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AGRIBUSINESS

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Beef upheavel ‘won’t benefit NZ’. PAGE 16

NZ waits after European release of new tractor range.

PAGE 27

MANAGEMENT Thinking 100 years ahead. PAGE 23-24

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS SEPTEMBER 21, 2021: ISSUE 735 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Meat heads! PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE MEAT Industry Association (MIA) says it’s facing bureaucratic barriers from Immigration NZ as it tries to get sufficient halal butchers for the coming season. In its just released annual report, the MIA says there simply aren’t enough Muslim butchers in the regions where the meat processing plants are based to do the job. Therefore migrant labour is essential. It adds that when the current visas for overseas halal butchers in NZ run out, the industry will face a crunch point. The MIA wants the Government to create a special work visa for halal butchers but has yet to get a response to this request. Chief executive Sirma Karapeeva says they have a small window of opportunity to sort this out and a final solution has still to be crafted. “For meat processors this would be one of the top issues,” Karapeeva told Rural News. “It’s about getting the labour settings right and having enough people to process products and value-add.” She says this is closely followed by having enough stock to process. “This, of course, links up to the cli-

mate change and environmental issues that our farmer colleagues are working through at the moment.” Karapeeva says climate change is huge for the red meat sector because there is still a lot of work to be done and there are some very big issues that need to be resolved. “This is around the pricing of emissions and what would work in a way that incentivises the reduction of emissions, while not undermining the profitability and productivity of farms.” Karapeeva says dealing with this requires some complex thinking and work. She adds that consultation processes currently being undertaken in the environmental space are “really intense and disjointed”. Karapeeva doesn’t believe the processes have really been thought through and says unless you’re intimately involved it can be very confusing. “I get the sense the different groups and organisations involved in these changes are pushing their own agenda,” she says. “They are consulting with the same people but not necessarily understanding the connectivity between the various pieces of policy that are being proposed and how the package will impact on the farming community.”

HELPING OUT! Jack (left), Tom and Lachie (background) Strachan helping out with tailing at their uncle Miles Anderson’s South Canterbury farm earlier this month. The Strachan boys, aged 11, 7 and 9, live in Timaru but regularly visit the farm and like to lend a hand when they can. With lambing and tailing happening around many parts of the country, scenes like this will be regular sights over the next month or so.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

NEWS 3 ISSUE 735

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Less drama expected at this year’s Fonterra election SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS��������������������������������������1-12 MARKETS���������������������������14-15 AGRIBUSINESS���������������������� 16 HOUND, EDNA����������������������� 18 CONTACTS������������������������������ 18 OPINION����������������������������� 18-21 MANAGEMENT���������������23-24 ANIMAL HEALTH����������� 25-26 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS�����������������������27-29 RURAL TRADER�������������� 30-31

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: Inkwise NZ Ltd CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz

NOMINATIONS ARE open for Fonterra’s board election but a repeat of the drama that rocked the vote three years ago can be ruled out. Two sitting directors – Leonie Guiney and John Nicholls – who were at the centre of the polling debacle, are up for re-election this year. Guiney and Nicholls both confirmed to Rural News that they will be taking part in the candidate assessment panel (CAP) process, where candidates are assessed and recommended in a shortlist to Fonterra’s board. “Yes I will and am happy to,” says Guiney, a South Canterbury farmer. “The election process has been changed back to how it was prior to the year I was removed. “That means only shareholders can remove incumbents.” Guiney, who is serving her second stint as a director, was blocked in 2017 from standing for re-election after failing to get the CAP’s recommendation. Changes to Fonterra’s governance and representation prevented an unsuccessful CAP process candidate from standing as a farmer-nominated candidate. Changes to voting also included farmers casting ‘yes’ or ‘no’ against each candidate. A candidate needed 50% or more yes votes to win a board seat. After biding her time for one year, Guiney stood again for the board in 2018, this time as a farmer-nominated

Leonie Guiney says she will be taking part in the candidate assessment panel (CAP) process this time.

candidate, alongside Nicholls. They were up against three candidates endorsed by the panel and Fonterra’s board: current chairman Peter McBride, Maori agribusiness leader Jamie Tuuta and former board member Ashley Waugh. However, farmers brushed aside the board’s recommendation, rejecting two of their

candidates. Only Guiney and McBride got over 50% of yes votes. For the first time in Fonterra’s history, a second director election was held in early 2019, where Nicholls beat Tuuta. Waugh decided not to stand. In July 2019, after consulting farmer shareholders, Fonterra Co-operative

Council, then known as Shareholders Council, made changes to the election rules. Changes include removing the Fonterra board’s power to decide which incumbent directors can stand again. Also gone was the 50% threshold required for successful candidates in contested elections. The changes also removed the need to hold a second election, with the board given the powers to appoint a farmer director to fill the vacancy until the end of the next annual meeting. This year McBride, Guiney and Nicholls retire by rotation after serving three years. All three have confirmed that they will be standing for re-election. Candidates can nominate in two ways. Nominations through the independent assessment process ended last Friday. These candidates will be assessed by the panel – made up of My Food Bag chair Tony Carter, Warehouse chair Joan Withers and SkyCity chair Rob Campbell. The independent assessment process candidates will be announced on October 18. This will be followed by the nonassessment process, where farmers can put themselves forward as a candidate, and this will run from October 18 to 28. The final list of candidates will be announced on October 29 by the Returning Officer. Successful candidates will start their directorships at Fonterra’s annual general meeting later this year.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

4 NEWS

Another new milk plant planned for the Waikato MILK PRICE GUARANTEE

SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

SINGAPORE-BASED OLAM Food Ingredients says its proposed milk plant in South Waikato is the first phase of an ambitious development plan. The first stage of the greenfield project on an 11ha site in Tokoroa involves construction of a spray dryer facility. Additional facilities will be added over time. OFI Dairy senior vice president Naval Sabri told Rural News the new plant will initially make wholemilk powders, with a focus on high-spec, customised powders for its global customers. “Over time we will expand the range of dairy ingredients we make at the site,” he says. “Our customers use our products in bakery, confectionary, desserts and beverages so they need high quality ingredients such as powders, creams and yoghurt.” Sabri could not say how much milk would be processed in the first season, scheduled to start after mid-2023. “It’s very early days for us. Our first priority

OFI general manager Paul Johnson and operations director Paul Rennie at the company’s new plant site at Tokoroa.

is talking to farmers and listening to what they need, and then shaping our milk supply offer to suit those needs,” he told Rural News. “We don’t have an exact number of farmer suppliers in mind, but we are taking a long-term approach to growing milk supply as this is just the first phase of our development plans.”

The Singapore-based conglomerate is no stranger to the NZ dairy industry. Until recently it held a cornerstone stake in NZ’s second largest milk processor, Open Country Dairy. It is also a major buyer of dairy products from Fonterra and other processors. Sabri says OFI will

continue its wider commercial relationships in NZ. “We see the new plant as complementary to the ingredients we source from other suppliers, and a way for us to deliver more customised solutions to our customers. “New Zealand dairy is very well regarded on the world stage and we look forward to continuing

to support that with our development.” OFI ranks among the top three dairy suppliers in the world. The Tokoroa plant will become part a global network that spans 20 major milk consumption markets, such as South-East Asia, China, the Middle East, and Africa. OFI operations director Paul Rennie says the

FARMERS SUPPLYING milk to Olam Food Ingredients’ (OFI) proposed Tokoroa plant will enjoy a minimum guaranteed milk price and competitive advance rates. General manager milk supply Paul Johnson told Rural News the Singaporean-based company has been talking to farmers in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty catchments and to rural professionals. Johnson, who joined the company from Fonterra in June, says these discussions would shape up their milk supply pricing structure. “The feedback we are getting is that farmers want confidence and certainty around milk pricing and good cash flow,” he claims. “On our part, we are looking at offering a minimum guaranteed milk price and competitive advance rates and we believe this will give farmers confidence and certainty and help with cash flow.” Johnson says the company’s priority is to develop a supply offer that works for farmers on every level. He says OFI is a strong local player, backed by a significant global business. “We are taking a long-term view with milk supply partnerships. This means taking the time to understand what will make a genuine difference to our milk supply partners and then shaping our offer accordingly.” OFI will be sourcing milk from around Waikato and Bay of Plenty – regions with about 1500 farmer suppliers. Johnson says the company would only need a small number of farmer suppliers for the first season.

new factory is expected to create 50 to 60 full time jobs in Tokoroa when fully operational, with more jobs anticipated in future stages of the development. “We are looking forward to joining the

Tokoroa community and sharing our strong focus on operating sustainably,” he says. “It will complement the work we will do throughout the supply chain and the work that farmers are doing on their farms.”

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

NEWS 5

Winds a major blow NIGEL MALTHUS

FARMERS WITH irrigators blown over and damaged in a pair of back-to-back windstorms may not get them working again this side of Christmas, according to Mid-Canterbury Federated Farmers president David Clark. Two fierce storms moved up the country, passing through Canterbury overnight on September 9 and 10, with the second less than three days later on the Sunday. While MetService issued a Red Alert warning for the second, Clark told Rural News the first should also have been a Red Alert. “In some respects, Thursday night/Friday morning was worse than Sunday, depending on which locality you’re in. They certainly missed forecasting the Thursday night wind.” Clark says the biggest trouble for affected farmers is the lack of parts and the “pitifully slow shipping service” to New Zealand to repair the damaged irrigators. “So, people that have got damaged irrigators may not see them going again for Christmas.” Even some irrigators that were tied down and aligned with the expected wind were blown over,

A Rainer Irrigation crew led by foreman Wame Ramalasou, left, works on an upturned pivot near Staveley in Mid-Canterbury. Their first task was to lift a section off a track to give the farmer full use of the farm again, before lifting it all back onto its wheels and assessing the full extent of the damage. NIGEL MALTHUS

Clark says. “There’s quite a few irrigators blown over in the Lyndhurst/Lauriston area, some north of the Rakaia River as well. “Then on Sunday afternoon there’s been a lot of damage around Mount Hutt and above Methven and along the Mid-Canterbury foothills.” However, irrigation equipment suppliers are

hoping that a bit of number-eight wire attitude will get the machines up and running. Rainer Irrigation chief executive Lucas Cawte said the two storms were the biggest to hit Canterbury since a very big event in 2013. He says from talking with his connections, there could be more than 200 irrigators affected. Both pivots or rotorainers

and ranging from some with only minor damage to complete write-offs. “I can’t speak for other irrigation companies,” Cawte told Rural News. “But I know that we’ll have our guys up and going well before Christmas. We’ve had a decent amount of stock on hand.” Carrfields Irrigation general manager Brent Dawson said that even

in normal times, shipping from America took at least four weeks – but that was now rolling out to three and four months. “Global supply chains are certainly making quite a quite a big impact in terms of supply of products and we’ve got a lot of stuff on the water that’s got to get moved around, just like everybody.” He says it was a

N 190

matter of working with affected customers to see what could be done. “There’s opportunities to do something as a temporary fix until parts arrive,” Dawson says. The storms hit an area already badly affected by a Red Alert event earlier this year, the big rainstorm and flooding of late May. Scars of the flooding are still evident in the form of unrepaired

roads, now added to by debris from the winds, in the form of fallen tree branches and baleage plastic wrapped around fences. Clark says a number of hay sheds have been blown away. They were mostly empty at this time of year so it would have no major impact of feed supply but they would need to be replaced for next season. Meanwhile, Cate Hogan-Wright, who farms a little further south at Montalto, near the Rangitata Gorge, said the wind was “awful” but their farm did not sustain much damage. Tree branches at a neighbour’s came down over powerlines on Thursday, but the power was fixed by Friday evening. “Sunday’s wind wasn’t as bad, but the lightning and thunder were pretty spectacular,” she said. Clark adds that that “by and large” electricity supply stood up very well. “EA Networks [the Ashburton District’s power and fibre network operator] need to be congratulated for the resilience of the network,” he says. “There’s been a lot of investment made over the last 20 years in strengthening the network and it certainly has stood up well at the weekend. So, well done.”

