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AGRIBUSINESS

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

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NEWS Deer boss optimistic on venison exports. PAGE 12

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS FEBRUARY 23, 2021: ISSUE 720 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

MEAT PRICES REMAIN STEADY SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

Merino New Zealand’s plan to market wool internationally on the promise that it is grown “regeneratively”, has been described as a ‘marketing exercise’.

Hype or Holy Grail? NIGEL MALTHUS

MERINO FARMERS need to be sure of their evidence if they are to embrace a regenerative agriculture label, says Lincoln University Professor Jon Hickford. Commenting on Merino New Zealand’s launch of its ZQRX programme, which aims to market wool internationally on the promise that it is grown “regeneratively”, Hickford calls it primarily a ‘marketing exercise’. Hickford told Rural News that he was not against marketing, nor the

increased farm performance monitoring which the programme entails. But he says farmers needed to be sure the techniques employed have scientific evidence behind them. “It’s a marketing ploy and I wish them well, but they do need to be cautious in case someone comes asking questions.” As president of New Zealand Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Science (NZIAHS), Hickford recently led a group of mainstream New Zealand agriculture scientists in criticising regenerative agriculture as an illdefined fad of dubious scientific merit.

“Marketing’s great at making claims about how a product will make you feel, how it might behave, what it might do for you and so on,” Hickford says. “The problem with it, is if you are ever challenged to actually prove that what you claim is real. If you claim that your farm systems are ‘better’, then the people buying the product may ultimately one day come back and say, ‘prove it, show us that it’s better’.” Hickford says there has to be an evidential trail to support what you’re claiming “Therein is the tension with

regenerative agriculture in New Zealand – because it’s just a claim. There’s no evidential basis to what is being claimed.” Hickford said there was room for merino farming to improve its environmental performance and some farmers were already moving away from grazing high country, and into more intensive lower altitude grazing with better feed systems. He says that would give better wool while retiring environmentally-sensitive land. • Jumping on the regen bandwagon, page 6

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SOME GOOD news for sheep and beef farmers; farmgate returns are stabilising, according to ANZ agriculture economist Susan Kilsby. Farmgate returns for lamb have been stronger than previously anticipated with prices are holding near $6.50/kg CW. Kilsby notes that in its January forecast update, ANZ anticipated prices would drop as far as $6/kg CW. “While further cuts in schedule pricing can’t be ruled out, it now looks like there may not be much more downside,” she says. “We remain cautious and now forecast farmgate lamb prices to reach a low point of $6.25/kg CW next month.” The relative stability is being driven by a combination of factors: international market prices are generally holding, New Zealand’s currency has stabilised, and there are not vast quantities of lambs coming forward for processing Kilsby says stocking rates are still lower than normal in some regions where destocking of capital stock occurred during last season’s drought. Pasture growth conditions have also been more favourable this season. TO PAGE 3


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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 3 ISSUE 720

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Dairy goes gangbusters SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS��������������������������������������1-15 HOUND, EDNA����������������������� 16 CONTACTS������������������������������ 16 OPINION�����������������������������16-18 AGRIBUSINESS���������������������� 19 MANAGEMENT��������������� 20-21 ANIMAL HEALTH������������22-23 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS���������������������� 24-26 RURAL TRADER��������������26-27

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: Inkwise NZ Ltd CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31.03.2019

CHINA’S GROWING appetite for New Zealand dairy products is showing no signs of abating. Global dairy prices rose for the seventh consecutive Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction last week and it’s all being put down to Chinese demand. ASB economist Nat Keall says strong demand from China has fuelled gains at GDT auctions over the past three months. “Domestic consumption has risen steadily over the course of 2020 as the Chinese economy has picked up, but domestic stockpiles haven’t managed to keep up, despite aggressive purchases through most auctions,” says Keall. He points out that analysis by dairy advisory services company, HighGround notes that while consumption in China is up 16% year-on-year, inventories for whole milk powder (WMP) have started to drift down toward yearago levels. WMP prices rose 4% last week to US$3,615/metric tonne, the highest

Chinese demand for New Zealand dairy products remains strong.

levels in nearly five years. Westpac senior agri economist Nathan Penny says underlying the strength in export prices is the surging Chinese economy. With Covid-19 under control, China was the only major global economy to grow over 2020. Importantly, as the economic momentum has continued into 2021 household spending has gathered steam.

But there are fears that should Chinese demand for NZ dairy wane, prices could drop. Open Country Dairy chief executive Steve Koekemoer told suppliers that some concern has been raised due to demand predominantly coming from Chinese buyers. But he added that domestic milk production and processing in China are still a lot higher than purchasing from overseas, which has underpinned the demand.

“Our expectation is that prices will level out and that we might see a little softening moving forward, as we have reached a critical benchmark,” says Koekemoer. “Regions outside of North Asia are more hesitant to buy at the current elevated levels and should Chinese demand start to wane, the market would need them to start buying, which they would likely only do after a downward price correction. “Nonetheless, the future looks bright, even if prices had to retreat slightly. We should see other regions come to the table preventing any serious decline.” Penny notes that growth in SouthEast Asian economies is not far behind, further underpinning demand for New Zealand products. “The global rollout of Covid vaccines will give global food demand a second ‘shot in the arm’, particularly from other secondary dairy markets,” he says. “Currently, global food supply is struggling to keep up with surging demand, causing high grain (feed) prices.”

Beef and lamb prices stabilising FROM PAGE 1

“This, combined with fewer mouths to feed, and more crops grown, has reduced the urgency to offload stock.” The outlook is also rosier for beef farmers. Farmgate beef prices have stabilised as the recent as international markets show tentative signs of recovery and supply from competing markets eases. Kilsby says limited volumes of store stock are being traded at pres-

ent as cattle are being utilised to clean up pastures which are rapidly losing quality as soil moisture levels rapidly deplete. The supply of manufacturing grade beef from NZ is starting to slow, which has been supportive of prices in international markets. At the farmgate level, pricing has stabilised after falling quite rapidly over the past few months, says Kilsby. “Farmgate prices for prime stock tend to fall most years until about February, before gradually picking

up,” she says. Meanwhile, prices for manufacturing cow usually remain soft until winter – after the main dairy cow culling period. The recent plateauing of schedule prices has also been supported by a slowdown in the volume of stock available for processing. As summer temperatures rise, feed reserves are drying out quickly, making pastures more suitable to feed cattle than fatten lambs. The dairy cow-cull season may

also be slightly later than normal, as strong milk prices and relatively good pasture cover levels encourage farmers to milk cows a little longer than otherwise. Kilsby says the rate of culling has slowed since the beginning of October. “This is being driven primarily by fewer beef cows being culled, rather than a significant change in the number of dairy cows being culled.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

NEW


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

4 NEWS

Shipping challenges mount SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND exporters and importers are facing “a perfect storm” as global shipping challenges mount. David Ross, chief executive at Kotahi, New Zealand’s largest containerised exporter, says a number of supply chain challenges have come together to create a perfect storm. He told Rural News that this could be the “new normal” well into 2021. For NZ exporters and importers, disruption caused by Covid has been exacerbated by Australian port industrial action and Port of Auckland capacity issues. Ross says these continue to disrupt container availability flows and coupled with globally dis-

rupted supply chains, few vessels are managing to run to schedule. “This is putting pressure on service levels,” says Ross. “This situation is being played out in most locations around the world, with shipping lines forced to make adjustments to their vessel itineraries to manage capacity, congestion and weather impacts with global shipping statistics reporting that ontime performance in the Asia-Pacific region has dropped to just 15%, from a norm of about 70-80%. That’s a big drop.” Kotahi, founded in 2011 by Fonterra and Silver Fern Farms, has long-term strategic commitments with Maersk Line and Port of Tauranga to attract larger, more efficient ships to New Zealand.

Shipping disruptions caused by Covid have been exacerbated by Australian port industrial action and Port of Auckland capacity issues.

Ross points out that in these market conditions, the value of strong strategic partnerships come to the fore. “Working collaboratively with our customers and partners, such as Maersk and Port of Tauranga, we have been managing this situation for a number of months and continue to operate at close to 99% container

availability. “There is an unavoidable small level of delay due to the scale of ship schedule slippage, however we are confident we will continue to get all our customers’ cargo to export markets,” he says. The reliance on shipping is higher than ever as few planes are flying international routes. ANZ agri analyst

Susan Kilsby notes that demand for most goods has remained intact throughout the pandemic and it has been the service sector that has taken the brunt of the pain associated with lockdowns and physical distancing measures. She says shipping costs are rising rapidly. “Shipping schedules are constantly changing,

with numerous schedules being cancelled or containers being rolled over and simply not being collected. “This has left many empty containers stranded well away from where they are most needed, with refrigerated containers particularly difficult to source,” Kilsby explains. “Shipping times are

being extended due to delays at ports, resulting in product shortages and buyers bringing orders forward in order to offset the delays.” NZ’s second largest dairy processor Open Country Dairy says it has had to manage through some shipping delays but is, overall, in a very good position, with shipments for the season being on track. OCD chief executive Steve Koekemoer says shipping orders continues to be a challenge globally. “It affects all sectors due to Covid. Our supply chain team are doing a fantastic job managing the demand in this highly disruptive environment and our customers have been very appreciative of the efforts put in,” says Koekemoer. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 5

High-quality connectivity crucial for rural NZ PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

RURAL PEOPLE should be getting the same level of connectivity in terms of broadband and mobile coverage as the people who live in urban areas. That’s the view of the Technology Users Association of NZ (TUANZ). Chief executive Craig Young told Rural News that rural users also shouldn’t have to pay more to get this coverage when urban people are getting high quality connectivity for nothing. It is well known that many farmers and rural businesses have to buy costly equipment to get broadband and many cannot get mobile phone coverage at all. Young says it’s almost more important for rural people to have high quality connectivity, given their often remote locations and the fact that they are running significant businesses – not only farming but other service related enterprises. He says there are also health and safety issues. “We are expecting New Zealanders to make the most of this digital technology and ser-

Craig Young says rural users shouldn’t have to pay more to get coverage when urban people are getting high quality connectivity for nothing.

vices with government agencies and corporate organisations expecting customers to do more and more online,” Young explains. “Banks are withdrawing cheques and Rural Women NZ have rightly pointed out that there is a significant number of people who can’t do things on-line and rely on cheques and snail mail to pay their bills. Before these organisations go

diving down the on-line track, they need to be aware of life in rural NZ,” he adds. “Organisations like IRD and banks need to be aware that if people can’t connect or haven’t got good connectivity they should be able to do these things by the traditional means.” Young says it’s interesting to note that the Climate Change Commission, in its recent report, said that if farmers and

people in rural areas are going to be expected to meet all sorts of environmental targets and provide data to local and central government agencies, they need good connectivity. “Significant parts of our GDP are driven out of rural NZ and that’s not just farming,” Young told Rural News. “I visited an engineering business north of Christchurch recently

and, unfortunately, because of the land and forestry – and despite the fact that new coverage that has gone in – it just hasn’t helped them. They employ 44 people and export their products, but they are just struggling to connect and get good connectivity. “The other thing we need to combat is the perception that these users are very remote. In quite a lot of cases, they

are close to urban areas, but we just haven’t solved the problem.” Young blames the present problems on the overall strategy of dealing with connectivity in NZ. He says some great work has been done in the past and, by and large, this is as a result of large projects which have connected large numbers of people. He says the goal was big bangs for bucks. But

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he believes it is now time to invest money in small projects to solve some of these problems – not unlike the 1960s when television coverage was patchy and local solutions were used to solve the issues. He says many of the telcos are wedded to the idea of putting up more towers, but for many in rural areas that solves nothing. “It might be as simple as the Government paying for the rights of a satellite dish on a person’s property or a dish on a property which may serve a small community,” he explains. “We need to look at new technologies and find solutions so that all New Zealanders get equal access to technology and are not penalised because they live in remote locations.” Young points out that in the Covid environment, young people risk being disadvantaged in their education, and others with their health. He says rural people must have the same access to entertainment and business options as urban populations. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

6 NEWS

Merino group claims it’s not jumping on bandwagon NIGEL MALTHUS

THE NEW Zealand Merino Company (NZM) has jumped on the regen ag bandwagon and launched what it claims is the world’s first “regenerative wool platform”. NZM claims this will “improve the sector’s environmental footprint”, while appealing directly to increasingly environmentallyconscious consumers. The company has partnered with wool apparel and footwear brands Allbirds, icebreaker and Smartwool to launch the ZQRX programme, which promises consumers that the wool they are buying is farmed according to an “index of regenerative farming practises”. The company has signed up 167 farmers to the programme. In a press release, NZM chief executive John Brakenridge says the global fashion industry is responsible for 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions and on-farm emissions represent about 60% of the emissions associated with woollen products. “Regenerative farming represents a considerable opportunity to sequester (store) carbon, and slow climate change,” he said. “Through the adoption

Central Otago merino farms are among the many already signed up for the New Zealand Merino Company’s new ZQRX programme. Photo: New Zealand Merino

of regenerative practices that both store more carbon and emit less, we could reduce our on-farm emissions down to zero. “We dream of a day when all wool is farmed with regenerative practices,” Brakenridge added. Dave Maslen, NZM general manager for markets and sustainability, told Rural News that ZQRX builds on NZM’s successful ZQ programme, which was launched in 2007

“An audit is really good at setting a base standard but we know that our growers are doing a lot more on their farm every day; they go way beyond what an audit requires them to do. “ as an audited set of standards for growers around animal welfare, environmental integrity and social responsibility. He says RX goes beyond ZQ’s audit-based model. “An audit is really good at setting a base

that through to our consumers.” RX instead uses an index of 15 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) across environment, social responsibility and animal welfare, and uses “science and data” to measure

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experts and third parties around such things as rates and modes of carbon sequestration in soils, and greenhouse gas net emission calculators. One example of the KPIs was a monitoring toolkit for growers to be able to measure instream invertebrates, as an indicator of their farm’s biodiversity. Maslen says the rate at which a grower might move up or down the index depended on the individual. NZM would ask growers what measure they wanted to improve on and NZM advisors would help draw up a strategy to achieve it. To be part of the programme was to be on a journey of continual improvement, he said. The number signed up already represented close to half of the 400 in the old ZQ programme, and more were interested in joining. Maslen did not put any figures on the likely cost to growers in joining the scheme, but claims the rewards were in the returns. He says the performance of grower contracts under ZQ had been well ahead of the average commodity market and NZM expected that to continue and accelerate under RX.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 7

Long-running Psa case settled PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

A LONG running legal dispute between the Crown (MPI) and a group of kiwifruit growers over the incursion of kiwifruit vine disease Psa has been settled out of court. The litigation arose from the 2010 incursion of the kiwifruit vine disease Psa. Strathboss Kiwifruit Limited, representing a group of kiwifruit growers, post-harvest operator Seeka Limited and others, have agreed to accept a Crown offer of $40 million, which includes a significant contribution from the Crown’s insurers of $15m. The plaintiffs had originally brought a claim for $450 million plus interest against the then Min-

istry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) for allowing the Psa into NZ. The claimants took MAF to court to gain compensation for the losses they suffered as a result of disease. The case went to the High Court and the Court of Appeal and was due to go to the Supreme Court last week, but the parties decided to call it a day and settle out of court. Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) director general Ray Smith said all parties agreed that it was time to move on and bring a close to the legal challenges that have been running since 2014. “This payment to settle is a sensible one on a per-head basis given the number of claimants in the class action, and their legal and litigation funder costs. But the settlement

MPI director general Ray Smith says it was time to move on and bring a close to the legal challenges that have been running since 2014.

acknowledges the grievance felt by the kiwifruit sector plaintiffs.” Smith says the settlement confirms the earlier judgment of the Court of Appeal, which in April 2020 found it would not be fair, just or reasonable to make the Crown legally responsible for losses of this kind. The

court also ruled that no legal duty of care was owed by the relevant MAF staff to the plaintiffs and noted they were protected by a statutory immunity, as was the Crown. Smith says the settlement gives immediate financial certainty for the Crown and avoids a com-

plex Supreme Court hearing and a long wait for a decision. “Much work has been done to enhance and improve the way we manage pre-border risk, import processes at the border and incursions that inevitably occur. New Zealanders can have confidence

in our current biosecurity system.” Kiwifruit Claim Chairman, John Cameron said the $40m settlement concludes what has been a long, hard and stressful fight for the kiwifruit growers. He says the settlement provides some compensation to growers whose livelihoods were devastated by the Psa incursion. “Importantly, we have achieved what we set out to do which was to hold the Government accountable for its negligent actions tha caused the Psa outbreak. “This was a very tough decision. Our case was meritorious and deserving, but we understand litigation is extremely risky and uncertain even for cases with such strong facts such as this one.”

Cameron says the Kiwifruit Claim Committee explored every option to ensure the growers got the best outcome and after consulting with its legal team and obtaining further independent legal advice, they were advised to accept the settlement. He says what happened to the kiwifruit industry in 2010 was entirely preventable. “MPI knew Psa existed, they knew the damage it could cause if it was let into the country and they breached their own protocols that were in place to keep it out. It is critical our primary industries can rely on our government to perform their biosecurity role with reasonable care and skill; we don’t want to ever see this happen again.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

8 NEWS

Hemp food business a real family affair JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

A FAMILY-RUN food brand is entering the market with the aim of delivering wholesome food products to consumers. Based on the Ellis family’s Bay of Plenty farm, Harvest to Hand is the brainchild of Holleigh Ellis, a food scientist who grew up on the farm. Ellis says inspiration struck amid the Covid-19 lockdowns in 2020. “Lockdown loomed last year, we got our thinking caps on and I ran with the idea of starting a food brand, but we didn’t know what,” she told Rural News. Ellis says there were many ideas, but hemp seed was what they had to hand as her father, Ian, had previously been contracted to grow it on the farm. “I love natural and health foods and hemp ticked all the boxes.” Ellis says the business has been somewhat of a family affair. “Currently, I wear several hats when it comes to developing and launching and

growing the brand. “Dad is busy running the family farm, which is a cropping farm during the summer and finishing stock during the winter.” Ellis says her partner, Dylan Pearce, runs two businesses of his own as well as working on Harvest to Hand; one is a beekeeping business and the other is a trucking business. “Dylan and I catch up on the business when he gets home from work each day.” Ellis says that both Pearce and her father are mentors to her because of their experience in business. “I love being around and involved with the farm and working alongside family. It’s so important to me. My grandmother is still living on the farm and it’s important to stick together, support each other.” She says the business is always going to evolve and diversify. “We have so many ideas of what’s to come, it’s just making them happen. “We aren’t just a hemp company, we’re a food brand which will produce more products as we grow.”

