LUBRIBOR and TURBOLINE, are our other very popular AVIATION products.

BLUE CHIP FLIGHT SCHOOL Flight Training Our Pilots Become Captains! Blue Chip Flight School has 25 years of experience, training professional and recreational pilots from over 30 countries. Situated at Wonderboom National Airport, we provide flight training from PPL to ATPL. Blue Chip has an accredited in-house examination centre, a modern fleet of aircraft as well as a SACAA approved FNPT II simulator. We offer a web based, paperless electronic booking, authosheet and student file system. Hour building is with a difference; we host fly-aways and cross country trips that provide unique opportunities to be exposed to unfamiliar environments, and our instructors are always close at hand for guidance. There is no substitute for a personal visit. Every day is open day at Blue Chip. Better still, talk to people in the aviation industry, former Blue Chip students are in sought after positions worldwide. Contact Blue Chip Flight School on: Tel: 012 543 3050 Email: admin@bluechip-avia.co.za Website: www.bluechipflightschool.co.za

Contact Benveroy, a division of KHUBENKER ENERGY (Pty) Ltd Tel: +27 11 726 7162 ben@benveroy.com +27 71 453 1517 vernon@benveroy.com +27 79 524 1461 www.benveroy,com www.khubenker.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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043 736 6181 I

BORDER AVIATION CLUB & FLIGHT SCHOOL Flight Training and Hire & Fly of Aircraft Border Aviation has been training pilots since 1940. We cater for both career and general aviation recreational pilots in microlights, fixed wing, helicopters, multi engine, warbirds and other historical aircraft. Join our vibrant East London aviation community and achieve your PPL or NPL for those seeking an adventurous recreational license or launch your career and join our commercial pilot training program. We also offer conversion to type training, hour building, renewals, short field landings & take offs, instrument flight (IF) training and hire & fly. Our dedicated team of instructors work with each student on a one-on-one basis, offering them tailored training specific to their needs. We offer our training out of three facilities; Our East London Airport base allows for Instrument flight training (IF Training). Our Wings Park base is situated just outside East London and allows for short field training on grass runways. Our third base is at Queenstown Airfield which provides our students an opportunity to experience high altitude and mountain flying. We welcome any aviation enthusiast from teenaged ab-initio students to the casual weekend flyer to pursue their aviation passion. Border Aviation’s fleet consists of a Cessna 150, a modern glass-cockpit Sling 2, a Piper Archer 181, a Mooney M20, a Beechcraft Baron (BE58), a Savannah XL and Helicopter. We also offer flight simulator training as an add on or alternative to further your instrument rating. Aviation is a career or hobby that brings a new adventure over every horizon. If you are interested or would like to find out more and book for an introductory flight, please feel free to contact us on: Tel: +27 43 736 6181 Email: admin@borderaviation.co.za Website: www.borderaviation.co.za

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CAPE AIRCRAFT INTERIORS Aircraft Maintenance, Refurbishment, Survival Equipment SJ Aviation offers expertise and specialized fixed wing and helicopter maintenance and repairs, spares, refurbishing and rebuilds. We offer R22 and R44 rebuilds and overhauls as well as wide range of Robinson spares. With 29 years of qualified experience we offer professional maintenance on a wide range of aircraft. Our CAA certified workshop includes Cape Aircraft Interiors with interior refurbishment, interiors and exterior spray paint, custom maid aircraft covers, including intake covers. Our services include the refurbishment, testing and sales of safety belt harnesses. We also provide rental and refurbishment of safety equipment including life rafts, escape slides, floatation gear, life vests, helicopter floats, hydro and filling of cylinders. Contact Information: Travis Roland/ Lindsay Cupido Tel: +27 (21) 934 Fax: +27 (21) 934 2022 Email: travis@zs-cai.co.za Michael@wcaeromarine.co.za Cape Aircraft Interiors General Aviation Area Cape Town International Airport


C W Price & Co C.W. PRICE AND COMPANY Airport Support Equipment CUBBY AIRCRAFT Plane Sales Based in the picturesque village of Barrydale near Swellendam in the Western Cape, Cubby Aircraft manufacture an 80% scale copy of the Piper Super Cub, with a variety of engine choices. The latest development is the Cubby Renegade which may be flown solo from the front seat and is substantially larger than the basic Cubby. With modern materials and technology, the performance has been vastly improved. The purchase price is remarkably low and operational costs are kept to a minimum due to the use of automotive fuel as opposed to expensive and sometimes hard to find Avgas. The price is dependent on the choice of engine. The Cubby can be registered as a Light Sport aircraft or a non-type certified light aircraft. Undercarriage can be either tri-gear or a tail dragger configuration. The Cubby is available in kit form, fast built and basic kit. It is also available as ready to fly or fully built, but without engine, radio and instruments

C.W. Price and Company has been involved in aviation and meteorological instruments for over 71 years. They also import aircraft ground power units and aircraft towing and push-back equipment. Based in Midrand, C.W Price are the appointed agents for airport support equipment from aircraft ground power to man portable rugged Redbox power packs for aircraft starting. They are also agents for Eagle All Wheel Drive aircraft tow tugs for regional, corporate and military applications. They are also importers of Precision Airmotive fuel injector parts and overhaul kits along with some starter generator spares. Weather stations stand alone for regional airports or their well established online VitalWeather system for remote or sms monitoring of small airports is a specialty of theirs. Contact Kelvin on: Tel: 011-805-4720 Email: cwp@cwprice.co.za Website: www.cwprice.co.za

Jean Crous welcomes visitors at his factory on Route 62 and can be contacted on 072 671 6240.

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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DIEPKLOOF AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE DJA AVIATION Aviation Insurance

DIEPKLOOF AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE AMO, Aircraft Maintenance

DJA Aviation was formed over 40 years ago by Dennis Jankelow and to this day remains South Africa’s foremost specialist aviation insurance brokerage, offering the greatest concentration of aviation insurance experience and expertise on the African continent and continuing to lead the market in the areas of product innovation and technical development.

With 70 years of experience, Diepkloof Aircraft Maintenance (AMO SACAA 1398) are one of the leaders in aircraft maintenance as well as the preferred choice for many clients. Now based at Cape Winelands Airport, Hanger E1, Diepkloof Aircraft Maintenance is a South African Civil Aviation Authority approved AMO.

DJA Aviation creates aviation insurance programmes for its clients that are perfectly balanced in the critical areas of cost, coverage, service and security. In addition, DJA Aviation’s long- standing and close relationships with the insurers who underwrite its products – locally, regionally and internationally – ensure that a DJA Aviation client is in the best possible hands when losses occur. DJA Aviation is an authorised Lloyd’s correspondent and has conducted aviation insurance business at Lloyd’s for more than 40 years, a relationship that is strengthened by regular visits to the Lloyd’s market by DJA Aviation’s key personnel. DJA Aviation is an Authorised Financial Service Provider (FSP No 15808) and a proud member of the iCapital Group. DJA Aviation’s social responsibility programme includes on-going support for the South African Guide Dogs Association for the Blind. Contact DJA Aviation on: Tel: 0800FLYING (0800 359-464) Email: mail@dja-aviation.co.za Website: www.dja-aviation.co.za

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It is your one-stop AMO facility that offers a wide range of services that include general aviation aircraft maintenance, Non-Type Certified maintenance as well as specialized services. General Aircraft Maintenance: • All single engine Piper & Cessna & Beechcraft series • All Air Tractor, Thrush, Dromader, AG Cat, Piper Brave & Piper Pawnee • All Lycoming, Teledyne Continental engines • All Pratt & Whitney -Turbine & Radial engines. • Non-Type Certified (NTCA): • All NTCA Aircraft work - Homebuilt, Ultralights etc… • Specialist Services: • Hartzell & Mc Cauley Propellers • Licenced for complete rebuilds • Specialised Sheetmetal work • Fabric covering and interiors • Aircraft weighing • Welding • Propeller balance Contact details: E-Mail: diepkloofamo@gmail.com Nick Kleinhans: +27 83 454 6366 Pieter v Aswegen: +27 82 784 7133 Cape Winelands Airport, Hanger E1


D.M. AVIATION SPARES Aircraft Parts and Consumables

DYNAMIC PROPELLERS Propeller Specialists

D.M. Aviation Spares is situated on the north side of Lanseria, Unit 2, next to Century Avionics, Gate 5. The company stocks aircraft parts, aircraft consumables and general consumables.

Established in 2008, Dynamic Propellers specialises in the overhauling, repair and maintenance of propellers for commercial and privately owned aircraft.

D.M. Aviation Spares was started in 2011 by Daniella Mawson who has been in aviation since 1980 and in the aircraft parts industry since 1990. She therefore has extensive knowledge of parts and their sourcing. D.M. Aviation Spares’ aim is to make life easier for the smaller AMOs at the airport by holding fast moving stock. Daniella goes out of her way to source parts that others say are not available. D.M. Aviation imports parts as well as sourcing hard to find aircraft components. They provide clients with the best prices and service possible. Furthermore, they are agents for Aircraft Spruce and others. For more information, contact Daniella Mawson on: Tel: 082 576 8853 Email: dmaviationspares@gmail.com

With a staff compliment with a total of around 130 years propeller overhaul experience, Dynamic Propellers overhaul and maintain all Hartzell, McCauley, MT, Hoffmann, Sensenich and Hamilton propellers and is the only enterprise in South Africa that provides comprehensive repair and maintenance services on Dowty and Whirlwind propellers. All of which is done to the highest standards as stipulated by the various propeller manufacturers. Dynamic Propellers’ repair services are performed both in-house in a state of the art aviation engineering workshop, or in the field. Highly skilled engineers will travel domestically or to neighbouring countries and abroad to cater for customers’ propeller requirements. Dynamic Propellers is an SACAA Authorised Service Centre, AMO 1150, and is the sole McCauley Authorised Service Centre for the African continent. Contact Details: Pero Visser Tel: +27 79 492 0592 Email: pero@dynamicpropeller.co.za Andries Visser Tel: +27 82 445 4496 Email: andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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EAST COAST AIRWAYS Jet A1 Avgas East Coast Airways has proudly been in operation at Virginia Airport since 1977, and in recent years has expanded to provide bulk fuel services to the general aviation industry nationally from our main distribution depots in Durban and Port Elizabeth. East Coast Airways prides itself in being one of the largest suppliers of Jet-A 1 and Avgas, providing cost effective pricing structures to the most remote locations. With our wide-ranging fleet our delivery capacity allows for flexibility and our sales team will endeavour to accommodate diverse delivery needs, making us one of the most competitive suppliers in the market. Our team of skilled employees have up to 35 years’ experience within the general aviation industry with special focus on quality and safety. With our dedicated team of employees, we strive to meet the demands of our customers and understand how important turnaround times are, with local delivery being 24 hours and 48 hours for remote locations. Contact: Virginia Office: 031 564 9344 Email: wanita@eastcoastsa.net Port Elizabeth Office: 041 581 4194 Email: rowin@eastcoastsa.net Website: https://eastcoastairways.co.za/ 20 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

EXECUTIVE AIRCRAFT REFURBISHMENT Interior and Exterior Refurbishment “Quality is our Passion”, this is the mantra that we live by at Executive Aircraft Refurbishment. We are an Aircraft Interior and Exterior refurbishment facility, based at Lanseria International Airport, quality workmanship and service excellence, combined with knowledgeable staff has earned us the reputation of No.1 Aircraft Interior and Exterior refurbishment facility. Complete aircraft exterior paint strip and resprays are done all under one roof, designing paint scheme lines, logo’s to customer specifications. We also offer a mobile touchup service to our customers ensuring their aircraft stays in mint condition. Our interior shop also specializes in complete interior refurbishments such as the refurbishment of overhead stowage bins and seating, Roof-liners, cockpit glare-shields, cabinets and galleys, wool carpets, textile and non-textile floor covering, refurbishment of seats and foam building in varying modern styles. We manufacture interior window sun- shields and aircraft exterior ground covers, EAR also re-web and re-certify aircraft safety belts. Executive Aircraft Refurbishment are the right choice for interior and exterior refurbishments of your aircraft from interior refurbishment to exterior spray painting, we do it all. Entrust your fleet to Executive Aircraft Refurbishment for a new fresh look and we promise to have your aircraft ready and serviceable when you need it.

Tel: +27 (0)10 900 4149 Mobile: +27 (0)82 547 8379 Info@earefurbishment.com Francois@ earefurbishment.com Hangar 11 (interior shop) and 31(paint shop) Lanseria International Airport South Africa, Gate 5, North Side


F. GOMES UPHOLSTERS Aircraft Upholstery F. Gomes Upholsters is a family based upholstery company. Established in 1979, the company specialises in aircraft, as well as motor vehicle, boat and furniture upholstery. F. Gomes Upholsters will refurbish your aircraft interior to look like new, giving it the class it deserves. They use only the best quality materials, and their craftsmanship is outstanding. Mr Gomes, the founder of F. Gomes Upholsters, has been in the upholstery business for close on 40 years and as such brings many years of experience and professionalism to the company. F. Gomes Upholsters provides an expert re- upholstery and upholstery service that caters to any upholstery need. No job is ever too small or too large. F. Gomes Upholsters is based in Johannesburg. For exceptional craftsmanship at the best prices, contact F.Gomes Upholsters on: Tel: (011) 614 2471 Fax: (011) 614 9806 Email: gomesuph@netactive.co.za

GEMAIR Aircraft Maintenance Gemair was started in 2007 by Andries Venter, a South African Air Force trained engineer with over twelve years of aviation maintenance experience. Since relocating to Lanseria International’s south side in 2009, the company has continued to grow and now looks after the maintenance needs of a full range of privately owned, training and charter operated aircraft. These range from Non-Type Certified Aircraft through light singles and twins and on to turboprops and light jets. Gemair is a recognised CAA Approved Maintenance Organisation, AMO number 1003, and has a team of nine full time engineers who together have a combined total of over 50 years of aviation experience. Backed up by the full time administrative staff, Gemair is able to perform all your aviation maintenance requirements. The company has expanded into aircraft interiors through the acquisition of Lanseria Aircraft Interiors and aircraft charter through the acquisition of Out of the Blue Air Safaris. Contact Andries Venter: Cell: 082 905 5760 Email: Andries@gemair.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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GUARDIAN AIR (PTY) LTD Air Ambulance, Executive Charter

HELI-AFRIQUE Helicopter Maintenance

For your private air charter, Guardian Air provides the assurance of absolute quality, utmost privacy, and highly personalised service. We understand the intricacies of the air charter environment and promise a seamless experience for our discerning passengers. We have a proud reputation for our professional and empathetic management of the diversity of cultures we encounter. Business travellers, leisure travellers and other high-profile people choose us for our uncompromising commitment to customer service, exceptional onboard amenities, comfort, and safety.