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

6 NEWS

First RSE flights planned for October SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FRUIT GROWERS are hoping three planeloads of Pacific Island workers will touch down in Auckland early next month, under the revised Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme. New Zealand Apples and Pears chief executive Alan Pollard says work is underway to facilitate the flights that were delayed this month due to the Level 4 lockdown. Pollard told Rural News that a lot of planning goes into each flight. “There are a lot of details required – whether we organise chartered

flights or commercial flights, pre-departure testing regime and selfisolation arrangements,” he explains. “There is also the visa process and making sure contracts have been secured for the workers. “We are hopeful of getting the three delayed flights to Auckland early next month.” Earlier this month, the Government announced that the first stage of oneway quarantine-free travel with Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu will commence in October. It also issued new requirement for these workers: they must receive their first vac-

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NZ Apples and Pears chief executive Alan Pollard says there could be another 100,000 tonnes of fruit to harvest this year and the industry will need an extra 2,500 workers.

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seven days – pending a negative Day 5 result. Pollard says growers are comfortable with the new requirement. He says anyone in NZ, including RSE workers, get fully vaccinated if they wish to be, as part of the plan to keep everyone safe. He adds that self-isolation and Covid tests for RSE workers were part of the lockdown last year and won’t be an issue for the sector. Pollard says the sector is very happy with the Government decision to resume RSE arrivals. Normally, there would be 12,500 RSE workers in the country around this time. Due to Covid, this number is around 7,000 – with half of them scheduled to return home.

Pollard says the Government has agreed to a quota of 14,400 RSE workers and the sector hopes to ramp up numbers in the coming months. Apple growers need workers for thinning orchards in October and November, with summerfruit growers needing workers for harvesting in December and January. Apple growers will start harvesting in February. Pollard says last year weather events led to a 40% drop in the apple harvest. “If we have a full season this year, then there will be another 100,000 tonnes of fruit to harvest and we will need an extra 2,500 workers.” The sector also relies on backpackers, but

HORTICULTURE NEW Zealand says it welcomes the Government’s decision that quarantine-free travel for Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) workers from the Pacific will commence next month. HortNZ chief executive Nadine Tunley says the announcement is a relief for both the New Zealand horticulture industry as well as the Pasifika communities who have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic. “Confirmation that our RSE workforce can travel is a positive step that will give growers some confidence about labour for the coming season. It will go some way towards winter pruning being completed and the coming season’s harvest being picked.”  But Tunley notes that even with the increased movement of RSE workers from the Pacific, the horticulture industry will still be short of seasonal workers. “That’s why the whole industry is behind additional programmes to attract more New Zealanders to horticulture,” says Tunley.  “Our industry is grateful to the Government for this agreement. We will continue to work closely with the Government to ensure the safety of our workers, their whanau and the wider community.” 

Covid has stemmed their arrival in the country. Pollard estimates there are 5,000 backpackers in the country right now, compared to the usual 50,000. Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor says officials in New Zealand are working with partner Pacific countries and the industry on the final measures that need to be in place and exact dates of the October flights. “Substantial planning has been under way both in New Zealand’s horticulture and viticul-

ture sectors and in our partner countries for the arrival of these workers, with some incoming flights deferred in August and September because of New Zealand’s Alert Level 4 settings,” O’Connor says. “We will be closely monitoring this first stage of one-way quarantinefree travel. “Our intention remains to broaden eligibility for quarantine-free entry to New Zealand from these countries and Tokelau when we can be sure it is safe to do so.”

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LEAVING ON A JET PLANE – AGAIN! DAMIEN O’CONNOR is planning to head back to Europe again shortly to breathe oxygen into the free trade agreements that New Zealand is negotiating separately with the UK and the EU. This will be the Minister for Export Growth and Trade and Agriculture’s second trip to Europe this year. O’Connor’s visit will coincide with European politicians coming back from their summer break. He will visit key European Union capitals, as well as the headquarters of the EU in Brussels. There is also a rumour that he may stop off for talks in the United States. If so,

O’Connor would become the first NZ politician to meet with officials of the new Biden administration. There is also a suggestion that he will visit Ireland, where he has family connections. O’Connor’s Irish links may help in some way to gain a friend at court in Europe, now that the UK is no longer part of the EU. But there are no guarantees in the world of FTAs as a former trade minister and NZ High Commissioner to London, Sir Lockwood Smith, told Rural News several weeks ago. He described the EU as a totally different kettle of fish to Britain. Smith believes

the EU is struggling a bit on the whole issue of agricultural access and says the first offer to NZ was “risible”. O’Connor and the NZ negotiating team face challenges with the EU given that any FTA requires the approval of all 27 member states. On the slightly more positive side, he may be looking to finalise a FTA with the UK or at least get an agreement in principle for a FTA. After O’Connor’s first trip to Europe this year, there were talks that NZ and the UK would have an agreement in principle signed last month, but this hasn’t happened. – Peter Burke


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

NEWS 7

China demands, NZ delivers! “The Chinese are a net importer of food and it has to strike a balance about keeping Covid out and keeping its people safe.”

PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MEAT INDUSTRY Association chair John Loughlin says China is one of the most demanding export markets in the world. This is particularly so in the present Covid-19 environment and Loughlin says NZ companies need to be aware of the strict Chinese health requirements, or risk being excluded from that market. China is very concerned about the possibility of Covid coming into the country on imported products and he says there is a belief the virus can survive on packaging materials stored in cool environments. Loughlin says NZ meat companies have to be aware of China’s high import

MIA chair John Loughlin says China is one of the most demanding export markets in the world.

standards – especially in regard to Covid. “The Chinese are a net importer of food and it has to strike a balance

about keeping Covid out and keeping its people safe,” Loughlin told Rural News. “There is no indication that they will ban

individual countries from sending product to China because of Covid-related matters. But, at the same time, they have removed

access on a temporary basis for individual meat processing sites that have had problems.” He says, in extreme cases, if the Chinese have felt all is not right with a company, they have banned imports from that company. Suspensions can take a long time to reverse and in some cases a year. “Their approach is that they need to be satisfied on the controls at the individual processing plants and companies.” Loughlin says there are also instances when the bans have been lifted within a matter of days. The companies most

at risk are smaller, singlesite operations and Rural News is aware that no stone is left unturned by these companies to meet the strict Chinese standards, which can change depending on the Covid19 situation. Loughlin says China is particularly demanding and there is an expectation within the Chinese Party system and government that it will keep people safe, hence the very high standard of import requirements. “China came late to the world of global trade and didn’t have a set of import rules, so it looked around the

world and took the most demanding standards from each country and pulled those into a package,” he explains. “They took something from one country and another thing from another country and so on – so that’s why Chinese standards are so high.” Loughlin says in China there is a big expectation on government officials that imported goods will meet the higher standards and will keep their people safe. He says China and NZ have taken similar approaches to dealing with Covid by trying to stamp out the virus and that bodes well for us. Loughlin believes NZ is very capable of meeting the Chinese standards but warns companies can never relax their vigilance on this issue.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

8 NEWS

Access barrier for farmer mental health JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW initiative has been launched to improve access to counselling for farmers. However, the founder of the charity behind it says accessibility is one of the main barriers for farmers seeking mental health assistance. The Will to Live Charitable Trust’s ‘RuralChange’ initiative will see farmers jump the sometimes eight-week queue to access three free private counselling sessions. The initiative was launched in early September and Will to Live founder Elle Perriam told Rural News that they’d already had 15 farmers sign up. Perriam, who founded Will to Live after her boyfriend passed away in 2017, says the issue in

rural communities isn’t necessarily the waitlists for appointments but access to mental health services themselves. “I don’t think it’s the waitlists. It’s probably more the accessibility for them to get physically to see someone,” she says. Perriam adds that for many it is a long drive to physically visit a counsellor and media reports of long waitlists could be off-putting for some. The RuralChange initiative, she says, also seeks to find a counsellor for those who are signed up to the programme. “So, we’re not just handing out money and saying: ‘go find someone’. We’re also facilitating them, giving them a lift of local and accessible counsellors for them.” Recently, an ACCfunded study for mental health programme Farm-

Will to Live Charitable Trust founder, Elle Perriam with Tekapo farmer Harry Railton who has sought professional help for his depression.

strong found that 58% of recently injured farmers were able to link their accident to stress associated with farm work. Another 24% claimed aspects of diminished mental health were a major contributor to their injury. Factors that contributed to this diminished

mental health, according to the report, included having too much to do and not enough time, exhaustion, lack of sleep, challenges coping with the ups and downs of farming, and feeling in need of a break away from the farm. Virginia Burton-Konia, ACC’s head of workplace

safety, says she encourages all farmers to priorities their mental health and wellbeing. “Farmers spend their lives growing our food and milk and helping our economy, but they’re not great at looking after themselves,” BurtonKonia says. “It’s important for

farmers to take a moment to think about what they are about to do and think about what could go wrong to prevent injury.” According to Shaun Robinson, chief executive of the Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand, the public system for acquiring mental health help has been left in a ‘dire state’. “It’s beginning to head in the right direction,” he says. “It’s important to take charge of your wellbeing and seek out the mental health support that will exist in your community already.” One major issue for farmers and those in rural communities is the isolation felt by some. “Isolation is one factor that can impact on our mental wellbeing,” says Robinson. Gerard Vaughn, project manager at Farm-

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strong, also says that isolation can be a big problem for farmers. “People working in farming can spend a lot of time by themselves so it’s really important to get off farm and connect,” Vaughn says. Vaughn says that – along with programmes like Farmstrong – the 1737 text line and rural support trusts are available for those who are struggling with their mental health, but these should not be used as replacements for counselling or clinical services. Will to Live is working with Rural Support Trust facilitators across New Zealand to encourage the farmers they speak to, to use the funding. www.willtolivenz.com/ i-want-help

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

NEWS 9

T&G is developing 2D orchards as part of move to more automation.