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Left to right Dylan Pearce, Holleigh Ellis, and Ian Ellis of Harvest to Hand.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 9

Dairy shines in Covid world SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

CONSUMERS ARE flocking back to dairy products as Covid shines the light on health and wellness, says Tom Bailey, the new senior vice president for Southern Pastures. Bailey, who took up his new role in Auckland after working as a senior dairy analyst for RaboResearch in the US, told Rural News that dairy demand has come roaring back as people seek natural nutrition and go back to basics – simple, uncomplicated, familiar and trusted food. “Covid has empha-

sised health and wellness from many angles and demand for milk is back,” he says. “There are specific examples of this on a national scale; the US has bought massive amounts of dairy as part of its food support programs,” he says. “Chinese demand has also been very strong. The government has emphasised the health benefits of milk, and we are hearing that fluid milk demand is pumping.” As a result, the Chinese dairy processors do not have excess milk, which they normally would, because fluid milk demand has been so

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Southern Pastures’ Tom Bailey says consumers are flocking back to dairy products as Covid shines the light on health and wellness.

strong. This has helped bolster NZ exports as our exports meet growing demand and also backfill where domestic Chinese manufacturers are missing. Bailey also says NZ

ingredients remain at a substantial premium relative to the global markets, due to many factors – grass-fed is better, many brands require Fonterra specifications for label requirements, and NZ has a great working relation-

ship with key importing markets, such as China. Southern Pastures owns and operates 20 farms in Waikato and Canterbury and also owns boutique milk company Lewis Road Creamery. The company milks

cows under a stringent independently certified 10 Star certified values program, which stipulates grass-fed, free-range, climate-change mitigation, human welfare, animal welfare, GMO-free, palm products free, growth hormones free, antibiotic stewardship, and environmental sustainability requirements. Premium milk produced under the Southern Pastures 10 Star program is currently used in Lewis Road Creamery’s grass-fed butter sold in Whole Foods and other stores across the US. Bailey believes valueadd dairy products of the type produced by Southern Pastures and Lewis Road are poised for significant global growth.

“We’ve seen a backto-basics trend for some time now, with consumers seeking out high quality, nutritious dairy options over more expensive and less healthful alternative plant-based products,” he says. “People are showing a clear preference for more natural, less adulterated foods with shorter ingredient lists.” He said premium markets will increasingly pay more for dairy that has an authentic and traceable story. “When you add attributes such as sustainability or more favourable omega 3:6 milk fat ratios you can extend your market lead, and that’s where Southern Pastures really stands out.”

NEW ZEALAND milk volume is surprisingly declining in a highly profitable environment. Tom Bailey believes this is due to legislative uncertainty around environmental regulations and central bank policies creating reluctance to invest in dairy. “This is affecting banks’ willingness to lend as well as farmer ability to expand. This is a lost opportunity for the economy,” he says. While NZ supply set for further possible declines, Bailey believes NZ premium are well positioned to be maintained relative to other global dairy export markets. “Furthermore, consumers continue to show a lot of love for grass-fed products,” he told Rural News. “Because grazing is amazing and NZ dairies are the most productive with the smallest environmental footprint in the world, NZ products should sell well. “There is no doubt that premium consumers want our products – our Lewis Road brand has had fantastic traction in the US, and we are set to launch on Amazon, making us the first NZ butter brand store on Amazon.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

10 NEWS

FEPs are a tool that have been developed to help farmers recognise on-farm environmental risks and set out a programme to manage those risks. CREDIT: PAUL SUTHERLAND PHOTOGRAPHY

Farm Environment Plans now becoming an important farming tool PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

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versity’s Farmed Landscapes Research Centre (FLRC). Normally the FLRC workshop runs over three days, but because of Covid, the organisers decided to go with a one day event with a single theme – FEP’s. About 50 participants came to the workshop at Massey’s Palmerston North campus, while more than 350, including several speakers, joined in via Zoom. FEPs are a tool that has been developed to help farmers recognise on-farm environmental risks and set out a programme to manage those risks. The FEP is unique to an individual farm and the level of complexity of

the plan largely depends on the farm system. With the Government’s strong focus on improving water quality and also on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, Professor Chris Anderson, who heads up the research centre, says FEPs are a huge issue now. He says they are becoming a major tool for dealing with environmental issues. Speakers on the webinar and workshop, which included representatives from regional councils, science organisations and industry good organisations, covered a range of topics. These included the research being done

on Green House Gas Emissions and working with farmers to develop FEPs. “It was great having more than 400 people wanting to know more about these plans. We got to a larger audience than we usually do and picked up people who don’t normally come to these workshops,” Anderson told Rural News. “For example, we had professionals in the legal space and banks that don’t normally engage with us. We are confident that what we are doing is working well and the scope is to do it more often.” He says as the demand for more FEPs grows, Massey University,

through this research group, has a big role to play in thought leadership and promoting discussion to solve some of the challenges. “As a research organisation, we don’t want to take sides,” Anderson explained. “We are not involved in accreditation or auditing of the plans, but we are involved in discussion, training and good science that will underpin the plans.” Anderson agrees that with social media, much so-called pseudo or inaccurate science is circulating and he says it’s important to promote discussions and get positive stories into the media to engage people.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 11

Profit, sustainability both important PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HEAD of Massey’s School of Agriculture & Environment, Professor Paul Kenyon, says the direction the Government is heading on sustainability heralds the way that NZ will farm in the future. However, he adds that we shouldn’t forget that we need to farm in a profitable and productive manner, but also in a sustainable way. Kenyon says Massey University is a significant contributor to the knowledge that is needed to achieve these new goals and the university has a role in the areas of teaching and research. But he concedes that it is important to realise the role of others in doing this as well. “We are not doing it alone and are working with a number of partners across NZ and across the world in a number of areas,” he told Rural News. “There is the water quality aspect and greenhouse gas aspect and we can’t be leaders as a university in all areas. So, we have strength in the areas of water quality and nitrous oxide areas, but we also contribute to other areas – including greenhouse

gas emissions.” To that end, Kenyon says Massey University is including material about environmental issues in its signature courses of Bachelor of Ag Science and Bachelor of Agri Business. He says this has been done in association with their partners to make sure the information students are given is about increasing profitability and productivity for farmers, but in a sustainable manner. “In our courses there is a lot more about environmental impacts underpinning all the course and throughout the programme,” he explains. “It’s not so much about a paper or course on the topic, but it is thread throughout the degree programme.” Kenyon says Massey University has had a long tradition of being very strong in animal science, be that in the traditional bachelor of ag science or the vet science programme. However, the message he’s getting from employers is that they want people who have a degree to have a far more in-depth knowledge of the subject. Kenyon says this is understandable given that animal welfare is becoming increasingly important to consum-

ers and regulators in our export markets, and the industry needs people who can ensure these goals are met. He says one of the challenges of educators today is trying to predict

what knowledge and skills the workforce will need in 20 years’ time. Kenyon says Massey wants to be proactive and produce graduates who have the skills to meet any needs in the future.

Professor Paul Kenyon says we need to farm in a profitable and productive manner, but also in a sustainable way.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

12 NEWS

Deer boss optimistic on venison JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

INNES MOFFAT says he is optimistic for exports of venison in 2021. The chief executive of Deer Industry New Zealand (DINZ) says that while Covid-19 had a significant impact on sales across the globe, total exports increased in 2020. “With the restaurant trade severely curtailed in our main markets, sales of venison, like other higher end cuts, have been significantly impacted,” Moffat told Rural News. “Exporters have swung to supplying companies that produce retail items with some success.” He says that new accounts in both the United States and Europe have been gained and increasing quantities of venison have been purchased. However, the total value of venison has decreased between 2019 and 2020. Data provided by Stats NZ shows an 18.12% decrease in the average price per kilo of chilled

DINZ chief executive Innes Moffat says he’s optimistic about venison exports in 2021.

venison between November 2019 and November 2020, from $22.74 to $18.64. Moffat says the New Zealand deer industry developed to supply customers in Europe and Asia with New Zealand venison. He adds that the industry can’t be overreliant on one market. “In order to be a competitive land use option, the venison sector needs to sell venison to the highest paying markets and has a good spread of markets to reduce risk

of over reliance on one market.” New Zealand venison marketers sell venison to approximately 30 markets around the world, with roughly a third of export revenue coming from Europe. Moffat says the sector has come off a period of relative stability and profitability and looks forward to rebounds in prices once European and North American restaurants reopen. “We saw during the relaxation of Covid-

related restrictions during 2020 that restaurant dining quickly returned to normal levels in the USA and countries like Germany and Belgium,” he says. “Vaccination programmes underway in Europe, the UK and North America will allow a return to more normal circumstances, and this will allow venison sales to return to normal.” He adds that the sector is expecting a moderate season for chilled venison in 2021, but stocks of frozen venison will take a while to “work through the system.” Moffat also says that New Zealand companies have put in a big effort to sell venison in New Zealand, to some success. “Retail packs, small goods and online sales have increased substantially this year,” he says, adding that sales to the restaurant sector in New Zealand have been affected by the lack of international tourism in 2020. @rural_news

A coalition has been formed to develop a market for NZ velvet as a health food ingredient in China. Credit: Kieren Scott Minaret Station.

NEW HEALTH FOOD FOR CHINA? DINZ RECENTLY announced that three companies have formed a coalition to develop a market for New Zealand velvet as a health food ingredient in China. The coalition – made up of CK Import Export, PGG Wrightson and Provelco – aims to replicate an explosion in demand for deer velvet from South Korea. Moffat says he was heartened when the companies approached DINZ with the proposal to form the coalition. “Collaboration means companies can make faster progress in the market and it makes it easier to secure government

and industry funding,” he says. Moffat says DINZ will support the initiative because of its potential to benefit the whole industry. “It aligns with our objectives of building market recognition of New Zealand velvet as a premium product, developing new markets, and creating sustainable on-farm value.” The three companies will collectively provide most of the funding with a contribution from NZ Trade and Enterprise and administrative support and some funding from DINZ.

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Meat exports remain strong in 2020 NEW ZEALAND’S red meat sector exported $9.2 billion worth of products during 2020 – an increase of 1% on the previous year. According to analysis by the Meat Industry Association (MIA), NZ’s overall meat exports during the year reached historically high levels – 7%

above 2018 exports ($8.6 billion) and 21% above 2017 ($7.6 billion). The top 10 markets for New Zealand meat remained unchanged during 2020. China continued to be the major customer, with exports worth $3.3 billion, accounting for 36% of total exports for the year.

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kets increased. Sheep meat exports rose by 3%, to just over 400,000 tonnes, with China the top market, followed by the UK and US. Exports to the UK increased 10% by value compared to 2019. Beef exports rose in both volume and value, to 471,718 tonnes, worth

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 13

Fonterra’s debt reduction gets tick of approval SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S STRATEGIC review following two years of financial losses has received a tick of approval from ratings agency Fitch. This month Fitch Ratings revised the co-operative’s outlook to stable from negative and reaffirmed its ‘A’ rating. In a statement to NZX, Fonterra chief financial officer Marc Rivers says the improved outlook rating reflects the co-op’s progress following a strategic review. “In particular, the work we’ve done to improve our balance sheet over the last few

years,” he says. Fitch says its key rating drivers included significant progress the co-op made refocusing on its core New Zealand dairy business. “This has helped the co-operative retain its defensive traits, which previously underpinned the rating. “Fonterra can pass on global dairy-price and foreign-exchange movements to farmers in its global ingredient business, and benefits from resilient profit margins in the consumer and foodservice business when dairy prices are low. These reduce profit volatility and maintain its leverage metrics.”

Fonterra’s chief financial officer Marc Rivers says the improved rating outlook reflects the co-op’s work improving its balance sheet over the last few years.

in its core business to address its profit volatility. In 2019, it sold iconic ice cream maker Tip Top

Fonterra has been divesting non-core foreign assets and implemented a number of cost-cutting measures

to Froneri, a joint venture between Nestle and PAI Partners for $380 million. Last year, it offloaded stakes in DFE Pharma

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tegic review and may also be sold. On Covid’s impact on Fonterra, Fitch says the pandemic and civil unrest in markets such as Hong Kong and Chile had some impact on Fonterra’s business in FY20. But Fitch expects the impact on Fonterra’s core ingredient business to be limited, as global dairy sales remain resilient. “Fonterra’s consumer and food-service division may, however, recover slowly, as the hospitality sector across many markets remains dampened by the restrictions to manage the pandemic,” it says. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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and Foodspring for $623 million. This financial year the co-op hopes to complete the sale of China Farms for $555m. Fitch notes that Fonterra’s completed asset sales are in line with its target to reduce gross debt by $1 billion. As a result, leverage declined to 1.7x in financial year 2020 (FY19: 2.2x) and Fitch expects leverage to remain around this level over the medium term. Fitch has not included any potential divestments in its base case but notes that Fonterra continues to sell off its stake in Beingmate, while DPA Brazil remains under stra-

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

14 NEWS

Ag contractors face up to challenges BRENDON BURNS

NEW ZEALAND’S rural contractors are facing a mixed bag of weather conditions, from drought in Northland to a cracker season in Southland. They’re also reporting some labour issues with inexperienced Kiwis causing damage to machinery and pumping up insurance claims. The Rural Contractors NZ board met recently and members reported they and their farmer clients are dealing with a very diverse range of climatic conditions. Waikato-based Helen Slattery represents Zone 1, which extends to Northland from northern Taranaki and northern Hawkes Bay. She says Northland was in near drought conditions and while the Waikato was dry, the conditions

were perfect for maize. The grass harvest for the season had also been good with a lot more hay made than last year. This had meant Waikato farmers hadn’t needed to buy in feed though this was now starting to change. Wairarapa-based Clinton Carroll told the RCNZ Board that things had been similar in his area. While it had been a good season in the end, he’d found it the toughest ever after a cold, wet start. Barley harvesting was just starting, with some above average yields reported. Grass growth had been good but conditions were now beginning to dry out. Canterbury member Martin Bruce says it’s still relatively green compared to other seasons and cereal and maize crops were also doing well.

Rural contractors around the country are tackling a number of weather and labour issues.

The harvest was in full swing. Staffing remained an issue with many rural contractors forced to hire people from other industries who often had no real idea about the work involved. Wanaka-based Richard

Woodhead says Otago had experienced all sorts of weather from drought conditions on the eastern coast to snow to torrential rain annihilating cherry crops. “There’s lots of sad stories there.” Crops had also been

affected with one recent harvest of rye corn recording 0.6 tonne per hectare rather than the usual 3-4 tonnes. RCNZ president David Kean, who is based near Winton, said Southland had been experiencing

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a “cracker season” after 200m of rain in January. “The crops are jumping out of the ground. Everyone’s got enough work.” The downside was finding skilled workers. Kean says Agricul-

ture Minister Damien O’Connor had encouraged rural contractors to hire more Kiwis and the industry had responded. However, while some recruits were good, others simply did not have the necessary skills. As a result, insurance claims were on the rise for damaged machinery. Kean says some managers were at their wits’ end dealing with issues – such as men in their 60s or even 70s who’d perhaps had skills in their day to drive tractors but found dealing with today’s hi-tech machines a real challenge. He says some rural contracting managers had left their jobs because of the “horrible pressures” created by having to deal with issues arising after leaving people working alone operating machinery in paddocks.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

NEWS 15

Recommendations ‘ambitious and challenging’ PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

INITIAL REACTION to the Climate Change Commission report has been generally muted, but there are some concerns in the agricultural sector. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern claims the commission’s draft advice, released earlier this month, sets out an ‘achievable blueprint’ for New Zealand. She says the report demonstrates NZ has the tools to achieve our target but calls on us to accelerate our work. “As a government we are committed to picking up the pace and focusing much more on decarbonisation and reducing emis-

sions rather than overly relying on forestry,” Ardern says. “The advice also highlights that the cost of action on the economy is not as great as many have previously thought. In fact, action on climate change is an economic opportunity for New Zealand.” Climate Change Minister James Shaw believes the release of the draft advice is a significant milestone. “There are two things that stand out from the draft advice – first, that action will be required across all sectors of the economy,” he says. “And second, that meeting our targets is affordable and possible with existing

BLNZ chief executive Sam McIvor.

technology.” Meanwhile, Beef + Lamb New Zealand says the commission’s focus on reducing the country’s fossil fuel emissions and its recognition that largescale forestry planting is not the long-term solution is encouraging. However, chief executive Sam McIvor adds that farmers would have liked to have seen greater

recognition of the sequestration already happening on sheep and beef farms as a result of their own conservation efforts over the last few decades. “There are also a number of areas of the report that will be of concern to farmers,” he says. “We need to study these in more detail to understand the assumptions, methodologies and sci-

ence used by the commission to underpin some of its advice.” He says this included the commission’s advice of a 15% reduction in sheep, cattle and dairy livestock numbers within the next nine years, analysis of the social and economic impacts of land-use change on communities and the science behind the methane targets. McIvor says sheep and beef farmers have reduced their greenhouse gas emissions by more than 30% since 1990, while improving productivity and generating export value for the country. He adds that it is the only sector in New Zealand to record

this scale of achievement when it comes to reducing emissions. DairyNZ boss Dr Tim Mackle says it is encouraging to see the commission’s recommendations focus on R&D and rural broadband as solutions to support agriculture to reduce emissions. He says climate policy is incredibly complex and science sits at its core. Mackle says the commission’s science-based approach is ‘ambitious and challenging’ for all of New Zealand and farming is no exception. “We will be looking at what this advice could mean for dairy farmers and how the Government will partner to support our sector through this

transition,” he adds. “Our farmers have already started making practice changes on-farm, along with introducing Farm Environment Plans. We will continue to push into this and leverage science and technology to support us on the journey,” he says Mackle says DairyNZ welcomes the acknowledgement of a ‘split gas approach’ and that methane does not need to reduce to net zero. He adds that the commission’s proposals and underlying assumptions will be closely examined over the next few weeks, in particular the biogenic methane targets and advice on reducing stock numbers.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

16 OPINION EDITORIAL Better connection, now! WE MAY now be into the third decade of the 21st century, but unfortunately much of NZ’s rural broadband and mobile coverage remains at third world levels. That is unacceptable in a modern, first-world country like New Zealand. How is it still the case that many farmers and rural businesses around the country have to buy costly equipment to get broadband, while many others cannot even get mobile phone coverage at all? As the Technology Users Association of NZ (TUANZ) chief executive Craig Young says, rural people should be getting the same level of connectivity in terms of broadband and mobile coverage as the people who live in urban areas. It is even more important for rural people to have high quality connectivity, given their often remote locations and the fact that they are running significant businesses – not only farming, but other service related enterprises. “We are expecting New Zealanders to make the most of this digital technology and services with government agencies and corporate organisations expecting customers to do more and more online,” Young explains. “Organisations like IRD and banks need to be aware that if people can’t connect or haven’t got good connectivity they should be able to do these things by the traditional means.” He is absolutely right. How can rural people be expected take advantage of digital technology when many do not have access to reliable, affordable broadband? Meanwhile, the Climate Change Commission, in its recent report, said that if farmers and people in rural areas are going to be expected to meet all sorts of environmental targets and provide data to local and central government agencies, they need good connectivity. If government and others are expecting the farming and the rural sectors to play their part in reducing the country’s carbon emissions, reliable and affordable connectivity is a must. The Government needs to step up and make rural broadband connectivity and mobile phone coverage a priority in its post-Covid infrastructure plans. PM Jacinda Ardern promised to govern for all New Zealanders when she was re-elected last year. How can this be so when young rural people risk being disadvantaged in their education, and others with their health and businesses? Ardern and her Government now must act on her election night promise. Rural people deserve same access to health, entertainment and business options as their urban counterparts.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

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EDNA

“From now on, every dead possum we trap gets sent to Canberra!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Hats off!

Good idea

Unemployable?