Heli Afrique specializes in general helicopter maintenance, upgrades, repairs, interior and exterior refurbishment and modifications, specialising in the Airbus Helicopter SA341, H125 (AS350/355 series), H120 (EC 120), H130 (EC 130), H135 (EC 135 series), BO105 and BK117 helicopters. We provide first and second line maintenance of TURBOMECA, Allison and Lycoming Engines and hold a service centre for Robinson R22 & R44 helicopters.

Guardian Air is a trusted provider of qualified, quick response, 24-Hour Air Ambulance services throughout Africa. Our dedicated fleet of ICU Air Ambulance Jets can transport multiple patients in comfort, with the highest standard of care. The vast distances, varying geographies, and remoteness of locations on the African continent make for a challenging environment. Together with our medical partners, Guardian Air has the operational expertise and resources to manage the unique challenges of medical emergencies in Africa. Contact Details: Tel: +27 11 701 3011 24 Hrs Emergency No: +27 82 521 2394/+27 72 849 1342 Email: ops@guardianair.co.za Web: www.guardianair.co.za

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Heli Afrique assist with inspections, C of Registration, Airworthiness formalities and have assistance from SACAA Inspectors to issue Certificates of Airworthiness and Certificates of Registration from abroad in foreign countries. Heli-Afrique facilitates the sale of used helicopters, carry out export/import, customs and shipping formalities. We provide pre-purchase inspections of helicopters worldwide. Based at Rand Airport, Heli-Afrique holds a large range of spares inventory for the above mentioned helicopters and engines. Heli-Afrique holds the following CAA approvals: SACAA # 830, Republic of Zambia, Zimbabwe, Angola and Lesotho. We are the proven alternate ‘AMO’ to Airbus Helicopters and TURBOMECA in Southern Africa. Contact: Tel: 011 021 3866 Email: accounts@heli-afrique.co.za www.heli-afrique.co.za


INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT CLEARANCES Aircraft Handling & Clearance/ Permit Specialists International Flight Clearances are Lanseria based aviation consultants whose aim is to add value and ensure safety to international flights anywhere in the world, while reducing the stress factor for both operators and passengers. They have immense experience in dealing with all types of flights, both regionally and internationally. They assist in cost efficient and safe route planning, whilst adding a personal touch. By being intimately acquainted with Africa in all her moods, and being familiar with the vagaries of every country, they have the expertise to plan with the detail necessary to bypass avoidable inconveniences, ensuring a trouble free trip for passengers. Contact International Flight Clearances on: Tel: +27 11 701 2330 or +27 76 983 1089 (24hours) Email: flightops@flyifc.co.za Website: www.flyifc.co.za

KZN AVIATION Executive Charters KZN Aviation is an established BEE compliant multi-taskedaviation company, based at Virginia Airport in Durban North. We are licensed in terms of the South African Civil Aviation Authority and the Air Service Regulations. KZN Aviation own and operate both fixedwing aircraft and helicopters, offering a range of services that include helicopter and fixed-wing VIP charter work, contract work, tourism flights, powerline and pipeline inspections, aerial photography, vehicle searches, traffic surveillance and patrols to name a few applications. KZN Aviation has a hand-picked team of professional and dedicated staff who are available 24/7 to offer assistance, advice and provide cost effective quotations. We have vast experience in the charter and contract market and have been actively involved in aviation for decades. KZN Aviation pride themselves on ensuring that high quality services, tailormade to meet customer requirements are provided efficiently and effectively without compromising safety. Our rigorous safety standards are maintained by highly experienced flight crews and are constantly reinforced through the highest levels of professionalism and integrity displayed. Our crew receive recurrent training to ensure performance remains consistently exemplary. Contact KZN Aviation on: Tel: 031 564 6215 Melanie Simon: 082 655 7811 Email: mel@kznaviation.co.za Website: www.kznaviation.co.za

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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g Edge Aviatio Leadin n ZT-RGA

ic t s u o Ac ty) Ltd N & M ices (P Serv

“Sharing the passion” LEADING EDGE AVIATION Helicopter Firefighting and Heavy Lift Operations Leading Edge Aviation is an SACAA approved Aircraft Maintenance Organisation (AMO 261) based at Nelspruit Airfield in Mpumalanga. Leading Edge Aviation (LEA) caters to numerous fields including firefighting, external lift operations, wildlife conservation and refurbishing and restoring of aircraft interiors and exteriors, including fitment of SACAA approved windows. Utilizing their UH-1H and UH-60 helicopters, LEA are perfectly positioned to meet your utility helicopter requirements. Whether you need supplies moved, wildlife relocated, natural disaster support, construction equipment lifted or fire suppression carried out, LEA are available to assist. With lifting capabilities up to 3000kg’s, we use the latest equipment and vast experience to meet our clients needs. In addition, LEA has the only SACAA approved painting booth in the Lowveld and carries out all painting using Boeing and Airbus approved products across the Cessna, Piper and Embraer and Beechcraft range. Our interior refurbishment division carries out the finest leather and upholstery work. All painting and leather work includes CRMAs for the applicable aircraft. Peter, Zeph, Sipho, Alfred and Lucas, along with the team, will ensure all your refurbishment expectations are met and exceeded. Feel free to contact Leading Edge Aviation with any queries: Tel: +27 13 7413654 Email: office@leaviation.co.za Website: www.leadingedgeaviation.co.za 24 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

M AND N ACOUSTIC SERVICES Acoustics and Calibration M and N Acoustic Services (Pty) Ltd is a SANAS accredited laboratory and specialises in calibrations on Acoustic, Human vibration, Vibration and DC/LF measuring equipment. The laboratory also operates according to the ISO/IEC 17025:2017 Specification for the competence of calibration laboratories. • SANAS accredited laboratory • Cost effective without compromise of quality • High quality traceable standards • Trained experienced technicians performing calibrations Our Calibration capabilities include: • Acoustics » Noise Exposure Meter/ Noise Dosimeters/ Dose Badges » Sound Level Meters TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 » Calibrators • Vibration » Human Vibration Meters ( Hand,Seat and Arm triaxial accelerometers) » Vibration Meters DC Low Frequency - Multimeters/ Clamp meter/ Insulation testers/Voltmeters With a dedicated team, we will ensure excellent turn-around times and affordable prices, while never compromising on delivering an outstanding service. Your Calibration is our concern!

Contact: Amanda Naudé email: admin@mnacoustics.co.za Tel: 012 689 2007 (076 920 3070)


RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES

LITSON & ASSOCIATES (PTY) LIMITED Aviation Safety Reviews/ Aviation Classroom Training FROM PLANNING TO LANDING: Litson & Associates conducts its worldwide turn-key Aviation Safety service from its offices situated in Somerset West, Cape Town, South Africa. L&A can be of assistance from the first concept of an aviation service in a country and the identification of suitable aircraft operators, pre-contract audits or pre-start-up safety reviews to on-going Operator operational reviews which include aircraft, airfield, on-shore heli-pad and off-shore heli-deck inspections, including providing the client with a comprehensive, professional report. L&A are accredited members of the Flight Safety Foundation Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) Association. CLASSROOM TRAINING: L&A is an official SACAA accredited training organization, undertaking classroom raining in Cape Town, Johannesburg and around the world with in-house training being our specialty. Currently with the ongoing pandemic, all our courses are being held virtually with a real-time instructor, following the identical schedule we would normally use in the classroom. Our highly experienced facilitators train delegates in courses including Safety Management System, Quality Management Systems & Auditing, DG, SEPT, CRM and Occurrence Investigation. Contact: M05 building, Bakers Square, Paardevlei, Somerset West 7130, Cape Province Telephone: +27 (0)21 8517187 Email: enquiries@litson.co.za www.litsonandassociates.com

LITSON & ASSOCIATES RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES (PTY) LIMITED Software / eSMS-S™ L&A RMS operates globally through its offices situated in Somerset West, Cape Town, South Africa. The company specialises in software tools for primarily the aviation and corporate industries. Software management systems include: • eSMS-S™ - Simplified electronic Safety and Quality Management system designed and used globally for all size operations - affordable, easy to use and available in English and Spanish. Helpdesk for ongoing assistance and training. • eSMS-S™LITE – A simpler starter option of the above system for small operators, with the option to add more tools at any time. The cost of the programme includes ongoing training. • eREP™ - An Audit report creating, hosting and tracking system. • eTEND™ - An L&A RMS Tender and Bid evaluation tool. • eFLITE-S - An L&A RMS Aircraft Operations Management system. • eVENTS - This is an Aircraft Accident database for use by RMS clients and operators for research. Contact: M05 building, Bakers Square, Paardevlei, Somerset West 7130, Cape Province Telephone: +27 (0)21 8517187 Email: enquiries@litson.co.za www.esms-s.com/about-us www.litsonandassociates.com

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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MERCHANT WEST Aircraft Finance

MISTRAL AVIATION SERVICES Wheels, Brakes and Landing Gears

The Merchant West group of companies provides asset finance, fleet finance and working capital solutions to corporates, SME’s and high net worth individuals.

Mistral Aviation was founded in 2002 with the aim of addressing the high cost of operating aircraft thousands of miles from the original equipment manufacturers. (OEM).

In the South African aviation industry, we finance: • New and used fixed wing and rotor aircraft • Avionics Upgrades • Engine Overhauls and Aircraft Rebuilds Merchant West offers its clients: • Tailor-made solutions which address each client’s unique needs. • Fast turnaround in the credit decision. • Sustainable pricing for the full term of a contract. For more information contact your broker or Andrew Eaton at Merchant West. Contact: andrewe@merchantwest.co.za +27(11)-305-9515 +27(82)-075-6709 www.merchantwest.co.za

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Mistral continues to add to its capability and has just added Machining and NDT. Our experience has grown and we are about to embark on training of our staff to take up the challenge of new equipment. Contact Details: Telephone: (27) 81-755-2534 Fax: (27) 11- 395 1291 E-Mail: Peter@mistral.co.za Website: www. mistral.co.za Address: Safair Campus Northern Perimeter Road, OR Tambo International Bonaero Park Kempton Park Gauteng South Africa


NEVERGREEN Commercial Aircrafts Maintenance Facility and AMO Nevergreen is SACAA AMO1165 based at OR Tambo Interantional airport in Kempton Park Johannesburg SAAMO specializing in Light & Heavy Maintenance on Boeing B737 classic fleet as well as aircraft scrapping and recycling. Located at the busiest aviation hub in Africa giving us exposure to the main operators and airlines in Africa.We are midsize AMO trying to be efficient, cost effective and offering our services to all major and minor operators in the region. Company personnel consist of experienced management and very motivated young technicians happy to perform every given task. For more details pls consult our website: www.nevergreenaircraft.co.za or contact us: manager@nevergreenaircraft.co.za Our contact number is +27 10 003 3747

PAMBELE AVIATION Air Charter Pambele Aviation has its primary base of operations located at Grand Central Airport (Midrand). Pambele Aviation is a dependable air charter company operating throughout Southern Africa providing light aircraft transport services. We have been operating in the South African air charter market since 2006 and have fourteen years’ experience providing charter flights for the private and business sectors, transporting business leaders, tourists and VIP’s. The primary aircraft being operated are a Beechcraft King Air B200 and a Cessna Grand Caravan 208B. A number of light piston engine aircraft are available for smaller group sizes, or for those who are budget conscious. The passenger charter services are ideally suited for customers requiring access to remote, or poorly serviced destinations. A satellite base of operation is located at Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport serving the Lowveld region of the country. Pambele Aviation holds license N892D and a Part 135 AOC. Email: fjoubert@pambele.aero OR lowveld@pambele.aero

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COMMERCIAL-INDUSTRIAL-RESIDENTIAL AIRCRAFT HULL ALL RISKS THIRD PARTY PASSENGER LIABILITY PILOT EXCESS INSURANCE Est 1997 Insurance We have 23 years of insurance experience specialising in all Immovable Property, Business and Aviation risk. AVIATION • We are pilots and understand your aviation requirements. PROPERTY • All Sectional title, Free Hold and Property Management experience. Are you adequately insured and paying a market related premium ? We offer obligation free policy reviews. Email:

paulcormack@propertyinsurancebrokers.co.za

Website: www.propertyinsurancebrokers.co.za Facebook: propertyinsurancebrokers

Licensed financial service provider FSP13367

SKYHAWK AVIATION Flight Training Skyhawk Aviation was established by Mike Gough (Airbus Training Captain and SA Flyer columnist) in 2008. Well established as the dominant operation in the flight training environment at Lanseria International Airport, Skyhawk Aviation offers the resources required for the successful completion of all CAA licences and ratings. We are approved to conduct the full type rating for the Airbus 320 and Airbus A340, as well as proficiency checks and ATP revalidations. Aimed specifically at developing the professional pilot, we specialise in both the full turn-key contract clients as well as individuals starting out on the road to flying for a living. Part of our services include accommodation, transport and visa services. Skyhawk is associated with the Sakhikamva Foundation, and offers programs to high school learners to expose the kids to aviation. Come and see our Boeing 737 nose section kitted out as a classroom! If you need a reality check about the sometimes hard truth about becoming a career pilot, then you can’t go far wrong by dropping in at Hanger 30, Gate 5 at Lanseria. Contact: Tel: 011 701 2622 Email: mike@skyhawk.co.za or info@skyhawk.co.za Website: www.skyhawk.co.za

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South Africa

SKYSOURCE INTERNATIONAL Aircraft Maintenance

SOUTHERN MAPPING Hangars and Maintainance

Skysource International South Africa, a Aircraft Maintenance Organisation, situated at Lanseria International Airport, strives to provide its clients with only the best quality service, ensuring a relationship with trust, confidence, integrity and peace of mind in a job well done.