Labour pains hurt grower SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

DESPITE STRUGGLING to find workers, fresh produce grower and trader T&G is still forging ahead with growth plans. The fruit and vege producer is developing 300 hectares of orchard in Hawke’s Bay and Nelson, which it claims it is part of its growth strategy. In August, T&G announced it was recruiting for 150 permanent positions across its apple operations. T&G global director operations, Craig Betty, says the creation of these new permanent roles demonstrates the company’s commitment to continuing to expand its apple volumes. He says this will help the business to meet global demand, provide career opportunities to existing talent within the business, as well as to people in the wider community. “Our apples business has an ambitious growth strategy in place to grow our premium Envy and JAZZ apple brands to meet worldwide demand,” Betty says. “To achieve this vision, it’s critical we have a talented, passionate and supported team who are empowered to be their best.” He adds that despite the company’s best efforts to recruit locally last year, the 2020/21 season was extremely challenging. “With limited availability of skilled people ready to work in the regions, combined with a reduced number of Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) arrivals.” Betty says the new roles will help deliver on future growth objectives, while also helping retain existing talent. The 150 new permanent roles were advertised internally amongst T&G’s

casual and contracted seasonal workforce, as well as externally. Those employed in the roles will move through harvest and post-harvest roles and will develop a thorough understanding of both operational and growing processes. This will include spending time developing T&G’s 2D orchards as part of the company’s pathway to automation. “Across our growing operations, we’re re-developing our orchards to 2D planting structures to support the efficient use of automation and robotics in the future,” Betty adds. “We’re committed to our roadmap to automation and continually optimising our supply chain to increase productivity.” However, the new roles don’t signal an end to the company’s labour woes. Betty says although these jobs will provide support at the peak of the apple season, T&G will still need to recruit thousands of people nationwide for the upcoming season. “Recruitment remains a critical focus for the upcoming 2021-22 season,” he explains. “This season our team did an incredible job hiring more than 950 New Zealanders to work alongside a reduced number of RSE team members.” However, Betty points out that at the peak of the season T&G was still short of around 300 people per day, which meant a significant amount of fruit was left on trees. “With these new positions, we expect our productivity to increase as we build our team’s skills and capabilities, however, we’ll still require additional seasonal team members to join us throughout the harvest.”

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

10 NEWS

Hang in there – it ‘wool’ get better DAVID ANDERSON

HANG IN there – don’t give up on wool! That’s the message to the country’s strong woolgrowers from Tom O’Sullivan – chair of the Campaign for Wool (CFW). The Campaign for Wool NZ (CFWNZ), an offshoot of the global movement to promote wool, was established in NZ in 2011. Its aim is to increase the value of wool through education and awareness programmes. CFWNZ has just launched a new short-term strategy, which O’Sullivan is confident will lift the fortunes of NZ’s struggling strong wool growers. He concedes that there is no silver bullet to wool’s current woes but says to deliver effective and sustainable growth requires immediate action. “Farmers have been grappling with the cost of shearing for years. In my own case, last year it cost me $30,000 – after selling the wool – to shear my sheep,” O’Sullivan says. “That’s a bloody expensive animal welfare cost.” He says that unless the economics of strong wool can be turned

NZ strong wool growers are sick of talk – they want “action, honesty and accountability.”

FULL TIME JOB TOM O’SULLIVAN is not only chairman of CFWNZ – which he took on in 2019 – he is also the organisation’s fulltime development officer. O’Sullivan sold his Hawkes Bay farm in late June, and while he is looking to buy another property, he recently renewed his contract with CFWNZ for another year. One of his key focuses over the next 12 months is to triple the organisation’s budget from the $500,000 raised in 2020. “CFWNZ’s funding effectively comes from farmers via a voluntary contribution of only 1 cent/kg at the point of testing,” he told Rural News. “However, not all suppliers are part of the scheme and they do have option to opt out of paying the CFW levy.” O’Sullivan estimates that around only

Campaign for Wool NZ chair Tom O’Sullivan says immediate action is needed to lift strong wool from its current woes.

around, more and more farmers will either move to shedding breeds like Wiltshires or exit the sheep sector completely – with more good farmland lost to forestry. “It won’t be one single thing that makes the difference,” O’Sullivan told Rural News. “It will be everything coming together to create a groundswell of demand.” However, he believes,

as the world moves towards more sustainable, environmentally friendly products, now is the best opportunity that strong wool has ever had. “The world is on the cusp of a massive environmental crusade for which wool can provide solutions,” O’Sullivan says. “The future is extremely bright if we walk the talk to promote and buy wool products,

which can help protect the environment.” He is adamant that to change the fortunes of NZ’s strong wool industry, a new transformational strategy for the future direction of the industry is needed. “Strategy must come before structure or tactical pieces of work,” O’Sullivan adds. “That’s why CFWNZ has been quietly working with

Auckland-based industry strategists Richards Partners to produce the framework for an overarching strategy.” He says the aim of

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40% of the current NZ strong wool clip makes the contribution to CFWNZ. He aims to get that up to 80%. “CFWNZ has a vital role to play in bringing all industry stakeholders together,” he says. “Being non-commercial allows us to speak with no vested interest in the industry. We are an impartial and industry-good voice – for benefit of all stakeholders.” O’Sullivan says NZ strong wool growers are sick of talk. “They want action, honesty and accountability,” he adds. “For now, we want growers to read and absorb our strategy and share it with others. We’d really love farmers to join us.” • See: https://nzwool.co.nz/campaignfor-wool-nz-releases-a-new-strategy-togrow-consumer-demand/

the new strategy is for CFWNZ to be the wool information conduit for both consumers and industry stakeholders. It takes a two-pronged attack – tackling both consumers and the industry – across four areas: • Communication and education • Digital advancement – to amplify its message • Insight development • Strengthen partnerships O’Sullivan says the two-pronged approach is important because growing consumer demand for woollen products is only one part of the solution. “We also need to

ensure we support and develop industry to drive value back through the supply chain to the grower,” he explains. “If there’s no industry, there’s no need to grow consumer demand.” O’Sullivan warns that if nothing changes, the strong wool sector doesn’t have a lot of time. “A fractured industry has always been an issue – infighting and lack of co-ordinated strategic direction,” he adds. “A transformational strategy is needed and the mandate from industry to support it. “Without it, nothing will change.”

Read us until the cows come home!

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

NEWS 11

New catchment award a ‘natural fit’ for BEFA JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

THE BALLANCE Farm Environment Awards has launched a new Catchment Group Award as part of its 2021 awards programme. The new award, which is supported by the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust and NZ Landcare Trust, is designed to commend catchment groups and the work they do across New Zealand. “It’s a natural fit between two not-forprofit organisations partnering to support farmers and celebrate the efforts of rural communities working together to drive environmental improvements,” James Ryan, general manager of the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust told Rural News. The award is open to catchment groups from all eleven regions in

which the awards operate. Ryan says that aside from the new honour, other awards on the programme have been updated “to ensure that it aligns with the latest sector thinking around good practice”. He says the new criteria have been tested with both farming and rural professionals and the trust believes participants will be provided with clear guidelines of the assessment framework. On the subject of potential winners, Ryan says the judges are looking particularly for innovation. “We cater for farmers and growers at all stages of their sustainability journey and encourage people to get involved regardless of where they see themselves on this journey. To be successful in winning an award we expect to see examples of innovation and a commit-

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

12 NEWS

$8 still on the cards SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMGATE MILK price forecasts continue to fluctuate despite a rise in global dairy prices in the last Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction. Predictions issued by banks range from $7.70/ kgMS to $8.30/kgMS. Fonterra also has a wide ranging forecast – $7.25 to $8.75/kgMS for the 202122 season. The co-op will provide an update when it announces its 2020-21 annual results this week.

For banking agri economists, forecasting the milk price is also tricky, as reflected by two updates earlier this month. BNZ lifted its milk price forecast to by 50c to $8.30 while Rabobank dropped its forecast by 20c to $7.80. Jarden’s head of derivatives Mike McIntyre told Rural News that there are two schools of thought on demand shifting away from Chinese buyers and how it would impact prices in the coming months.

McIntyre says the bearish view is that Chinese customers have built stockpiles and won’t be buying big as they have done in the past. “There’s a view that this will structurally weaken dairy prices,” he says. The more bullish view is that while Chinese buyers have stepped away, demand from other regions like the Middle East and South East Asia is picking up. “The bullish view is that this extra demand will keep prices up,”

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McIntyre adds He says it’s too early to say how prices will fare but an $8 payout is still on the cards. “We’ve still got a long way to go and the next four to five GDT events will give us a better idea.” BNZ senior economist Doug Steel says the dynamics and balance of risks appear to be changing with robust demand bumping up against subdued supply. “It is as much that GDT prices have stopped falling as it is that they

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have bounced a bit,” says Steel. “Rather than any precise estimate of what Fonterra’s 2021-22 milk price might turn out to be, we think it should be read as the balance of risk is moving to something above $8 rather than below it. Of course, something below $8 can’t be ruled out.” But RaboResearch senior analyst Emma Higgins believes the strength of Chinese import demand will be pivotal. “All eyes are on China — our key export market

❱❱ ANZ - $7.70/kgMS ❱❱ Westpac - $7.75 ❱❱ Rabobank- $7.80 ❱❱ ASB $7.90 ❱❱ BNZ - $8.30 ❱❱ Fonterra - $7.25 to $8.75

— as a source of risk to the downside,” she says. “Supply is outpacing demand in China, with domestic production growth combined with growing inventories, and these factors point to the potential for a period of destocking later this year and into 2022.” Higgins says global markets may be able to absorb lost sales from China through 2021, but

pressure will be felt in 2022. Initially in Oceania, but eventually rippling through global dairy markets. “Despite the lift in prices at the recent GDT auction, we see a strong possibility that the nearterm peak in global dairy commodity prices is likely behind us,” she adds.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

14 MARKETS & TRENDS

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

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Record prices spring into life Dairy

DAIRY COMMODITY prices had a mixed performance in August 2021. Average prices for Oceania SMP saw a small uptick, reflecting weaker milk production growth in Europe and steady demand from the main buying regions of China

and Southeast Asia. WMP continued to drift lower over August 2021. Rabobank’s view is that Chinese buyer confidence (particularly to procure stock further out across the year) is under pressure. This pressure is brought about by the need to clear expensive

inventory and is increasingly impacted by strong local milk production in combination with the resurgence of Covid-19 in parts of China. The strength of the peak will play an important role in price direction in the coming months. July 2021 milk production jumped 6.6% YOY following high milk price forecasts and supportive weather. Rabobank forecasts flat milk production for the full 2021/22 season.

Beef

ARGENTINE BEEF export restrictions to China are not directly impacting New Zealand export volumes but are supporting farmgate pricing. Total New Zealand beef exports for the month of July 2021 were slightly back on June vol-

umes (-5%), indicating that New Zealand beef isn’t filling the deficit in China caused by Argentina’s restrictions on beef exports. The Argentine export restrictions are, however, providing a firm pricing floor for New Zealand farmgate pricing. This set a new record for the month of August

2021. The North Island bull price continues to track well above (+12%) the five-year average and pricing range. Rabobank expects the strong demand and pricing to continue through to at least October.

Sheepmeat

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prices across both islands for August! Prices not only signify schedule records for the month of August, they set new records for the highest schedule prices since RaboResearch began recording this data in 2010. These record prices are being supported by demand from the US and

localprocurement pressure. July exports were 10% back on 2020 volumes for the same month. Lower export volumes for July are a reflection of the higher number of sheep killed early in the season due to drought. The season-to-date mutton kill is 8.7% ahead of the 2020

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

MARKETS & TRENDS 15

COUNTRIES

Content supplied by Rabobank - Growing a Better New Zealand Together rather than exports. If we see this, it is likely to put further pressure on global prices, which will flow through to local NZ farmers.

Exchange rate

season. In addition, lower lamb crop volumes for 2020 have flowed through to a reduced lamb kill of 3.9% for the season to date. Beef + Lamb NZ is forecasting a slight increase in lambing percentages across the country for 2021, with ewes in OK body condition after a challenging autumn and summer. Market fundamentals are holding firm, and Rabobank anticipates farmgate pricing to hold over the coming mo

Fertiliser

RABOBANK EXPECTS that high global fertiliser prices will be here to stay until at least the new year, primarily supported by the ongoing strength of commodity prices. With phosphate prices so high, we expect some farmers will lighten application rates. Initially, we think this could lead to global prices easing by as much as 10% to 15% during the third quarter in the course of northern hemisphere procurement.