Great idea

YOUR OLD mate was a little confused by Maori Party MP Rawiri Waititi’s stance over not wanting to wear a tie in Parliament’s debating chamber. Waititi was booted out of Parliament on the first day back this month, after a dress code scuffle with Speaker Trevor Mallard. As he was leaving the house, after being ejected by Mallard, Waititi said: “This is not about ties, it is about cultural identity.” The Hound suggests Waititi may very well have had a valid point about the archaic rule around wearing neck ties in Parliament, which has now been relaxed. However, he suggests if Maori Party co-leader is going to pull the old ‘cultural identity’ claim then he’d probably have more truck and ‘mana’ if he were not wearing his omnipresent, ridiculous-looking cowboy hat, which is hardly traditional Maori garb!

A MATE of the Hound’s suggests there is an easy solution to farming sector concerns about more trees being planted to meet the country’s carbon emissions targets. “I believe there is a simple answer to the issue of getting more trees planted without affecting livestock production,” he explained. “It’s called shelter belts!” He reckons if the ‘powers that be’ gave farmers carbon credits for a single row, side trimmed shelter belt, this would cover the costs of the tree stock, planting, fencing on both sides and the on-going trimming. “I reckon we would see a lot of shelter belts planted, with the benefits of shade and shelter for stock, reducing nutrient run off and increasing biodiversity – as well as a valuable crop to harvest in 30 years,” he adds. Your canine crusader believes this is worthy idea, but probably too practical and simple for the boffins in Wellington to ever consider!

YOUR CANINE crusader shakes his head at the complete lack of practical and real-world knowledge in both government and the bureaucracy. Even blind Freddy could have seen that the impact of Covid on getting foreign workers would be a major problem for the horticulture sector and lazy locals would not do the job. However, instead of making plans to fast-track ways for international workers to come into the country, government – in their infinite wisdom – decided unemployed New Zealanders would fill the gap. They developed a scheme, available to anyone who moved off a benefit, offering up to $200 a week for accommodation costs and a $1,000 incentive payment for workers, who completed jobs of six weeks or longer. Guess how many unemployed locals took up the scheme? A staggering 54! Not so much unemployed, but unemployable!

YOUR OLD mate has long argued Landcorp’s farming business – Pamu – is a bigger dog than he is. The state farmer’s latest result of $8 million for the half-year ended 31 December, 2020, shows its return on assets – managing 117 farms, 84 of which they own – makes it a terrible business for both the country and taxpayers. However, a recent brilliant suggestion from North Otago farmer Grant Ludeman would kill two birds with the one stone. He suggests that the Government order Pamu to completely destock all its farms and plant them in natives – making a huge contribution to decarbonising the country and meeting the CCC’s aim for a 15% reduction in NZ’s livestock numbers – as well as ridding the taxpayer of a poorly performing state business. Win, win!

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

OPINION 17

Slow down and smell the flowers! I HAVE been a regular reader for a number of years now, the last couple of decades in particular. Not so long ago, I was reading around 40 books each year. There is so much learning readily available in good books! Now, added to that, I have been copying/ cutting and filing for over three decades. Stories that have motivated and moved me, and quotes that I find poignant and powerful are tucked away in my files. I even have a number of quotes on the importance of reading. Here’s just the one for an appetiser: “Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.” (Harry S Truman, 33rd US President) For my column this month, here’s one of those stories. I choose it because the application is so pertinent in today’s world. This story could easily have happened in any city with a busy transit hub. On a cold January morning, at a busy Metro station in Washington D.C., a young violinist was busking, as people rushed on by, chasing their day. After three minutes, a middle-aged man paused briefly, then hurried on. Thirty seconds later, a woman threw the first dollar into his case, as she hurried on past. Six minutes later a man leaned against a wall to listen for

FARMER’S CHAPLAIN

Colin Miller

How many times has being in a hurry got us into a pickle, simply because we didn’t push the pause button long enough to think it through? More times than we would like to admit is my guess. How many great moments in life have we missed as we have bar-

a few minutes, then looking at his watch he moved on. After ten minutes a little boy stopped, but his mum was having none of it, and hurried him along. Other children did the same, but every parent without exception kept their kiddies moving along. Only seven people stopped long enough to actually listen for a bit, while just 20 of the folks threw some money in. He collected $50 for his efforts that morning. After about 45 minutes he stopped playing, packed up and moved on. Nobody seemed to notice and there was no applause as he left. The young violinist? Joshua Bell, one of the world’s finest musicians! He had played some of the most detailed classical pieces ever written, on a violin reportedly worth more than NZ$5 million dollars. Two days before this, he had played to a sold-out theatre, where folks had paid $150 per ticket, just to hear him play.

relled right on by, ‘foot to the floor’? I doubt whether all the folks at the Metro that morning will ever get that opportunity again. Added to these thoughts is the wellknown fact that this highspeed living is simply not good for your health. It will definitely catch-up

with you sooner or later. “My goodness, it’s late February already!” someone gasped. For me, I notice when I slow down, strangely the clock seems to slow down too. And when I get wound too tight and crank up the tempo, strangely the clock seems to speed up as well!

side of life has helped me immensely with this; it’s helped me put the brakes on when I’ve needed to. It’s a non-negotiable part of my life. Look after yourself and those closest to you. God Bless. • To contact Colin Millar email: farmerschaplain@ ruralnews.co.nz

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and incorporated the idea in their models were very unsure of their findings. They said, “uncertainties remain”, “there is still a substantial range in the absolute level of emissions”, and “further work is warranted.” A lead author for the IPCC, Dr Myles Allen, an earlier supporter of the theory of methane being a powerful player, now says the claims are 400% over-stated. He and his fellow researchers are pushing for the GWP 100 formula that underpins the methane potency theory to be abandoned. Allen now believes a methane molecule may have just seven times the radiative absorptiveness of CO₂. Our Government and the Climate Change Commission chose to ignore this critically important finding. Even if the strong methane molecule theory is used the outcome in warming is little changed. Proposing that methane is X times more potent than CO₂ doesn’t make a scrap of difference – water vapour dominates anyway and reducing our methane emissions by a puny portion to save the world is futile and irrational. [The second part of this piece will run in the next issue]

So, slow down and get some balance into your schedule as soon as you can. Don’t wait for ‘a rainy day’ to make some adjustments. You may find the ‘rain’ to be more of a storm that lasts a whole lot longer than you had imagined! And yes, the spiritual

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

18 OPINION HELPFUL ANALOGY Order

Gas

Part per million ppm (dry air bases)

% by volume (moist air basis) (1.5% water vapour)

Greenouse gas?

Equivalent litres in 2,500,000 litre Olympic pool

1

Nitrogen

780,840

76.9%

No

1,922,500

2

Oxygen

209,450

20.63%

No

515,770

3

Water vapour

0

1.48%

Yes

37,000

4

Argon

9,340

0.92%

No

23,000

5

CO2

415

0.041%

Yes

1,025

6

Neon

18

0.0018%

No

45

7

Helium

5

0.0005%

No

12

8

Methane

1.8

0.00017%

Yes

4.3

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Absurdity on steroids! F.A.R.M. (Facts About Ruminant Methane) is a group of farmers and scientists who question the need for drastic cuts in ruminant methane. They argue that there is a natural cycle where the emitters of a GHG (methane) use as much as they emit to grow the grass the cows need to produce the methane and thus puts ruminant methane in a different category to fossil fuel emissions. Owen Jennings prosecutes FARM’s argument in part one of a two part opinion piece…

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IT IS beyond comprehension that otherwise intelligent and erudite adults can believe that reducing methane from NZ’s agricultural sources will make even the tiniest jot of difference – other than signalling, internationally, how virtuous we are. Let’s do the numbers. The Climate Change Commission (CCC) proposes reducing ruminant methane by 10% over the next 9 years or 1.1% per year. Ruminant methane, according to NASA/ NOAA, is only 12% to 15% of all global methane emissions. NZ has just 1% of the world’s ruminants. Therefore, every year, the CCC’s suggestion will lead to a reduction in the planet’s methane by 1.1% of 1% (our share of ruminants) of 12% – 15% (the share of methane emissions caused by ruminants). That is a reduction contribution of 0.0000132% - 0.0000165% of all methane emissions per annum. It is immeasurable, absurdly insignificant and any suggestion of warming is a fantasy. We all know that the trace gas, methane is just one of several Greenhouse Gases (GHG) that allegedly can impact temperature. All the GHGs together make up only 1.52% of the total atmosphere of which water vapour is the 1.5%. Water vapour varies around the globe from 0.5% to 4%. But just for the GHG portion of the NZ atmosphere (1.52% total) the proportion of

these GHG’s are: Water Vapour – 97.3% CO₂ – 2.69% Methane – 0.012% Nitrous Oxide – 0.0019% This means water vapour is 36 times greater in concentration than the total CO₂ and more than 8,000 times greater than the TOTAL methane concentration. (See table) Methane is already a very minor player in the atmosphere and we are proposing to remove 0.0000165% of it by taking an axe to our most successful industry. Utterly absurd. There are at least two counter arguments that might be raised. The first is that methane is a very powerful absorber of radiation – as much as 84 times stronger on a weight-forweight basis than CO₂. Therefore, we need to take action. However, the claims of potency for methane are highly dubious. Scientists, including our Dr Jock Allison, and international physicists including Dr Tom Sheahen, Dr William Wijngaarten, Dr Will Happer and others, assert that the absorptive capability of methane molecules is not greatly different to CO₂ molecules – which Tyndall discovered way back in the 1860s. The molecular structure of these trace gases is remarkably similar. Furthermore, the scientists who first hypothesised that methane was radiatively more powerful than CO₂ TO PAGE 17


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

AGRIBUSINESS 19

The rewards of good data PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND’S primary sector is our equivalent of the USA’s Silicon Valley of excellence. That’s the view of one of the country’s illustrious agricultural economists, Rob Davison, who recently received an award for his outstanding contribution to the primary sector. The award goes alongside the ONZM he received in 2016 for his services to NZ’s sheep and beef sector. This latest award is well deserved for a person who has helped build and shape one of the most respected economic institutions in the country. Davison has been with Beef+Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service for more than 40 years, much of that time as its executive director. He told Rural News that the red meat sector has made huge productivity gains over the years. A great example of this is the fact that the country has reduced its sheep flock since 1990-91 by 54% yet it produces only 8% less lamb. “Similarly, our beef cow herd is down by

20%, but our steer production is up 7% - largely reflecting that half the cattle coming off sheep and beef farms now is of dairy origin. “So, our efficiencies are way up there. “Whatever one likes to think the primary sector it remains a huge and significant productive engine in the NZ economy,” he says. Davison believes a lot of commentary today is what he describes as ‘industrial thinking’,

which means that you define processes very precisely. But he says people have to remember that farming is a biological and climate driven system meaning the sector is dealing with huge “natural” variability and that is a great challenge. “That biological variability is huge and this is not understood or overlooked by some people who say they are going to fix things and fix farming,” he says.

CHANGE KEEPS COMING

Beef+Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service executive director Rob Davison was recently awarded for his outstanding contribution to the primary sector.

PATHWAY TO SUCCESS ROB DAVISON grew up in the Wellington region and says his interest in the primary sector was sparked by the fact that his father bought the NZ Journal of Agriculture. He says his father probably bought the magazine for the gardening pages, but the young Davison was personally interested in the main agricultural stories and was motivated by these, and by relatives who farmed in the King Country. “After I left school, I became a farm cadet and worked at Tora Station out on the Wairarapa coast for a bit over a year,” he told Rural News. “I then went off to Southland, Waimahaka, to learn how to winterfeed sheep and cattle on forage crops. I then worked on a Canterbury farm and then went to Massey

University to gain a Diploma in Sheep Farming.” Davison went back to working on farms again, but a chance meeting with Professor Jim Stewart of Lincoln University set him on a new career path. On meeting Stewart, Davison discovered that Lincoln was planning a new degree in Agricultural Commerce, which he completed and followed with an honours year – including a paper on trade policy among other things. “I really enjoyed Lincoln as an older student. It was there that I was introduced to Frank Ward who was director of the then Meat and Wool Board’s Economic Service and was offered a job there as a research officer,” he says.

Transitioning from farm life to working in the city came easily for Davison and he has been there ever since. He’s very proud of the Beef+Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service and what it has achieved since it came into being in 1950. He says its goal then, as it still is, focuses on providing independent, authoritative, credible information to shape policy for the sector. Underpinning its policy and sector benchmarking work is the sheep and beef farm survey. The Economic Service uses the survey information to forecast future production and profitability and model scenarios, which in turn shape policies in the sector – all firmly linked back to the actual farm situation.

SINCE HE took up farming and then his role at the Economic Service, Rob Davison has seen many changes. His own organisation is now taking account of environmental issues in their survey. Davison says the big changes for the sector were in the 1980s when farm subsidies were removed and the sector was subjected to the ebbs and flows of the free market. He points to the changes in land use noting that since 1990, NZ has given up 26% of its grazing area. Some, he says, has been lost to the DoC estate, QE-II covenanted land, reversion to scrub land and other native vegetation, subdivision to lifestyle blocks near population centres, viticulture, horticulture and urban development. He adds that close to a million hectares of sheep and beef land has been converted to dairy farming. “Since the 1990s, there is now about 36% less land farmed for sheep and beef,” Davison told Rural News. “Yet the sector is in a very strong position and remains one of the fundamental engines that drive our economy.” Davison says people are often inclined to just look at pastoral farming and forget the contribution of the downstream processing industries in the meat and dairy sectors, which again make a significant contribution to the wealth of NZ. He says, despite Covid, the sector has performed impressively and a sign of this is that the NZ dollar has not weakened but rather firmed up during this crisis.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

20 MANAGEMENT

Securing a future for NZ pastures KATHY DAVIS

FARMERS, SCIENTISTS and rural industry leaders are meeting in Waikato later this year to start mapping out a secure future for New Zealand pastures. The Resilient Pastures Symposium (RPS), organised by the NZ Grassland Association (NZGA), comes 10 years after the association’s landmark Pasture Persistence Symposium. With agriculture currently earning more than 40c in every NZ export dollar, those behind the event say pasture – and innovative thinking about its prospects in coming years – has never been more relevant. Pasture is a significant global advantage for NZ, but faces increasing pressure from climate change,

WHAT, WHEN, WHERE? THE TWO-DAY programme will feature peer-reviewed research papers and a range of keynote presentations, including strong focus on farmers’ own experiences and observations. Equally important will be Q&A sessions, and a futurefocused workshop to scope required industry action. The NZGA Resilient Pasture Symposium will be held 11 and 12 May at Karapiro. www.grassland.org.nz.

environmental regulation and social and market expectations. “The uniqueness of NZ’s high value animal protein exports – their embedded naturalness and low per unit emissions compared with competitor countries – rests on our pasture base,” says RPS organising committee chair David Chapman, principal scientist at DairyNZ. “We want to make sure our market strength

continues to grow from this base, because that is critical to NZ’s economic future.” The 2011 Pasture Persistence Symposium gave rise to significant new pasture R&D and industry-led initiatives, including the highly influential DairyNZ Forage Value Index. NZGA president Warren King, senior scientist at AgResearch, says 10 years on, climate change effects signalled

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in 2011 have intensified, and the physical environment for growing pasture is more challenging and volatile than ever. But other challenges that barely registered then are now competing for the attention of researchers, plant breeders and farmers alike. Environmental regulations are putting caps on nutrient inputs and losses from pastoral systems. GHG emissions are being considered, with emphasis on reduction. Social and market expectation around the way animals are farmed and treated are now part of the farming landscape. “And all this needs to

be done using less land, with more trees being planted and better exclusion of waterways.” Chapman says in this context, all the signals suggest NZ grassland farmers will need more information and support over the next two decades than at any time in the past. “So, there is urgency to pinpoint the critical knowledge gaps and get to work on filling them. That’s what the symposium will focus on. “Pasture persistence is still a key part of the programme, but the scope of this event has broadened to pastures that are resilient, and capable of

playing their key role in meeting coming challenges.” The RPS will highlight current soil, plant genetics and management solutions, and look towards future opportunities, giving those who attend a chance to contribute to charting future priorities, he says. A key goal for event is to achieve broad-based primary sector collaboration and direction for further pasture development. It also seeks government and industry recognition of the pressing need to invest in future proofing pastures for the good of all New Zealanders.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

MANAGEMENT 21

Major task ahead for NZ farming MATTHEW REEVES

NEW MODELLING from the Climate Change Commission has outlined a major task ahead for the agribusiness industry in New Zealand. The Government has committed to an extensive emissions reduction plan in order to combat climate change, involving a 10% decline in agricultural emissions by 2030, and a 24% to 47% decline by 2050. Achieving this target will require major changes across the agricultural sector, including a significant decline in herd sizes and the uptake of new technologies. The agriculture sector is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in New Zealand, accounting for around 40% of current emissions in the country. The bulk of this comes from livestock methane

emissions, including 51% from the country’s 6.1 million dairy cattle, and 47% from the country’s 26.2 million sheep and 4 million beef cattle. According to modelling from New Zealand’s Climate Change Commission (CCC), a reduction in herd sizes of close to 15% across each livestock type from 2018 levels would be required for the sector to meet its emissions reduction target. Furthermore, a price on emissions from the agriculture sector is expected to be introduced by 2025. Close to 36.2% of New Zealand’s total landmass is used for pastoral agriculture. The national sheep flock has already been in steady decline over the past five years, and this trend is expected to continue through to 2025-26. Wool is anticipated to

The agriculture sector is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in New Zealand, accounting for around 40% of our current emissions.

continue to face strong competition from synthetic fibres such as polyester. Furthermore, domestic demand for lamb is expected to decline, in favour of leaner forms of protein such as chicken. Emission reductions targets and associated polices may exacerbate

the decline of the sheep farming industry, which is expected to decline at an annualised 0.5% through 2025-26, to $2.2 billion. Close to 4,600 sheep farmers are operational in 2020-21, but approximately 150 of these businesses are expected to exit the industry over the next five years.

Farmers may exit the industry due to pressure to invest in efficiency improvements, cut back on flocks, and knowing an emissions price is around the corner, while other potential entrants may be discouraged from joining the industry. Meanwhile, the CCC’s recommendation to

reduce national cattle herd numbers by up to 15% is a challenge for both the beef and dairy farming industries, which had previously been expected to grow at an annualised 1.6% and 1.5% over the next five years. Cattle are the most significant source of biogenic methane emissions in New Zealand. Rising per capita beef and veal consumption in China, which is among the largest markets for New Zealand beef exports, is projected to be a major opportunity for exporters over the next five years. The expected weakness of the New Zealand dollar will likely continue to support demand for New Zealand beef in export markets. However, the proposed cuts to livestock numbers may not need to be as severe as the CCC

has laid out. Innovation in livestock technologies have the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture sector. The Australian Government research agency, CSIRO, has developed a feed additive from seaweed that could cut methane emissions from livestock by as much as 80%. This additive may be available for New Zealand farmers later in 2021. Other technological advancements present a promising outlook for livestock farmers. Advancements such as more efficient animal feed and selective breeding of low-emissions animals are likely to play a significant role in supporting the agriculture industry going forward. • Matthew Reeves is a senior industry analyst for IBISWorld.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

22 ANIMAL HEALTH

Possible scanner shortages likely WHILE MOST rams have yet to go out, farmers are being encouraged to book their sheep scanners in early. The call comes in case of any possible shortages of scanner availability due to Covid-19 border entry restrictions. Beef+Lamb New Zealand’s senior advisor biosecurity and animal welfare, Will Halliday, says getting an understanding of the scale of the shortage now will enable the industry and Government to put steps in place to allow the entry of these critical workers, provided they meet the criteria. He says the Ministry for Primary Industries has expressed concern about the lack of people

Farmers are being encouraged to book their sheep scanners in early this year due to possible shortages due to border restrictions.

not booking space in isolation hotels for

critical primary sector workers such as scanners.

