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AGRIBUSINESS

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Students excited about Ag careers. PAGE 21

A new standard in sprayers.

PAGE 35

NEWS Dairy sector loses a champion PAGE 6

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS FEBRUARY 5, 2019: ISSUE 669 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

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Chad Hall, Livestock Manager for Cherylton Farms in Kojonup, Western Australia

Cherylton Farms has a 20,000 acre operation about 300km south west of Perth where they crop, farm sheep and run an Angus stud. “Handling an Angus stud takes a lot of physical work. We needed a crush that could do the work, but also help us in getting the most accurate data possible.“ “Being an Angus stud, it is very important for us to be objective about the measurements that we take.” “This means that we have to have gear that is very consistent, weigh scales that is accurate and that EID is read accurately every time.” “The quiet handling of animals is also very important to us and the Te Pari Titan has a very quiet bail system that keeps the animals calm.” “The reason we ended up with a Te Pari is that we were very impressed with the operations, the squeeze is a very handy feature and the headbail operation is not a ratchet system, making it much quieter and keeps the animals calm and causes less stress on the animal. The nylon sleeves on the latches also makes it a much quieter and smoother operation. The clever right hand draft from within the crush is very handy and useful and the rubber floor in the crush helps us keep the animals calm and is softer on the feet.” “All these things help us keep the animal nice and quiet which is important in selecting for temperament.”


AGRIBUSINESS

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Students excited about Ag careers. PAGE 21

A new standard in sprayers.

PAGE 35

NEWS Dairy sector loses a champion PAGE 6

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS FEBRUARY 5, 2019: ISSUE 669 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Brexit blowout prep PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE MEAT industry is preparing for Britain to crash out of the EU on March 29. Beef + Lamb NZ’s general manager policy and advocacy, Dave Harrison, told Rural News that while BLNZ hopes this won’t happen it is making preparations. He says the UK political situation over Brexit remains in limbo as politicians struggle to agree among themselves as the clock ticks down to the ‘leave’ date. “We are actively planning for the worst-case scenario,” said Harrison. “We are hoping that this will be a lost investment, but we are investing in the software and the computer programming we need to have to run a split

quota system if need be. “We are talking to exporters about what it means for allocation systems so there is actually a heap of work going on to make sure that on March 29 – if the worst happens – we are as prepared as we can be.” Harrison sees a real possibility that Britain will crash out and that will be detrimental to NZ meat exporters. An issue of concern is the arbitrary splitting of the sheep and beef quotas when Britain leaves the EU. Britain and the EU have agreed that there should be a 50/50 split of the sheepmeat quota

and a 65/35 split for beef. “Our argument is that splitting the quota doesn’t represent the full value of the quota,” Harrison explains. “Because being able to send a certain amount of product to one country and then a certain amount to another 27 countries isn’t the same as being able to send it anywhere in 28 countries, which is the case at present.” He says the issue may need to be sorted out through the World Trade Organisation (WTO) under whose rules the original quota was set. Another issue relates to the onward

shipping of product once it reaches Europe. Often cargo destined for the UK will initially arrive in, say, the port of Rotterdam and then be transshipped to its main destination, which is Britain. But he says it’s hard to understand what might happen under Brexit. Harrison and a colleague are heading to Europe in the next week or so to talk to customs officials and try to clarify the situation. He is hoping to get changes to the certification system, which would make things easier.

Feed for Africa! Normally at this time of the year Central Hawkes Bay is bone dry – like many parts of the country – but this season is an exception. Local Beef + Lamb NZ farmer council member Michael Hindmarsh, who farms up on the Napier-Taihape road, says “it is unbelievable”. The hills are green and the sheep and cattle are gorging themselves on the oversupply of grass and crops. Copious supplements are being made. In fact, this sudden green wave has caught many farmers by surprise with too few stock on hand to eat the available feed. – See more page 8-9

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A GROUP of sheep breeders are calling on MPI to reverse the 2016 relaxation of the rules on importation of sheep and goat germplasm. Previously, no ovine embryo or semen imports were allowed from countries other than Australia, due to the risk of importing diseases such as scrapie, foot and mouth and maedi visna. MPI now allows imports from the UK, France, Canada and Australia. It has also approved importation of semen in the form of frozen pellets. Oamaru Perendale breeder Jane Smith says that makes matters worse because pellets are outdated, contrary to international standards and an additional biosecurity risk compared with straws. Australia has reacted by banning the importation of sheep genetics from New Zealand, concerned that our standards are now too low. Smith told Rural News that the new rules are for the “alleged economic benefits” of importing exotic and milking sheep genetics. But she claims these have little regard for other groups in the industry who had opposed the change. And she says biosecurity incursions since then, notably Mycoplasma bovis, have given their concerns added urgency. “We hear that we have a worldclass biosecurity programme in New TO PAGE 30