We expect that this will be short lived though and that, given the time taken for shipping and local procurement, local farmers are unlikely to see any benefit flow through by way of lower prices. We continue to watch the situation regarding Chinese fertiliser exports very closely. To recap, the Chinese government is providing guidance to local fertiliser producers to focus on domestic markets

THE NZ$ plummeted 2.8% in three days, to a nine-month low, in midAugust. This followed the snap three-day nationwide Covid lockdown announcement and was in the context of a stronger US$. Despite remaining in lockdown for the rest

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

16 AGRIBUSINESS

Beef upheavel ‘won’t benefit NZ’ SUDESH KISSUN

CHINA LOVES BEEF

sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

IN 2020/21, China imported more than 2.2 million tonnes of beef, and 40% of these exports (around 900,000 tonnes) came from Brazil, with a further 23% (more than 500,000 tonnes) from Argentina. US exports have increased to around 110,000 tonnes in 2020/21, as a result of the US-China Phase One trade deal that went into effect in February 2020. New Zealand’s beef exports to China accounted for 8% of its total imports during the year.

A MAJOR upheaval in the global beef market isn’t expected to translate into gains for New Zealand exporters. Two of the world’s top five beef exporters – Brazil and Argentina – have voluntarily restricted exports. Brazil has suspended beef exports to China while they investigate two cases of ‘atypical’ BSE or mad cow disease. Argentina has extended export restrictions until the end of October in an attempt to keep a lid on domestic beef prices, which increased over 65% in the country since mid-2020. Meat Industry Association chief executive Sirma Karapeeva says NZ will not be able to increase exports to fill the supply gap left by South America. “At the moment, we are in the low point of the New Zealand processing season, so we do not anticipate any significant

China is the world’s largest beef market.

immediate gains for New Zealand exporters,” she told Rural News. However, if Brazil isn’t able to send beef to China over a longer period, it might seek other markets, including ones serviced by NZ exporters and this could impact us,” she adds. “While NZ will not be able to increase exports to fill the gap, there is a concern that if Brazil cannot access the China

markets for a longer period of time, it might seek to diversify and increase its exports to other markets such as Indonesia, the Philippines, the Middle East, and other south-east Asian countries.” Karapeeva says this may impact New Zealand exports to these markets. Brazil’s move means as the world’s biggest beef exporter it won’t be selling beef to the world’s

biggest beef buyer – China. Karapeeva says if Brazil stops exporting to China, even for a short period, it will have a significant impact and it will be difficult for other countries to fill the gap. “Argentina’s beef export restrictions will limit its ability to fill the gap and Australia’s exports are significantly down due to the herd rebuilding,” she explains.

“Uruguay and the United States might be able to increase their exports but wouldn’t be able to fill the gap left by Brazil.” A Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) spokesman says the US appears to be in the best position to capitalise in the medium-term, given improved access into China, continued rising exports into premium Asian markets and

access to the Chinese market. “The cessation of Brazilian exports to China and the extension of Argentina’s restrictions will continue to apply upwards pressure on the market in maintaining historically high prices at home. “However, the recent shakeups out of South America may provide some benefit over time. Given that Australia has the best traceability systems in the world, it can prevent instances like these occurring, which will hopefully be a consideration for China moving forward.”

tighter supplies out of key competing exporting nations. MLA notes that, year-to-date, the US has imported eight times more beef into China compared to 2020, and with the USDA currently forecasting beef demand to increase another 6.4% in 2022, the US is positioning itself as a reliable competitor in that country. According to MLA, the impact of Brazil and Argentina’s actions on Australia looks to be limited, considering the supply shortage at home and trade tensions that have reduced Australian

Tailing - get it right! WITH DOCKING – or tailing – underway in many areas, Beef+Lamb New Zealand is reminding farmers about the new tail length requirements. Will Halliday, B+LNZ’s senior advisor, animal welfare and biosecurity, says the length of the docked tail must be no shorter than the distal end of the caudal fold. That is the end of the flaps of skin that attach the underside of the tail to the lamb’s body.

“This is the absolute minimum length under the new animal welfare regulations, which came into effect in May of this year.” Docking tails shorter than this can lead to in infringement fee of $500. Halliday says a hot iron or rubber ring are the only methods that can be used to remove tails. He adds that using of any other method can lead to a fine of $500. “It is important farmers ensure their

The docked tail must be no shorter than the distal end of the caudal fold – that’s the end of the flaps of skin that attach the underside of the tail to the lamb’s body.

docking or tailing gangs are aware of what is required under the new regulations and the people removing the tails are adhering to that minimum length.” Only lambs under six months of age can be docked by a farmer or staff – any lambs older than six months must be done by a vet. Docking a lamb over six months old is an offence with a fine on conviction of up to $3,000.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

18 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Ball dropped! FOR MORE than a year now the primary sector has been crying out for changes around immigration settings to help ease numerous critical worker shortages right across the country’s key export earning industries. The Government and immigration officials have badly dropped the ball on this issue – with the entire country is paying for their incompetence. There is no doubt that things have been complicated by Covid-19 and the ongoing restrictions this has placed on allowing people into the country. However, governments are elected – and officials employed and well paid – to come up with solutions to such problems. Yet the piecemeal, ad-hoc, minimal changes made by both in this area are a national disgrace. For starters, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi has been completely MIA – that’s ‘missing in action’, not the Meat Industry Association, which is probably keen to chat to him on immigration issues, as is the rest of the primary sector. He is clearly either out of his depth or not interested and the Prime Minister should have relieved him of the portfolio months ago. One suspects that because her caucus has all the depth of the bird bath, and any capable minister is already overloaded, there is no one with the talent to manage or oversee this highly challenging role. This is leading to some frankly stupid decisions being made – like visa applications for desperately needed migrant dairy workers being declined over a contentious 40-hour working week requirement imposed by the Government. And the problem is getting worse, as not only is the dairy industry not able to get workers from overseas, it’s losing some of its existing workforce to countries such as Australia and Canada who are offering better visa deals for migrant workers. Jason Herrick, Southland Federated Farmers sharemilker section chair, summed it up well in a letter to Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor calling for immediate government action. “Using the excuse that it’s keeping New Zealanders safe on one hand, and then allowing entertainers, sports personalities, and movie producers, cast and crew into the country through our MIQ facilities, and safely do so, then why can’t this be replicated for our split migrant families and essential workers?” The very same question can be asked about rural contractors, shearers, vets and many others – and we deserve an answer.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Phone 09-307 0399 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 021-842 226 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“You said speaking Te Reo Maori could open doors for people, so I yelled ‘Kia ora’ as I drove up, but it didn’t work!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Greenwashing!

Dirty tricks?

Who?

Murky waters

A mate of the Hound’s wants to know what’s happed to meat company Silver Fern Farms and its latter day conversion to wokeism. Recently, the meat processor made a big song and dance about going down a ‘regenerative agriculture’ path. However, as your old mate’s source points out, SFF is using the Savory Institute process to monitor its regen accreditation – this being done by a company called Ata Regenerative. However, this old mutt’s mate points out that a quick check of the credentials of some of the people involved at Ata includes one who was once heavily involved with the infamous Crafar farms empire. Remember how sustainable that enterprise was – not! Meanwhile, SFF is now crowing about achieving Toitū. What did Shane Jones use to say? ‘Go woke, go broke’!

An email from Fed Farmers’ president Andrew Hoggard to Ag Minister Damien O’Connor, saying some unkind things about the Groundswell movement – before its big countrywide protest in July – was recently released to a media outfit under an Official Information Act (OIA) request. This has put Feds in a bad light and helped drive a wedge between it and Groundswell. The Hound suggests this was a deliberate, Machiavellian move by O’Connor to foster ag sector infighting and take the heat off his government’s imposition of numerous anti-farming regulations. It turns out that O’Connor (and PM Ardern) refused to release other communications received about Groundswell in the same OIA request, “to maintain the effective conduct of public affairs through the free and frank expression of opinions by or between or to Ministers of the Crown or members of an organisation…”

The refusal of both Damien O’Connor and PM Jacinda Ardern to release some of the correspondence they received about Groundswell begs a question or two. Who was this correspondence from and why are the Government protecting them? Your canine crusader suggests the Government – and especially O’Connor – has had a long, tetchy relationship with Feds and would have been happy to throw them under the bus for political gain. According to a mate of yours truly, he reckons this correspondence will be from either Beef + Lamb and DairyNZ, or the Food and Fibre Partnership Group. Funny thing is that, at present, Groundswell seems more in touch with rural concerns than any of those three groups who are about as popular in farming circles as Ron Brierley would be at a kindergarten picnic!

Your canine crusader knows there is a great deal of unease – especially in rural NZ – about the Government’s three waters reforms. Your old mate has been forwarded a document from the Department of Internal Affairs (which is doing the Government’s bidding on these reforms) relating to the three waters proposal and it makes concerning reading. Here is some of what it says: “A Mana Whenua Group for each of the four entities will be established to guide strategic performance expectations alongside local government. Each Mana Whenua Group will have equal voting rights to local government and the new entities will have statutory obligations to fund and ensure Mana Whenua participation…” That’s as clear as mud!

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ...................... Ph 027 272 5372 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams .......................Ph 021 100 4381 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ........................ Ph 021 963 177 sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz Peter Burke ........................... Ph 021 224 2184 peterb@ruralnews.co.nz MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 markd@ruralnews.co.nz

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Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

OPINION 19

Overseer’s demise not good I fear that the Government will take this opportunity to introduce controls on inputs and practices.

DOUG EDMEADES

THERE IS an adage from the old labour union days which states: It is a poor job that cannot carry a supervisor. We only need to modify this slightly to make it relevant to a current issue: It is a poor Overseer that cannot carry a job. I am of course lamenting the apparent death of Overseer, the decision support model which the regional councils embraced with alacrity to manage nitrogen leaching from farms to waterways. We are now told by a group of independent scientists that Overseer is: a) not fit for purpose, meaning it should not be used in a regulatory setting, and further and more worrying, b) it is not fit for anything much, including the most basic function it was developed to do – calculating the approximate rate of N leaching from a given farm. I am not surprised by the former conclusion. I have been warning anyone who would listen about this reality. Given the errors inherent in its use, it was inevitable, in my view, that sooner or later farmers would be arguing with regional councils, and most likely in the law courts, about the ‘true’ rate (the quantitative amount) for nitrogen leaching from their farms. The stakes were high because the way things were shaping, a farm could be deemed noncompliant on the basis of the predicted Overseer N leaching rate. That possibility it appears is now dead – thank goodness. Personally, I was happy for Overseer to be used for the function it was designed for – to undertake what-if analysis on a given farm to understand the effects of different farm management practices impacts on nitrate leaching. In this setting, a qualitative answer only was required to understand the trends over time. However, the reviewers do not see it that way. They say that the modelling approach used

that this is the approach adopted in many developed countries to manage N leaching. If this were to happen

it would signal an important philosophical change. New Zealand’s approach to date to managing these diffuse nutrient losses

has been to avoid input controls and focus on output controls. Managing the consequences of farm management practices, not the management practices per se. This approach was seen as allowing farmers maximum flexibility to operate their farm

within output limits. This was the philosophical basis for a tool like Overseer. Alas, despite about 20 years of effort, science has failed to deliver a tool fit for this purpose and its failure has delivered the pastoral sector the possibility of dictatorial input controls on the

farming sector. This is a tragedy for science and for the pastoral farming sector. • Doug Edmeades has more than 40 years’ experience as a soil scientist. He established his own science consulting business in 1997, which has evolved into agKnowledge.