Operating out of our newly renovated Hangar H at Grand Central Airport, Southern Mapping, a Woolpert Company, has resources to hangar and maintain several different aircraft. The Responsible Person Maintenance, Andrew Watson, has over 40 years’ experience in aircraft maintenance.

Specialising in turbo prop aircraft we deliver aircraft refurbishments with an excellent lead time and quality maintenance including, but not limited to phase 1-6 inspections, annual inspections, airframe and sheet metal repairs. With highly skilled and experienced technicians, we strive to only deliver the best quality service beyond our client’s expectations. As we have the knowledge of the time constraints involved in aviation, we work hard to ensure we keep to a reasonable timeframe to have your aircraft ready and serviceable when you need it.ent. Contact: Telephone: +27 10 900 4300 E-Mail: info@skysourcesa.com http://skysourceinternational.com Kempton Park Gauteng South Africa

In addition to the normal SACAA audits, Southern Mapping’s AMO is audited by independent industry advisors such as SSGS Hart Aviation, Litson and Associates and Air Safety Navigators. The AMO currently offers maintenance services on the following: • Pratt and Whitney PT6 (small and large) engines and the full range of Lycoming and Continental engines. Insofar as airframes are concerned, we cover the following: • Cessna 100, 200 and 400 series (incl. Reims 406) • Piper 28, 31, 32, 34, 36 and 46 • Partenavia P68 Series Soon to be offered: • DA42 and DA42NG For more information on our maintenance and hangarage offerings, contact: Andre Wehmeyer, Responsible Person Flight Operations and Aircraft, at andre.wehmeyer@woolpert.com or +27 (0)82 652 3505.

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

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Durban: +27 31 571 6600 Mossel Bay: +27 44 692 0006 train@starliteaviation.com

Contacts Continued: www.starliteaviation.com starlite_training_academy starlite_training_academy ning Academy Starlite Aviation Training Academy STARLITE AVIATION GROUP Aviation School, Medevac Contracts Starlite Aviation Group - a diverse, solution driven company, offering a range of helicopter, fixed wing and drone services globally. Starlite is a trusted, long-term partner to governments, NGO’s, the military and corporates. Starlite Operations offers customers tailored solutions for aircraft and onsite maintenance, ground and air personnel for; medevac, cargo and passenger, private aircraft charters and a wide range of services for general contract work. Starlite Aviation Training Academy, in Durban and Mossel Bay offers helicopter, aeroplane and drone pilot training. SACAA certified FNTP II simulators at both bases. Starlite Aero Sales specialises in the sale of new and pre-owned aircraft and offers a range of after sale services to customers. Starlite Maintenance Johannesburg and Starlite Maintenance Durban. Providers of maintenance and logistics for Starlite aircraft and third-party work. Contacts: Starlite Aviation Operations – Helicopter and Fixed Wing Contract and Emergency Services Fiona McCarthy: +27 82 522 3813 fionam@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com/operations Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ starliteaviationoperations/ Instagram: @starlite_aviation_operations

30 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

Starlite Aviation Charters – Helicopter and Fixed Wing Private Aircraft Hire Jennifer de Lange: +27 82 977 1847 charters@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com/charters Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ helicharters/ Instagram: @starlite_aviation_charters LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ starlite-aviation-charters Starlite Maintenance Johannesburg – AMO 927 Hennie Pietersen: +27 82 822 5376 henniep@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com/maintenance Starlite Maintenance Durban and Mossel Bay - AMO 824 Emmanuel Mhungu: +27 82 402 7117 emmanuelm@starliteaviaiton.com www.starliteaviation.com/maintenance Starlite Aviation Training Academy – Helicopter, Fixed Wing and Drone Pilot Training Arme Birkholtz: +27 31 571 6600 train@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com/training Facebook: https://www.facebook. com/1Starlite/ Instagram: @starlite_training_academy Starlite Aero Sales – New and Pre-Owned Aircraft, Insurance, Maintenance and Import/Export Klara Fouché: +27 83 324 8530 klaraf@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com/aerosales Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ aircraftsalessouthafrica Instagram: @starlite_aero_sales LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ starlite-aviation-aero-sales


SPRINGBOK GROUP OF COMPANIES Charters, ATO, AMO Springbok Group of Companies is a family run business with over 76 years of flying experience in South African Airways. Springbok Classic Air operates a rare fleet of Aircraft that have slowly over time become some of the last of their kind in Africa and around the world, which makes it our duty to ensure we can share these rare and historically significant machines with fellow Aviators who have a fine taste for the romance of vintage air travel. We specialise in custom Flying Safaris on our vintage fleet to destinations across Southern Africa. Springbok Air Academy provide pilot training from Private Pilots Licenses all the way up to B737 and A320 Type ratings, and Springbok Aviation Services offer the highest standard of aircraft Maintenance. Preservation, Conservation, and Education is our passion, contact us today and see what it means to be a part of our Springbok Family. Email: info@springbokclassicair.co.za Telephone: 011 824 2142 Web Page: www.springbokclassicair.co.za Instagram: @springbokgroup Facebook: Springbok Group Of Companies LinkedIn: Springbok Group of Companies YouTube: Springbok Group of Companies Link to profile video: https://youtu.be/SZVlftI-KgM

TITAN HELICOPTER GROUP Offshore Helicopter Operator The Titan Helicopter Group (THG) operates and provides helicopters and throughout Africa and other parts of the world through its subsidiaries in various countries. THG has operating bases in South Africa, Namibia, Equatorial Guinea, Brazil, and Borneo. With its focus on Oil & Gas and EMS markets. THG is approved for operations by all major oil companies and mining groups worldwide, with particular emphasis on safety and efficiency on each flight. All aircraft are multiengine and equipped with emergency equipment for increased safety and fully OGP compliant. For more information, contact THG on: Telephone: +27 44 878 0453 Email: info@thghelicopters.com Website: www.titanhelicopters.com

AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022

31


TITANIUM AIR Aircraft Charter Titanium Air is a private, boutique-style Aircraft Charter company based out of Lanseria Airport. Flying with a private charter company offers you complete privacy and luxury, while minimising your waiting time at the airport and have you flying within minutes of your arrival. Titanium Air has an unblemished safety record and their pilots have extensive knowledge and experience of all types of aircraft. Titanium Air caters to corporate and leisure travellers alike and specialises in bush and hunting lodge transfers where small aircraft are needed to land on and take-off from dirt runways. Titanium Air is dedicated to its clientele and makes every experience a memorable one, from first point of contact to the safe touch-down at your destination. Contact: www.titaniumair.co.za

VELOCITY AVIATION Flight Clearances, Ground Handling, and Aircraft Parts. Velocity Aviation was created in 2007 to deliver exceptional service with regards to Flight Clearances, Ground Handling, and Aircraft Parts. With the primary focus of creating a service unique to the African continent, the company’s accuracy, efficiency and professionalism are always combined to match and adapt to the client’s needs in order to exceed their expectations. Whether it’s providing passenger assistance, aircraft charter and management, flight planning or refuelling services or sourcing and delivering parts, Velocity Aviation handles every situation in a positive, professional and personalised manner. Several manufactures have appointed Velocity Aviation parts division as a direct distributor, agent, or franchisee. The organisation has extensive inventories, including Goodyear Aviation tires and tubes, BP aviation lubricants and turbine filters, new and overhauled avionics and components and general parts and accessories. Velocity Aviation guarantees the fastest and most efficient response to their customers’ needs and requirements, and maintaining an exceptional level of service has allowed the company to evolve from a local company to global organisation. Contact Velocity Aviation on: Tel: +27 11 659 2306 Cell: + 27 78 051 6586 / + 27 082 872 3263 Website: www.velocityaviation.co.za

32 AVIATION COMPANY PROFILES GUIDE 2022


FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

Edition 157 | December / January 2021/22

Rodger Foster – on Post Covid recovery

Mike Gough:

Knowledge Skills & Attitude

SAAF – should

it share with its neighbours? 1

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

SANSA’s

Space Weather


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CONTENTS

TABLE OF

Publisher Flyer and Aviation Publications cc Managing Editor Guy Leitch guy@flightcommag.com Advertising Sales Wayne Wilson wayne@saflyermag.co.za

DECEMBER / JANUARY 2021/22 EDITION 157

Layout & Design Emily-Jane Kinnear Patrick Tillman

ADMIN: +27 (0)83 607 2335 TRAFFIC: +27 (0)81 039 0595 ACCOUNTS: +27 (0)15 793 0708

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Bush Pilot - Hugh Pryor Airline Ops - Mike Gough Defence - Darren Olivier Face to Face: Rodger Foster Dubai Airshow 2021 SANSA Monitors Space Weather Denali - First Flight AME Directory Starlite Directory Atlas Oil Charter Directory AEP AMO Listing Backpage Directory

© FlightCom 2021. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronically, mechanically, photocopied, recorded or otherwise without the express permission of the copyright holders.


A NOTE FROM

THE EDITOR: I often get asked how general aviation is doing. The answer is – I don’t know. Some parts seem to be doing really well, others really badly. A COMMON PERCEPTION is that general aviation is dying, largely due to it becoming too expensive and oppressed by the CAA – and video games competing for young pilots. Yet the flight schools are doing well. According to the SACAA, there were 13,223 pilots in South Africa as at October 2021. Ten years ago there were 14,560 pilots, so the decline has been relatively small. Why is the continued health of GA so important? Simply because, in the absence of any training budget in the SAAF, every South African pilot, regardless of where their career takes them, begins as a general aviation pilot. Their experience gained with light aircraft lays the groundwork for flying large aircraft. Many airline pilots secretly admit to how boring piloting a large airliner can be, compared to flying a small single-engine plane around the Okavango Delta. For old airline pilots, the thrill of first solos and cross-countries lives with them long after their initial training.

With airlines having to fund training to attract new recruits into the industry, there is a real hope that the biggest single obstacle to the growth of GA will be overcome – and that is the lack of funding for ab-initio training. Further, Mike Gough, our stalwart airline columnist, has been quietly working away at bringing the Multi Crew Pilot Licence to South Africa. This will use sophisticated and stringent selection criteria that will almost (but not quite) guarantee the success of the student, and thus the student’s ability to repay bank financing.

student pilot’s repay bank financing

And now, with the airlines facing unprecedented pilot shortages, the importance of GA as the foundation for the African air transport industry is ever more important. Flight schools are ramping up capacity. And most importantly, pilot pay is expected to likewise increase, making being a senior pilot as financially rewarding as being a senior company executive.

Compared to perhaps R100,000 for a bachelor’s degree, the R500,000 required for a Commercial Pilot’s Licence may seem a lot. But if the much-anticipated shortage becomes real, the salaries will make repayment of that half a million Rand seem like a bargain. The problem with fat pilot salaries is that it will attract those who do not have the passion and commitment flying requires. Commercial flying demands an extraordinary level of commitment and sacrifice, which only those with a deep avocational passion for flying will be able to endure. This will continue to make being a pilot an unattractive job to those who want the cushy working conditions and status of a regular office job – that may one day provide accesses to the levers of procurement. While we wait for high pilot salaries – may I wish you all a happy Christmas and a better 2022. 


BUSH PILOT HUGH PRYOR

I spent eleven exciting, sometimes challenging and often very amusing years flying for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), The main reason why I enjoyed those years so much was that it would be difficult to find a more admirable, brave and amusing bunch of people to work with, and that includes the aircrews.

I

T WAS NOT ALL RISK FREE of course, because the ICRC, by definition, only works in war zones and are the guardians of the Geneva conventions on the Rules of War and the treatment of prisoners and innocent civilians.

ICRC is looking for companies who employ pilots who have experienced operations in, shall I say, rather more ‘demanding’ theatres. To give you an example... there was one route in Angola where we were not allowed to fly above 80 feet AGL, in order to avoid SAM 7 missiles...but we nevertheless lost three of our Twin Otters and one C130 Hercules to missile strikes and one Twin Otter to an IED which had been planted on the runway at Cuima.

in Angola we were not allowed to fly above 80 feet AGL, in order to avoid SAM 7 missiles

An interesting anomaly in those rules is that the ICRC does not own any aircraft. Aircraft bearing the official ICRC insignia are protected by the Geneva Conventions, but the aircrews are not. They are ‘contractors’, employed by the airline from whom the aircraft is hired and therefore the crews are not ‘Official Delegates of the ICRC’ and are not protected by the Rules of War because they are ‘Voluntary Non-Combatants’ and are therefore not technically ‘innocent’.