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 3

Cheap shots offend many

ISSUE 669 www.ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS��������������������������������������1-19 SUDESH KISSUN

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A LONG-TIME anti-farming newspaper columnist is facing backlash on social media for falsely implying last year that former Fonterra chairman John Wilson was faking ill-health. Facebook and Twitter users are urging Rachel Stewart to apologise to Wilson’s family; some are calling on NZ Herald to sever ties with the deliberately antagonistic columnist. Wilson died last week and was farewelled by his family and friends at the weekend in Hamilton. After Wilson had stepped down as Fonterra chairman in July last year citing health reasons, Stewart tweeted that “I’m confident that John Wilson is in fine fettle, and his ‘health scare’ was an excuse to slip quietly out the back door of Fonterra. Can anyone prove me wrong?”

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Former Fonterra chair John Wilson.

Following Wilson’s death, Stewart’s original tweet resurfaced with calls for her to apologise to Wilson’s family. Stewart, known for her anti-farming views, tweeted last week, “Turns out John wasn’t in “fine fettle” - but neither was Fonterra at the time. Before his deification gathers full steam, who

INAPPROPRIATE SUPPORT A BEEF + Lamb NZ director who ‘liked’ Rachel Stewart’s tweet last week has raised eyebrows in farming circles. Melissa Clark-Reynolds says she liked the “apology” Rachael Stewart tweeted last week. An independent director, appointed by the BLNZ board, Clark-Reynolds has refused to apologise to farmers for her thoughtless action, but concedes Stewart’s initial tweet about John Wilson’s was “atrocious”. “I liked the fact that she apologised last week.” BLNZ chairman Andrew Morrison was asked if Clark-Reynolds – who is paid $33,000 a year by meat levy payers, many of them Fonterra shareholders – should apologise to dairy farmers, most of them also BLNZ levy payers. “Beef + Lamb New Zealand has extended its condolences to John Wilson’s family and friends following his recent passing. Melissa Clark-Reynolds uses her Twitter account in a personal capacity,” Morrison told Rural News.

Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 79,599 as at 30.09.2018

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do I make my unreserved apology out to?” However, there was no apology from Stewart on Twitter. Taranaki farmer and avid social media user Mathew Herbert urged her to start with Wilson’s family. “They’ve lost a husband, father, brother and on the day you were asking to be proven wrong they were dealing with learning he probably wouldn’t live much past Christmas,” he replied to Stewart. Lawyer Emma Marr was scathing in her reply. “Have you ever thought about being gracious and attempting to look genuinely sorry about a truly horrible comment you made? The man was dying. Your comments, then and now, couldn’t have been more ill-judged.” On Rural News’ Facebook page, David Clark had a message for NZ Herald. “It is long overdue for the NZ Herald to bring an end to Rachel Stewart’s personal vendetta against the NZ agricultural sector and she should most definitely be sacked for her misjudged tweet.” Contract milker Brandon Law posted that it was “a cold hearted mongrel thing for her to say”. “Her comments are testament to her quality of character.” Meanwhile, Stewart has taken umbrage at Rural News for pointing out her insensitive, nasty comments about Wilson and the impact on his friends and family. She accused this newspaper of being “low life scumbags” and “assholes”. • Tribute to John Wilson, page 6

TRADE TENSIONS PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

EXPORT DEMAND for wool has fallen away recently, as tension rises between China and the United States over trade tariffs, says PGG Wrightson wool general manager Grant Edwards in his January report. “This has prompted Chinese manufacturers to take a cautious approach to their buying requirements. Through late winter and spring, fine, medium and strong wools all underwent reductions in demand, and therefore in price,” he says. “Although European and British markets for wool remain solid, the significant price lifts the sector needs depend on the volumes bought by China, which are not happening.” Uncertainty about trade has also impacted the currency, so creating another setback for grower returns. “For crossbred wool, prices now mirror the low levels they fell to 12 months ago.” Aside from the trade situation with China, market conditions for fine wool growers are favourable. “Demand for its use in active sportswear and outdoor clothing continues to grow, while drought in Australia reduced that country’s national fine wool clip, and therefore the overall global market supply. “More positively, a live wool auction held in conjunction with the New Zealand Agricultural Show in Christchurch in midNovember was well attended by buyers, growers and the public, who witnessed the transaction of more than $7 million of wool in four hours.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