Doug Edmeades

in Overseer is irreparably flawed and that other approaches to this vexed issue must be examined. This of course has put the regional councils, whom the Government relies on to deliver on water quality policies, between a rock and a very hard place. Indeed, the Government is so concerned that it has put out its own 35-page report outlining how it will respond to the review’s conclusions. They propose to investigate, over the next 12 months, four options to replace Overseer: developing a new risk assessment tool; develop a new generation Overseer; introducing controls on inputs and practices – and developing a new approach to modelling. I fear that the Government will take this opportunity to introduce controls on inputs and practices. Why? Because it is easy and does not cost too much in time and resources to implement. In addition, they have already started down this road with little fuss from farmers. Remember the recently imposed 190 kg N/ha/yr limit on N fertiliser? Why not 100 kg N/ ha? Why not ban N fertiliser altogether, as some on the green fringe have been advocating? Why not limit stocking rates? After all, it is a main driver of N leaching. Mike Joy would be vindicated, at last! Such policies would be very popular politically with the urban green fringe – those folk who buy into the Dirty Dairying movement and believe farmers and, in particular, dairy farmers, have had it too good for too long. Bear in mind also

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

20 OPINION - LETTERS CONTEXT IS NEEDED! TO FOLLOW on from the excellent article by Steven Cranston (Rural News 10 August), in regard to how farm emissions are misrepresented by the Government and the mainstream media. There’s a need for more context to be added to the biogenic methane produced by the farmed sheep, cattle and deer

(ruminants) in New Zealand. The target that has been set for New Zealand to be NET carbon neutral by 2050. This applies to emissions of CO2 gas, which is by far the major greenhouse gas. It means that businesses/factories etc will be able to continue emitting, provided they can offset these emissions –

principally by buying carbon credits, planting trees or electrification, so long as sufficient reliable electricity generation is available. The widely quoted figure used about biogenic emissions is that they are around 48% of NZ’s greenhouse gas emissions. This is a gross estimate, not net as it should be to provide a meaningful and

valid comparison with CO2 emissions. The breakdown of methane emissions in New Zealand shows that 86% comes from our ruminant farmed animals, sheep cattle and deer, 11% from waste disposal, landfills, wetlands, 3% from the energy sector and some others. This means that biogenic methane we

produce is 86% of 48% of our emissions. The 48% figure used is simplistic and incorrect. Methane emissions from all livestock have fallen by 7% since 1990 and stabilised since the year 2000. Global levels of methane are still increasing, but from sources other than the ruminants in New Zealand. With a 50% reduction in sheep numbers

and 23% drop in beef cattle since 1990, taking into account the near doubling of dairy cattle in the same period, the industry has already reduced methane/ carbon emissions since 1990 by more than 30%. Because New Zealand’s ruminant sourced methane emissions are close to static, taking into account the above, the net emissions are effectively zero. The carbon cycle as it applies to ruminant produced methane is in balance. The only way to increase biogenic methane is to increase ruminant animal numbers. The trees and other woody plants that grow

on farms are not allowed to be counted as offset to methane and other GHG emissions. But they are permitted, when in a forest situation, to be used as offsets to the production of CO2 produced by the burning of all fossil fuels. The Parliamentary Commissioner for the environment Simon Upton has made the case for fossil fuels emissions to be expressed as gross and methane as net. This would allow the true position of ruminant farming in New Zealand – much of which is already carbon neutral or in credit. Paul Studholme 7 RD Waimate

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THANK YOU for the recent ‘The Hound’ item promoting DairyNZ’s current board of director elections. Voting opens 20 September and we are keen to see all levy paying dairy farmers voting for their preferred candidates. While we appreciate the extra plug for this year’s election, we noted some incorrect content that we wanted to clarify. Firstly, you incorrectly stated that we’d named other directors as standing for re-election – please be clear, there is only one director Jacqueline Rowarth is position up for election this year. retiring by rotation. No other directors were mentioned. This year, director Jacqueline Rowarth is retiring by rotation. We have two candidates now confirmed for the DairyNZ board election: Stu Muir, Waiuku; Jacqueline Rowarth, Tirau. We wish them both the best. And to answer your second query – yes, naming who was re-standing for election was a genuine oversight and one quickly corrected. Simply nothing more than that. The successful candidate will play a key role in helping create a better future for farmers and supporting the governance and leadership of DairyNZ. Voting closes October 19 – levy payers will receive their vote packs electronically this year. Visit www.dairynz.co.nz/ agm to find out more. Jim van der Poel DairyNZ chair

WE’RE IN THIN AIR H O M E O F YA M A H A

OFF-ROAD EVENTS

SUBSIDISE FORESTRY with carbon credits, which pump up an ever inflating Helium balloon. If we burden farms with ‘thin air’ or methane taxes on ‘Ruminant Burps’ then what is the combined effect? Unaffordable farms. Food production falls. Rural unemployment. Gutted communities. Closed schools. Food prices soar. And millions of people starve – especially the poorest of the poor. Can we farmers morally allow this to happen? Isn’t this exactly what the Paris Accord attempted to avoid? Dave Stanton Geraldine


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

OPINION 21

Questions over Govt’s Covid strategy ANDREW BAYLY

QUESTIONS HAVE to be asked about the Government’s Covid strategy. The Government’s principal approach has been to impose a line of defence at our borders to stop the virus coming in. It has dawdled with rolling out vaccinations across the country. We are currently second-tolast in the OECD (overall

lion Covid Response and Recovery Fund that was set aside to deal with the pandemic. This leaves only about $5–$6 billion unallocated in the kitty. Around $12 billion has been squandered on projects completely unrelated to the pandemic. Robertson’s response to this issue? Don’t worry, we will borrow more – and the economy is strong anyway. This atti-

relates to our immigration settings. It is outrageous that we have many thousands of immigrants who have been here from the start of Covid last year whose visa status is unclear. They are unable

to bring their loved ones through MIQ to join them here in New Zealand. Understandably, many are leaving. The Government has been too slow to provide certainty for these people.

The huge risk is that both our migrants and young Kiwis will leave New Zealand in droves as the rest of the world opens up. • Andrew Bayly is National’s Shadow Treasurer.

Andrew Bayly

Wherever I have been over the past few months, the first issue raised by business owners is the shortage of talent. about 119th in the world) and have less than a quarter of our population fully vaccinated. This delay is not only a health issue, but increasingly an economic one, as the cost of lockdowns is huge – both to the economy and to the taxpayer. The current lockdown is costing the economy about $1.9 billion per week and the first fortnight cost the taxpayer $1.25 billion. Relying solely on a line of defence at our borders has not worked. There have been at least a dozen border control failures, the most recent allowing the dangerous Delta virus to take hold in Auckland. All can be tracked back to mishaps at MIQ facilities. Once through the border, our abysmal vaccination rate meant we had no choice but to impose an extended, national lockdown. The other danger area is our ports, and we have had three near-misses with ships coming into Tauranga, New Plymouth and Lyttelton with Covid cases aboard. Proper facilities should have been established away from our cities, such as at our military bases. These would have provided immediate access to greater space, cooking facilities and ease of providing entertainment options for those in isolation. According to Budget documents, Finance Minister Grant Robertson has already allocated around $45 billion of the $50 bil-

tude highlights two worrying issues. The first is that over the past 18 months, our debt has almost doubled from $60 billion to just under $120 billion. More troubling is that at the rate the Government is borrowing – currently about $110 million every day – our debt is forecast to increase by approximately another $65 billion over the next three years to $184 billion. That’s about $100,000 in debt for every household in New Zealand. It can be appropriate to increase debt to fund measures to stabilise the economy in a shock or to respond to a natural disaster. But not for many of the pet projects that have been funded out of the Covid Response and Recovery Fund. Wherever I have been over the past few months, the first issue raised by business owners is the shortage of talent. There are two edges to this. The first is there is a maximum level of employment – and we are close to it. In normal situations, firms have a choice as to who they hire; under-performers are not hired. However, with our borders closed and skilled labour in short supply, firms are not investing in growth as much as they could, or they are downscaling their businesses so they can meet customer expectations. Neither is a good outcome. The second issue

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

MANAGEMENT 23

Thinking 100 years ahead THE COUPLE behind one of New Zealand’s most sustainable farms are challenging other farmers to think three or four generations into the future when making decisions. The call comes from Central Hawkes Bay farmers Evan and Linda Potter. The couple are the Ballance Farm National Ambassadors for Sustainable Farming and Growing, and current Gordon Stephenson Trophy holders – so they know a thing or two about the environment. The Potters bought their 566 hectare hill country sheep, beef and deer farm – Waipapa Station – in 1997. They describe it as “a blank canvas” when they arrived at the gate with nothing more than fencing gear and a team of

Evan and Linda Potter urge farmers to carefully review their systems and assess what effect their operations will have over the next 100 years or more.

dogs. Over the years, they have expanded the farm to 720 hectares and carried out extensive planting. They have also retired about a quarter of the land.

Evan says he and Linda quickly realised the large gorge running through their property was never going to be productive, so they decided to put it into the Queen Elizabeth II

National Trust – with the encouragement of Hawke’s Bay Regional Council. Some farmers might feel they are giving away parts of their land, but the Potters say they

worked together with the trust to figure out rules and exceptions that worked for both parties – like retaining stock and water access where needed. “It is a partnership,

with shared outcomes, in perpetuity,” Evan explains. It wasn’t a quick process, taking about six years to totally fence off the gorge and put all the arrangements in place, but the Potters say it helped to streamline their operation. “It was the right decision because most of it was class 7 or 8 [very steep],” he explains. “Management-wise, we’ve taken out a mongrel piece of land to muster, as well as enhancing the beauty and biodiversity of the place – so it just made sense.” He adds that by taking out that 25%, they’ve been able to focus on the better land and not waste a whole lot of time and money on a piece of land that’s never going to perform.