This sounds like a load of legal ‘Gobbledygook’, until you actually start flying for these guys. The pay is normally very good and tax-free, but the

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FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

The Twin Otter’s PT-6A exhaust stacks are built so far out in front of the wing that a heat-seeking SAM 7 will destroy the engine. Fortunately however, the fuel is all safely stored down in the belly, reducing the risk of collateral fire. If the crew are quick, the Twin Otter’s other engine will keep everybody in the air until they find somewhere sensible to land. Which our crews did in Angola, and although we lost four of our Twin Otters in Angola,


FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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we got all our passengers safely on the ground. The only severe injuries were caused by the hangovers the following morning. The tragedy was our C-130. Its Captain, Dorian Schon and its Co-pilot Nick Dough had been the heroes of us twiddly pilots. They were flying ‘The Big One ‘. They were legendary in Ethiopia during the Great Famine in 1984/5 because they were the only guys who would take ten tons in to Lalibella and get out of there, without hitting Ras Dashen, a mountain which was in the way. In Angola, Dorian and Nick were our heroes, but they considered us ‘Twiddlys’ as ‘Front Line’ operators and so, if the Hercules was on the ramp when we got back from flying, Dorian would walk across and count the number of bullet holes in our aircraft. He would then drag us back to the hostel, where we had to drink a beer for each bullet hole, and if it had gone in one side and gone out the other...then that was two beers. Basically, Dorian and Nick were the ‘morale’ for us Twin Otterers.

The strange thing about Angola was that we were all being shot at. Yet apart from the two Twin Otters hit by the SAM-7s all the other ones were patchworks of repairs carried out by the engineers to bullet holes which none of us heard as they pierced our little cocoons. Each repair was therefore labelled by the engineers and was worn like a medal.

The strange thing about Angola was that we were all being shot at

Then I did a week of flying out of Benguela with Maria, an Angolan-born Portuguese girl who had trained in South Africa but had retained a colonial sense of humour, which she needed, when we got back to our base, in Huambo. We landed and taxied into the parking but nobody came out to greet us, so I just closed down and it was like ‘Zero’ until Hans Granenwerger, our Grandfather Twotterer grabbed open my door and shouted for me to get out...so I did. While we exchanged seats he asked me how much fuel there was. I told him that we had three hours left as he slammed the door and proceeded to takeoff across the parking area. Hans managed to land the Twotter on a bit of road,

8

across which the C130 had crashed, but the only human remains which he could find was a female left hand which was wearing the engagement ring which one of our engineers had recently bestowed upon her to both their delight. The tragedy was overwhelming, but, maybe because we were all so shocked by losing our heroes, we were welded together by a bond so strong that not one of us took up the offer of repatriation. We had lost our friends and one of our engineers had lost the love of his life. They had lost their lives doing a job, saving lives and now it was up to us to finish the job for which they had paid the ultimate price.

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

I received six ‘medals’, although two of them were downrated to one because one of the bullets came in one side of the aircraft and went out the other.

The only time I remember being shot at was after I had been transferred from Angola to Mozambique. There was a civil war in progress and one of our jobs was air ambulance, mostly picking up ‘Whiky-Whikys’, a radio pseudonym for ‘War Wounded’ to remind us of what we were looking forward to on our return to Beira, after the mission. One day Jacko, a young Mozambique-born Portuguese co-pilot and I were detailed for a flight to a place called Meringue, a small government garrison in the middle of miles and miles of thick thorn bush. This was ‘enemy country’, and radio communications between the aircraft and the troops on the ground did not work, so they had a system for letting us know what the ground conditions were for our arrival.


The ICRC procedure was for us to circle the destination at 3000 feet AGL, to show everybody that we were a Red Cross aircraft on a mercy mission and not a government Antonov 26, chucking bombs out.

middle of the instrument panel exploded in sparks and bits of flying metal and glass and there were one or two more thuds and bangs My immediate reaction was that something had gone explosively wrong with the radios and then Jacko shouted something expletive In Portuguese and I just dived for the trees...and I mean ‘below the trees’, because in Angola they had heat-seeking missiles and the only escape from those, at low level, was to get out of sight in amongst the foliage. So we did that for fifteen minutes, while we tried to sort out the problems.

The guys on the ground would then lay white sheets out on the airstrip. One sheet halfway down the runway would indicate that the security was okay, but the airfield was flooded. One sheet at each end of the runway told us that the Security and the landing conditions were good...and if there were no sheets, then neither side were happy and it was time to turn away and go back to Beira for further instructions.

Jacko was great and he and I went through all the emergency checks to make sure that the ‘Old Girl’ was going to get us back to Civilization in one piece.

The rebel ‘Renamo’ forces generally respected these rules and we only had one Caravan shot down. They were en route from Maputo to Nampula at 11 000 feet (FL 110), so it must have been a lucky shot which screwed up the reduction gearbox and the pilot, an Austrian, who is still a good friend of mine, managed to pull off a miraculous deadstick landing in the high reeds of a dried-up dam which had belonged to an old Portuguese mining company, in the thickest of the thorn bush. The Caravan settled comfortably into the reeds and slowly flopped over onto its back, while still supported by the reeds Everybody walked out, to be rescued by a Russian Mi-17 helicopter crew, not without considerable risk to themselves...but that is another story.

because one of the bullets came in one side of the aircraft and went out the other.

As far as we could work out, the flying controls were all working fine, but the Autopilot was not talking to us anymore. The fuel and hydraulic systems didn’t appear to have any unexpected holes and the engines still spoke ‘PT-6’ to us and I had an invaluable ‘King’ handheld VOR Transceiver in my flight bag, which had nearly caused a divorce, when I bought it, but it got us back to Quelimane that day and I have been forgiven.

Jacko and I did, of course, complain about our treatment upon our arrival over Meringue and the garrison commander apologised but explained that they had come under attack from Renamo as we came over and so they didn’t have time to take the sheet away and their only option was to fire incendiary rounds in front of us, to warn us off and we, stupidly, flew into them!

Anyway, we got to Meringue and started our circle, when I noticed that there was only one sheet on the threshold of the runway.

The wooden nose of our Twin Otter needed considerable surgery and so, instead of Medals, our Twin Otter got medal ribbons from the engineers, which I hope she wears to this day. 

Well that was not in our instructions, so I stupidly went for a closer look and suddenly the radio rack, in the

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

9


AIRLINE OPS MIKE GOUGH

The concept of a combination of knowledge, physical flying skills and correct attitude (KSA for short) would be well known to those who have been involved in any advanced aviation training program.

W

ITHIN THE GENERAL Aviation (GA) environment, this would be referred to as Airmanship, which to many is a mysterious or even undefined concept. Spending quality time at one of South Africa’s busiest international airports – Lanseria – has certainly illustrated the vast divide that exists between formally trained and assessed KSA, compared to some examples of seriously lacking airmanship. So how would one define this concept of Airmanship? Airmanship is defined by the US Federal Aviation Administration as -

Ebbage and Spencer, in their 2003 paper entitled ‘Airmanship Training for Modern Aircrew’, used their research to define this concept as, "A personal state that enables aircrew to exercise sound judgment, display uncompromising flight discipline and demonstrate skillful control of an aircraft and a situation. It is maintained by continuous self-improvement and a desire to perform optimally at all times."

maintained by continuous selfimprovement

• A sound acquaintance with the principles of flight – (Knowledge) • The ability to operate an airplane with competence and precision, both on the ground and in the air – (Skills) • The exercise of sound judgment that results in optimal operational safety and efficiency – (Attitude).

10 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

Sounds like these attempts to define this aspect are all on the same page. We all have most certainly seen, in one form or another, the good, the bad and ugly examples of this trait.

A very simple example of poor airmanship (of which we are probably all guilty of at some stage of our aviation careers) is turning an aircraft in front of an open hangar and prop-blasting dust and debris inside. This would normally then be followed by an irate occupant of the hangar storming out and berating the pilot, and then presenting the hapless aviator with a broom and firm instructions to reverse the transgression.


Airmanship requires pre-flight checks being properly done - including the removal of pool noodlers.

This sort of situation would (normally) never be done consciously, and the pilot’s attention would be on parking or positioning the aircraft, while not whacking a wing tip in the process. It is the unconscious consequence of the rearward-facing propeller blast that indicates a momentary loss of Situational Awareness (SA), part of the Attitude aspect, and is most certainly a part of airmanship.

effects of downwash and permitted landing areas. Skills exhibited was that of barely being able to avoid a physical collision with nearby aircraft (specifically mine), and an absolute denial and aggressive response to the suggestion that things could have been done better indicated an attitude that would at some point result in an accident. That is an example of conscious denial of transgressions of aeronautical common sense.

A few years ago, I was sitting in one of my Cessna 172s with a student, conducting a post flight briefing after having shut down. This was on what is loosely referred to as the Freight Apron at Lanseria - which has never seen much freight activity. However, as it is relatively uncluttered, it is frequently used for helicopter movements.

Unconscious poor performance is somewhat more common. As my hangar is pretty full of aircraft when flying is done, or the weather is not cooperating, we find ourselves walking between tightly parked wings, tails and propellers. My bright idea to comply with health and safety in this situation is the humble pool-noodle – the expanded neoprene foam in a large noodle form popular with kids in the swimming pool.

A gentleman in his Hughes 500 helicopter (a hot ship for a new PPL-H, as he was) air taxied right over the top of my aircraft at about 20 feet and proceeded to shakily alight a few metres away, with the resultant rotor wash feeling like a mini tornado in the momentarily battered Cessna.

Split along one side of its entire length, this metre-anda-bit of high density foam is easily slipped onto the trailing edge of a Cessna wing, which helps immensely to eliminate the well-known Cessna Rash on one’s forehead.

An attempt to discuss this display of potentially lethal lack of airmanship resulted in a perfect example of KSA – and all in the negative, unacceptable sense. Zero knowledge of the traffic patterns for helicopters,

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

11


Logic would dictate that this item, attached to the trailing edge of an aileron, should be removed before flight.

The basic ASK model.

It has happened on at least one occasion that an entire pre-flight inspection has been done, without the noodle being noticed and removed. This by a licenced individual. Luckily, the noodle’s grasp of the aileron is somewhat tenuous, and in this case, slipped off while on the taxi way. There was a bit of explaining to be done to the fire truck staff as to how a pool noodle ended up being reported as present on Taxiway A. In terms of Airmanship, this is a lack of being observant as well as a failing of application of procedures. Where it falls into the KSA model is the Attitude component, in terms of how one approaches a pre-flight inspection. This situation is not entirely removed from the multiple events that have occurred in the past with respect to the lack of removal of flight control locks before flight, all of which have had disastrous consequences. The Knowledge and Skills component have been fairly well addressed through the steady improvement of simulator training scenario development as well as

the extensive use of computer based training and the advent of online resources. The Attitude aspect is a more elusive element to define and thus train and refine. Aviation history is full of examples of where the attitude of the crew has directly contributed to a fatal accident. The most notable being the collision of

The Inner Art of Airmanship - is recommended reading.

12 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


two Boeing 747s at Tenerife in 1977, when a highly regarded Captain had a mindset to depart while disregarding procedures and inputs from other crew members.

careers or escaped a particular tricky situation with aplomb, managed to channel the positive side of their attitudes into that particular success. English states, “It turns out there are many more places to look for flying lessons than in twisted wreckage sitting in a smoking hole in the ground.”

As is the structure of an investigation, the focus is almost always on what went wrong, and very little insight as to what went right, and this is where the essence of modern Crew Resource management courses is founded.

The entire advanced aviation training industry has made huge strides in the Human Factors area, and with this progressive thinking at the fore, we can expect more of the positive training aspects to emerge, as opposed to simply the lessons that have already been learned.

Dave English, in his work ‘Inner Art of Airmanship’, points out that psychology journals traditionally cite six times more negative aspects for each positive, or ‘what went right’ aspect. Looking down our noses and gasping at the blatant disregard for procedures / minimum altitudes / aircraft limitations and so on, does not teach us how those who have had exemplary

I would suggest taking a look at http://www.innerairmanship.com/asstd/index.html

Airmanship - looking cool is not part of it.

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

13


NEWS

A350 PAINT PROBLEMS An undated photograph of what appears to be paint peeling, cracking and exposed expanded copper foil (ECF) on the fuselage of a Qatar Airways A350 aircraft may be the start of a widespread problem for Airbus. Qatar has grounded 20 of its 53 A350s, saying it is acting on orders from its local regulator, until reasons for what witnesses describe as the blistered and pock-marked appearance of some of its A350s can be confirmed. Reuters reports that a dispute between Airbus and Qatar Airways over paint and surface flaws on A350 jets stretches beyond the Gulf, with at least five other airlines raising concerns since the high-tech model entered service. Airbus says there is no risk to the A350's safety - a point echoed by the other airlines, which have not grounded any jets and describe the issue as "cosmetic." Airbus said in response to queries from Reuters there had been some problems with "early surface wear" that in some cases had made visible a sub-layer of mesh designed to absorb lightning, which it is working to fix. 

14 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

Paint breaking away from the skin of a Qatar A350.


Wishing a season of joy and happiness to all our loyal customers and may you all have a prosperous New Year.

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FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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15


DEFENCE DARREN OLIVIER

If recent events across the African continent south of the Sahara have taught us anything, it is that for most countries, air power is increasingly unaffordable, ever more tenuous, and generally in retreat.

T

HE COST OF NEW AIRCRAFT continues to climb and, perhaps surprisingly, new offerings from Russia and China do not have low enough price tags to substantially offset that. So Africa’s air forces are facing the same dilemma of air forces all over, of having to do more with less. But given the continent’s security issues and its relatively low economic power, it’s having to do much more with much less than most. That’s a problem.

across roles, it also brings increased cost. As an example: The C-130 is a good, versatile medium heavy air lifter, used by most air forces for tactical lift. Back in the early 1990s, a C-130H would have cost an air force around US$55 million in current (2021) US dollars. Yet today, it costs almost twice that to buy a C-130J. Certainly, the C-130J is a big improvement on the C-130H in every single way, but is it twice as good?

a multi-role aircraft can only be used for one role at a time

Many problems can be solved by throwing money at them, and this is no different, but for any modern air force the money needed to maintain even a decent number of aircraft across multiple capability areas rapidly becomes prohibitively expensive for a developing country.