The critical worker border exemption is now

led by Immigration NZ (INZ) and employers

must apply to INZ on behalf of their employees to ensure they meet the criteria for ‘critical worker’. Halliday says he has been engaging with the Government, Federated Farmers, the New Zealand Veterinary Association and sheep and beef vets to highlight the issue and he is encouraging sheep farmers to book their pregnancy scanners now. “While it seems very early to be thinking about scanning, Covid19 restrictions mean we cannot call up scanners from other parts of the world as we have in the past. It is important farmers and the industry plan ahead so applications can be made

for critical worker border exemptions and where permitted, managed isolation booked well ahead of winter.” He says employers bringing scanners into the country should not be deterred if they were turned down last year. “Processes have changed and I would encourage them to apply again.” Scanning is an important management tool which has significant benefits for feed management and animal welfare. Traditionally, scanners have been brought in from the Northern Hemisphere and Australia to help local scanners carry out pregnancy scanning from May through to August.

MPI to review heat stress issue MPI SAYS a significant amount of work is under way this year to update animal welfare codes and provide updated advice to farmers for issues such as heat stress. Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) veterinarian and director for animal health and welfare Chris Rodwell says, early next month, MPI will – in collaboration with industry partners through the Farm to Processor Animal Welfare Forum – review its work programme after recently completed shade and shelter research. Rodwell says that while mitigat-

ing heat stress in livestock is complex, MPI is confident that this pan-sector discussion will ensure a joined-up approach is taken. “The industry has already been proactive on this issue and we are looking forward to keeping that momentum going in order to deliver the best welfare outcomes for outdoor livestock.” Rodwell says it’s important that all options for shade and shelter are on the table, not just man-made infrastructure solutions – such as barns. “Ultimately, New Zealand’s outdoor farming system is a good thing

for our animals. It allows them to behave naturally – including lying down in paddocks – and it reduces the possibility of disease spread,” he explains. “We want to ensure that during adverse weather, animals have access to protection from the elements – hot, cold or wet weather. “That may be by using natural features such as trees or scrub, or artificial structures.” Rodwell says, as well as permanent shelter, farmers can use short-term solutions to protect animals from heat stress – such as altering farm

management practices like mustering and milking times. Improving regulatory standards to manage heat stress in livestock is amongst several pieces of work currently being undertaken by the National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC). NAWAC is an independent committee formed to give advice on animal welfare to the Minister of Agriculture and the Associate Minister of Agriculture (Animal Welfare). Working groups are currently reviewing existing codes for dairy cattle and pigs, and a further group

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is about to commence work on the sheep and beef code. Amongst other things, NAWAC will be looking to strengthen the standards to ensure protection from thermal stress. These drafts are expected to available for public consultation later in 2021. At that time, the public will be asked to provide their thoughts and feedback on the draft documents. In other work, NAWAC is developing a code of welfare for breeding birds in the poultry industry, and for farmed fish. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

ANIMAL HEALTH 23

Wiltshires in big demand PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DEMAND for Wiltshire sheep is “incredible and unbelievable”, according to the country’s major breeder of the sheep that sheds its wool. William Morrison of Morrison Farming, based near the town of Marton in the Rangitikei district, says the demand is sparked by the very low price of wool. Morrison says his father accumulated all the Wiltshire sheep in New Zealand and most of the flocks today have originated from their farms. Currently, they have about 1,000 purebred Wiltshire’s on their farms and the remaining

3,000 ewes are a composite called Ezicare, which is largely based on a Texel Wiltshire cross. While the Wiltshire breed is a minority breed in NZ, it has suddenly come to the fore as wool prices have progressively slumped. For many farmers, shearing has been done only for animal welfare issues and is a loss to their businesses. Morrison thought, as wool prices steadily dropped, demand for the self-shedding Wiltshire’s may have increased, but says this has only happened recently. “Interest in Wiltshire sheep and demand for quality rams, ram hoggets and breeding females has been unprecedented over

the last three months,” he told Rural News. “I would say that demand has been at least 10 times more than any previous year. There are some days when I have fielded three inquires every day.” As well as their ability to shed their wool, Morrison says Wiltshires have other great attributes. He says they have a high fecundity and regularly scan over 190% on this farm, and the rams make excellent terminal sires because they are different from other NZ breeds. Morrison says the wool shedding attributes of the Wiltshire are interesting and genetic based. “However, the shedding displayed by individual sheep is also

influenced by that animal’s weight, condition, health, age, as well as on-farm conditions in spring,” he explains. “Healthy, heavy animals experiencing a warm, early spring will shed their fleece a lot earlier than animals that are under stress or are experiencing a cooler, later spring.  For example, a big, healthy two-tooth ewe might fully shed its fleece. However, when rearing triplets, the following year it may not fully shed.” Morrison says twotooth Wiltshire ram sales have been very strong throughout the country and there are plenty of quality ram hoggets

Wiltshire breeder William Morrison says growing demand for the self-shedding sheep has been sparked by the very low price of wool.

that can still be sourced from good breeders. He reckons good quality ram hoggets are a good option and a cost effective way to start your breedingup program or to experiment with Wiltshires this mating. Morrison Farms sells between 100 and 200 rams a year and between 200 and 400 ewes for breeding. Morrison says

it would be nice to have more to sell, but any move to do this has to be done carefully and align with their overall farming strategy. “We have some tremendous sheep breeds, breeders and flocks in New Zealand. As sheep farmers, all we need to do is to visualise the type of sheep that we want on our farms, write down

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the performance numbers that we want our sheep to achieve and then we can breed our ewes flocks to look like and do exactly that,” he told Rural News. “For many New Zealand sheep farmers, Wiltshire sheep genetics are a fantastic opportunity and will be an important ingredient for their future flocks.”


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

24 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Packs a clean punch and firm bale MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE LATEST generation of Krone Big Pack balers sets out to minimise the total cost of ownership (TCO), while also boosting operator comfort and optimising high-wear components to increase machine longevity. The new Big Pack 1270 and 1290 balers sees the bale chambers extended by more than 20% to 3.6m and a full-width top plate. This follows the design of the BiG Pack 1290 HDP HighSpeed, resulting in better bale shape and higher bale weights. The new baler’s Variable Filling System uses a sensor to detect the amount of straw in the pre-compression chamber. When there is not

enough material present to produce a good wad, an electric brake is triggered, meaning the packers continue to fill the pre-chamber, before material is released to the bale chamber. Upgrades have seen a reduction in peak loads, resulting in a doubling of service life for this area of the baler. In-cab adjustment by the operator allows precise control of pre-compression, wad thickness and the number of wads created. A completely new and unique feature is the knotter cleaning system. This not only cleans the knotter mechanism, but also other machine areas. This is done by using hydraulic turbines to generate an overpressure inside the knotter bay so no debris can collect there in the first place.

Krone Big Pack balers boost operator comfort and optimise high-wear components on the machines.

shaft alignment and increased shaft life. Hitch height is now adjusted on the hitch ring, a fast and easy solution that also made for the slimmer drawbar and improved manoeuvrability. Big Pack runs on highquality, yet comparatively

The air flow is then channelled to the areas underneath the panels and downwards to the axle. A heavier-duty drawbar with a slimmer profile, features a beefier support for the drive shaft giving more adjustment options for drive

light-weight, tandem axles from BPW. These have parabolic springs and all major grease nipples auto lubricated, so reducing maintenance. The pick-up runs on heavier gauge wheels, with auto-lubricated bearings, while the crop

press roller suspension is adjusted steplessly on the left side of the machine. Twine boxes are now integrated into the hydraulically-actuated side panels, keeping twine protected from dust and debris. The newly-designed twine box

offers a clear view of the balls and has capacity for thirty, 10-15kg balls. As an option, two additional twine boxes can increase the total storage capacity to 42 balls and a total weight of 630kg. All Big Pack models with cutting units will be equipped with the proven VariCut cutterbar (VC), available either with a maximum of 51 blades or with a blade cassette with up to 26 blades. This allows multiple configurations of blades in work to achieve the required chop length, but a simple rotating shaft adjustment to engage the required number of blades. Krone continues to offer the roller chute for the Big Pack either with or without bale-weighing sensors. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Double-row drilling increases yields GERMAN MANUFACTURER Lemken claims there are yield and quality advantages to be gained by precision planting maize in two staggered rows. Following research carried out at the University of Osnabrück in Germany, the results showed a beneficial effect on maize silage quality, with a 7.9% increase in metabolisable energy and 5.4% increase in biogas production. The research used a large-scale trial plot. Yield and quality was measured for three different sowing rates of seven, eight and nine seeds/m² (70,000, 80,000 and 90,000 seeds/ha) using the staggered twin-row DeltaRow technique on the Lemken Azurit 9 precision drill. Compared to single-row systems, improvements were recorded in each scenario, with the greatest improvement at the rate of eight seeds/m², where yields increased by 4.5%. Researchers suggested that this technique offers plants roughly 70% more room to grow with improved access to moisture and nutrients. – Mark Daniel

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Lemken claims there are yield and quality advantages by precision planting maize in two staggered rows.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 25

Better sowing accuracy MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

VÄDERSTAD HAS updated its Spirit 400C/S pneumatic seed drill, which aims to deliver greater seeding precision, user-friendly electronics and a high field performance in the 4-metre seed drill sector. The new unit includes the innovative E-Control control system, including ISOBUS Task Control, updated hydraulics, SeedEye blockage monitoring and increased general access. “The Spirit family is known to provide impressive precision at high working speeds on the field,” says Björn Jeansson, Väderstad’s commercial product manager for seed drills. “The new update of Spirit 400C/S makes it benefit from key features from the larger models in the Spirit range.” Benefitting from a raft of features taken from larger models in the range, the Spirit 400C/S is equipped with a highcapacity hopper with an integrated fan, two access platforms and an open machine design to provide better access to all

components throughout the machine. An updated hydraulic system is delivered with active seed coulter pressure, which is adjustable following harrow pressure and automatic headland sequence control. In the paddock, the driver has full control over the seeding operation via the iPad-based, Väderstad E-Control system. SeedEye blockage monitoring allows seed and fertiliser output to be visualised in real time. This means, if any deviations should occur, the system gives an immediate warning so that any impact on the drilling can be quickly resolved. The new Spirit 400C/S is available as the seedonly, Spirit 400S, as well as seed and fertiliser versions called Spirit 400C FIX and Spirit 400C InLine. The FIX version places the fertiliser in 5cm wide strips at 125mm row spacing, in front of every seed row. The Spirit 400C InLine version is designed to apply a low-rate starter fertiliser, via a separate outlet, together with the seeds in the seed coulter.

The Väderstad Spirit 400C/S pneumatic seed drill is designed to deliver greater seeding precision.

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Surprisingly, the new Giltrap WideTrac fertiliser spreader with unrivalled high specs, outstanding performance and built-in durability comes without a high price tag. The WideTrac comes standard with a 780mm wide belt so it can handle anything you throw at it and delivers it in the most precise way - eliminating wastage, and saving you time and money. Its simple to use digital interface lets you quickly and easily set density, spread rate and width at the touch

of a button. And being hydraulically driven means it can all be controlled from the comfort of your cab. Engineered tough and built tough, the Giltrap WideTrac’s internally reinforced 4, 6 and 8 tonne plastic-moulded bins sit on a hot-dipped galvanised steel frame for years of trouble-free ownership. So what would you expect to pay for all this? Be pleasantly surprised. Visit your local dealer or go to giltrapag.co.nz

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VÄDERSTAD HAS introduced the new 80/120mm point, which at a working depth of 10-15cm, combines the advantages from the 80mm and 120mm points into one assembly. Built using high-quality Swedish steel, the point is said to deliver aggressive cultivation, combined with a very intensive mixing. Having a narrower bottom section, the 80/120 point has the benefit of great soil penetration ability combined with an impressive straw incorporation, says Magnus Samuelsson, concept developer at Väderstad. The 80/120mm point can be fitted to the Cultus, Opus and TopDown tine cultivators.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

26 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER

Combines win robotics award MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

JOHN DEERE’S X Series Combine Harvesters received a CES Innovation Award to recognise their ‘outstanding product design and engineering in consumer technology’. The X Series combine harvesters use ActiveVision camera technology that helps farmers see inside the grain tank. It also assists with observation of tailings to allow

John Deere’s X Series combine harvesters recently received a CES Innovation Award.

farmers to monitor the condition of harvested grain. This technology, complemented by proprietary algorithms, is said to pro-

vide farmers with information to make critical decisions in the moment, while also gathering data to help them inform future decisions.

Scoop purchase of new Shibaura ST-460 tractors

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DUAL PURPOSE TRAILER MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NORTHERN IRISH manufacturer Slurry Kat has developed a multi-purpose trailer. It is designed, in the first instance, to be a 22-tonne, half-pipe dumper. However, with the addition of a kit, it can easily be switched to silaging operations. Distributed in New Zealand by Brownrigg Agri Gear, the SDT’s (silage dump trailer) chassis and main components are made from S355 high-tensile steel. Meanwhile, the body is manufactured from Hardox S700 steel. This allows the use of 5mm steel, making the trailer lighter, but retaining the structural strength required for intensive hauling operations.

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John Deere chief technology officer Jahmy Hindman says the award recognises the company’s efforts to build smart machines, systems and solutions. “These help unlock customer economic value through enhanced precision, automation, speed and efficiency.” While not yet available in Australia and New Zealand, two new X Series combine harvesters, the X9 1000 and X91100, will be added to John Deere’s harvesting line-up technology in late 2021. JD claims the X Series uses the latest technology to deliver informed decisions and self-driving functions. For example, the harvester can automatically adjust itself to adapt to changing conditions to run at peak levels. This allows service technicians to manage things remotely, thereby minimising downtime and supporting profitability.

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A retrofit silage kit can be quickly installed or removed as one piece – including the hydraulic door. When installed, the original dump trailer door drops down to allow a flat floor for easy material discharge. At the front of the silage body, a forward sloping front panel is said to allow easier filling when paddocks are opened up. This can happen either when being towed by the harvester or “firing” over the roof of a towing tractor. The combined capacity, when the silage kit is added, is around 34 cubic metres. The trailer is carried on a pendulum bogie axle system that utilises 710-40R22.5 tyre equipment. Interestingly, all paintwork is covered by a five-year guarantee as standard.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

RURAL TRADER 27

RURAL ONLINE

BEAT THE COVID PRICE RISE!!! Shipping costs up by 250%. We can’t absorb them. Some existing stock available at the old price. Act now!

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Promotion available between 1/01/21 to 31/03/21 on new farm vehicles (AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM), through participating authorised Yamaha dealers while stocks last. Offer available for specified models, and warranty registered on or before 31/03/21. *FINANCE DISCLAIMER: Zero deposit; zero repayments for the first 12 months and 4.95% p.a. fixed interest rate on a 36 month loan term. Asset backed commercial applicants only with NZBN registered for minimum of 1 year. Maximum amount financed is $35,000 and applies to AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM. Offer available from January 1, 2021 to March 31, 2021 with final settlement date of April 30, 2021. Credit criteria, fees, charges and conditions apply including an application fee of $325, $10 PPSR fee and a dealer administration fee. Finance to approved applicants by Yamaha Motor Finance New Zealand Ltd. (YMF) NZBN 9429036270798 FSP 9622. At participating Yamaha dealerships while stocks last. Information provided is general only and does not take into account your particular objectives, financial situation and needs. **INSURANCE DISCLAIMER: Information provided is general only and does not take into account your particular objectives, financial situation and needs. Please read the Policy Wording available at www.yminz.co.nz before you make any decisions regarding this product. Insurance is underwritten by underwriters at Lloyd’s of London acting through its agent Yamaha Motor Insurance New Zealand Ltd (YMINZ) NZBN 9429045857638 FSP 556706.


Central Districts Field Days

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

FEILDING MARCH 18-20, 2021

FEBRUARY 23, 2021: ISSUE 720  www.ruralnews.co.nz

NZ’s backbone! the region – including Food HQ at Massey University. peterb@ruralnews.co.nz “There are a number of initiatives that THE CENTRAL Districts field days is we are involved in regionally that are all designed to showcase what the Manawatu about food production and how we add region is all about – the backbone of the value to it,” Warboys explains. “As well the hub, the Manawatu district is a highly proNZ economy. That’s the view of the Manawatu Dis- ductive grass roots farming region, which trict Mayor Helen Warboys who says the we are very proud of.” She says they are still working on event is logically based in the town of Feilding because this has become a significant growing the hub and she sees the new Manawatu/Taraua highway, that will replace agricultural hub. the now abandoned “Something I’ve Manawatu Gorge been working on cre- “Farmers come from all Road, as ensuring ating for many years,” that district is well she told Rural News. over NZ for the CD field connect from all Warboys says the days and some who say points of the comregion is all about they prefer it because pass. food production and However, it’s is also supported by they are not as big as the Central Dishaving significant the national event in tricts field days that military bases in the Hamilton.” help showcase the region as well. growth and impor“In my previous role as the manager of Feilding Promotions, tance of the Manawatu District. “Farmers come from all over NZ for the the goal was for the town to become the agribusiness centre for NZ,” she explains. CD field days and some who say they prefer “We did a lot of work in previous years to it because they are not as big as the national attract agribusinesses to the town, which in event in Hamilton,” Warboys says. “They the 1990s was well known as rural servic- say it has got too big and it’s hard to find ing town where mums and dads came on your way around the Mystery Creek site Friday for the sheep and cattle sale and did and that sort of stuff.” Warboys says exhibitors for the field the shopping.” But Mayor Warboys says, over time, they days come from all around NZ and before started to attract companies like Rabobank the days of Covid, some came from overand FMG and other businesses that sup- seas. She believes the CD field days does a lot port agriculture. She says they have been very successful at that over the past 25 to build relationships between the urban years and have achieved their goal of being and rural communities and many of those who go to the event are from towns but a very significant rural hub. She adds that a number of agri science are keen to see and admire the innovation and food science organisations are also in that is driving efficiency in the rural sector. PETER BURKE

Manawatu District Mayor Helen Warboys says the CD field days is designed to showcase the backbone of the NZ economy.

Preapproval is now a lot easier with online tools that can give a definitive answer within a few minutes.

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For more information call us on 06 370 0390 www.tulloch.nz Dealers located nationwide

Preapproval can also be granted by answering a few simple questions over the phone, which makes the process simple and straightforward. These Krone finance offers apply to all new imported products so be in quick to ensure your order is made by the end of March 2021. The interest rate for the loan is 2.95% and is based on a schedule of 36 monthly payments. This loan also consists of a $375 documentation fee and $20 Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR). Any documentation relating to either package needs to be preapproved and supplied prior to the end of March 2021 to ensure the order is met. Lending and credit criteria apply.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

2 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

From a local show to major national event CENTRAL DISTRICTS field days attract more than 27,000 people each March for three days to Feilding in the Manawatu.

Visitors come to connect, discover and experience the future of New Zealand’s primary industries.