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The Potters are calling on all New Zealand farmers to carefully consider whether they could do something similar by undertaking a simple review of their systems and assessing what effect their operations will have over the next 100 years or more. “Most farms could probably retire a percentage of their land with no productivity drop,” Evan believes “That said, we also recognise there’s no one rule for all farms – they’re all unique little ecosystems – and it’s also important to acknowledge the many farmers already on this path.” As part of their efforts to retire unproductive land, the couple fenced off Waipapa’s gorge and began extensive pest control – with the native TO PAGE 24


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

24 MANAGEMENT

Thinking ahead FROM PAGE 23

flora in the gorge quickly regenerating. “When we first came here, the gorge had a lot of kowhai trees that were nothing more than sticks. You could walk for 10 minutes and shoot 20 possums – they were under every flax bush,” Evan explains. That pest control has not only reduced the number of possums, but also the wild cats, ferrets, and rats have dropped right off. As a result, the Potters have much less chance of diseases like TB or toxoplasmosis affect-

The Potters realised the large gorge running through their property was never going to be productive, so they put it into the Queen Elizabeth II National Trust – with the encouragement of Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.

ing their stock. With so much planting going on every year, Linda has taken to propagating her own natives

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EVERY EXPENSE adds up and the Potters admit that even with careful management their first few years at Waipapa – when they faced droughts and price fluctuations – were financially tough. “We’ve always been pretty disciplined in terms of our finances. Sometimes that involves not biting off more than you can chew.” Evan says that while an environmental spend needs to be flexible and not compromise financial profitability, the couple see it as a fixed business expense – not discretionary. “It could cover any activity, like earthworks, water, fencing – there are no rules.” The Potters are thankful to those who have helped them over the years, whether that be with skills, advice or cash flow. ANZ has helped to finance them over the years, and Evan reckons the most important thing a bank can do for a farmer is to take the time to understand their business. He says, at one point, he felt the bank only served one purpose – giving out loans. But now he considers his relationship manager “a vital part of the business”. ANZ managing director business

Lorraine Mapu applauds the Potters’ approach, and their challenge to other farmers. “With environmental regulations increasing alongside consumer expectations around sustainability, farmers like the Potters are future-proofing their operation by taking steps like this,” she says. “Their foresight, along with a diversified production model, will continue to serve them well not only environmentally, but financially. Environmental impact is something all farmers around the world are going to have to confront.” Mapu says that ANZ recognises that some of these decisions are not easy to make or implement – but seeing sustainability as an investment opportunity, rather than a regulatory burden, will ultimately see those businesses rewarded. “New Zealand farmers have always been innovators in the face of change, and if we can adapt quickly to this new, more sustainable business landscape, we’ll have a jump on our competitors in the international market.” Looking forward, the Potters are aiming to leave their land at Waipapa in a better state than when they arrived. As caretakers of the farm, feel they are responsible for its long-term sustainability.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

ANIMAL HEALTH 25

Benefits of long-acting B12 injections Central Southland vet Andrew Roe reviews use of the long-acting vitamin B12 injection products, SMARTShot B12 and SMARTShot B12 plus Se, in the management of vitamin B12/cobalt deficiency with and without selenium deficiency in ewes and lambs*. WHEN IT comes to helping our sheep farmer clients prevent vitamin B12/ cobalt deficiency in their stock, one of the biggest challenges – compared to dealing with deficiencies of other trace elements – is the variability and unpredictability of cobalt levels in their pastures. Due to a range of factors, the timing and severity of deficiency can vary from year to year, farm to farm, and even across different parts of the same farm. SMARTShot takes away all the guesswork around vitamin B12 supplementation. It is given at tailing – and lasts for six months (or for the life of most of your finishing lambs, if a 0.5 mL dose is used). Farmers in my area (southern South Island) can be confident that the vitamin B12 with/without selenium requirements of their lambs will be met for the whole of the period where cobalt levels may be low in their pastures. For those farmers in areas that experience more severe cobalt deficiency, there is the option to treat the ewes as well, to ensure that their lambs

KEY FINDINGS • Vitamin B12/cobalt and selenium are important for the development and productivity of flocks grazed on NZ pastures. • About 45% and 25% of NZ pastures, respectively, will not provide adequate cobalt and selenium for grazing livestock. • Because lambs should be treated as early as possible to prevent deficiencies of vitamin B12/cobalt or selenium, preference should be given to injecting at docking time. • SMARTShot is a novel form of long-acting vitamin B12 injection with or without selenium for vitamin B12/cobalt and selenium supplementation in sheep.

start life with adequate vitamin B12 reserves. Convenience is the other important benefit of SMARTShot. While it may be possible to achieve similar results using repeated injections of short-acting vitamin B12 and selenium products. The need to yard the lambs monthly – as well as the extra work around administering multiple injections, not to mention the increased risk of injection-site lesions – all add to the appeal of SMARTShot. From a veterinary perspective, SMARTShot is a great product and I do not believe that anyone would dispute its effec-

tiveness. Our challenge is to point out to our farmer clients the value, in terms of productivity, reliability, and convenience, of investing in a long-acting vitamin B12 and selenium treatment for their lambs. In studies of cobaltand selenium-deficient flocks, following a single long-acting vitamin B12 injection of lambs at docking, vitamin B12 levels were increased and maintained at adequate levels for 3-4 months until time of slaughter. Mean growth rates were increased above that of untreated controls for 6 months and liveweights maintained for 8 months. Following a single

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A long lasting B12 injection when given at given at tailing lasts for six months – or for the life of most of your finishing lambs, if a 0.5 mL dose is used.

long-acting vitamin B12 plus selenium injection of ewes pre-mating, adequate levels of vitamin

B12 were maintained for 180 days and levels of selenium for 300 days. Adequate levels were

maintained in their lambs until 1 month of age for vitamin B12 and until weaning for selenium.

[*This review was funded by Virbac NZ and is courtesy of Animal Health Research Review]

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GROWTH RATE Over the same period weaning weights (adj. 100 days) have exceeded 36kg from a lambing % consistently above 150%. & SURVIVAL COMMENTS: • All sheep DNA and SIL recorded. • Ram hoggets have been eye muscle scanned since 1996. • All ewe hoggets are mated. • Breeding programme places a heavy emphasis on worm resilience – lambs drenched only once prior to autumn. • Scored for dags and feet shape. DNA rated for footrot and cold tolerance. • We take an uncompromising approach – sheep must constantly measure up.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

26 ANIMAL HEALTH

Milk-based replacers better RECENTLY PUBLISHED research suggests that farmers should avoid feeding milk replacers with vegetable proteins and fats to lambs in their early life. A milk replacer containing 100% milk-based ingredients is better for growth, health, and wel-

fare in the first five or six weeks, the study found. Carried out by scientists from AgResearch – and funding from NZAgbiz – the research considered the use of different compositions of milk replacers in artificial rearing systems, what it means for animal per-

formance and health, and costs for the producer. Around 200 East-Friesian male lambs were allocated to pens using a randomised experimental design and reared on one of two commercially available milk replacer formulations - one being 80% casein and 20%

whey milk protein and 100% milk fat. The other 50% casein, 40% whey milk protein and 10% hydrolysed wheat protein and 100% vegetable oil. The lambs were able to feed on demand from automatic feeders, with free access to grass hay also available.

Study lead author and AgResearch senior scientist Sue McCoard says the results seen in lambs fed either milk replacer were similar when it came to death rates. However significant differences were observed in growth rates, health and need for use of antibiotics.

AgResearch senior scientist Sue McCoard says the results seen in lambs fed milk replacer showed significant differences in growth rates, health and need for use of antibiotics.

“Among the key findings was that feeding a milk replacer containing vegetable ingredients versus 100% milk ingredients resulted in lower growth rates (242 versus 296 g/d) – with four times more lambs failing to reach the minimum weaning weight by the end of the study,” she says. “The milk replacer containing vegetable ingredients was also associated with an increased incidence of health issues – notably scouring, pneumonia, pink eye, and external infections.” McCoard adds that the cost of health intervention by lamb was $17.20 per head, compared to $7.32 per head for those fed the 100% milk ingredient replacer. “We also saw a 2.5 times increased likelihood of therapeutic antibiotic use to treat health issues among those lambs reared on the milk replacer containing vegetable oil,” she explains. “Notably, lambs fed milk replacer containing vegetable ingredients were eight times more likely to get scours and three times more likely to get pneumonia.” McCoard says these results indicate feeding lambs in the first five to six weeks of life with milk replacer containing vegetable proteins and fats

should be avoided. “Improving early life nutrition through feeding of milk replacers containing 100% milk-based ingredients supports growth, health, and welfare by providing protection against disease and reduces costs associated with health care. The reduction in therapeutic use of antibiotics also contributes to meeting consumer demands for chemical-free food production and reducing risk of antimicrobial resistance.” The effects of different combinations of milk replacer ingredients used in this study are still to be established. “It is clear however from this research and other studies, that investing in the right choices around the early life nutrition of artificially reared livestock is important, and has an increasingly important role in animal agriculture,” McCoard says. “It not only helps producers avoid costly animal health and welfare issues but can also provide an advantage for lifetime performance as well as reducing wastage which is important for sustainable and ethical livestock production systems.” More: www. appliedanimalscience. org/article/S25902865(21)00039-2/fulltext


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 27

NZ waits after European release of new MF tractor range MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WHILE IT’S still to be confirmed when they’ll arrive in New Zealand, Massey Ferguson’s new MF 7S series has launched in Europe. The new models take their looks from the recently released MF 8S and the freshly showcased MF 5S and MF 6S ranges. The new, four model range offers maximum

a new armrest, multi-pad controller and a Datatronic 5 terminal that is said to be brighter and clearer. A new air conditioning system and an air-suspended seat take care of comfort, while the tractor can also be optioned with a suspended cab and axles. In higher spec variants, such as Exclusive and Efficient, the radio, the operator’s mobile phone and media are accessed through the

A ‘boost’ function takes those numbers to 175, 185, 210 and 220hp respectively, while maximum torque at 1,500rpm, normally between 700 and 850Nm, rises to between 750 and 925Nm when EPM kicks in. power outputs of 155 to 190hp, bridging the gap between the new fourcylinder 135-180hp MF 6S and the larger 7.4 litre, six-cylinder 8S machines The MF7S.155, 7S.165, 7S.180 and 7S.190 all feature AGCOPower 6.6 litre engines. They deliver maximum power – as the numbering suggests – but enhanced with Electronic Power Management (EPM). A ‘boost’ function takes those numbers to 175, 185, 210 and 220hp respectively, while maximum torque at 1,500rpm, normally between 700 and 850Nm, rises to between 750 and 925Nm when EPM kicks in. Transmission choice is the well-known Dyna-6 semi powershift, or the constantly variable DynaVT. With a 2.88m wheelbase and 4.93m turning radius, the 7S range is designed for heavyduty applications. The machines offer a 9.6 tonne lift capacity, complimented by a 4.0 tonne rating up front, with the option to fit rear wheel equipment up to 42-inch diameter. Outwardly, the tractors retain a six-post cabin layout, while inside the cabin, expect to see

Datatronic terminal that incorporates ‘must haves’ like Bluetooth, USB and Aux connections – with incoming phone calls displayed on the touch screen. Externally, for those contemplating loader duties, a Visio roof with improved upward vision can be optioned. Meanwhile, those looking to turn night into day can fit up to 16 LEDs. For those looking for similar levels of horsepower, but in a more compact, agile and lighter package, the new 6S series might be worth a closer look. This new five-model range will eventually replace the 6700S series tractors. The new range offers maximum power outputs of 135, 145, 155, 165 and 180hp, in the appropriately dubbed 6S.135, 6S.145, 6S155, 6S.165 and 6S.185 respectively. However, with EPM those numbers are taken to 150, 160, 175, 185 and 200hp. Powered by a four-cylinder AGCOPower engine of 4.9 litres, the same transmission choices are available. The layout sees a 2.67m wheelbase and 4.75m turning radius, said to be the tightest of any

Massey Ferguson’s new MF 7S series has been launched in Europe, but it is not yet confirmed when they will be available in NZ.

200hp currently available on the market. The control layout mirrors that seen on the MF 8S series, including a new multi-controller and the 9-inch Datatronic 5 terminal. Expect to see comfort being taken care of with the options of mechanical or active-mechanical cab suspension, an optional suspended front axle layout and a revised airsuspended and leather clad operator seat.

Rear lift capacity is up to 9.6 tonnes with a standard hydraulic output of 110 litres per minute. There’s the option of 150l/min on Dyna-6 models and a stonking 190l/min on Dyna-VT. Models 6S.165 and 6S.180 can be specified on 42-inch rubber, while selected models can also be specified with factoryfitted, loader subframes to accommodate the FL series (Alo-sourced) front end loaders.