Aircraft are becoming more complex in almost every sense, and while that brings added capabilities and some savings in terms of being able to reuse them

16 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

You can also double that unit price for any realistic acquisition: New Zealand’s recent purchase of five C-130J-30s, including a single flight simulator and a support package, worked out to nearly US$200 million per aircraft.

Of course you also don’t need to buy brand-new aircraft, and a number of lower and middle income countries have opted to buy second-hand aircraft where possible. Poland for instance just bought five ex-USAF C-130Hs for the bargain price of US$14.3


Could the SADC states ever co-operate enough to be a new NATO?

million, though that was partially subsidised by the US government to support an ally. The assessed value of the aircraft was US$ 60 million, with further retrofits and upgrades needed in Poland before they can enter service.

requirements that might include airlift, ISR, attack, air defence and maritime patrol, and wondering how the hell they’ll be able to afford to acquire more than a token capability in each of those roles as and when their current types require replacement.

But this approach has downsides, too, among which is that not all aircraft types are available in good or costeffective condition second hand, that you’re usually acquiring 30+ year old aircraft with relatively high ongoing maintenance and support costs, that they often need to go through refurbishment and upgrade before use, and that unless you can afford a thorough retrofit, you’re stuck with the configuration and systems that the previous owner deemed suitable for their needs, not yours.

In fact, it’s now something that not a single SubSaharan African country is reasonably able to do, with even South Africa struggling to maintain its core set of capabilities and unable to replace its ageing aircraft. Sure, you can go all-in on multi-role and try to use a few aircraft types across as many missions as possible. Hang a few missiles on a Cessna C-208, pop on an ISR turret, and now you have a light transport, a training aircraft, a light attack aircraft, and a surveillance aircraft all in one. Great! Except, it now costs much more to operate in the transport or training role than a basic C-208, it’s vulnerable to ground fire, costly

In any case, it’s a tough ask for any African air force planner looking at their twenty year forecasted

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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Poland paid just U$14.3m for five ex-USAF C-130Hs.

to lose in combat or in an accident, and you have the inherent opportunity cost of any multi-role aircraft which is that it can only really be used for one role at a time: each time you take it up for a transport mission, you’re effectively taking away a light attack and ISR aircraft from your fleet. In the end, while aircraft like this are undoubtedly useful and can bring cost-savings when used carefully, no amount of slapping on more gear and roles onto a single airframe can make up for a lack of numbers. And in emergencies, you’re seldom going to need either a transport, or a light attack aircraft, or an ISR platform, you’re going to need all three simultaneously and in different places. How then do we solve this dilemma? The needs keep growing, both in terms of having to respond to natural disasters exacerbated by climate change and in terms of new insurgent threats springing up everywhere; from northern Mozambique to northern Nigeria, as the world becomes less stable. But the same circumstances mean African air forces will generally have even less available funding to spend on acquiring and operating aircraft than they do now.

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The answer is a simple one, but far from easy: Sharing. In short, what no Sub-Saharan African country can afford alone, regional groupings can afford together, by pooling resources, allowing countries to specialise in certain service areas, and achieving economies of scale. Each country could have access to a fuller range of capabilities for a much lower cost than operating everything themselves, especially if the most expensive facilities like training centres and maintenance depots are consolidated and shared. In reality this is impossible, at least in the foreseeable future. For it to work would require a level of political, economic, and social integration that doesn’t exist in any regional grouping on the continent, and certainly in none globally outside of NATO. It would also require, most importantly, that every country involved permanently give up the idea of ever engaging in any sort of inter-state war with other countries in their region, something which seems incredibly difficult to predict in today’s chaotic world. So it’s only a dream, a semi-utopian and idealistic vision with no hope of success. But it’s at least interesting to think about, so let’s dive into what such an approach might look like.


Take SADC: It’s a political and economic alliance of 16 southern African countries, with a total land area of nearly 10 million km² and over 360 million people. It’s peaceful in terms of inter-state warfare, at least since the 1998-2002 war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, but two of its member states are struggling with widespread and intractable insurgencies, about half are losing billions in revenue by being unable to protect their exclusive economic zones from illegal fishing and other illicit maritime activities, and all are acutely vulnerable to climate change.

maintenance facility in South Africa with targeted work share packages that involved industry in Angola, Namibia, Zimbabwe, etc as well? Similarly, if South Africa, Angola, Namibia, Mozambique, Madagascar, Tanzania, and the island nations of Mauritius, the Seychelles, and Comoros all pooled their resources to establish a single maritime domain awareness centre with sub-regional offices and on a joint purchase of long-range maritime patrol aircraft with three or four regional operating bases, they could probably achieve much better collective control over their waters than each one attempting to do it individually.

Moreover, each of its members are struggling to maintain substantial and relevant armed forces given the rising costs of military equipment and demands for non-military budget spending. When it came time to assemble a self-funded military force to intervene in northern Mozambique, all that SADC could reasonably muster in terms of air support for the mission under the provided budget was a handful of helicopters, a single C-208 for ISR, and four medium-to-heavy airlifters to assemble the half-brigade-sized force. It’s far from sufficient.

Airlift, too, is a prime candidate for transnational sharing as argued here before and proven by NATO’s Strategic Airlift Capability. With pooled funding and shared facilities, SADC could afford at least a small squadron of heavy airlifters like the A400M or probably to have at least a dozen medium airlifters like the C-130J available at any given time. Either would be a huge improvement in regional capability.

do jet fighters still have a role to play?

In the end though, this is just a thought experiment and an incomplete one at that. Even if we ignore the impassable political and social barriers standing in the way of this sort of idealistic integration, which even the EU has yet to achieve, there are so many more factors to consider before it would be a realistic proposal. For instance, not all consolidation would bring savings, and the requirement for work shares to avoid countries feeling disadvantaged introduces its own set of problems.

But from a pure efficiency perspective, and again imagining our ideal utopian vision of all countries working together to combat internal threats like smuggling and insurgency, rather than needing to prepare for regional war, SADC has too many duplicated resources. Eight of its members operate fighters, though at least half those with such token and outdated capabilities that they might as well be non-existent. Most have transport helicopters, though generally in small numbers and more oriented toward light utility types rather than more useful medium transports. All have too few attack helicopters and light attack aircraft, and of dissimilar types. And so on. Of course all also have duplicated training facilities and maintenance units.

Then there’s the issue of mismatches between how each country views the priority of its requirements, how you fairly distribute cost burdens, how you allocate mission time, and a million other things. And do jet fighters still have a role to play? If so, can they truly be used as shared assets, given the prestige they inevitably carry? It all gets messy, complicated, and non-utopian quite fast.

What if instead, Botswana hosted all the flying training for SADC, with instructors and industry support from the rest of the bloc? And what if SADC’s members agreed to standardise on certain types, such as perhaps the Airbus Helicopters H225M for medium lift helicopters, and established a single depot

So it’s not a realistic goal, not just yet anyway, but perhaps some parts of it might just be. Continental air forces need to be thinking about the next twenty to thirty years and thinking seriously about how they’re

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Regional cooperation in Africa is not easy - as evidenced by the failure of Zambia and Zimbabwe to agree a new name for the Victoria Falls.

going to be able to maintain sufficient capabilities to meet an uncertain new world. They need to be looking at their neighbours, and at examples from elsewhere, to figure out what small steps they can safely make without sacrificing sovereignty to slowly share costs and opportunities with neighbours.

Maybe that involves more standardisation, both on aircraft types and on subsystems, or maybe it involves more shared training, or some level of maintenance consolidation. Whatever the case, it has to be something new, innovative, and a little bit risky, because the status quo isn’t working any more. 

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NEWS

BESTFLY ACQUIRES

AW169S

Angola’s Bestfly has announced it is to acquire four Leonardo AW169 light intermediate twin engine helicopters. This is the first entry of the AW169 into the African market. The introduction of the AW169 is a significant boost to Bestfly’s air operations in Angola. It says it will be conducting passenger and equipment transport in the energy industry by “leveraging latest technology and navigation/mission avionics, latest certification and safety standards, outstanding performance, the largest cabin in its category and a modern maintenance approach.”

wide range of applications, including air ambulance, law enforcement, executive / corporate and offshore transport, electronic news gathering, training, military and utility roles. Leonardo says, “In the energy industry sector, by supporting oil and gas or wind farm, the AW169 has already proven successful in Europe and the Middle East. More than 130 units have been delivered worldwide and have logged more than 90,000 flight hours.” 

Orders and options for nearly 290 AW169 helicopters have been signed by over 90 customers in more than 30 countries around the world to date for a

Bestfly is acquiring four Agusta Westland AW-169s.

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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Rodger Foster says Airlink is both a regional airline and a network carrier.

Airlink has been one of the star survivors of the Covid-19 pandemic. It is seizing opportunities to expand its network across Africa – and is rapidly expanding its fleet to accommodate the many new opportunities it has made. AviaDev’s Jon Howell (JH) asks Airlink’s CEO Rodger Foster (RF) how he has met the challenges – and what the new normal is expected to be. 22 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


JH: Airlink is an airline that has done much in the past 25 years to keep sub-Saharan Africa connected, especially during the dark times over the past 18 months. It's now almost two years since you terminated the franchise agreement with South African Airways and set up on your own code. I guess you were thinking “We're poised for gigantic growth, with all guns blazing,” and then of course Covid came along and spoiled the party. How much did that impact change your strategy and what lessons have you learned as a result of the past 18 months or so?

there are all of the absolutely essential bolt-on’s to the basic system, such as revenue optimisation and accounting systems and so on. I'm very pleased to say that Airlink has accomplished total independence from the relationship that we previously had with the mothership.

In August this year you entered a codeshare with Emirates. Tell us a bit more about the agreement and are you starting to see the benefits? As a SADC airline we connect local business centres with other economic centres. However, we rely on commercial partnerships with airlines that provide long haul services from source markets such as North America, the United Kingdom, Europe and Asia, for us to gain access to those markets for the purposes of providing seamless connectivity to our customers. We operate a local and regional network of destinations all linked together by our hubs, we offer high frequency of services with availability to serve the markets’ requirements at the right timing. Our customers originating their travels from within our network have access to the world’s most popular destinations via the services of Airlink’s commercial partners, and reciprocally, customers originating their travels from source markets within the networks of our partners have access to all of Airlink’s destinations via the services of our partners in conjunction with our own. We are therefore proud of the codeshare relationships we've established with Emirates and United, as well as the interline relationships with many others, including: Lufthansa, British Airways, Qatar, Air France, KLM, Virgin, Delta, Ethiopian, TAAG, LAM, Cathay, Turkish and many others.

RF: If anything, Covid presented us with the opportunity to implement our strategy. Bear in mind that our relationship with South African Airways lasted 25 years. When your business is dependent on a mother ship for that amount of time, you can imagine that to untangle that spaghetti and to reinstate independence is a mammoth task. So Covid and the lockdowns presented the opportunity for us to quietly get on with that implementation of our independence and that entailed setting up new systems and relationships. Bear in mind that Airlink is at the end of the day a network carrier and a regional airline. As a network airline we have interlining agreements and that required systems establishment and the implementation of those systems.

Airlink is standing alone, totally independent from the mothership

And then there are the commercial partnerships. The lockdowns and the ebb and flow of easing was mayhem for us. There were curfews, travel prohibitions, countries closing their borders, airport hours of operation changes and airport closures. Some airports still remain closed, even today, and there is one instance that a country’s borders remain closed. All of them caused multiple business disruptions but at the same time allowed us quiet time to get on with the implementation of the systems, in particular the inventory hosting systems. And then, of course,

Are we seeing the benefits of international travel being reactivated? We absolutely are. Just a month and a half

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

23


Rodger Foster with one of his Embraer 190s. He expects to upgrade to Embraer E2s. Pic Garth Calitz.

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ago we had almost zero interlining traffic, other than for online interlining, in other words, on our services from Cape Town to Johannesburg and on to Bulawayo for example. But right now, interline traffic represents about 20% of our business, so we've definitely seen an uptick and the multiple relationships that we have firstly established and then nurtured are undoubtedly bearing dividends. We need to see this in context – long-haul travel is currently only at about 40% of its pre-Covid levels.

see that relationships and commercial partnerships and agreements are the future of our business, but in an agnostic way. We don't want to be locked into one of the alliances on an exclusive basis. All three of the major global alliances and their key airline partners are relevant to our destinations as they collectively access the source markets to our destinations, and vice versa, where customers originating their travel from within our network would want to access their choice of global destinations through one of our partners who are members of one or the other of all three major global alliances.

It's a real sign of approval from both sides that those carriers obviously trust you and see the benefit of working with Airlink. And that's part of your longevity as I think you have a longer tenure as CEO of an airline than any other. How important are the lessons you've learned over those many years of being in the industry? Has it cemented your ability to deal with what's being thrown at you at the moment?

We want to look at what's best for our network system and our customers who need to get access to our destinations through our network in conjunction with what is best on every continent, and in every one of the source markets. Therefore we tied up a codeshare with Emirates which has the biggest global reach. We have also tied up a codeshare with United which is best placed to provide connectivity to the North America source markets via its hub in Newark - on to Johannesburg and then throughout our network, on a reciprocal basis.

long-haul travel is currently only at about 40% of its preCovid levels

Its equipped me better than if I was a green stick to the game. I've been doing it now for almost 30 years, and you don't always get it right. But you do learn from your experiences and that’s what, together with your own skill set, develops expertise over time. It boils down to firstly: the clarification of what you're trying to do, and secondly: what you're trying to be. You can't be everything to all needs, but you can be something that, as long as you can define it clearly, you can get on with implementation.

Emirates are also alliance agnostic, as are many of the other partners that we engage with. Lufthansa and United are prominent members of the Star Alliance and in the case of our codeshare with United, this is on an alliance agnostic basis so we can also have a commercial relationship with Delta, which is part of Sky Team, and that opens up all the doors to us. It's that experience that gives us the ability to adjudicate what is best for our business and specifically for our customers who need to travel from within our network system through our hubs and then access their end destinations everywhere in the world through our partnerships. 