The CD field days has been bringing NZ’s rural communities and industries together for the past 27 years. The event has

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The CD field days has been bringing NZ’s rural communities and industries together for the past 27 years.

grown from a collection of marquees into a significant national event. It attracts exhibitors and attendees from across the country to the rural heartland of the North Island. From farmers, foodies to techheads and townies, it is now New Zealand’s largest regional field days and has something for everyone. The event showcases, cutting edge machinery and equipment, the latest developments in rural innovation, thrilling FXM shows, lifestyle trends, top-notch regional food and local brews. This year, the CD field

days is gearing up for its 28th event. Now well-established and the largest regional field days in New Zealand, generating over $50 million in sales revenue, its roots stretch back to 1993 when it was introduced by Don Eade as an annual event. If you have visited CD field days during any one of its 27 years, you’re bound to find that a number of things don’t change: Its location at Manfeild, compelling a transformation from a paddock to a mini town over a matter of days The presence of farm

machinery and tractors, hallmarks of the industry and the people who come to see them The thousands of visitors and hundreds of exhibitors, united in their passion for a thriving agricultural community Equally, there are many ways you can see how the three-day event has grown up over time. Central Districts field days sales manager Cheryl Riddell says the event started with 230 sites occupied by exhibitors. It has now grown to more than 600. Riddell says the appetite from businesses to be a part of the event has

only increased as word spread about the success exhibitors were having. “In addition to the usual crowd favorites such as, the National Excavator Operator Competition, Black Falcons flyover and the NZFC Central Districts fencing competition,” she explains. “We now host Franklin Farm FMX crew, new mobile app technology, a forestry hub, a dedicated cuisine pavilion and a premium bar where you can kick back and relax for a yarn, with a topnotch drop from local brewing legends Brew Union.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 3

Ag takes off as a uni option PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

PEOPLE ARE starting to realise the true strength of agriculture in the New Zealand economy. That’s the view of Professor Paul Kenyon who is the Head of the School of Agriculture & Environment at Massey University. He says student numbers are up by between 20% and 30% on the previous year in Massey’s key degree courses. These are the Bachelor

of Ag Science, the Bachelor of Ag Commerce, the Bachelor of Horticultural Science and the Bachelor of Environmental Science. “We are encouraged that people are seeing employment opportunities in the greater agricultural space,” Kenyon says. “It seems people see it as a stable industry to get into and realise that in the agriculture and horticultural sectors there is a breadth of opportunities for individuals – depending on their interests.”

Kenyon says there is still a lot more work to do to raise the value and profile of agriculture and horticulture in particular. He reckons if he were a young person, he’d not just be looking at agriculture, but at the vast array of options in horticulture. “Unfortunately, the horticulture industry is little tainted by the media suggestions that all the opportunities are in fruit picking,” Kenyon told Rural News. “But in horticulture, there are so many options for young

PROMOTING THE SECTOR MASSEY UNIVERSITY will be at CD field days promoting its degree courses. Kenyon says the focus will be highlighting the opportunities at the undergraduate and post graduate level for the individuals who want to get into the greater agriculture or horticultural space. He says the field days are one of the mediums they use to attract students to Massey. “We work directly with the schools and invite them to our open days at the university,” Kenyon explains. “We also send people out to schools. It’s important for young students and high school students to be exposed to

the opportunities and to hear from their peers who are doing the programme now,” he adds. “Hearing that they are enjoying the programmes and learning a lot, and where they see themselves going in the future.” Kenyon says they also make a point of getting alongside parents of potential students, as it is well known that they have a significant influence on the career decisions of their sons and daughters. “We expect to get lots of questions at the CD field days and we may get some later either on-line or by telephone,” he adds.

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Massey University’s head of Agriculture & Environment Paul Kenyon says they will be at CD field days highlighting the career opportunities in both the ag and hort sectors.

people to get into in terms of management, be it on or off farm. It is a growing industry and it

will continue to grow.” According to Kenyon, science is so important in horticulture and under-

partners such as HorticultureNZ to encourage young people into the sector.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

4 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Games bring town and country PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

IN THE week before the CD Field days, Palmerston North hosts the ever-popular NZ Rural Games. These are run by a trust headed by Margaret Kouvelis and also includes a number of leading farmers and business people in the region. The event is designed to create an agricultural week in the region and the focus of the games is to draw in city and townsfolk. Kouvelis says the games highlight the skills that rural people had and still have to build our nation. Such things as shearing, fencing and coal shovelling – basic jobs that have now become competitive sports. “It’s a way of celebrat-

Watching dogs trying to control sheep is always popular.

ing our rural sports men and women in the same way as we celebrate other sports people,” she told

Rural News. “One of the first trustees was Sir Brian Lochore who recognised the tre-

mendous work that the shearers and fencers do and saw the importance of celebrating their

efforts.” Originally the rural sports were held in Queenstown, but the

trust managed to get them to the Manawatu region where Kouvelis says they are an iconic fit

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

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closer together In the afternoon, there will be a chance for the various secondary schools to test their skills against each other with the clash of the colleges. On Saturday and Sunday, the rural games begin in earnest and will be a chance for young and old to walk around and see the various activities or to sit in comfort and watch the games on large television screens which are strategically placed

around the square. Kouvelis says people often say they are coming for an hour or two but get caught up in the activities and end up staying for the day. The rural sports and field day organisers work closely together to promote each other’s events. “It’s all part of celebrating and showcasing agriculture in the lower North Island,” she says.

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The main events take place on the Saturday and Sunday, but this year Kouvelis says they have some special activities on the Friday. “This year, on the Friday, we are introducing the agri futures event for years 12 and 13 students from all high schools in the lower half of the North Island,” she adds. “The idea is for them to come and find out about the rural agricultural sector and about jobs within the sector. They’ll be able to see the various sports, but also Beef+Lamb NZ and DairyNZ will be there promoting careers in agriculture.”

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in the famous square of Palmerston North city, which Kouvelis claims is an idyllic place and an excellent venue and meeting place for town and country. About 40,000 people are expected to attend NZ Rural Games over the three days of Friday March 12 to Sunday March 15. This year, about 150 competitors are expected to be involved in the games. In the past, some have come from overseas, but not this year due to Covid-19. The games are free to the public and the cost of staging them is covered by sponsorship of about $1 million.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

6 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Manawatu’s economy bouncing back ALTHOUGH THE national economy is still functioning below prepandemic levels and the road ahead remains uncertain, the Manawatu region appears to be bearing up well. While the Manawatu economy continues to

experience the impact of the effects of Covid-19, it was not hit as intensely as the rest of New Zealand. According to economics forecaster Infometrics, the region’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) declined by 1.8% per

annum in the September 2020 quarter (compared with the September 2019 quarter), while New Zealand’s GDP declined by 3.3%. “The September quarter offers a good picture of the rate of economic recovery in the region,”

says Linda Stewart, chief executive of the Central Economic Development Agency (CEDA). From the beginning of the Covid-19 impacts, it was expected that regions with a large food based primary sector would weather the economic

Chief executive of the Central Economic Development Agency Linda Stewart.

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storm better than those highly exposed to international tourism. “Food-based primary exports continued to perform well, as overseas markets are increasingly attracted to New Zealand produce thanks to our reputation for high quality produce and food safety standards,” says Stacey Bell, economist for the Manawatu District Council. Mark Piper, director category, strategy & innovation for Fonterra says the Manawatu is fortunate to be a centre for food innovation in NZ. “We have teams of people right across the region always challenging the boundaries of how we make food better – better for you and a better allround experience, affecting primary exports positively,” he explains. Export values have held up relatively well because of continued strong demand and increased volumes. Commodity prices for our two largest exports, (dairy and red meat) have fallen

“While the forecasts remain, the beginning of the roll out of effective vaccines in the UK, US and hopefully Europe, in the coming weeks and the subsequent loosening of economic restrictions, supports a more positive outlook.” in terms of trade, meaning the value of goods we export to the goods we import have started to slide downwards. “The outlook is for the further softening of red meat prices in particular heading into 2021 due to the decline in restaurant activity in the Northern Hemisphere,” Bell explains. “While the forecasts remain, the beginning of the roll out of effective vaccines in the UK, US and hopefully Europe, in the coming weeks and the subsequent loosening of economic restrictions, supports a more positive outlook,” she adds. Meanwhile, the number of people in the

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region registered for the MSD Job Seekers benefit increased by 22% in September 2020 from September 2019, while the number in New Zealand increased by 43% – nearly double that of our region. “Manawatu is geared for growth and recovery. Capital projects and investments from central and local government and a significant construction pipeline further support the recovery of our region, along with our resilient primary sector and connected business community. 2021 is looking bright, and we will come back stronger than before,” Stewart concludes.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 7

Attitude minimises agri sector’s Covid losses – survey A NEW study has found a strong ‘can do’ attitude and cooperative spirit in the agricultural sector were significant factors in minimising losses and uncertainties during the Covid restrictions last year. The report, coauthored by Lincoln University’s Dr Lei Cong – with contributors from AgResearch, The University of Queensland, NZ Institute of Economic Research, and Plant and Food Research – measured the immediate impacts of Covid-19 restrictions to June 2020 on the Australian and New Zealand agri-food systems and how resilient these systems were. It found the effects

The report found that the high level of ingenuity in the rural communities was a key element to their resilience and capacity to overcome movement restrictions and the disruption caused by Covid. PHOTO: KIEREN SCOTT

on both countries were broadly similar, with relatively minor economic

impacts across the surveyed agri-sector industries.

The report says the high level of ingenuity in the rural communi-

ties, both in Australia and New Zealand, was likely a key element to their resilience and capacity to overcome movement restrictions and the disruption of value chains. “Restrictions and new rules of engagement and interaction were adopted rapidly as ‘people accepted a new reality and adapted to it’.” According to the report, the agricultural sectors in both countries “assimilated the many ‘unmanageable disruptions’, such as the loss or disruption to export markets and short supply of inputs. This created impetus for diversifying markets and strengthened business cases for value-adding and local

manufacturing.” It also suggests that this resilience emerged from a combination of the agri-sector industries having relatively high technology, being well connected/networked and having some experience of prior shocks – as well as being well supported, primarily logistically, by their governments. “Agricultural producers in Australia and New Zealand are well organised and business-oriented, and thus had the right structures and sufficient financial backing to manage through a pandemic,” the report states. “Product demand was maintained domestically due to income support, while export markets

remained fairly constant.” It also noted that some important lessons – such as the need to upskill young people in rural areas and control or reverse the negative rural migration, the need to diversify export markets, as well as the need to plan for the ‘unplannable’ to deal with the next ‘Black Swan’ event. The researchers conducted 44 interviews and had 321 responses to the survey with similar numbers of responses from non-farmers across the two countries. They had about twice as many responses from farmers in New Zealand than in Australia. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

8 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 9

Time for UK to ‘walk the talk’ TODD MULLER

ONE OF life’s commercial shibboleths is that one should be wary of going into business with close friends because emotion is always involved. But shibboleths are meant to be broken – as we have proven with our dear friend Australia over 40 years. You can have remarkably close economic relations with mates, and it can work. You have to have a unifying idea (in our cases, closer economic integration and freedom of movement) and the strength of relationship to say it like it is. So, I believe it’s time to address the elephant in the trading room. The eye-watering gap between the UK’s rhetoric on free trade and its current approach to NZ. One year ago, PM Boris Johnson outlined his Government’s vision for free trade in a speech to the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich. He stated the UK is “re-emerging after decades of hibernation as a campaigner for global free trade”, that the “global community are in danger of forgetting the key insight of those great Scottish thinkers, the invisible hand of Adam Smith, and of course David Ricardo’s more subtle but indispensable principle of comparative advantage, which teaches that if countries learn to specialise and exchange then overall wealth will increase, and productivity

I have no visibility on the UK market access offer. But the initial smoke signals are not hopeful and do little to reduce the sense that Boris Johnson’s ambition for free trade is more fog like than the piercing light of freedom he purports it to be. But there is still time to right the ship.

You can have remarkably close economic relations with mates, and it can work.

will increase”. Johnson warned that “free trade is being choked” because of “politicians who are failing to lead”, that he sees the UK as “the supercharged champion of the right of the populations of the earth to buy and sell freely among each other”. He spoke with urgency about the need to engage with old friends and partners listing New Zealand “on whom we deliberately turned our backs in the early 1970s” and suggesting that we “don’t just listen to what I say or what we say, look at what we do”. Johnson stated the UK has now “embarked on a project to be open, outward-looking, generous, welcoming, engaged with the world championing global free trade – now when global free trade needs a global champion, I believe we can make a huge success of this venture, for Britain, for our European friends, and for the world.” Well that certainly is a unifying idea and one NZ has quickly signedup for because it talks to our nation’s approach to trade across successive governments. We

Indeed, I had written off UK INEOS a few weeks ago and now look at them! And as Boris himself noted “this is the moment for us to think of our past and go up a gear again to recapture the spirit of those seafaring ancestors whose exploits brought not just riches but something even more important than that – and

that was a global perspective. That is our ambition. There lies the port, the vessel puffs her sail…the wind sits in the mast”. Indeed, Prime Minister, but it’s time to lift the anchor. • Todd Muller is the National Party’s spokesman on trade @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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own. According to the Economist, UK farmers get paid US$3.3 billion a year, simply to farm and can apply for another $750 million for worthy things like planting hedgerows. Additional schedules of payment for green activities are being worked on for 2024 introduction. NZ farmers get minimal government support in underpinning research, drought relief and occasional water storage capital injections. But despite this, we can land product on the other side of the world with lower environmental impacts than our Northern Hemisphere competitors. Our farmers produce the lowest carbon impacting beef and dairy in the world – besting anything the UK can achieve per kilo of product produced.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

10 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Job losses worry meat sector NEW ZEALAND’S meat processing industry says, while it supports moves away from coal, it has some major concerns about cuts to livestock numbers as proposed in the recent Climate Change Commission’s draft report. The industry says it is generally supportive of the focus on reducing the use of fossil fuels. However, as the country’s largest manufacturing sector, it is worried about the impacts of the report’s stated 15% reduction in sheep, cattle and dairy numbers. Meat Industry Association chief executive Sirma Karapeeva says the coun-

try’s red meat processors and exporters are committed to reducing and eventually eliminating the use of coal, although achieving the commission’s 2037 target will be difficult. “We do need a fair and just transition away from coal to ensure jobs and livelihoods are not put at risk. However, our chief concern is that any drop in livestock numbers may jeopardise the viability of some processing plants and jobs in rural communities,” Karapeeva explains. “Meat processors rely on throughput of livestock to create efficiencies of scale and be

“We do need a fair and just transition away from coal to ensure jobs and livelihoods are not put at risk. However, our chief concern is that any drop in livestock numbers may jeopardise the viability of some processing plants and jobs in rural communities.”

The meat sector believes the Climate Change Commission’s assumption that NZ can reduce livestock numbers by 15%, while still maintaining current production volumes, is overly optimistic.

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profitable. “The commission estimates that without major on-farm practice change and new technologies, a 15% reduction in livestock numbers will be required to achieve the targets by 2030. “This would have a serious impact on the ability of many processors to keep operating.” She adds that the assumption by the commission that we can reduce livestock numbers by 15%, while still maintaining current production volumes, seems optimistic. “We need to understand why the commission made this assumption to better assess the likely effects for the industry.” However, Karapeeva says the meat sector agrees with the commission – and sheep and beef farmers – that the widespread planting of exotic pine trees is not a long-term viable solution to addressing climate change. “We can’t plant our way out of climate

change. Wholesale planting of pine trees on sheep and beef farmland is not the answer and it will have significant implications for jobs in regional New Zealand,” she adds. Currently, NZ’s red meat processing sector generates more than $10 billion in export revenue every year and is also a significant regional employer in New Zealand. Karapeeva says any changes to this would have a major impact on people’s livelihoods – especially in regional parts of the country. “For instance, in the Otago/Southland region, the sector employs 7,700 full-time people with more than 10,000 fulltime jobs underpinned by the industry. It also contributes 11.5% of household income in the region,” she explains. “In Taranaki/ Manawatu and Whanganui, the sector supports almost 10% of full-time employment in the region with 5,200 directly and it underpins more than 8,300 full-time equivalent jobs.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 11

Massey student wins scholarship MASSEY UNIVERSITY student Sophie Ridd is this year’s recipient of Ravensdown’s Hugh Williams Memorial Scholarship. The 19 year-old is about to start her second year of study towards a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at Massey University’s Palmerston North campus. She says the scholarship will reduce her financial burden and open up new opportunities for her to pursue tertiary study at higher levels. “I am absolutely stoked to receive this support as it will enable me to pursue my passion even further.” The Hugh Williams Memorial Scholarship provides the recipient with $5,000 per year for each year of a student’s undergraduate study in agriculture or horticulture disciplines at Lincoln or Massey University. The recipient will also be offered the opportunity for paid holiday work at Ravensdown if available. The scholarship was founded to commemorate the late Hugh Williams, who was a Ravensdown Director from 1987 to 2000. Ridd was encouraged to apply for the scholarship by her parents, John and Jenni. The Ridd family are long-time Ravensdown shareholders and run an arable farm, along with sheep and beef

finishing and winter dairy grazing, just north of Feilding. “Growing up on the family farm taught me the virtue of hard work and kindled my interest in the science behind modern farm management.” Ridd says agriculture touches on all aspects of her life. Aside from being raised on a farm and studying agricultural science at university, she is also a keen competitor in cattle shows. Last year, she was a reserve for the NZ Future Beef Team at the World Hereford Conference, and this year Ridd will be heading down to Oxford to take part in the National Royal A&P Society competition. “I’ve really enjoyed getting into cattle showing. I like the discipline as it teaches you how to interact, groom and control an animal, while also working on your own personal presentation. It’s a very grounding experience.” Ridd says that while she is in the early stages of tertiary study, she has already found an area of particular interest. “Coming from a crop farming background, I am really interested in learning more about how the nutritional profiles of crops affect stock development and growth.” Whatever she special-

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ises in, Ridd is confident her future is with the agricultural industry. “Many of the jobs of tomorrow will come from innovations and breakthroughs from this country’s leading farmers and scientists today. I cannot wait to start my career

Second-year Massey student Sophie Ridd says the scholarship will enable her to pursue her passion for agriculture even further.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

12 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Speciality tractors for orchards MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DEUTZ-FAHR range of 5D TTV orchard tractors are a specialist tractor for the orchard and vineyard sector. The tractors are available in three widths to suit varying applications. The V series has a minimum overall operating width of 1,077mm and maximum 1,293mm, while the cab has a total width of 1,000mm. The S series features the same cabin, allowing configurations from 1,267mm to 1,517mm widths. Meanwhile, the F series can operate from 1,441mm to 1,632mm, with a wider 1,200mm cabin. The machines offer a choice of 3 or 4-cylinder Farmotion engines between 88-113hp. These are mated to SDF’s own

KEEPING MORE CONNECTED DEUTZ FAHR has expanded its precision farming division, formerly known as AGROSKY, and rebranded it to SDF Connected Farming Services. It comprises of five key product families: iMonitor3, SDF Guidance, SDF Fleet Management, Data Management and ISOBUS. A major update sees the AGROSKY SRC40 receiver being replaced by the all-new SR20 receiver for automated steering systems. This features greater satellite access in the southern hemisphere, alongside a 3-axis gyroscope for pitch compensation as standard. Scheduled for release later in the year, SDF data management simplifies the transfer of task and working data from tractor to office. This uses a standard ISO-XML format for easy handling with a range of applications and software. Data is transferred through the universal data exchange platform Agrirouter system.

continuously variable transmission, that offer independent ground and

This platform is compatible with a wide range of leading agricultural machinery manufacturers. Data that can be transferred includes, but is not limited to farm master data, measures (task data), field boundaries, track lines and application maps. The new SDF Fleet Management suite also allows easy tracking and management of SDF products, with a choice of two modules to suit the level of connectivity required by the operator. A Basic Telematics Module can transfer machine data to a smartphone, connecting via Bluetooth, to deliver fuel consumption, utilisation and productivity, viewed in the SDF app. Meanwhile, the Communication Telematics Module features an internal e-SIM which always makes all important machine data accessible via the internet, including vehicle position and single machine or fleet statuses.

engine speeds for precise control in a range of applications.