The New MF 7S series includes a new multi-controller and the 9-inch Datatronic 5 terminal.

VENDRO TEDDERS The dependable Vendro mounted tedder series deliver an exemplary level of standard specification and boast a host of innovative features. • Rotor construction is of the highest strength and rigidity to allow optimised tine function. • Working width from 4.6m to 11m. • New Optiturn 3D tines to spread the swath perfectly.

Invest in longevity and quality. Invest in the best.

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

28 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

A big tractor needed! MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

GERMAN CULTIVATION and seeding manufacturer Amazone has launched a new semimounted plough range, suitable for tractors in the 400hp class. Available in seven, eight and nine furrow variants, the Tyrok 400 series features the SpeedBlade plough body. This incorporates a patented, extra-large front shinpiece that helps to reduce wear rates across the main body of the plough – thereby reducing wearing-metal costs. Other new features include SmartTurn; where at the headland, the turnover cycle – which takes just nine seconds – is slowed at each end of the ram stroke to create a damping effect. This

Available in seven, eight and nine furrow variants, the Tyrok 400 series semi-mounted plough range is suitable for tractors in the 400hp class.

reduces stress on the frame of the plough. Meanwhile, AutoAdapt automatically adjusts the

front furrow hydraulically, after the overall ploughing width is adjusted, to accommodate changing

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soil conditions or sloping ground. The machine offers mechanical furrow width

and hydro-pneumatic suspension on the transport wheel as standard. There are also a wide

range of options, including hydraulic working width adjustment, hydraulic overload pro-

tection and traction control. The latter uses a hydraulic cylinder to transfer weight to the tractor’s back axle, helping to reduce wheel slip and overall fuel consumption. A selection of solid or slatted mouldboards are complemented by a range of skimmers, trash boards, landside protectors and sword landsides for stony ground. It also comes with a disc coulter assembly for the last furrow and a swivel press arm for working with packer assemblies. As we go to press, Rural News understands that the NZ importer Landpower is reviewing the new range with regards to introducing it to the New Zealand market. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Making lamb marking easy DESIGNED BY a sheep and beef farmer, Vetmarkers are made in New Zealand and sold around the world. The roller marking tables are easy to load and offer ample working space for vaccinating, earmarking and castrating. The units are designed so there are no leg hooks to worry about and lambs getting caught. The units can be configured to automatically spray for flystrike when the lamb is released and – importantly – release the lamb back onto its feet. There is also the option of a double spray system. Following two years of trials, the company has added an optional full-length stainless steel base tray that fits between the roll-

The Vetmarker roller marking tables are easy to load and offer ample working space for vaccinating, earmarking and castrating.

ers, eliminating the risk of lambs getting their feet caught. They are suitable for retrofitting to any units manufactured in

2012, with mounting only requiring three holes to be drilled in the original frame. www.vetmarker.co.nz

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Tyre plant to double capacity

RISING GLOBAL demand for off-road tyres for agricultural, forestry, construction and industrial applications has prompted Yokohama Rubber Group to further increase the production capacity of its new Visakhapatnam plant in India. Currently being built on a 39ha site, the US$171m investment will double the new plant’s planned daily production capacity. Scheduled to begin in the first quarter of 2023, initial capacity will reach 55t of rubber a day, with the next stage in early 2024, taking output to 123 tonnes daily. As well as the plant at Visakhapatnam, Yokohama Rubber also has a factory in Israel, who jointly produce the Alliance, Galaxy and Primex, off-highway tyre brands.

Edison Award for New Holland

NEW HOLLAND Agriculture has won a Gold medal at the 2021 edition of the Edison Awards for the groundbreaking Loop Master™ knotting technology featured on its BigBaler 1290 High Density and BigBaler PLUS range. The technology combines the concepts of the two existing knotting technologies, the ‘loop’ knotter, and the double knotter, adopting the strength of the former and removing the loose twine ends of the latter. This is said to allow the use of lower grade twine and a calculated saving of over 3.5 miles of twine over a 10,000-bale season.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 29

PFG shows farmers and customers the love “We encourage our employees to think ‘we’re keeping them growing’, down to an individual basis where we embrace – ‘I’m keeping them growing’.”

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

AT THIS year’s National Fieldays, the Power Farming Group (PFG) set out to thank farmers and contractors for their efforts in keeping the country going through Covid in 2020 with a ‘We Love Farmers’ theme. Formed back in 1948, PFG now operates in New Zealand, Australia and the US employing 405 people, with an underlying philosophy of “we are local – so we support local”. Speaking about the growth of the company over the last two decades, NZ chief executive Thomas Campbell noted that the familyowned group had seen turnover grow from $91m to $444m. “We now want to take the business to the next level, but we can’t do that without our customers,” says marketing director Brett Maber. A recent Power Farming Customer Summit brought together a wide range of customers to

A wide range of people from around the country attended the recent customer summit at PFG’s headquarters in Morrinsville.

the company’s headquarters in Morrinsville. The aim was to help customers understand the PFG operation, and for PFG to understand the future expectations of its customers. Following a site tour, Brett Maber explained the make-up of the company and its inherent philosophies. “Our existence is to be there to support farmers, growers and contractors – without them we

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don’t have a business,” he explained. “We encourage our employees to think ‘we’re keeping them growing’, down to an individual basis where we embrace – ‘I’m keeping them growing’.” Maber went on to explain that, like many agricultural businesses, one of their biggest challenges was attracting and retaining good staff. He said this had resulted in a change of mindset about a decade ago, which saw

recruitment start before school leaver age, on-thejob and residential training within the group’s facilities, and upskilling staff members as technologies evolved. This was followed by an open discussion about the positives and negatives of customers’ own experiences with dealing with PFG and its local dealerships. With a pool of visitors from Southland, Canterbury, Gisborne and North

Auckland, the majority praised the work of the local dealerships, particularly the fact in most cases they were dealing with family businesses. No doubt, this is helped by the fact that in many cases, PFG operates a joint equity ownership model, with local individuals having “skin in the game” alongside PFG. On the customers’ wish lists were requests such as easier to understand invoicing. Others

suggested a need for better installation of new products at the time of delivery, with ongoing out-of-season operator training, to get the best from their machines. The suggestion of ‘How-to’ sessions for phone and tablet applications also emerged as a possibility. Looking at the broader picture, product knowledge on the service side raised some comments – particularly around junior technicians getting exposure to new products, rather than old hands who often appeared to be too specialised in specific product ranges. Larger operators also said more support during major breakdowns – with the likes of loan machines— to keep them going would be a huge benefit.

Summing up the event, those invited appreciated the opportunity to interact with PFG. “We tend to buy product on the job it does, but importantly when and where we can get it fixed if it breaks down,” Josh Bleeker from South Canterbury said. “So, parts and service support is critical for us.” Likewise, Paul and Helena Hoekstra from Southland said they really like the family feel at their local PFG dealership and find the backup outstanding. “On our wish list, we’d like to see more focused local salespeople who have a better understanding of the individual models in a product range that would best suit our area.”

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RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 21, 2021

30 RURAL TRADER CRAIGCO SENSOR JET

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• QUEENSTOWN & CENTRAL OTAGO ‘AUTUMN MAGIC’ 6 days, depart 20 April 2022. Highlights include BBQ lunch on TSS Earnslaw, Skyline Gondola and sight seeing in the magical region of Central Otago.

Free Range & Barn Eggs

NZ’s finest BioGro certified Mg fertiliser For a delivered price call... 0800 436 566

7680

$

TOP DOG BOX • Accommodates up to 4 dogs • 6 individual air vents • Removable centre board • 2 lockable galvanised gates

• In-house drainage • Tie down lugs on each side • Fits all wellside & flatdeck utes (2 models) • Raised floor for insulation

Single without tow ball mount .........................$585 Single with tow ball mount ..............................$655 Wellside ........................................................$920 Flatdeck ........................................................$920

+GST

Freephone 0800 11 60 60

ALL PRICES INCLUDE GST

www.travelwiseholidays.co.nz SUPPLYING FARMERS SINCE 1962

Phone 0800 625 826 • www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

BEFORE EPOXY RESIN APPLIED

At Not Just Coatings, our experience and professionalism is demonstrated in every job we undertake With our office in Kaiapoi we offer free quotes in the Canterbury area

Quality Greenhouses Range of models sized 2 metres - 10 metres

Some of the services we offer... • Grouting/Sealants • Waterproofing • Concrete repairs/Crack injections • Concrete grinding • Internal tank cleaning

• Waterblasting from 5000 psi up to 40,000 psi • Hydro Demolition • Abrasive blasting • Polyurea Coatings

If you would like more information or arrange a time to meet please contact: AFTER EPOXY RESIN APPLIED

Mike 027-236 4133 • Chris 027-427 5004 • Sales 027-626 2117 sales@notjustcoatings.nz

WATERBLASTING (HYDRO DEMOLITION)

FLAKE FLOORING

morrifield CELEBRATING

40 YEARS IN BUSINESS 1980-2020

MORRIFIELD GREENHOUSES

Thank you to our Valued Customers for • Easy assembly • NZ made since 1980 your continued support over the years • Strong Win!! and durable • Grow all year round PROUD TO BE NEW ZEALAND MADE

Greenhouses

www.morrifield.com

T/F 03 214 4262 E info@morrifield.com

www.morrifield.com

ONE STOP WATER SHOP 300mm x 6 metre .......................... $410 400mm x 6 metre .......................... $515 500mm x 6 metre .......................... $690 600mm x 6 metre .......................... $925 800mm x 6 metre ........................ $1399 1000mm x 6 metre ...................... $2175 1200mm x 6 metre ...................... $3475 ALL PRICES INCLUDE G.S.T.

CULVERT PIPES

New Zealand’s CHEAPEST Culvert Pipes! FREE joiners supplied on request. • Lightweight, easy to install • Made from polyethylene

Check out our NEW website www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

Phone

06 323 4181

or

0800 625 826 for your nearest stockist

Joiners supplied FREE with culvert pipes


Watching over your pastures so you don’t have to.

Delivering a complete suite of pasture protection and brushweed control products for New Zealand farmers.

Preside™

Our portfolio of powerful, proven products has helped farmers from one end of the country to the other create and maintain thriving businesses, and has earned us an excellent reputation as pasture protection and brushweed specialists.

Tordon™

Our extensive suite of herbicides provides farmers everything they need to win the war against weeds and brushweeds.

Tordon™

Visit corteva.co.nz to view our online pasture and brushweed resources.

BRUSHKILLER XT

POWERFLO™

HERBICIDE

HERBICIDE

Tordon™ 2G GOLD

HERBICIDE

PASTUREBOSS™ HERBICIDE

Vigilant™ II

GRANULAR HERBICIDE

Grazon™

HERBICIDE

HERBICIDE

Versatill™

Visit us at corteva.co.nz ®, ™ Trademarks of Corteva Agriscience and their affiliated companies. COR-RNPSTBR-CTA0019


SPRING INTO ACTION THIS SEASON!

LAWN EQUIPMENT

SMALL TRACTORS

0800 333 734 CERVUSEQUIPMENT.CO.NZ Gisborne | Feilding | Hastings | Rotorua | Stratford | Te Puke Waipapa | Waipukurau | Whangarei

SPRING 2021

LARGE AG EQUIPMENT

HAY EQUIPMENT


STEP UP FOR THE

X FACTOR! BEST IN CLASS MOWERS

GREAT LAWNS START WITH JOHN DEERE’S RANGE OF RIDE-ON MOWERS! Built tough and packed with innovative features to deliver a quality cut and a comfortable ride. With the extensive range of 100 Series, Select SeriesTM and ZTracTM Zero-Turn mowers available with your choice of side or rear discharge decks, mulching and bagging options to choose from, there is one right for you.