We are a regional airline and a standalone network system now, whereas before we were a component of a composite network system. I suppose in many ways we remain a composite. We are the local and regional component, and the composite is a collaboration between ourselves and our global partners. I think it's that clarity of thought that has matured over time; we

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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NEWS

STARLITE SOLD TO SAF HÉLICOPTÈRES Prominent South African company Starlite Aviation has been sold to French company SAF Hélicoptères to form part of a global aviation group: SAF Aerogroup. SAF Aerogroup, is consolidating its position as the French leader and a major player in the helicopter and fixed wing service sectors worldwide, by opening up new markets in Africa and the Middle East. The new group of 500 employees, manages 8 maintenance bases, 2 training centres, 5 flight simulators and operates a fleet of 78 mission aircraft for: Medevac operations, EMS, light and heavy lift work and VIP transport. The pilot training fleet consists of 40 helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, including 3 twin turboprop aircraft. SAF Aerogroup operates in France, Ireland, Belgium, South Africa, Mali and Niger with a consolidated turnover of 100 million dollars. Within three years, SAF is expected to create 100 to 300 additional jobs and a turnover of 150 million dollars. The acquisition opens up new market opportunities for the SAF Aerogroup geographically and expands their areas of expertise. Starlite is a leading multi-faceted aviation group of companies, offering helicopter and

26 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

fixed wing aircraft for challenging missions in austere environments and a well-established manned and UAV pilot training academy, supported by numerous dedicated maintenance divisions across Africa. Recognised worldwide, Starlite has maintained a strong presence and long history rooted in Africa, providing 24/7 mission ready helicopter and fixed wing aircraft for complex assignments for: medical emergency services, and rescue and relief. Starlite Aviation’s globally recognisable brand will remain unchanged under SAF Aerogroup. Gareth Schnehage, CEO of Starlite Aviation says, "We are delighted to be joining the SAF Aerogroup. Ultimately, it is our customers and employees who will benefit from this merger." Tristan Serretta, CEO of SAF Aerogroup: "Our ambition is to become a global player in airborne services, and this acquisition takes us one step further in that direction. Our common culture aimed at excellence will significantly facilitate the integration of Starlite Aviation teams". 


NEWS

DR ANSA JORDAAN

HONOURED

The British Royal Aeronautical Society has awarded its prestigious President’s Award to South African doctor, Dr Johanna (Ansa) Jordaan.

work experience includes the South African Military Institute of Aviation Medicine, the South African Civil Aviation Authority, medical director of South African Airways, medical director of Occupational Health at International SOS and working as an independent consultant. Her memberships include the Aerospace Medicine Association, the International Academy of Aviation and Space Medicine and the Airlines Medical Directors Association. She is an advisor to the World Health Organization. 

The Royal Aeronautical Society’s president, Mr Howard Nye, awarded Dr Jordaan his President’s Award “to recognise outstanding skill and professionalism in the field of aviation and aeronautics, especially in adverse circumstances.” The award is entirely in the gift of the incumbent President and may be awarded to individuals or teams. Dr Jordaan’s colleague, Dr Kenneth Ingham, says, “This is only the second time in the history of the Royal Aeronautical Society that the President's Award has been issued, this time to Dr J J Jordaan of CAPSCA in ICAO, for their tireless work on aviation safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Not bad for a "Boeremeisie” from Carletonville.”

RAS President Howard Nye with Dr Ansa Jordaan.

The Royal Aeronautical Society’s citation reads that Dr Johanna (Ansa) Jordaan, “is the Chief of the Aviation Medicine Section at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). She is a medical doctor with post-graduate degrees in Aerospace Medicine and Occupational Health. Her previous

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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DUBAI

AIRSHOW 2021 Hannes Meyer

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The Dubai Airshow 2021 kicked off on 14 November, still under the Covid-19 blanket, but that did not deter Dh286.5 billion ($78 billion) worth of commercial and defence contracts signed during the show, surpassing the previous edition’s total by over Dh100 billion.

The Boeing 777X was the undisputed star of the flying display.

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H

ELD AT AL MAKTOUM International Airport at Dubai World Central from November 14 to 18, industry specialists and leaders from across the aviation, aerospace, space and defence sectors arrived at the Airshow from every part of the globe. This year’s Dubai Airshow is the biggest edition of the event since it began in 1989. Almost 150 countries are represented at this year’s Airshow, which includes 20 country pavilions and new additions. There were also civil and military delegations from more than 140 countries with more than 370 new exhibitors at the event. Dubai Airshow and the UAE Space Agency signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on the second day of the Airshow. The two parties will collaborate to further position Dubai Airshow as a key platform for companies and investors in the space sector. The partnership will support organisations looking to establish a presence at future editions of the event and will enable space companies to benefit from the participation, engagements, networking and agreements created at Dubai Airshow.

Airbus launched its A350 freighter at the airshow with ALC as launch customer with an order for seven A350Fs. Boeing now has more than 200 orders for its 737800 Boeing Converted Freighter (BCF) from 19 customers. Boeing announced the opening of three more B737-800 conversion lines with Icelease as the launch customer. The company will open up one conversion line at its London Gatwick MRO and a two further lines in 2023 at KF Aerospace MRO in Kelowna, Canada. Emirates Airlines announced they will retrofit 105 aircraft with new premium economy seating. The 18 month programme will be conducted at their Emirates engineering facility in Dubai. 52 A380s and 53 B777s will be retrofitted and work will begin at the end of 2022. Emirates also announced an order or two B777Fs to be delivered in 2022 and signed an agreement with IAI to convert four Boeing 777-300ER passenger aircraft into freighters, starting in 2023, with an option for further conversions.

star of the flying display was the Boeing B777X

This year focused very much on the future of aviation in terms of sustainability and virtual reality. In the exhibitors’ hall was an abundance of companies promoting electrical powered flight as the future of aviation, and virtual reality, being the leading training tool.

Orders Announced This year the aircraft orders announced at the show did not disappoint. Airbus was the clear winner with 406 airframes, Boeing with 98 and ATR with 18.

Home colour from the Emirates A380 in Expo 2020 livery.

30 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


ABOVE: An Etihad B787-9 with the UAE's Al Fursan team. BELOW: The US military was there in force - here a USAF KC46 with a C130 behind.

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Bombardier's Global 7500 continues to chalk up steady sales.

Airbus opened up the show announcing a massive 255 Airbus A321NEO and A321XLR order from low cost consortium Indigo Partners. Indigo partners includes Low cost carriers Wizz Air from Hungary, Frontier from USA, Volaris from Mexico and JetSMART from Chile and Argentina. ALC signed a letter of intent for 23 A320-300’s, 55 A321Neos, 20 A321XLRs, 4 A330Neos and 7 A350Fs. Kuwaiti low cost carrier, Jazeera Airways, ordered 20 A320Neo’s and 8 A321Neo’s

Boeing signed a deal worth nearly $9 Billion for 72 737MAX with Indian startup low cost carrier Akasa Air. African carriers did not disappoint. Nigerian airline Ibom Air Ordered ten A220s. Air Senegal is to acquire five Airbus A220-300s under a lease agreement with a division of Macquarie AirFinance. Air Tanzania placed an order with Boeing for a 787-8 Dreamliner, a 767-300 Freighter, and two 737 MAX aircraft.

The still hopeful single-aisle contender - Russia's Irkut MC21.

32 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


The Kamov Ka-50 is a Russian attack helicopter with the distinctive coaxial rotor.

Flying Display

Angolan airline Bestfly announced the lease of up to four E190s from ACIA. Nigerian start-up Overland Airways ordered three firm plus three options for E175s. Afrijet has signed for three ATR 72-600s with new PW engines. Binter Canarias ordered four ATR 72-600’s plus one option and Tarom signed a firm order for three ATR 72-600’s.

The crowd was spoiled by a variety of displays. Performing was UAE Al Fursan, Saudi Hawks, Airbus A350, Russian Knights, French Rafale, Japanese Airforce C2 Kawasaki, Italian AW609, Irkut MC-21 just to name a few. The star of the flying display was the Boeing B777X, making its international airshow debut. Another noteworthy flying demonstration was the Russian Mi-28NE attack helicopter which made its first demonstration flight abroad.  Tecnam's P2012 made a welcome appearance.

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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NEWS

AIR TANZANIA

ORDERS MORE JETS The financially embattled Air Tanzania has announced an order for four new Boeings: a 787-8, a 767-300 Freighter and two 737 MAXes. The order, valued at more than $726 million at list prices, was previously listed as unidentified on the Boeing Orders and Deliveries website, pending the announcement of the orders at the Dubai Airshow. In 2016, the Tanzanian government under President Magufuli had initiated a yet another attempt to resuscitate the repeatedly bankrupt national airline. The airline announced it intended to double its fleet to 14 aircraft by 2022 and increase its longhaul and regional routes. Wikipedia notes that in April 2021, the Tanzanian Auditor General warned that Air Tanzania flights flying abroad run the risk of being impounded due to huge debts incurred by the company. He stated that the company had incurred losses of USD 65 million since 2016. However, in May 2021 the Government of Tanzania announced a bailout of USD 194 million for the airline.

“Our flagship 787 Dreamliner is popular with our passengers, providing unrivalled in-flight comfort and ultra-efficiency for our long-haul growth,” said Air Tanzania CEO Ladislaus Matindi.” Adding to our 787 fleet, the introduction of the 737 MAX and 767 Freighter will give Air Tanzania exceptional capability and flexibility to meet passenger and cargo demand within Africa and beyond,” he said. “Africa is the third fastest-growing region worldwide for air travel, and Air Tanzania is well-positioned to increase connectivity and expand tourism throughout Tanzania,” said Ihssane Mounir, Boeing senior vice president of Commercial Sales & Marketing. “We are honoured that Air Tanzania has chosen Boeing for its fleet modernization program by adding an additional 787 and introducing the 737 MAX and the 767 Freighter into its expanding network.” Boeing’s 2021 Commercial Market Outlook forecasts that, by 2040, Africa’s airlines will require 1,030 new airliners valued at $160 billion and aftermarket services such as manufacturing and repair worth $235 billion, supporting growth in air travel and economies across the continent. 

Air Tanzania has announced it is to acquire another B787-8 and two 737-8 Max aircraft.

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FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

2021

35


The South African National Space Agency

SANSA MONITORS

SPACE WEATHER T he South African National Space Agency (SANSA) has been monitoring space weather since 2011 when it launched a limited research and development Space Weather Centre at its facility in Hermanus.

South Africa, through SANSA, was selected as an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Regional Space Weather Centre in 2018. This designation means that a fully operational capability for the African region will be in place by 2022, along with advanced research capabilities in the space weather field.

The new R90 million project includes upgrades to the SANSA Hermanus facility that will see the establishment of additional state of the art structures dedicated to 24/7 monitoring of space weather for civil aviation globally, and over the entire African region. “This is very exciting for us as we are growing the space weather capability of Africa,” says Dr Lee-Anne McKinnell, SANSA Managing Director.

The space weather impacts on the aviation sector have been identified to be in the areas of High Frequency (HF) Communications, Satellite Navigation and Surveillance, Satellite Communications and Radiation Exposure. “The development of suitable products

Space Weather impacts many aspects of aviation and will become mandatory in flight plans.

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in each of these areas are at an advanced stage and will lead to an information service required for the mitigation of these impacts, which in turn will assist with the reduction in the economic impact to the sector,” says McKinnell.

will require space weather to become a mandatory component for flight plans.

These upgrades, currently under construction, will include a space weather monitoring room with big screens displaying real-time data with an additional 24/7 functionality and a 100-seater auditorium for conducting training, public participation and awareness sessions on space weather, and additional offices for students and accommodation for visiting researchers.

• Real-time forecasting and monitoring of space weather to reduce and mitigate the risk of • the impact of space weather on technology, critical infrastructure and human activities. • Provide tailored information and data for space weatherrelated requirements, such as High Frequency propagation forecasts, to clients. • High Frequency Communications prediction software (IOCAP) • Facilitate communication and service co-ordination regarding space weather, particularly • during periods of enhanced solar activity and in the event of extreme space weather activity. • Promote understanding of space weather and its effects among users, researchers, the • media and the general public. • Tailor-made training solutions in HF radio systems, Geophysical exploration and satellite, spacecraft and airline operations.

Watch: This is how the new Space Weather Centre will look What is the impact of space weather on Aviation?

SANSA provides the following space weather services:

space weather will become a mandatory component for flight plans

Space weather refers to the effect of the sun on the earth and is caused by four main components: solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), high speed solar wind and solar energetic particles. When these components interact with the earth’s magnetic field, they can cause disruptions to our technologies. Communications and navigation disruptions and increased radiation exposure due to space weather events pose a serious risk to the aviation industry and this is why ICAO

SANSA is building a new Space Weather Centre in Hermanus.

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The current Space Weather Centre.

SANSA’s magnetic expertise The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) is recognised as the national expert in magnetic technology applications. It provides quality-controlled services to clients in the defence, aviation and aerospace industry. These services contribute significantly to the work of private aviation companies, national airports, the South African Navy (SAN) and South African Air Force (SAAF), and thus to the safety and security of all South Africans. With more than 80 years of magnetic operations under its belt, SANSA’s Hermanus facility offers state-of-theart equipment and services and operates a magnetically clean facility that enables them to perfectly calibrate landing compasses. SANSA products and services • Landing compasses, which are used to calibrate aircraft compasses, also need regular calibration. SANSA offers not only calibration of landing compasses, but also performs general maintenance on these compasses.