The cabin features a flat floor layout for ease of access and operator

Deutz-Fahr’s range of 5D TTV tractors are aimed at the orchard and vineyard sector.

comfort. Importantly, these offer an electronically selectable filtration system to Cat 4 safety standards. This system directs air flow through paper filter elements

during standard applications, but when carrying spraying or dusty duties can be selected to divert air through the carbon filter to ensure safe air quality.

Meanwhile, an in-cab display keeps the operator informed about cabin pressurisation and the carbon filter status. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 13

Causing a stir makes life easier for dairy farmers MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

QUITE OFTEN the need to regularly agitate dairy effluent ponds or tanks is overlooked in the initial design stages. This will likely lead to problems later down the track with crusting, sludge and sand build-up, ultimately reducing storage capacity and likely causing pump or irrigator blockages. In all cases of effluent storage and distribution, the theory is to keep the solids in suspension, meaning pumping so the sludge and sand is being constantly removed

from the system to the paddock. Yardmaster offers an extensive range of effluent stirrers that are designed to meet specific application requirements and customer feature preference. In recent years, safety and ease of service has seen a move towards shore-mounted solutions. The Yardmaster shoremounted stirrer comes in two lengths and with two power ratings. Features include a winch for prop height adjustment and adjustable slew angle, allowing a wide range of prop placement within the pond. This means all

areas can be agitated and solids incorporated into the effluent. The Yardmaster shoremounted stirrer is ideal for ponds, offering the capability of stirring up to 9 million litres using 11kW. An in-ground pond might not be a viable option in certain applications – such as a high-water table or difficult topography. In which case, it is likely that an above ground tank may be required. Yardmaster can deal with the agitation of such storage solutions. A Yardmaster overthe-wall stirrer frame

MAKE SHEARING SAFE

and submersible stirrer can be used, with the stirrer frame able to accommodate up to a 4.3 metre wall height tank. The submersible stirrer can be removed using the frame without needing to drain the tank or use a Hiab. These stirrers are available in 1.5 to 7.5kW options and offer the ability to agitate up to 2 million litres. Yardmaster stirrers are also available for inground tanks, floating pontoons and fixed wall installations. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Yardmaster offers an extensive range of effluent stirrers.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

14 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Film binding now available MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE KUHN VBP 3100 series variable chamber baler-wrapper combination can now be equipped with the patented Kuhn Twin-reel film binding system. The manufacturer claims this increases the baler’s versatility in silage production. The process has already been a proven concept on Kuhn fixed chamber baler-wrappers since its introduction in 2015. The patented film binding system uses two regular 750mm stretchfilm rolls, which offers several advantages compared to other film bind-

Kuhn’s VBP 3100 series baler-wrappers can now be equipped with film binding systems.

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film roll holding system, this makes the exchange of film rolls on the VBP 3100 series an easy job. The film and net binding systems are two separate systems, which enables the operator to switch between the two without the need for tools. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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costs by up to 37% and extends the intervals for changing film reels by around 30%. Additionally, the customer’s inventory management is simplified by using regular stretch-film. Thanks to lower roll weights, the film is easy to handle. Combined with the low lifting height and the user-friendly

ing systems available on the market that are using wide mantle film. Using regular, freely available wrapping film enables customers to benefit from a lower purchase price and use a much higher pre-stretch ratio compared to conventional wide film binding systems. This is said to reduce film binding

WHEN PRODUCING round silage bales, more and more often film binding is preferred over traditional net binding. Film binding provides tighter, more compactly wrapped bales with better protection around the circumference of the bale. The additional oxygen barrier guarantees better silage quality, and the improved bale shape enables more effi-

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cient storage. There are also many practical benefits for the farmer. A film bound bale means easy unwrapping, even during frost periods. There is no collection of silage in between the wrap so no feed is lost. Film-wrapped bales make waste management more efficient; there is no net and film to be separated, so all the plastic film can be recycled together.

SMOOTH BORE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

Code Explanation

Product code

PE PRESSURE PIPE PE PRESSURE PIPE

TM

PE PRESSURE PIPE

PE PRESSURE PIPE

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PE PRESSURE PIPE PE PRESSURE PIPE

LAND DRAINAGE

9 STOCK 12.5 WATER

12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

TM

Code Explanation

Code Explanation

Product code Coil length (metres) Code Explanation

Coil Length (metres)

12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE 12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

HP

20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

Code Explanation

Product Code

OD (mm)

3500.63PN25.100B

PE -or PRESSURE 12.5 BAR PEPVC 100 PRESSURE PIPEPIPE

Code Explanation

PE or PVC PRESSURE PIPE

LDPE PRESSURE PIPE

OD (mm)

Product Code Coil length (metres) Code2200-90PN8-100 Explanation

Product Code

340.32PN12.5.50 Pressure class OD (mm) Coil Length (metres) OD (mm) Code Explanation

Coil Length (metres)

PVC CULVERT PIPE PVC CULVERT PIPE

Coil length (metres)

S0E(metres) Length OD550-200-5 (mm)

OD (mm)

RURAL BLACK and BLACKLINE.

Black Pressure Class 3500.63PN25.100B pipe Black 3500.63PN25.100B pipe Coil Length (metres) OD (mm)

Length (metres)

PN 16

OD (mm)

Product Code

OD (mm)

Code Explanation

Code Explanation ID (mm) Code Explanation

ID (mm)300-40-50

Product300-40-50 code Coil length (metres)

COMPRESSION FITTINGS for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, METRIC COMPRESSION FITTINGS COMPRESSION FITTINGS for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, PN 16 RURAL BLACK and BLACKLINE. METRIC COMPRESSION FITTINGS PN 16 RURAL BLACK and BLACKLINE.

9pipe FARM DAIRY 12.5 EFFLUENT PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE Product Code Pressure Class Black pipe PVC CULVERT3500.63PN25.100B PIPE Black

Code Explanation

3500.63PN25.100B pipeProduct Code Coil Length (metres)

OD (mm)

OD (mm)

Coil Length (metres)

TM

16

Bar Bar

Code Explanation Code Explanation

16

PN 16

Pressure Class

go gowith withthe theflow flow

20 20&&25 25BAR BAR--PE PE100 100PRESSURE PRESSUREPIPE PIPE

Coil length (metres)

OD (mm)

Coil Length (metres) Coil Length (metres)

16 OD (mm)

Bar Bar Bar

Code Explanation

Product Code

Socketed one end

Coil Length (metres)

HP HP

PE or PVC PRESSURE PIPE

Code Code Explanation Explanation

NEXUS110.100 NEXUS110.100 OD (mm) OD (mm)

PVC CULVERT PIPE

Code Explanation

Product Code

Length (metres)

Code Explanation Product code

Coil length (metres)

pipe

400-110-100 OD (mm)

Product Code

Coil length (metres)

2200-90PN8-100 OD (mm)

Pressure class

Code Explanation

Product Code

Socketed one end

550-200-5 S0E OD (mm)

Length (metres)

OD (mm)

PE HEAVY DUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH BORE CULVERT PIPE NEXUS CULVERT 2005

Code Explanation Code Explanation Product code Coil length (metres) Product code Coil length (metres)

pipe pipe

400-110-100 400-110-100 OD (mm) OD (mm)

Code Explanation Code Explanation Product Code Coil length (metres) Product Code Coil length (metres)

Code Explanation

Bar Bar

Product Code

Length (metres)

OD (mm)

2200-90PN8-100 2200-90PN8-100

Code Explanation

OD (mm) OD (mm)

300-40-50

Pressure class Pressure class

Coil length (metres)

PVC PVCCULVERT CULVERTPIPE PIPE

PN 16

16

Length (metres)

OD (mm)

OD (mm)

FARM MAPPING USING USINGGLOBAL GLOBALPOSITIONING POSITIONING SYSTEMS FARM MAPPING SYSTEMS Code Explanation

Code Explanation Product code Coil length (metres) Product code Coil length (metres)

ID (mm)

Product code

Product Code

Bar

Pressure class

550-200-5 S0E

PE PEor orPVC PVCPRESSURE PRESSUREPIPE PIPE

COMPRESSION FITTINGS for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, METRIC COMPRESSION FITTINGS RURAL BLACK and BLACKLINE.

Code Explanation

Code Explanation

OD (mm) OD (mm)

HPDUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH PE HEAVY BORE CULVERT PIPE NEXUS CULVERT 2005

PIPE Bar Bar Bar

340.32PN12.5.50 340.32PN12.5.50

OD (mm) OD (mm)

Product code

Length (metres) S0E NEXUS110.100

Length (metres)

Product CodeCode Explanation Length (metres)

SMOOTH PE LAND SMOOTHODBORE BORE PE(metres) LANDDRAINAGE DRAINAGEPIPE PIPE Coil Length (mm)

Code Explanation

Code Explanation Code Explanation Product Code Pressure Class Product Code Pressure Class

OD (mm)

PE HEAVY DUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH PE HEAVY DUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH BORE CULVERT PIPE NEXUS CULVERT 2005 BORE CULVERT PIPE NEXUS CULVERT 2005 PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

2200-90PN8-100 NEXUS CULVERT 2005

16 16

16 Product Code

OD (mm)

FARM MAPPING USING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS

PRESSURE FARM MAPPING USING GLOBAL POSITIONINGLDPE SYSTEMS FARM MAPPING USING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS

RURAL BLACK and BLACKLINE.

Socketed one end

OD (mm) 550-200-5

Coil length (metres)

400-110-100

FARM MAPPING340.32PN12.5.50 USING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS Length (metres) OD (mm) Code Explanation

Code Explanation

360.40PN9.50 360.40PN9.50

12.5 --PE 100 PIPE COMPRESSION for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, 12.5BAR BARCOMPRESSION PEFITTINGS 100PRESSURE PRESSURE PIPE METRIC FITTINGS

Product Code

Code Explanation

Length (metres)

Code Explanation Product Code Coil length (metres) Product Code Length (metres)

ID (mm)

300-40-50 360.40PN9.50 300-40-50

Product code Coil length (metres) Length OD Product (mm) codeCoil Coil length(metres) (metres)

16 Bar 9 Bar 116 2.5

Coil Length (metres) Coil Length (metres)

Socketed one end

Product code

CodeExplanation Explanation Code Code Explanation Product Pressure Class IDCode (mm)

ID (mm) Code Explanation 300-40-50 Code Explanation Product Code Pressure Class Product Code Pressure Class Product code Coil length (metres)

OD (mm) OD (mm)

Bar

550-200-5 S0E

OD (mm)

Length (metres)

OD (mm)

Product Code Socketed one end Code Explanation Code Explanation

SMOOTH BORE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE 550-200-5 S0E

Code Explanation

Product Code Length (metres) Code Explanation

Coil Length (metres)

Code Explanation

Coil length (metres)

go with the flow

PE HEAVY DUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH 20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE PE HEAVY DUTY PIPE TWIN WALL SMOOTH BORE CULVERT NEXUS CULVERT 2005 BORE CULVERTPIPE PIPE TMTM NEXUS CULVERT 2005 LDPE PRESSURE PE PIPE Code Explanation PELAND LANDDRAINAGE DRAINAGE PIPE Product Code Pressure Class PE Black PEPRESSURE PRESSUREPIPE PIPE 3500.63PN25.100B pipe Code Explanation

Pressure class

Product Code Code Explanation Pressure Class

Bar

Coil Length (metres)

Pressure class

OD (mm)

Pressure class

OD (mm)

300-40-50 PVC CULVERT PIPE COMPRESSION FITTINGS for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, Code Explanation

Product code

Socketed one end

PE Code Explanation PEPRESSURE PRESSUREPIPE PIPE Product Code Pressure Class COMPRESSION FITTINGS for GREENLINE, REDLINE™, Black METRIC COMPRESSION FITTINGS 3500.63PN25.100B pipe

Code Explanation

Coil length (metres)

PIPE

Coil length (metres)

2200-90PN8-100

Coil length (metres) Code Explanation

Product Code OD (mm)

COMPRESSION FITTINGS forFITTINGS GREENLINE, REDLINE™, COMPRESSION METRIC COMPRESSION FITTINGS HP METRIC PNPN1616 RURAL BLACK andand BLACKLINE. RURAL BLACK BLACKLINE.

Code Explanation

Product Code

Code Explanation 20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE Product Code Socketed 550-200-5 S0Eone end

Product code

Product code

Bar Bar

2200-90PN8-100

OD (mm)

Bar

OD (mm)

HP

Coil length (metres)

Code Explanation

Coil length (metres)

400-110-100

BarPEPEorHEAVY PVC PRESSURE PIPE Bar DUTY TWIN WALL SMOOTH Bar BORE CULVERT PIPE

Pressure Class Pressure class OD2200-90PN8-100 (mm)

Code Explanation

Product Code

Product Code

Code Explanation

SMOOTH BORE PE Coil LAND DRAINAGE PIPE Length (metres) OD (mm) PE or PVC PRESSURE PIPE NEXUS110.100 PVC CULVERT PIPE HP PVC CULVERT PIPE 2200-90PN8-100

12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE ID (mm)

Product Code Pressure Class Code Explanation

LDPE PRESSURE PIPE LDPE PRESSURE PIPE

Black pipe

Coil Length (metres)

Code Explanation

Product Code Coil length (metres) Code Explanation

340.32PN12.5.50 Coil Length (metres) OD (mm)

OD (mm)

PE or PVC PRESSURE PIPE PE or PVC PRESSURE PIPE

Code Explanation

LDPE PRESSURE PE PRESSURE PIPE PIPE LDPE PRESSURE PIPE 400-110-100 Code Explanation OD (mm) Pressure Class Product Code

Product Code Pressure Class Code Explanation

20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE 20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

Pressure Class Code Explanation

Product code Coil length (metres) Code Explanation 360.40PN9.50 Product code400-110-100 Coil length (metres) Coil Length (metres) OD (mm)

Product Code Pressure Class 340.32PN12.5.50

OD (mm)

OD (mm)

Product code

Pressure Class

Coil Length (metres) 340.32PN12.5.50

OD (mm)

Coil length (metres) OD (mm)

400-110-100

Bar Bar

Coil Length (metres)

Coil length (metres)

pipe pipe

400-110-100 Code Explanation

Code Explanation

Product Code

go with the flow

Bar

Coil Length (metres)

Code Explanation Product code Product code

20 & 25 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

340.32PN12.5.50

Bar Bar

HP HP

OD (mm)

PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

20 PRESSURE & 25 BAR - PEPIPE 100 PRESSURE PIPE PE OD (mm)

PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

OD (mm)

CULVERT pipe

Code Explanation OD (mm) Product Code Pressure Class

Product Code Pressure Class Code Explanation

360.40PN9.50 Coil Length (metres) OD (mm)

Coil length (metres)

PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

Coil length (metres)

NEXUS110.100

Code Explanation

OD (mm) NEXUS110.100

TM

Product Code

For more information Phone 0800 800 262 Fax 0800 804 804 www.iplex.co.nz

Product code

go with the flow go with the flow

OD (mm)

Code Explanation

Product code

340.32PN12.5.50 Product Code Pressure Class

Bar

SMOOTH BORE PE PRESSURE PIPE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE SMOOTH BORE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE NEXUS110.100 12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

Product Code Pressure Class 360.40PN9.50

OD (mm)

Pressure Class

Coil Length (metres)

Pressure Class Coil Length (metres)

360.40PN9.50

12.5 BAR - PE 100 PRESSURE PIPE

360.40PN9.50

OD (mm)

Bar Bar

Coil length (metres)

NEXUS110.100

Pressure Class

Product Code OD (mm)

Code Explanation

Product Code

PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE BarPE PRESSURE PIPE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE Bar

TM

PE PRESSURE PIPE PE PRESSURE PIPE

9 12.5 9 pipe pipe 12.5

Code Explanation

Product code

Code Explanation 360.40PN9.50

Bar

TM

PE PRESSURE PIPE

99 112.5 2.5

Code Explanation

Product Code

Coil length (metres)

NEXUS110.100

BORE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPEOD (mm)

go with the flow

SMOOTH BORE PE LAND DRAINAGE PIPE

TM

go with the flow

PE PRESSURE PIPE

go with the flow SMOOTH

FARM MAPPING USING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS Code Explanation Code Explanation Product Code Socketed one end Product Code Socketed one end

Bar

550-200-5 S0E 550-200-5 S0E

OD (mm) OD (mm)

Code Explanation

Length (metres) Length (metres)

Bar


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 15

Designed by farmers for farmers MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE COMBI Clamp Sheep handling system is most commonly used for dagging, weighing, drenching and vaccinating, but it is also well suited for foot paring and mouthing. The manual operation gives the user greater control over slight adjustments and creates a quiet operation for improved stock flow. A bonus is its affordability and durability, offering years of maintenance-free use. The Combi Clamp can also be tailored to suit many farming operations, with a wide variety of optional extras – including three-way drafting, wheel and weigh gear attachments. “I’m very pleased with the Combi Clamp set up,” says user Les Scott. “Since August, we have been drenching, dagging, tagging and doing pre lamb work with ewes. We no longer seem to need the contractor with the conveyor, so – in that short time – we have come close to paying for it.” Scott says the system is great for a variety of jobs and he finds the three-way drafting a great addition. Meanwhile, the com-

pany’s cattle handling equipment is user friendly. The system comes with an auto catch head bail, with a durable range that suits all types of New Zealand beef cattle. The basic crush comes standard with practical features for safety and ease of access to the animal. There’s also a choice of vet and vetless models with parallel squeeze option, which all feature the auto head yoke. This can also be alternatively purchased as a standalone unit to be incorporated into existing systems. During product development, the company put a significant effort into reducing rattling noise, making the crush pleasant to use for operators and keeping cattle calm and relaxed. It says this results in the most common feedback, that the product is clearly designed by a farmer who understands livestock. Combi Clamp will be attending all three regional field day events. The ongoing success of the company’s product range sees two new faces joining the sales team. Scott Hassall will oversee sales throughout the South Island, with Claudia Fraser looking after the North Island. www.combiclamps.co.nz

VETMARKER

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SEE US AT REGIONAL FIELD DAYS • Northland Site – H4 • Central Districts Sites – O11A • Southern Field Days, Kirwee – Site 324

Serving NZ farmers since 1962 INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

www.pppindustries.co.nz sales@pppindustries.co.nz

0800 901 902


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

16 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Sprayers offer advanced crop protection MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