100 SERIES RIDE-ON MOWERS combine strength and reliability with yard-friendly simplicity, comfort and control. With a choice of models and a wide range of features and options to choose from, the 100 Series has something for everyone. BEST SELLER, ACT FAST WHILE STOCKS LAST

JOHN DEERE

S100

• 13 kW (17.5 hp) engine • 42 inch EdgeTM mower deck • Hydrostatic transmission w/ side-by-side pedals • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

JOHN DEERE

S120

• 16.4 kW (22 hp) V-Twin engine • 42 inch EdgeTM mower deck • Hydrostatic transmission w/ side-by-side pedals • Easy ChangeTM 30-second Oil change system • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

$3,688 INCL GST

$4,838 INCL GST

JOHN DEERE

JOHN DEERE

S140

X167R

• 16.4 kW (22 hp) V-Twin engine • 48 inch EdgeTM mower deck • Electric PTO, hydrostatic transmission w/ side-by-side pedals • Bumper: standard • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

• 12.4 kW (16.6 hp) V-Twin engine • 42 inch EdgeTM mower deck • Electric deck engagement • Collection capacity: 300 L • Bumper: standard • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

$5,848 INCL GST

$6,993 INCL GST

MOWER PARTS & ATTACHMENTS

MOWER SEAT COVER $72.45 INCL GST

CPLP22704

MOWER COVER $138.62 INCL GST

LP93917

POLY CARTS - 10P $673.74 INCL GST

CPLPPCT10JD

MULCH KIT

$212.53 INCL GST BM21816

SCAN HERE

TO SEE OUR FULL RANGE OF RIDE-ON MOWERS


GET IN EARLY, TO SECURE YOUR MOWER

SELECT SERIES RIDE-ON MOWERS are a homeowners dream, comfortable with exceptional cutting performance. With mower decks ranging in size from 42 inch to 54 inch, these mowers are ideal for mowing up to 1.4 ha (3.5 acres).

JOHN DEERE

JOHN DEERE

X350

X570

• 14 kW (19 hp) iTorqueTM Power System • 42 inch Accel DeepTM deck, mulching deck optional • Upgraded instrument panel • 4 year or 300 hour warranty**

• 18 kW (24 hp) iTorqueTM Power System • 48 inch Accel Deep™ deck • Hydrostatic Transmission • Mow up to 1.4 ha (3.5 acres) • 4 year or 500 hour warranty**

$7,000 INCL GST

$13,247 INCL GST

ZTRAKTM ZERO-TURN MOWERS the way to mow better fast! These mowers offer a solid frame, large tyres, convenient controls and excellent mowing

performance.

TOP SELLER BE QUICK STOCKS LIMITED

JOHN DEERE

Z335E

• 15 kW (20 hp) V-Twin IntekTM engine • 42 inch Accel DeepTM deck • Speeds up to 11 km/hr • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

$5,558 INCL GST

JOHN DEERE

Z355E

• 16 kW (22 hp) V-Twin IntekTM engine • 48 inch Accel DeepTM deck • Speeds up to 11 km/hr • 24 months or 120 hours warranty**

$6,409 INCL GST

READY, SET, MOW! Is your mower ready for the demands of Spring? We understand that your yard is at the heart of it all. So to help you care for it all, we offer a Fixed Price Mower Service using genuine John Deere parts.

$299

^

INCL GST

Book online at cervusequipment.co.nz or give your local Cervus Equipment a call 0800 333 734.

PREFER TO DO IT YOURSELF? WE CAN HELP WITH THAT TOO!

OR

The John Deere Home Maintenance Kit is a convenient way to get the maintenance parts you need. Included are the filters, oil & spark plugs for your mower as stated in the operators manual and start from

$95.21 INCL GST LG262


SERIOUS ABOUT MOWING?

TRY A JOHN DEERE COMMERCIAL MOWER!

John Deere’s range of commercial ride-on mowers is designed with your operation in mind providing excellent cut quality, dependability and outstanding comfort. If commercial lawn mowing is your business, then John Deere has a ZTrakTM Zero-Turn, Front or Wide-Area Mower for you.

OUR JOHN DEERE COMMERCIAL MOWER RANGE STARTS HERE: JOHN DEERE

Z915E

Protective zone around the operator is provided by the rollover protective structure (ROPS)

Two seat choices with ComfortGlide™ fore and aft suspension offer exceptional operator comfort

WITH 48 INCH DECK STARTING FROM

$17,394 INCL GST

Powerful 25 hp (18.6 kW) commercial-grade engine delivers classleading performance and efficiency

Heavy-duty frame provides strength and durability Durable hydrostatic drive train that delivers better cooling and provides easy access

Mower is easy to service with many accessible components

3 year or 1,200 hours warranty,** with no hour limit within the first 24 months Extra durability and mowing performance from 7-Iron™ II Side-Discharge decks pressed from a single piece of steel

12 COMMERCIAL MOWERS AVAILABLE

ASK US ABOUT OTHER COMMERCIAL MODELS!

Turn on a dime thanks to the exceptional control offered by our ZTrakTM 900 Series ZeroTurn Mowers, so you can get the job done faster without sacrificing any of the precision you’d expect from John Deere. And, since you all have different needs, we came up with E, M and R specification models to help meet them. Ask us about the full range of commercial mowers, and experience superior turning combined with excellent cutting performance.


A SMALL TRACTOR FOR

EVERY JOB!

6 YEAR 2000 HOUR POWERTRAIN WARRANTY** ON 1-4 SERIES TRACTORS

JOHN DEERE

BEST IN CLASS

1023E

• 23 hp diesel engine • Great maneuverability and easy operation with standard four-wheel drive (4WD) and power steering • 3-Point Hitch - Category 1

1025R

• Same frame as the 1023E, but with a 25 hp engine • Upgraded seat suspension & armrests • Cruise control

$17,000 EXCL GST TRACTOR WITH LOADER *$23,150 EXCL GST

$18,750 EXCL GST TRACTOR WITH LOADER *$24,900 EXCL GST

*

+ADD MORE

JOHN DEERE

*

ADD A 54D MOWER DECK FOR *$3,650 EXCL GST OR A 60D MOWER DECK FOR *$4,250 EXCL GST

JOHN DEERE

3038E • 38 hp

• Standard four-wheel drive (4WD) for maximum traction • Easy-to-use hydrostatic transmission (HST) increases tractor performance • No clutching for fast and easy direction changes • Clean and simple operator station is comfortable and convenient • Optional two-spool rear selective control valve for superior implement performance • Optional iMatch™ Quick-Hitch feature allows for easy implement hookup • Excellent serviceability reduces operational costs and improves productivity

$22,700 EXCL GST TRACTOR WITH LOADER *$29,500 EXCL GST *

COMPLEMENT YOUR TRACTOR

SILVAN HEAVY DUTY SLASHER, 131RS7G100 - *$7,435 EXCL GST

SILVAN 400L SPRAYER WITH 6M BOOM, KBC400 - *$4,560 EXCL GST

SILVAN 500L FERTILISER SPREADER, * $1,395 EXCL GST

SILVAN NOBILI MULCHER, BNG230/01 - *$16,000 EXCL GST


WORKHORSES

UNDER 100 HP! JOHN DEERE

5055E

The 5055E is designed and engineered to perform with the same matchless proficiency as the larger John Deere machines. • 55 hp

+

• PowerTech™ M 2.9 L engine • 12F/12R transmission with left-hand PowrReverser™ • 4-wheel-drive • 540 & 540E PTO

TRACTOR WITH H240 LOADER *$49,000 EXCL GST

JOHN DEERE

+

5075E

SPRING BLOWOUT BEST PRICING OF THE YEAR

Toughness, reliability, outstanding performance and low operating costs: it’s not just their attractive price that makes the John Deere 5075E, 3 cylinder tractor such a tempting choice. • 75 hp • PowerTech™ M 2.9 L engine • 12F/12R transmission with left-hand PowrReverser™ • 4-wheel-drive • 540 & 540E PTO

TRACTOR WITH H240 LOADER *$56,000 EXCL GST LEARN MORE

ABOUT THE JOHN DEERE 5 SERIES RANGE OF UTILITY TRACTORS

CERVUS PARTS & SERVICE

Call our friendly parts and service teams for all your requirements 0800 333 734. We stock more than just John Deere parts and we can service and repair all makes and models!


HUGE SAVINGS ON THE

6155M!

ONLY 17 AVAILABLE

John Deere 6155M utility tractors are real achievers. They are built tough, rugged and with plenty of power to handle the heavier side of field work like seeding and tilling. These tractors were made for hard work. Every day. • 155 hp • PowerTech™ E (Tier 2) • Choice of six transmission options

• John Deere loader option • MFWD with optional TLSTM Plus • Category 3N/3, 3-point hitch

PRICED TO SELL, BUY NOW FOR THE BEST PRICING


GO GREEN

THIS SPRING!

HUGE PRE-SEASON DISCOUNTS ON NOW JOHN DEERE

R310R REAR MOUNTED

JOHN DEERE

F310R

V451R

ALSO AVAILABLE

V441R

ALSO AVAILABLE

High capacity, high performance 2.2 m wide feeding system

MOWER CONDITIONER

Outstanding manoeuvrability, highly efficient cutterbar

VIEW THE FULL RANGE OF HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT AND FIND THE RIGHT PIECE OF MACHINERY FOR YOUR OPERATION

NOW IS THE TIME TO BOOK YOUR PRE-SEASON INSPECTION

Get your hay equipment ready for when it matters most! A Cervus technician will check over your hay equipment and provide a list of recommended repairs. Call our service team on 0800 333 734.

JOHN DEERE GENUINE PARTS WARRANTY<

Purchase your genuine John Deere parts from Cervus, and you’ll get a 12 month warranty on parts when installed by a Cervus technician.

0800 333 734 CERVUSEQUIPMENT.CO.NZ Some products, options, attachments or accessories may not be available. Images are for illustrative purposes only and may show features or attachments not included in the price. Implements and attachments are sold separately. Products, specifications and availability are subject to change without notice. The engine horsepower and torque information are provided by the engine manufacturer to be used for comparison purposes only. Actual operating horsepower and torque will be less. Refer to the engine manufacturer’s website for additional information. Prices are GST inclusive unless stated otherwise. * Prices exclude GST. **Warranty term limited to years or hours used, whichever comes first and varies by model. Conditions apply. 6 year/2000 hours (whichever comes first). ^Applies to workshop based servicing only. Does not include travel. Pricing is for John Deere petrol ride-ons only. Offer does not include the “Quick Change” oil filter models.Contact us for more information on the Limited Warranty for New John Deere Turf & Utility Equipment. <Parts warranty does not apply to all parts sold by John Deere. Original software claims, battery, REMAN AC compressor and supplier administered warranties (e.g. parts starting with SW or PT prefix and Mi-T-M products) remain unchanged. Prices are valid until 31 December 2021 or while stocks last.

Profile for Rural News Group

Rural News 21 September 2021  

Rural News 21 September 2021

Rural News 21 September 2021  

Rural News 21 September 2021

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