38 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

• SANSA hosts regular courses for the SAAF and the private aviation sector on how to execute a compass swing procedure, including background on space weather, geomagnetism and Fourier analysis (the mathematics behind the procedure). This procedure, which calibrates the aircraft compass, needs to be done in a magnetically clean environment, and SANSA assists clients in surveying an appropriate magnetically clean site on their own premises. • SANSA also offers the calibration of magnetometers or electronic compasses used for navigation and orientation in drones, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and satellites. • SANSA has designed and built a magnetic test bench used to test an aircraft standby compass before it is installed into an aircraft, thus ensuring that an aircraft is equipped with a working compass before executing an expensive compass swing procedure. • A high-resolution local geomagnetic field is modelled across southern Africa using SANSA observatory and repeat survey data. The output of this model is used for navigational purposes by SANSA clients. 


South African National Space Agency Protecting Africa's Infrastructure The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) offers ICAO and SACAA compliant products and services to the aviation sector in the fields of space weather and magnetic technology. Learn more about this and other exciting thematic space programmes at SANSA: www.sansa.org.za

An entity of the Department of Science and Innovation

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

39


NEWS

NIGERIA TO RESTART NATIONAL AIRLINE The BBC reports that Nigeria will launch a new flag carrier before April 2022. Nigeria’s Minister of Aviation, Hadi Sirika, says a strategic partner will own a 49% stake in the airline. A further 46% will be owned by local companies, and the government would not hold more than 5%. With echoes of the South African government’s search for a strategic equity partner for SAA, Sirika announced that the search for a strategic partner for the new airline is about to commence. It could be either a foreign airline or a financial institution, and the required capital is between $150 million and $300 million.

Nigeria last had a flag carrying national airline in 2003, when Nigeria Airways closed after 45 years of mostly loss-making operations. In 2005, Virgin Atlantic set up Virgin Nigeria as a joint venture with the Nigerian government. However, in an acrimonious split, in 2008 Virgin sold its stake in the airline and the carrier was rebranded Air Nigeria, only to cease operations in 2012, following safety troubles, groundings and an accumulation of debt. The most recent attempt to restart the airline was in 2018, but this ended when it was unable to find suitable investors. 

Air Nigeria closed in 2012 when Richard Branson pulled out of a joint venture.

40 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


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FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

41


NEW AIRCRAFT

DENALI

- FIRST FLIGHT B

EECHCRAFT’S NEW single-engine turboprop, the Denali, completed its first flight on 23 November.

During the flight, the team tested the aircraft’s performance, stability and control and its propulsion, environmental, flight controls and avionics systems. The aircraft reached an altitude of 15,600 ft. and speeds of 180 kt. The Denali is not just an all new airframe, it also has a hugely important all new engine. Powered by the clean-sheet GE Aviation Catalyst 1,300 shp-rated engine this Pratt & Whitney PT6 challenger features a dual-channel FADEC and propeller control and is claimed to use 20% less fuel than older turboprop engines, GE says. The Denali is expected to have a maximum cruise speed of 285 kt., have a full fuel payload of 1,100 lb.,

a four-passenger range with one pilot of 1,600 nm and a maximum cruising altitude of 31,000 ft. The aircraft is equipped with McCauley’s all-new 105-in.-dia. composite, five-blade propeller, Garmin 3000 avionics and an integrated Garmin autothrottle. It can be equipped for six passengers with individual reclining seats or for nine with a high-density seating option. The 2h 50m flight by the Denali prototype took it to a test site over Cheney Lake west of Wichita, accompanied by a Cessna Citation chase aircraft. The flight departed at about 8:20 a.m. piloted by Peter Gracey, senior test pilot, and Dustin Smisor, chief test pilot. Gracey said; “It’s just a great aircraft to fly. The Catalyst engine was outstanding, and the aircraft performed to the levels we were anticipating. First flights can’t go more smoothly than this.”

After a reportedly faultless first flight of over two hours, the Denali approaches to land back at Wichita.

42 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


The Catalyst-powered Denali has now flown with the new engine in the Denali airframe.

“Today’s landmark flight is not only a significant occasion for the Denali, it’s a truly great moment for our employees, our suppliers and the customers who will be flying this aircraft,” says Ron Draper, Textron Aviation president and CEO. “With its more environmentally friendly engine and largest cabin in its class, this is an aircraft that will change the landscape for high-performance, single-engine aircraft. Today’s flight is just the beginning for what we anticipate will be a long list of important accomplishments as we prepare the aircraft for certification and customer deliveries.”

The prototype aircraft, plus two additional flight test aircraft and three full airframe ground test articles will be used to test systems, engine, avionics and overall performance. Textron and GE announced the aircraft and engine in 2015. Flight testing began in 2018 with certification in 2019, but delays in the engine’s testing programme moved back the schedule.

✗ ✗ ✗ ✗

Britz

Rudi

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083 422 9882

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Belinda

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079 636 9860

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031 904 7460

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Philip

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✗ ✗

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Kenneth

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✗ ✗

Marais

Eugene

Mossel Bay

044 693 1470

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✗ ✗

Opperman

Chris

Pretoria Lynnwood

012 368 8800

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✗ ✗ ✗

Tenzer

Stan

Rand Airport & JHB CBD

083 679 0777

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✗ ✗ ✗

Toerien

Hendrik

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013 751 3848

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✗ ✗ ✗

Van Der Merwe

Johann

Stellenbosch

021 887 0305

johann.vdmerwe@medicross.co.za

Van Niekerk

Willem

Benoni

011 421 9771

http://willemvanniekerk.co.za

Other countries

E-MAIL

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FIRST NAME

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Senior Class 1, 2, 3, 4

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With this important and long awaited milestone, Textron has announced that certification is planned for 2023. 

✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗

✗ ✗

✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗ ✗

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

43


NEWS

BOEING 787

QUALITY CONTROL PROBLEMS CONTINUE The Seattle Times reports that Boeing has admitted to the FAA that some of its Boeing 787 composite components have been contaminated with Teflon and they may not be as strong as they were intended to be. This is the latest in a long list of manufacturing defects being investigated by the FAA. There is reportedly no immediate safety risk for the in-service fleet but the composite issue will possibly delay the resumption of production of the 787.

specs but recently the company has found bonds that are weaker than designed. The Teflon contamination has been found in parts made by at least two of the contractors making big pieces of the aircraft like wings, fuselage and tail.

“We are looking at the undelivered airplanes nose to tail and we have found areas where the manufacturing does not conform to the engineering specifications,” a Boeing spokesperson told the Seattle Times. “None of these issues is an immediate safety-of-flight issue.”

The most serious threat is with the fittings that connect the floor beam to the fuselage frame where the wings are attached. The Times is also reporting that the memo contains more information on the improper shimming of gaps between parts caused by waves in the composite material. The memo says more gaps have been found in passenger and cargo doors in the aft fuselage. Again, there is no immediate safety issue, but the gaps could reduce the service life of the airframes because they can lead to the fasteners that hold the skin on pulling out. That condition could affect as many as 1,000 aircraft. The memo also reportedly says the faulty titanium fasteners identified earlier may be in as many as 450 aircraft and there is a potential safety issue if two of the non-spec fasteners are next to each other. 

The contamination occurred during the bonding process on many of the large components of the aircraft. Plastic bags are used to create a vacuum that holds the composite material in position in a mould. The part is formed under heat and pressure in a giant autoclave. The bags and the material used to allow release of the bags contained Teflon and it left a residue on the composite. That residue can weaken the bond when parts are joined together using adhesives. Initially, Boeing tests showed the bonds to be within

Boeing is still having quality control issues with the 787.

44 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22


NEWS

BOEING KQ

LAUNCH INNOVATION HUB Boeing has announced a partnership with Kenya Airways to support its recently launched, Fahari Innovation Hub. The announcement was made at the Dubai Airshow 2021, with Kuljit Ghata-Aura, president of Boeing Middle East, Turkey and Africa and Allan Kilavuka, Group Managing Director and CEO of Kenya Airways, in attendance.

networking, research and learning. It aims to stimulate innovation by providing expertise, resources, services, mediation and support to other business functions and partner organisations.” “The industry has been through a tough two years, but it is resilient and promises to become even more competitive and complex. We have the opportunity to enable new entrants that think outside of our norm and consider new approaches to our business,” said Kuljit Ghata-Aura, president of Boeing Middle East, Turkey and Africa.

Launched in July 2021, the Kenya Airways’ Fahari Innovation Hub is a platform that brings together entrepreneurs and innovators to help accelerate the development of the aviation industry and tackle some of its current and future challenges. “We are very proud of our partnership with Kenya Airways to support their new start-up hub. We share a common objective to discover and empower new talent that will accelerate the growth of our industry.”

Group CEO and MD, Kenya Airways, Allan Kilavuka stated: “While the pandemic came with extreme challenges for the aviation industry, it also brought along opportunities for reflection initiatives, one of them being the Fahari Innovation Hub. This not only enabled the presentation of new world class ideas that became part of the solutions to the challenges we faced but also brought together partners with whom we have worked together across the value chain in a bid to revive operations.” 

The Fahari Innovation Hub is “an autonomous and agile business unit, created within Kenya Airways. Boeing will support the hub through equipping the centre with software, hardware, furnishing, and other essential requirements. Focused on being an epicentre for strategic innovation management, the centre will offer opportunities for co-creation, collaboration,

Boeing is backing Kenya Airways Innovation Hub.

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

45


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FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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NIGERIA - MURTALA MUHAMMED INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ExecuJet Aviation Nigeria Ltd

+2341 295 5110

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JOHANNESBURG F Gomes Upholsters

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Comporob CC

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086 502 3689

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M&N Acoustics Services Pty (Ltd)

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086 211 469

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• Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines; •Overhaul Engine; Components; •Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport , Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 • Tel: (012) 543 0948/51 • Fax: (012) 543 9447 • email: aeroeng@iafrica.com AMO No: 227

FLIGHT SAFETY THROUGH MAINTENANCE

FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

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BACKPAGE DIR DIRECT ECTORY ORY A1A Flight Examiner (Loutzavia) Jannie Loutzis 012 567 6775 / 082 416 4069 jannie@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za

Algoa Flying Club Sharon Mugridge 041 581 3274 info@algoafc.co.za www.algoafc.co.za

Adventure Air Lande Milne 012 543 3196 / Cell: 066 4727 848 l.milne@venture-sa.co.za www.ventureglobal.biz AES (Cape Town) Erwin Erasmus 082 494 3722 erwin@aeroelectrical.co.za www.aeroelectrical.co.za

Alpha One Aviation Opelo 082 301 9977 on@alphaoneaviation.co.za www.alphaoneaviation.co.za Alpi Aviation SA Dale De Klerk 082 556 3592 dale@alpiaviation.co.za www.alpiaviation.co.za

AES (Johannesburg) Danie van Wyk 011 701 3200 office@aeroelectrical.co.za www.aeroelectrical.co.za

Apco (Ptyd) Ltd Tony/Henk + 27 12 543 0775 apcosupport@mweb.co.za www.apcosa.co.za

Aerocore Jacques Podde 082 565 2330 jacques@aerocore.co.za www.aerocore.co.za Aero Engineering & PowerPlant Andre Labuschagne 012 543 0948 aeroeng@iafrica.com Aero Services (Pty) Ltd Chris Scott 011 395 3587 chris@aeroservices.co.za www.aeroservices.co.za Aeronav Academy Donald O’Connor 011 701 3862 info@aeronav.co.za www.aeronav.co.za

Aref Avionics Hannes Roodt 082 462 2724 arefavionics@border.co.za

Aeronautical Aviation Clinton Carroll 011 659 1033 / 083 459 6279 clinton@aeronautical.co.za www.aeronautical.co.za Aerotric (Pty) Ltd Richard Small 083 488 4535 aerotric@aol.com Aircraft Assembly and Upholstery Centre Tony/Siggi Bailes 082 552 6467 anthony@rvaircraft.co.za www.rvaircraft.co.za Aircraft Finance Corporation & Leasing Jaco Pietersen +27 [0]82 672 2262 jaco@airfincorp.co.za Jason Seymour +27 [0]82 326 0147 jason@airfincorp.co.za www.airfincorp.co.za Aircraft General Spares Eric or Hayley 084 587 6414 or 067 154 2147 eric@acgs.co.za or hayley@acgs.co.za www.acgs.co.za Aircraft Maintenance @ Work Opelo / Frik 012 567 3443 frik@aviationatwork.co.za_ opelonke@aviationatwork.co.za Aircraft Maintenance International Pine Pienaar 083 305 0605 gm@aminternational.co.za Aircraft Maintenance International Wonderboom Thomas Nel 082 444 7996 admin@aminternational.co.za Air Line Pilots’ Association Sonia Ferreira 011 394 5310 alpagm@iafrica.com www.alpa.co.za Airshift Aircraft Sales Eugene du Plessis 082 800 3094 eugene@airshift.co.za www.airshift.co.za Airvan Africa Patrick Hanly 082 565 8864 airvan@border.co.za www.airvan.co.za

Atlas Aviation Lubricants Steve Cloete 011 917 4220 Fax: 011 917 2100 Sales.aviation@atlasoil.co.za www.atlasoil.africa

Chem-Line Aviation & Celeste Products Steve Harris 011 452 2456 sales@chemline.co.za www.chemline.co.za

Fly Jetstream Aviation Henk Kraaij 083 279 7853 charter@flyjetstream.co.za www.flyjetstream.co.za

Comporob Composite Repair & Manufacture Felix Robertson 072 940 4447 083 265 3602 comporob@lantic.net www.comporob.co.za

Flying Frontiers Craig Lang 082 459 0760 CraigL@fairfield.co.za www.flyingfrontiers.com

Corporate-Aviators/Affordable Jet Sales Mike Helm 082 442 6239 corporate-aviators@iafrica.com www.corporate-aviators.com C. W. Price & Co Kelvin L. Price 011 805 4720 cwp@cwprice.co.za www.cwprice.co.za Dart Aeronautical Jaco Kelly 011 827 8204 dartaero@mweb.co.za