KVERNELAND IS set to expand its product offering, with the addition of a full range of mounted and trailed sprayers being rolled out over the coming months. This includes linkage-mounted iXter A and iXter B models, with additional capacity offered alongside the option of the 1,100-litre iXtra front tank. There is also an extensive line-up of iXtrack trailed models comprising T3, T4 and T6 versions. Across these sprayer ranges, buyers can choose technology to suit their budgets and operational requirements. This includes individual nozzle control, auto section control, iXclean tank washing, priming/purging functions and boom line

recirculation. The iXtrack T3, T4 and T6 trailed models, with tank capacities from 2,600 litres to 7,400 litres, can be configured with steel or aluminium booms extending from 18-40 metre working widths. These include twin-fold aluminium HAS and steel HSS structures from 24-30m, with wider options met using a three-part folding steel boom from 32-40m. Boom performance comes from a suspended parallelogram rear frame. This serves to mount the boom assembly and deliver excellent performance, while working height is controlled by a choice of Boom Guide ultrasonic control systems. The top-end Boom Guide Pro Active uses three levelling sensors on the central boom sec-

A Kverneland-mounted sprayer in action.

tion, allowing faster reaction to change of ground terrain via a central slope correction cylinder. Wider booms, of 24 to 36m working widths, can be equipped with five ultrasonic sensors. This has two outer sensors at the wider working width and one outer

sensor when operating at 24m. All iXtrack models are fully ISOBUS compatible. Kverneland’s iXspray hardware and software allows operators to use intuitive touchscreen and smart electronics to manage individual nozzle control or boom sec-

tions, boom line recirculation, and one-touch boom, spray line and tank cleaning processes. IsoMatch Grip adds further control options, with up to 44 fully customisable functions available from a single joystick. It ErgoDrive headland management system

Central Districts Field Days SITE #G27

Cnr Robinson & McNally Sts, Ashburton • Ph 03 307 9049 • Email admin@rainer.co.nz • www.rainer.co.nz

allows the boom to raise/ lower – and axle steering to be managed – by a single button press on the joystick. Nozzle control includes pneumatic or electric operation, which suits those using GPS for automatic section control and auto start/stop at

headlands. Individual nozzle control is available with iXflow E, which also offers remote App control of nozzles when outside the cab, to simplify pattern testing and checking nozzle flow. The tractor-mounted iXter A models offer a general purpose-style machine with tank capacities from 800-1,200 litres and booms spanning 12-21m. The more sophisticated iXter B is available with 1,0001,800 litre tank capacities and booms ranging from 15-30m. A semi-automatic or fully-automated liquid management system available with the iXtra front tank provides a fully-mounted combination boasting 3,000 litres. www.powerfarming.co.nz @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 17

Cane family on the ‘Case’ ALL BLACK captain Sam Cane has a reputation for tenacity and getting the hard work done. It’s a trait that must run in the family genes when you look at the farming career of his parents, who farm at Reporoa on the Central Plateau. Malcolm and Kathy Cane farm 390ha – of which 146ha is leased to a dairy farmer – running about 1000 deer stags and 500 hinds, plus about 500 mixed-sex weaners. Starting out as teenager, Malcolm began a hay-carting business, moving about 100,000 bales each season, contract fencing in the offseason and doing an 18-month stint working for a local dairy farmer. After seven seasons of hay-carting and fencing, then age 22, he was able to make a down-payment on an 80ha block in the area. Back then, bankers were pessimistic about farming and there was little to spare. “We had fifty grand and 50 deer and still had to go to about three banks because interest rates were about 19%,” says Malcolm.

Sam Cane (centre) is pictured with his deer farming parents Kathy and Malcolm in front of their Case Puma 165.

Even 10 years later, the Canes had not fully stocked their 80ha, so alongside their own stock, they grazed animals for others, while still maintaining the off-farm fencing business to keep ahead of the struggle. Now, around 30 years on, having experienced the ups and downs of the venison meat and velvet markets and keen

to spread risk, the Canes went into partnership in a hunting block in the Paeroa mountain range known as Broadview Hunting estate. As a side-line to the trophy hunting and selling velvet to New Zealand agents, Kathy also produces and distributes Canes Deer Velvet, a business built up gradually over the past

20 years, producing about five tonnes a year, as capsules and raw product. Malcolm’s father, Laurie – a Reporoa dairy farmer – only ever had Case Internationals, so he got started with the brand too, using a small International with a hay sweep. After about 15 years of running a tight ship, Malcolm bought two Case IHs: a 115 and a

Puma 165 from Giltrap. Malcolm Cane prizes his tractors because they offer a degree of farming independence, like his own hay-baling gear, that literally allows him to ‘make hay when the sun shines’. Producing 1500 baleage wraps a year with a Kuhn baler, the ability to cut hay on demand – usually up to five times a year – is priceless for the

Superior, longer-lasting fuel storage

deer, as they tend to be picky eaters. “Deer are that fussy that we cut the lucerne every 30 days. If it’s left any longer it’s not very palatable for them,” he says. Case IH and Giltrap Agrizone recently loaned the Canes a new Puma 165 CVT in a sponsorship arrangement in conjunction with their All Black son Sam, who remains a farm boy at heart despite being a professional rugby player. Malcolm says while he probably won’t use all the electronic features in his new Puma cab, he’s enjoying many of its features and it’s a nice smooth ride. “Put it this way, you don’t really feel like you’re working when you’re sitting in it.” www.caseih.co.nz

FENCING PRODUCTS TO SEE! SEE US AT SITE I25 TARAGATE – the ORIGINAL Multi Strand Electric Gate The preferred choice for over 20 years! – Taragate 4 Strand – Taragate 2 Strand – Taragate 4 Strand ‘Lifestyler’

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COME AND TALK TO US ABOUT ALL YOUR FENCING NEEDS

Contact us for more info on 0800 800 221 or visit our website www.ensol.co.nz See us the CD Field Days – Site N19 Ensol Way

Taragate Ltd

RD2 Hamilton, New Zealand Phone 07 843 3859 or 0800 TARAGATE (82 72 42) Email info@taragate.co.nz Web www.taragate.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

18 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

NZ tractor industry remains optimistic for 2021 MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND tractor sales finished 2020 on a

strong note, with December sales up 18.4 % on 2019. Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) pres-

ident Kyle Baxter says while 2020 posed challenges for the industry, the current mood of the organisation’s members is

handypiece ■ Ideal for shearing sheep, alpacas, goats and cow tails. ■ Variable speed from 2400-3500 rpm. ■ Latest brushless motor technology means minimal heat build up ■ 1400gms means 100-200gms lighter than standard handpiece. ■ At 2700 rpm the 12-volt lithium battery will crutch up to 300400 sheep, 400-500 cow tails. ■ Tough alloy switch box with auto rest fuse for overload or lockup – clips to belt.

Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) president Kyle Baxter says while 2020 posed challenges for the industry, the current mood is positive.

Worl d’s m o spee st powe r d cli pper ful varia ble is he re!

FIELD DAYS SPECIAL a FREE box of 10 cutters

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positive.   Overall, tractor sales for 2020 were down 15.3% compared with 2019. Sales of machines in the 375 HP and above were particularly affected with a drop of 25% on the previous year. However, some segments remained stronger than others during 2020, particularly lifestyle tractors (20-30HP), where sales volumes were very similar to 2019. Meanwhile, tractors sold in the viticulture and horticultural sectors, typically 80 to 100HP, saw a reduction of about 5% compared to 2019’s record breaking year. Hardest hit was the 140-375Hp range, traditionally sold into the arable and dry stock farming sector, with a

20% reduction compared to 2019.   “This HP segment accounts for a lot of the tractors sold to contractors and hire fleets, which were affected by the general uncertainties around the pandemic,” Baxter explained. “These guys also experienced further uncertainty in obtaining sufficient workers through the spring and summer season to operate their machines, with a consequential reduction in the yearly sales volumes of larger tractors.”  Looking forward, he says TAMA members are reporting demand for tractors and equipment steadily building, with customers securing machines for Spring/ Summer 2021.  

GET AHEAD

“However, the pandemic is continuing to disrupt the overseas supply chain across Europe, America and Asia,” Baxter adds. “Our members are doing everything they can to ensure machines arrive on time for the season ahead. However, there will be potential delays in global manufacturing and international shipping routes that may be felt during the first half of the year.” He says TAMA is advising its members to stay well informed of any shipping logistics and to liaise with their customers who may be affected by these delays. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

PRE-ORDER FOR SPRING

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AND GET A BONUS POWER UPGRADE to the next horsepower model on all Magnum, Optum, Puma ST5 and Maxxum ST5 tractors*

Built to your specs | 3 Years 0% Interest Free* 3 year/3,000 hour RedCover Premier Plus warranty* *Promotion ends 31st March 2021 and applies to factory forward orders only, for delivery by 31st December 2021. Excludes Puma and Maxxum Tier 3. Bonus Power Upgrade is available within a model range only (upgrades cannot be made between different model families). Finance offers are subject to normal lending criteria. Finance is based off 40% deposit, full GST upfront, 36 monthly principal and interest repayments. Some exclusions may apply. For full terms and conditions of this promotion, please contact your local Case IH dealer, or visit caseih.co.nz.

See us at the Central Districts Field Days, site C12-16 2294 Takapau Road Waipukurau 06 858 6041

0800 CASE IH caseih.co.nz 21CIH004

Palmerston North 06 354 7164 Taranaki 06 278 5119


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 19

VISIT

Saving backs We‘ve got and manpower milking for over 40 years bundled MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

HECTON PRODUCTS have been in the sheep handling business for more than 40 years now. In fact, the company’s Sheep Handler and Weigh Crate products are common sights all around the country. Hecton’s Sheep Handler has a reputation for speed and versatility. Built for strength, it is the perfect unit for dagging, crutching, bellying, foot trimming, vaccinating, wool sampling, mouthing, eye wigging, loading of AI cradles – or any

task requiring a sheep or goat to be mobilised on its side. Stock are held in a comfortable position during operation allowing full access to the underside of the animal, so no heavy lifting is required and operation is easy on the back. The Hecton Sheep Handler is available in both air-operated and manual (no air required) versions. The company is offering – for a limited time – a promotional price for its Weigh Crate. Having multiple jobs to do on your flock does not necessarily mean you need more staff or help to do it. The Weigh Crate is a low cost, qual-

ity-build solution that can be simply added into your yards. The crate can be hard mounted into an existing sheep race in the woolshed or it can be mobile and added into temporary yards. Hecton says the multipurpose product is ideal to use for tagging, drenching, mouthing, vaccinating and drafting. By adding load bars, you can also weigh your stock. The product is modular, additional components can be added at any stage to include dagging and ring crutching capability. www.hecton.co.nz

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• Timaru $329 ; Otautau $362. Prices excl. GST

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Driving dairy efficiencies? We can help.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

20 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

New generation large square balers MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW generation Kuhn SB series large square balers are said to deliver high capacity and high bale weights combined with more driver convenience. At its heart, driveline upgrades makes the balers extremely robust and durable. Meanwhile, a choice of four double-knotter models and three bale sizes offer a solution for every producer in all crop conditions. The SB series consists of four models: SB 890, SB 1270 X, SB 1290, and SB 1290 iD, producing 80 x 90cm, 120 x 70cm, and 120 x 90cm bales, respectively. The SB 890, SB 1270 X and SB 1290 perform in all crop conditions. The SB 1290 iD provides high bale den-

sities and is particularly suited to efficient logistics in shipping situations. The SB series balers feature an improved crop intake system, starting with a newly-designed crop guard, a torque increase on the rotor and feeder fork driveline to ensure up to 15% higher intake capacity. The KUHN patented torque regulation system on all models keeps the balance between capacity and density. This uses a crank angle position sensor and plunger rod load pins to measure the total machine load, throughout the complete plunger cycle. The new design offers good accessibility for daily inspection and maintenance. While on the safety front, the knotter deck is equipped with

The new generation Kuhn SB series large square balers are said to deliver high capacity and high bale weights combined with more driver convenience.

solid stairs and a safety railing. Other characteristics of the SB series include the integral rotor for con-

sistent crop flow, featuring bolted-up Hardox rotor tines for durability and easy exchange. An active pre-chamber fill-

ing mechanism (‘POWER DENSITY’) with a newly designed mechanical feeder fork steering system is said to help

produce evenly shaped bales. It also comes with a double knotter binding system and standard electronic monitoring

adapted for extremely dense bales. All SB models are fully ISOBUS compatible with an intuitive user interface, easy to control via the ISOBUS terminal of the tractor or via KUHN’s CCI 50 / CCI 1200 terminals. The machines also feature a load-sensing hydraulic system that is used for axle locking, knife steering and roller control. For operator looking to achieve extremely high dense bales, the SB 1290 iD model produces square bales with up to 25% higher density than conventional 120 x 90 format balers. The Kuhn TWINPACT, double plunger system ensures efficient bale compaction, while avoiding high peak loads on the machine. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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Not using interest-free money makes no sense. Buy a Suzuki KingQuad now, put it to work straight away, pay it off in 2023, all at 0% interest. Ask the boss, ask your accountant, ask the bank manager – it’s too good a deal to miss. Pay 1/3 up front, 1/3 next year and 1/3 in two years’ time. The KingQuad will get through a ton of work in that time, plus it’ll be under warranty the whole way. Too easy.

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KINGQUAD LT-A500XP

$15,217+GST

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$16,086+GST

Price excludes GST. Finance offer based on new Suzuki KingQuad ATV from 20 January – 30 April 2021, or while stocks last. The offer is based on 0% interest rate over 24 months and an up-front payment of one third of the MRP, $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR; a further payment of one third to be paid in 12 months; and a final payment of one third in 24 months. Normal UDC lending and credit criteria apply. Offer not available in conjunction with any other promotion.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 21

Turbocharged cultivators with a capital T! MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

INTRODUCED IN 2020, the Kverneland Turbo T cultivator comes in 6.5 and 8 metre working widths. Both trailed machines carry five banks of tines and fold to a manageable 3m transport width. Aimed at cropping farmers and vegetable growers, the Turbo T is said to be particularly useful for dealing with maize stubbles or fodder beet residues. The machine provides 725mm of under-frame clearance, combined with a 190mm leg spacing. Carrying 31 or 44 tines respectively, the 6500 and 8000 machines are equipped with the well known Kverneland Triflex 400 tines – with its instantly-recognisable green, maintenance-free, leaf spring configuration. Offering up to 400kg resistance, the layout can operate at working depths of 3-20cm. For the 2021 season, purchasers can also specify the Reflex tine assembly, aimed particularly at users in the North Island where there is more ploughing, to give the option of either ripping into stubble or working with wider points on

ploughed land. Distributor, Power Farming, reports that the machine is highly versatile in the spring ahead of maize planting, going deeper to help promote root growth. Likewise, post cereal harvesting, it can be used at high speed at shallower depths to promote weed and volunteer germination – with high work rates. The machine gives a “full cut” across the whole working width, with a combination of forward speed and resonance within the leg delivers good mixing of trash and organic matter. It also has the added benefit of a level finish. Power requirement is low at around 35-40hp per working metre, with routine maintenance also kept low by the use of high-grade steel and sealed bearing assemblies. For high daily outputs, the machines have a maximum horsepower rating of 450hp. The standard point, a 60mm knock-on fitting, is suitable for working at depth to ensure full soil movement through the profile, while also offering time saving during replacement. For shallower operations or lighter soil types, the machine’s options

Kverneland’s Turbo T cultivator is aimed at cropping farmers and vegetable growers.

include a 150mm point or the “Tiger” point – specifically designed for stony soils. Rear of the tines, a levelling element consists of a revolving disc configuration. This is suited to all conditions, particularly heavy land and high straw volumes, before final consolidation and finishing is carried out by the rearmounted, 565mm diameter Actipacker. Ease of use is taken care of with hydraulic cylinders and spacers for depth control. The cultivator also comes with a separate, manuallyadjusted crank handle for the levelling element. When the working depth is adjusted, a parallelogram linkage ensures the levelling system is also adjusted to maintain the quality of work.

FARM MACHINERY STRENGTH / QUALITY / PERFORMANCE CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS SEE US AT SITE

I30 - I35

Bale Feeders

Forage Wagons

Manure Spreaders

Read us until the cows come home!

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Tip Trailers

www.mcintosh.net.nz FREEPHONE: 0800 622 276


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

22 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Real handy in all situations MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

LISTENING TO customers across all sectors of agriculture helps the Handypiece team design and engineer options to make its unit better suited for each application. Inventor Dave Short says as part of the development process, any trial modifications are tested by experienced users, meaning if a perfectionist shearer is happy with the performance of the machine under load and at a selected speed, then farmers and farm workers will also be happy. The standard Handypiece Pro, with the purple curly cord, remains the most popular style. It’s suitable for users of all abilities, on sheep, cattle, goats, deer, large dogs, horses, grass

The Handypiece Pro features variable speeds from 2400 – 3500rpm, typically carrying out dagging, crutching and trimming cows’ tails at a mid-speed of 2700 rpm.

and plants. A shearing style

Handypiece, with a long straight cord, is designed

for experienced users and shearers, with the extra cord length offering longer blows when shearing. It also allows a longer reach when TB testing deer, or when being used on animals held in a sheep handler. The machines can be customised for lefthanded users, or with the power cord exiting from the middle of the motor, making it suitable for use by right and left-handed users. The Handypiece Pro features variable speeds from 2400 – 3500rpm, typically carrying out dagging, crutching and trimming cows’ tails at a mid-speed of 2700 rpm. Meanwhile, it offers a superior finish when shearing by running at the maximum speed. Equipped with a brushless motor, the Pro

units can crutch between 300 to 400 sheep from a single charge, while also weighing in at 100 grams lighter than a standard handpiece and developing

less heat build-up. Handypiece kits, supplied in a purpose-built carry bag, includes a 12 amp/hr lithium battery, charger, belt, holster

and pouch, along with a 5-metre extension cord. www.handypiece.co.nz CD Field Days site G16a @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Founding director Bill McIntosh (right) at McIntosh Farm Machinery’s Fieldays site solving the world’s problems with Rural News Group publisher Brian Hight.

BILL’S LEGACY LIVES ON! FOUNDING DIRECTOR of a top local farm machinery manufacturer has died, leaving behind a legacy based on strength and reliability – personal traits that live on in his company and the products it builds. Bill McIntosh and his brother Bryant founded McIntosh Brothers in 1951, starting as jobbing engineers around Palmerston North. In the ensuing years, the company grew into a leading manufacturer and exporter of farm machinery and the Manawatu’s largest crane hire company. The well-known McIntosh Farm Machinery range of farm gear, in blue livery, is among the strongest in the market and is now exported to various offshore markets. The McIntosh brothers got started in the farm machinery market by making sheep showers and stock crates for trucks. The stock crates necessitated a crane, so the brothers built their

own on a Commer TS3 truck, then a second and a third –the beginnings of the crane part of the McIntosh cranes business. In 1973, they displayed the first forage wagon at the national field days, generating great interest among farmers. Those were early days in the development of feeder wagons in New Zealand, but they are now a core product line for McIntosh Farm Machinery and a common sight on NZ farms. Before Bill passed away early this year, he was the oldest of three generations of the McIntosh clan working in the business, which has grown substantially since 1951. Possessing an incredible work ethic, Bill didn’t retire until health issues forced him to in his late eighties. He was 90 years old when he died – a milestone he had set himself, according to family members, saying “I’ll get to 90, then I’ll reassess.”