Dart Aircraft Electrical Mathew Joubert 011 827 0371 Dartaircraftelectrical@gmail.com www.dartaero.co.za ATNS DJA Aviation Insurance Percy Morokane 011 463 5550 011 607 1234 0800Flying percymo@atns.co.za mail@dja-aviation.co.za www.atns.com www.dja-aviation.co.za Aviation Direct Dynamic Propellers Andrea Antel Andries Visser 011 465 2669 011 824 5057 info@aviationdirect.co.za 082 445 4496 www.aviationdirect.co.za andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za www.dynamicpropellers.co.za BAC Aviation AMO 115 Micky Joss Eagle Aviation Helicopter Division 035 797 3610 Tamryn van Staden monicad@bacmaintenance.co.za 082 657 6414 tamryn@eaglehelicopter.co.za Blackhawk Africa www.eaglehelicopter.co.za Cisca de Lange 083 514 8532 Eagle Flight Academy cisca@blackhawk.aero Mr D. J. Lubbe www.blackhawk.aero 082 557 6429 training@eagleflight.co.za Blue Chip Flight School www.eagleflight.co.za Henk Kraaij 012 543 3050 Elite Aviation Academy bluechip@bluechip-avia.co.za Jacques Podde www.bluechipflightschool.co.za 082 565 2330 info@eliteaa.co.za Border Aviation Club & Flight School www.eliteaa.co.za Liz Gous 043 736 6181 Enstrom/MD Helicopters admin@borderaviation.co.za Andrew Widdall www.borderaviation.co.za 011 397 6260 aerosa@safomar.co.za Breytech Aviation cc www.safomar.co.za 012 567 3139 Willie Breytenbach Era Flug Flight Training admin@breytech.co.za Pierre Le Riche Bundu Aviation 021 934 7431 info@era-flug.com Phillip Cronje www.era-flug.com 083 485 2427 info@bunduaviation.co.za Execujet Africa www.bunduaviation.co.za 011 516 2300 enquiries@execujet.co.za Celeste Sani Pak & Inflight Products www.execujet.com Steve Harris 011 452 2456 Federal Air admin@chemline.co.za Rachel Muir www.chemline.co.za 011 395 9000 shuttle@fedair.com Cape Aircraft Interiors www.fedair.com Sarel Schutte 021 934 9499 Ferry Flights int.inc. michael@wcaeromarine.co.za Michael (Mick) Schittenhelm www.zscai.co.za 082 442 6239 ferryflights@ferry-flights.com Cape Town Flying Club www.ferry-flights.com Beverley Combrink 021 934 0257 / 082 821 9013 Fireblade Aviation info@capetownflyingclub.co.za 010 595 3920 www.@capetownflyingclub.co.za info@firebladeaviation.com www.firebladeaviation.com Century Avionics cc Flight Training College Carin van Zyl Cornell Morton 011 701 3244 044 876 9055 sales@centuryavionics.co.za ftc@flighttrainning.co.za www.centuryavionics.co.za www.flighttraining.co.za Chemetall Flight Training Services Wayne Claassens Amanda Pearce 011 914 2500 011 805 9015/6 wayne.claassens@basf.com amanda@fts.co.za www.chemetall.com www.fts.co.za

50 FlightCom: December / January 2021/22

Flying Unlimited Flight School (Pty) Ltd Riaan Struwig 082 653 7504 / 086 770 8376 riaan@ppg.co.za www.ppg.co.za Foster Aero International Dudley Foster 011 659 2533 info@fosteraero.co.za www.fosteraero.co.za

Gemair Andries Venter 011 701 2653 / 082 905 5760 andries@gemair.co.za GIB Aviation Insurance Brokers Richard Turner 011 483 1212 aviation@gib.co.za www.gib.co.za

Guardian Air 011 701 3011 082 521 2394 ops@guardianair.co.za www.guardianair.co.za Heli-Afrique cc Tino Conceicao 083 458 2172 tino.conceicao@heli-afrique.co.za Henley Air Andre Coetzee 011 827 5503 andre@henleyair.co.za www.henleyair.co.za Hover Dynamics Phillip Cope 074 231 2964 info@hover.co.za www.hover.co.za Indigo Helicopters Gerhard Kleynhans 082 927 4031 / 086 528 4234 veroeschka@indigohelicopters.co.za www.indigohelicopters.co.za IndigoSat South Africa - Aircraft Tracking Gareth Willers 08600 22 121 sales@indigosat.co.za www.indigosat.co.za

Integrated Avionic Solutions Gert van Niekerk 082 831 5032 gert@iasafrica.co.za www.iasafrica.co.za International Flight Clearances Steve Wright 076 983 1089 (24 Hrs) flightops@flyifc.co.za www.flyifc.co.za Investment Aircraft Quinton Warne 082 806 5193 aviation@lantic.net www.investmentaircraft.com Jabiru Aircraft Len Alford 044 876 9991 / 044 876 9993 info@jabiru.co.za www.jabiru.co.za Jim Davis Books Jim Davis 072 188 6484 jim@border.co.za www.jimdavis.co.za Joc Air T/A The Propeller Shop Aiden O’Mahony 011 701 3114 jocprop@iafrica.com Kishugu Aviation +27 13 741 6400 comms@kishugu.com www.kishugu.com/kishugu-aviation


Kit Planes for Africa Stefan Coetzee 013 793 7013 info@saplanes.co.za www.saplanes.co.za

MS Aviation Gary Templeton 082 563 9639 gary.templeton@msaviation.co.za www.msaviation.co.za

Sky-Tech Heinz Van Staden 082 720 5210 sky-tech@telkomsa.net www.sky-tech.za.com

North East Avionics Keith Robertson +27 13 741 2986 keith@northeastavionics.co.za deborah@northeastavionics.co.za www.northeastavionics.co.za Landing Eyes Orsmond Aviation Gavin Brown 058 303 5261 031 202 5703 info@orsmondaviation.co.za info@landingeyes.co.za www.orsmondaviation.co.za www.landingeyes.com Owenair (Pty) Ltd Lanseria Aircraft Interiors Clive Skinner Francois Denton 082 923 9580 011 659 1962 / 076 810 9751 clive.skinner@owenair.co.za francois@aircraftcompletions.co.za www.owenwair.co.za Lanseria International Airport Pacair Mike Christoph Wayne Bond 011 367 0300 033 386 6027 mikec@lanseria.co.za pacair@telkomsa.net www.lanseria.co.za Kzn Aviation (Pty) Ltd Melanie Jordaan 031 564 6215 mel@kznaviation.co.za www.kznaviation.co.za

Legend Sky 083 860 5225 / 086 600 7285 info@legendssky.co.za www.legendsky.co.za

PFERD-South Africa (Pty) Ltd Hannes Nortman 011 230 4000 hannes.nortman@pferd.co.za www.pferd.com

Litson & Associates (Pty) Ltd OGP, BARS, Resources Auditing & Aviation Training karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 21 8517187 www.litson.co.za

Pipistrel Kobus Nel 083 231 4296 kobus@pipistrelsa.co.za www.pipistrelsa.co.za

Litson & Associates Risk Management Services (Pty) Ltd. eSMS-S/eTENDER/ eREPORT/Advisory Services karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 8517187 www.litson.co.za Loutzavia Aircraft Sales Henry Miles 082 966 0911 henry@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia Flight Training Gerhardt Botha 012 567 6775 ops@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia-Pilots and Planes Maria Loutzis 012 567 6775 maria@loutzavia.co.za www.pilotsnplanes.co.za Loutzavia Rand Frans Pretorius 011 824 3804 rand@loutzavia.co.za www@loutzavia.co.za Lowveld Aero Club Pugs Steyn 013 741 3636 Flynow@lac.co.za Marshall Eagle Les Lebenon 011 958 1567 les@marshalleagle.co.za www.marshalleagle.co.za Maverick Air Charters Chad Clark 083 292 2270 Charters@maverickair.co.za www.maverickair.co.za MCC Aviation Pty Ltd Claude Oberholzer 011 701 2332 info@flymcc.co.za www.flymcc.co.za MH Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd Marc Pienaar 011 609 0123 / 082 940 5437 customerrelations@mhaviation.co.za www.mhaviation.co.za M and N Acoustic Services cc Martin de Beer 012 689 2007/8 calservice@mweb.co.za Metropolitan Aviation (Pty) Ltd Gert Mouton 082 458 3736 herenbus@gmail.com Money Aviation Angus Money 083 263 2934 angus@moneyaviation.co.za www.moneyaviation.co.za

Sling Aircraft Kim Bell-Cross 011 948 9898 sales@airplanefactory.co.za www.airplanefactory.co.za Solenta Aviation (Pty Ltd) Paul Hurst 011 707 4000 info@solenta.com www.solenta.com Southern Energy Company (Pty) Ltd Elke Bertram +264 8114 29958 johnnym@sec.com.na www.sec.com.na Southern Rotorcraft cc Mr Reg Denysschen Tel no: 0219350980 sasales@rotors-r-us.com www.rotors-r-us.com

Plane Maintenance Facility Johan 083 300 3619 pmf@myconnection.co.za Precision Aviation Services Marnix Hulleman 012 543 0371 marnix@pasaviation.co.za www.pasaviation.co.za PSG Aviation Reon Wiese 0861 284 284 reon.wiese@psg.co.za www.psg aviation.co.za Rainbow SkyReach (Pty) Ltd Mike Gill 011 817 2298 Mike@fly-skyreach.com www.fly-skyreach.com Rand Airport Stuart Coetzee 011 827 8884 stuart@randairport.co.za www.randairport.co.za Robin Coss Aviation Robin Coss 021 934 7498 info@cossaviation.com www.cossaviation.co.za

Villa San Giovanni Luca Maiorana 012 111 8888 info@vsg.co.za www.vsg.co.za

Starlite Aero Sales Klara Fouché +27 83 324 8530 / +27 31 571 6600 klaraf@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Vortx Aviation Bredell Roux 072 480 0359 info@vortx.co.za www.vortxaviation.com

Starlite Aviation Operations Trisha Andhee +27 82 660 3018/ +27 31 571 6600 trishaa@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Wanafly Adrian Barry 082 493 9101 adrian@wanafly.net www.wanafly.co.za

Starlite Aviation Training Academy Durban: +27 31 571 6600 Mossel Bay: +27 44 692 0006 train@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Windhoek Flight Training Centre Thinus Dreyer 0026 40 811284 180 pilots@flywftc.com www.flywftc.com

Status Aviation (Pty) Ltd Richard Donian 074 587 5978 / 086 673 5266 info@statusaviation.co.za www.statusaviation.co.za

Wings n Things Wendy Thatcher 011 701 3209 wendy@wingsnthings.co.za www.wingsnthings.co.za

Superior Pilot Services Liana Jansen van Rensburg 0118050605/2247 info@superiorair.co.za www.superiorair.co.za

Witbank Flight School Andre De Villiers 083 604 1718 andredv@lantic.net www.waaflyingclub.co.za

Titan Helicopter Group 044 878 0453 info@titanhelicopters.com www.titanhelicopters.com TPSC Dennis Byrne 011 701 3210 turboprop@wol.co.za

SABRE Aircraft Richard Stubbs 083 655 0355 richardstubbs@mweb.co.za www.aircraftafrica.co.za

Velocity Aviation Collin Pearson 011 659 2306 / 011 659 2334 collin@velocityaviation.co.za www.velocityaviation.co.za

Sport Plane Builders Pierre Van Der Walt 083 361 3181 pmvdwalt@mweb.co.za

The Copter Shop Bill Olmsted 082 454 8555 execheli@iafrica.com www.execheli.wixsite.com/the-coptershop-sa

SAA Technical (SOC) Ltd SAAT Marketing 011 978 9993 satmarketing@flysaa.com www.flysaa.com/technical

Unique Air Charter Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Unique Flight Academy Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Van Zyl Aviation Services Colette van Zyl 012 997 6714 admin@vanzylaviationco.za www.vanzylaviation.co.za Vector Aerospace Jeff Poirier +902 888 1808 jeff.poirier@vectoraerospace.com www.vectoraerospace.com

Wonderboom Airport Peet van Rensburg 012 567 1188/9 peet@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za Zandspruit Bush & Aero Estate Martin Den Dunnen 082 449 8895 martin@zandspruit.co.za www.zandspruit.co.za Zebula Golf Estate & SPA Reservations 014 734 7700 reception@zebula.co.za www.zebula.co.za

Trio Helicopters & Aviation cc CR Botha or FJ Grobbelaar 011 659 1022

stoffel@trioavi.co.za/frans@trioavi.co.za

SA Mooney Patrick Hanly 082 565 8864 samooney@border.co.za www.samooney.co.za

www.trioavi.co.za Tshukudu Trailers Pieter Visser 083 512 2342 deb@tshukudutrailers.co.za www.tshukudutrailers.co.za

Savannah Helicopters De Jager 082 444 1138 / 044 873 3288 dejager@savannahhelicopters.co.za www.savannahhelicopters.co.za

U Fly Training Academy Nikola Puhaca 011 824 0680 ufly@telkomsa.net www.uflyacademy.co.za United Charter cc Jonathan Wolpe 083 270 8886 jonathan.wolpe@unitedcharter.co.za www.unitedcharter.co.za

Scenic Air Christa van Wyk +264 612 492 68 windhoek@scenic-air.com www.scenic-air.com Sheltam Aviation Durban Susan Ryan 083 505 4882 susanryan@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com

United Flight Support Clinton Moodley/Jonathan Wolpe 076 813 7754 / 011 788 0813 ops@unitedflightsupported.com www.unitedflightsupport.com

Sheltam Aviation PE Brendan Booker 082 497 6565 brendanb@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com

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