Email: info@hecton.co.nz Visit our website www.hecton.co.nz for a full list of products CALL IN & SEE US | 73 PRESTON STREET INVERCARGILL PHONE: 03 215 8558

SHEEP HANDLER AND LEAD UP RACE

“Designed by a Farmer for Farmers”

See us at Site O21

• Fastest handler on the market • Ideal for dagging, crutching & foot trimming

See us at CD Field Days

SITE G16-G18

CRUTCHING TRAILER Hecton Contractors – Tandem covered crutching trailer

PHONE 0800 4 AGBITS | 0800 4 242 487 WEBSITE www.agbits.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 23

Blurring the boundaries between work and play MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW FROM the Yamaha camp is R Max2 XT-R. The manufacturer says the new machine blurs the boundaries between work and play. At its heart, a powerful 999cc parallel twin, fuelinjected engine that revs out to 8500rpm. This certainly takes care of the play part, particularly when mated to a refined chassis that features long travel Fox shock absorbers and drive modes for Sport, Trail and Crawl. On the flip side, when work beckons, its long service intervals make ownership easy, while a hydraulically assisted rear load tray and a factory fitted warn winch system help get the job done.

Looking at the new model in more detail, the machines are available in two or four seat configurations (RMax-2 and RMax-4). Both are equipped with On Command 2WD, 4WD with limited slip differential, and 4WD with a locked diff settings, engaged via a dash-mounted rotary control. The rear cargo bed offers a 272kg carrying capacity, with multiple tie-down points. While the rear, 2-inch receiver offers a 907kg towing capacity. As expected from Yamaha, the RMax features the Ultramatic V-belt transmission offering silky smooth transition as the speed increases. It has excellent downhill retardation and control, delivered by

a one-way sprag clutch built into the driveline. Catch up with these new models at the

upcoming Central Districts and South Island Agricultural field days sites.

East Coast

Farming Expo

24–25 February Wairoa A&P Showgrounds Gates open 9am both days

TRC EXTENDS ITS RANGE TRC TRACTORS is well known as an AGCO dealer for the Massey Ferguson, Fendt and Valtra brands – as well as agents for Stewart Trailers and Weaving Drills. Having recently moved to new, purpose-built premises at the gateway to Fielding, the start of 2021 also saw the company begin a new partnership start with Polaris. This now allows TRC to offer a comprehensive line up of utility vehicles, bikes and side-by-sides. The extensive Polaris range offers an array of machines for the farming, hunting and recreational sectors. These include well-known models such as Ranger, Sportsman, Ace and General. “We know that Polaris will complement the brands we already sell, particularly models like the Ranger,” sales manager Aaron Meurk says. “The 570HD-EPS-ADC is a nimble, compact twoseat machine with great features like a 44hp engine, electronic power steering, engine braking and an active descent system. The safety is taken care of by a full roll cage structure and a seat belt interlock system.” For those looking for more space and greater capacity, Meurk adds that the Ranger 1000 Series is also available with three seats, as well as petrol, diesel and electric powerplants and three throttle modes. With up to 82hp, on-demand, true all-wheel drive. Electronic power steering, engine braking and active hill descent, it’s really a go anywhere vehicle. Add to that a 454kg tray capacity and the ability to tow 1134 kg, it’s probably time to hang up the keys of the ute! www.trctractors.co.nz

Yamaha’s new R Max2 XT-R.

Two days of demonstrations, exhibits & seminars just for sheep & beef farmers Explore new ideas for your farming operation “The farming expo is an excellent way to bring rural professionals and businesses into one place for farmers!” Tickets available online or at the gate

eastcoastexpo.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 23, 2021

24 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Sustainable beef patties possible – study IT’S POSSIBLE to produce a beef patty sustainably across the supply chain in New Zealand, a year-long trial has shown. Key players in the red meat industry partnered with the Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI’s) Sustainable Food & Fibre Futures fund to develop a model for producing independently verified, sustainable beef through the entire supply chain. The project aimed to help meet a growing demand for ethically sourced and sustainable products. “The project showed that New Zealand can do this and the model can be scaled up – so this really is an encouraging milestone,” says Steve Penno, MPI’s director investment programmes. “It provides transparency to customers and the public in a way that hasn’t been possible before.” The trial used the McDonald’s supply chain as a test case. Six farms, processing companies ANZCO Foods, Greenlea, Silver Fern Farms (comprising 50% of New Zealand’s beef industry) and Beef+Lamb New Zealand collaborated to work out

A year-long trial has shown it’s possible to produce a beef patty sustainably across the supply chain in NZ.

how to meet sustainability requirements. “It was awesome to see the wider industry working together for a common goal rather than competing with each other to see ‘who can be the most sustainable’,” Penno says. The pilot focused on the sustainable principles of economic, environmental, and social

responsibility. It involved an independent audit and verification of the supply chain’s sustainability, including on-farm, meat processing, and patty production. It also aimed to address the stakeholder expectations identified in the Red Meat Profit Partnership and New Zealand Roundtable for Sustainable Beef materi-

ality studies, completed in 2019. These priorities included water quality and water use, animal welfare, and on-farm environmental management. The trial showed that the New Zealand Farm Assurance Programme Plus (NZFAP+) developed under the Red Meat Profit Partnership is an important part of dem-

onstrating New Zealand’s ability to produce sustainable beef on-farm. NZFAP+ complements and builds on the existing Farm Assurance Programme with three additional components: ●● Farm Environment ●● People ●● Biosecurity. It has been designed to protect and enhance all resources, create

better and more sustainable farming businesses, and incorporate socially responsible and ethical practices. This programme is expected to be rolled out more widely in April. McDonald’s Restaurants NZ, which serves 1.6 million people in New Zealand every week says it is keen to play a role in moving the industry fur-

ther towards sustainable practices. “More and more our customers are asking us how our beef is produced,” says Dave Howse, managing director McDonald’s Restaurants NZ. “We need to change and evolve with the times and we also need to lead – and sustainability is one of those areas where we really feel we can work with industry to move things forward.” The New Zealand Roundtable for Sustainable Beef will now look at building on the success of the pilot project by involving more farms and promoting the adoption of NZFAP+. “Many of New Zealand farmers’ practices are already sustainable and we hope that over time these practices will be adopted as the new norm,” says Grant Bunting, New Zealand Roundtable for Sustainable Beef chairman. “We have the opportunity to be world leaders and consciously create a complete food package that is better for the planet.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

FEEDING THE WORLD’S

ULTIMATE INNOVATION 6 YEARS IN THE MAKING GINORMOUS CAPACITY 17 TONNE PAYLOAD

HUNGRIEST HERDs

INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S MOST EFFICIENT COMBINATION FEED WAGON YET.

Visit hustlerequipment.com for more details

STARRING

TRIPLE-AXLE DESIGN GENTLE ON PASTURE MASSIVE 21m3 COMBINATION FEEDER

“A GAME CHANGER FOR LARGESCALE FARMS & HERDS”

COMBI RX218

Massive capacity Massive efficiency Higher profitability

Visit us at Mech Agriculture’s booth at Central District’s Field Days - site B21-23


GREAT DEALS ON KUBOTA AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

BREAKING NEW GROUND AGRICULTURE | AUTUMN 2021

0.9

% FINANCE PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

INTRODUCING THE NEW M5-1 ROPS & RTV 520

M5111

ACROSS THE M SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

RTV-520

*T&C’s page 03

   | KUBOTA.CO.NZ


M7 S ERI ES

K U B O TA ’ S M O S T P O W E R F U L TR ACTOR EVER

M7172

The M7-2 Series is Kubota’s flagship – the cleanest, most advanced tractor we’ve ever built, now offering 12 models, each with a huge variety of customisable options. Specifically designed for the farming professional who wants a versatile and hard-working tractor, the M7-2 is powered by a next-generation 6.1 litre, four-cylinder diesel engine, incorporating Kubota’s

clean-air technology and available in 130hp, 150hp or 170hp + boost and industry-leading constant power and torque.

GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR LOCAL DEALER TODAY


M7172 & SPARTAN NTA607-2

0.9

% FINANCE PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

ACROSS THE M7 SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

M7-2 SERIES 130-170HP PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR SERIES KUBOTA’S MOST POWERFUL ENGINE 130 to 170hp + boost and industry-leading constant power and torque NEVER IN THE WRONG GEAR Choice of 30-speed powershift or KVT variable driving to suit any operation (54 w/creep)

SIMPLE AND SOPHISTICATED High-end components with electro-hydraulics, monitor control and GPS readiness in the premium models BIG MUSCLE 9,400kg lift capacity, up to 110L/min hydraulic flow for all-round performance

GOOD CONNECTIONS The M7-2 is a multi talent and caters for a myriad of implements through 4 PTO speeds, Front Linkage & PTO, up to 6 remote valves (depending on the model)

*This finance offer from UDC Finance Limited is only available to eligible business applicants on loans with a term of up to 36 months. The 0.9% p.a. interest rate is fixed for the term of the loan and is only available with a minimum 20% deposit and applies to new M Series models. UDC Finance credit criteria, fees, terms and conditions apply. The finance offer is valid to 30/06/2021.

0800 582 682 | KUBOTA.CO.NZ

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MGX S ERI ES

The new generation MGX Series range delivers class leading power and reliability while reducing environmental impact. With one of the largest cabs in its class, the premium MGX range offers unmatched operator comfort and visibility. Built for maximum power and torque output with intelligent technology, the MGX series is equipped to efficiently handle the most demanding jobs in the field or farm.

CL ASS-LE ADING POWER & RELIABILIT Y

0.9

% FINANCE PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

ACROSS THE M SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

RECEIVE

$500

**

AT TACHMENTS CREDIT

M135GX

MGX SERIES 100-135HP Common rail engine with massive torque 24-speed powershift transmission with auto shift Super-quiet deluxe cab Bi-speed turn that speeds up front wheels for tight turns Available with narrow vineyard kit 5-year Powertrain warranty PERFORMANCE MATCHED ROTARY CUTTERS

GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR LOCAL DEALER TODAY


M5 S ERI ES

You can depend on the M5001 Series Standard Model tractors for outstanding performance and year-round comfort. The performance begins with a reliable and efficient Kubota engine that can power through even the toughest tasks with ease and speed. There’s plenty of power for PTOdriven implements, as well as convenient electronic speed control to keep those implements operating at optimum efficiency. A fully synchronized transmission and an advanced hydraulic shuttle for shifting between forward and reverse simplifies tractor operations.

S P A C I O U S A L L- G L A S S C A B I N C O M F O R T

0.9 $500

% FINANCE

RECEIVE

**

AT TACHMENTS CREDIT

PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

ACROSS THE M SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

M5111

M5 SERIES 93-110.5HP PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR SERIES KUBOTA DIESEL ENGINE Features a 3.8L engine that produces 93, 105 and 110.5hp, depending on the model, and includes constant engine RPM and engine rev memory TRANSMISSION 6 synchronised gears in 3 ranges with dual speed splitter. This enables 36 gear options. Power Shuttle ensures a smooth change of direction ULTRA GRAND CAB II Sets the standard in comfort and control with unparalleled visibility and ergonomic design MODEL CHOICE Standard and narrow tractor models available

M5101 *This finance offer from UDC Finance Limited is only available to eligible business applicants on loans with a term of up to 36 months. The 0.9% p.a. interest rate is fixed for the term of the loan and is only available with a minimum 20% deposit and applies to new M Series models. UDC Finance credit criteria, fees, terms and conditions apply. The finance offer is valid to 30/06/2021. **B, L, MX & M Series offer: Receive $500 credit towards the purchase of Land Pride performance matched attachments for your new Kubota B, L, MX or M series tractor. Credit must be used at the time of purchasing the tractor. Choose from Landscape Rakes, Slashers, Post Hole diggers, Disc Harrows, Rear Blades, Grading & Box Scrapers, Mouldboard Ploughs, Seeders and Seed Bed Rollers. Offer expires 30/06/2021 or while stock lasts.

0800 582 682 | KUBOTA.CO.NZ

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M5 ROPS S ERI E S

Put safety first and stay in close contact with those around you with the new Kubota M5 ROPS tractor. Designed to get every job done with the maximum efficiency while prioritising worker welfare, it’s shorter stature and manoeuvrability means working with height restrictions, tight spaces, and uneven surfaces is a breeze.

P R A C T I C A L C O M F O R T. K U B O TA S A F E T Y

NEW

0.9 $500 RECEIVE

**

AT TACHMENTS CREDIT

% FINANCE PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

ACROSS THE M SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

M5111

NEW M5 ROPS M5-1 ROPS PROFESSIONAL TRACTOR SERIES KUBOTA DIESEL ENGINE Features a 3.8L engine that produces 93 & 103hp on the Standard models and 87 & 100hp on the Narrow models that produce maximum horsepower at the lower engine speed of 2400rpm

TRANSMISSION 6 synchronised gears in 3 ranges provide a wide speed choice of 18 speeds with the top standard and all narrow models featuring a dual speed splitter for a total of 36 speeds. Power shuttle ensures very smooth changes of direction and drive engagement

MODEL CHOICE Standard and narrow tractor models available ROPS The mantra “advanced simplicity” takes centre stage in the operator station of our new M5-1 ROPS models. Flat floor design allows for easy movement of the driver when mounting or operating the tractor

*This finance offer from UDC Finance Limited is only available to eligible business applicants on loans with a term of up to 36 months. The 0.9% p.a. interest rate is fixed for the term of the loan and is only available with a minimum 20% deposit and applies to new M Series models. UDC Finance credit criteria, fees, terms and conditions apply. The finance offer is valid to 30/06/2021.

GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR LOCAL DEALER TODAY


MX SERIES T R ACTO R S

Simple to operate yet incredibly powerful, the economical MX Series is your workhorse for everything from property maintenance to commercial landscaping to farming. Its powerful 51HP 4-cylinder diesel engine is the industry’s smoothest to start, run and operate, while its 4WD capabilities deliver unmatched pulling power and greater all-round manoeuvrability.

B U I LT F O R P R O D U C T I V I T Y MX5200 & M7040SUHD MID-SIZED UTILIT Y TRACTOR KUBOTA DIESEL ENGINE 51 & 68hp smooth, powerful and quiet diesel engines

RECEIVE

$500

**

TRANSMISSION 8-speed mechanical synchro shuttle, or 3-range hydrostatic transmission option on MX5200

AT TACHMENTS CREDIT

STRONG LINKAGE Over a tonne lift capacity on the MX5200 and 1500kg on the M7040SU HYDRAULICS MX5200 and M7040SU offer 35.8L and 41.6L main pump capacity respectively COMPLETE THE PACKAGE Kubota loaders offer ample lifting height and capacity, ideal for demanding livestock farming

0.9

% FINANCE PA F O R 3 6 M O N T H S *

ACROSS THE M SERIES

FINANCE PROVIDED BY

UDC FINANCE LIMITED

MX5200

BX S E R I E S T R ACTO R S

Kubota’s BX Series is the all-rounder for lifestyle property maintenance and projects. Small yet powerful, its exceptional manoeuvrability and range of attachments make this a versatile sub-compact tractor. Featuring easy-to-use controls, a high-back seat and an ergonomic operator platform, Kubota’s BX Series has everything you need to take care of your property.

BX SERIES 18-25.5HP SUB-COMPACT TRACTOR RECEIVE

$250

~

AT TACHMENTS CREDIT

KUBOTA POWERED Equipped with 3-cylinder, liquid-cooled Kubota diesel engines and 2-range hydrostatic transmission controlled by a single foot pedal for simple operation OPERATOR AREA Deluxe reclining high back seat, spacious operator area, cruise control and easy to reach controls BX23S The most versatile compact tractor yet. Complete with quick attach/detach front end loader and backhoe ATTACHMENTS Switching between mowing lawns and front end loader work has never been easier. The BX loader can be attached without leaving the driver’s seat

COMPETITIVE FINANCE AVAILABLE ask your local dealer ACROSS THE BX SERIES

BX2680

˜BX Series offer: Receive $250 credit towards the purchase of Land Pride performance matched attachments for your new Kubota BX series tractor. Credit must be used at the time of purchasing the tractor. Choose from Landscape Rakes, Slashers, Post Hole diggers, Disc Harrows, Rear Blades, Grading & Box Scrapers, Mouldboard Ploughs, Seeders and Seed Bed Rollers. Offer expires 30/06/2021 or while stock lasts. **B, L, MX & M Series offer: Receive $500 credit towards the purchase of Land Pride performance matched attachments for your new Kubota B, L, MX or M series tractor. Credit must be used at the time of purchasing the tractor. Choose from Landscape Rakes, Slashers, Post Hole diggers, Disc Harrows, Rear Blades, Grading & Box Scrapers, Mouldboard Ploughs, Seeders and Seed Bed Rollers. Offer expires 30/06/2021 or while stock lasts.

0800 582 682 | KUBOTA.CO.NZ

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GREAT DEALS ON KUBOTA AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

UTILITY VEHICLES

Kubota’s RTV Series is the best way to get from A to B. As all-purpose as it is allterrain, this utility vehicle takes performance up a gear. Equipped with the latest safety equipment and designed to be exceptionally comfortable, the RTV is reliable in more ways than one. The range covers ROPS and CAB models, as well as a four-seater model, while the all-new RTV-XG850 Sidekick takes things to the next level. It’s Kubota’s fastest RTV and your perfect partner in the paddock.

A L L- D AY C O M F O R T & S A F E T Y NEW RT V520

NEW

NEW QUIET ENGINE 17.4hp liquid cooled petrol engine NEW SUSPENSION SYSTEM Upgraded 5-link rear suspension system for improved handling VARIABLE HYDROSTATIC TRANSMISSION (VHT) Hydrostatic transmission that keeps you in control during descents with engine-assisted deceleration DRIVE SYSTEM Selectable 2WD or 4WD with diff lock NARROW STANCE At 1390mm wide maneuver into and out of tight spaces with ease RTV-520

RT V-XG850 SIDEKICK UTILIT Y VEHICLES HIGHER SPEED Fast acceleration and higher transport speed (up to 64km/h) come from a powerful 48hp petrol engine KUBOTA’S CVT PLUS TRANSMISSION Featuring a centrifugal clutch designed to keep the thick, double cogged belt tight ensuring fast response and excellent belt durability SPEED-SENSITIVE EPS Light at low-speed and firm at high-speed, EPS (Electronic Power Steering) offers exceptional handling and stability INDEPENDENT SUSPENSION Even at high speeds the front and rear independent suspension delivers a smooth ride and offers plenty of clearance TOWING CAPACITY 907kg towing capacity for a wide range of jobs

RTV-XG850

RT V-X1140 K-VERTIBLE 4-seater people mover that converts easily from 1 to 2 rows of seating HYDRAULIC-LIFT Hydraulic tipping cargo box SAFETY Full ROPS protection RELIABILITY Kubota 3-cylinder diesel engine VARIABLE HYDRO TRANSMISSION (VHT-X) 2-range hydrostatic transmission with dynamic braking

RTV-X1140

   | 0800 582 682 | KUBOTA.CO.NZ

Profile for Rural News Group

Rural News 23 February 2021  

Rural News 23 February 2021

Rural News 23 February 2021  

Rural News 23 February 2021