4 NEWS

Wet, wet, wet

BIGGER THAN BELGIUM! MARK DANIEL

NIGEL MALTHUS

markd@ruralnews.co.nz

‘WET’ SUMS up the 2018-19 grain season for Canterbury, says the Foundation for Arable Research (FAR) research manager for cereals, Rob Craigie. Rainfall through December was high in Canterbury, ranging from 62mm at Chertsey to 177mm at Methven. Craigie said there was so much rain that trials at the FAR research site at Chertsey showed no difference in initial yields between irrigated and non-irrigated plots. “That happens very seldom. It might be once in 10 years that you get

Suggested actions ● Harvest fusarium-affected wheat crops as soon as possible once ripe. ● Consult the combine manual. Combine adjustments should follow the manufacturer’s manual when first going to the field. Once in the field, operators should sample the grain and make adjustments. ● The most important adjustments include concave clearance, screen openings and cylinder and fan speeds. This is particularly important when dealing with compromised grain quality. ● Many, but not all, Fusarium-infected kernels are shrunken and have lower densities. Increasing the combine’s fan speed can greatly increase the number of lighter kernels blown out the back of the combine. ● Harvest and store fusarium-contaminated grain separately. ● Good farm practices will minimise the risk of mycotoxins. Damp grain needs to be dried to minimise risk.

A team from Southbridge-based EAL Agriservices Group loads up new season’s barley straw from a 22ha paddock on Grant and Bruce Perry’s farm at Barrhill, Mid-Canterbury. EAL boss Tim Ridgen said the straw followed a “great” crop of barley. Harvesting of autumn-sown crops is now in full swing in the province with soaring summer temperatures, although a wet early season has been blamed for a spike in fungal diseases for some. RURAL NEWS GROUP.

the same yield on dry land as you would under irrigation,” he told Rural News. “That’s on our particular soil type. It would be different on dryland farms up towards Methven where they get a bit more rain, on deeper soils.” Craigie says it’s still early days to get a good feel for likely yields, but sunshine hours, which were needed for best yields, would also be a bit

low. “We’ve done some autumn barley; I would say average to a little bit below average.” However, the wetness has also brought more disease, with FAR receiving widespread reports of fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as head scab, in wheat crops across Canterbury. FAR says FHB is most easily recognised on immature heads where one or more spikelets in each head appear prematurely bleached. Large areas of

heads may be affected, and where infection is severe, pink or orange spore masses can be seen on diseased spikelets. Fusariumdamaged grains are pink or chalky white and shrivelled. The disease can cause significant yield losses and some strains can produce mycotoxins. FAR has produced a set of guidelines for harvesting fusarium-affected crops. Craigie says the main point is to set up the harvester to minimise the retention of the affected grains.

NEVER MIND Texas: for sheer size look at Australia, whose second-largest ‘farm’ recently changed hands. The sale of Clifton Hills Station, South Australia (1.65 million hectares) saw Australian businessmen Viv Oldfield and Donny Costello, of Crown Point Pastoral Company (CPPC), adding this business to their already substantial farming interests. The vendor was Clifton Hills Pastoral Company owned by David Harvey, Charles Simpson and Katherine Hartley. The purchase price was not made public but at the time of marketing in May 2018 the land value alone was reckoned $34m. By the time of purchase – conducted on a walk-in/walk out basis – the deal included 18,000 organically certified beef cattle, leading to speculation that the final purchase price was $45m to $50m. There are four pastoral leases on the Birdsville Track and extending into Queensland. The property, established in 1878, is said to have three distinct land types: gibber plains with creeks; soft, sandy hill country; and inland river flood plains. The 1.65 million ha property is half the size of Belgium. The business, based at Lilla Springs Station, south of Alice Springs, also farms the adjoining Pandie Pandie Station SA, Andado Station, east of Lilla Creek and the New Crown and Horseshoe Bend Stations NT – running 50,000 head of cattle. The buyers said the Clifton Hills property offers scale without massive infrastructure, with the large area allowing cattle to be well spaced out. And it came with a big cattle herd without the high costs of freight and complexities of buying stock from around the country.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 5

Ducking and diving for cover? DAVID ANDERSON

ANSWERS TO a number of questions about the actions of the state farmer Landcorp may be proving highly embarrassing for both the Government and the state farmer. Despite claims made by the coalition Government that it would be “the most open, most transparent Government that New Zealand has ever had,� ministers and officials have yet to answer questions asked late last year by Rural News under the Official Information Act (OIA) about operations at Landcorp. Rural News put these questions following revelations last year that Landcorp (now called Pamu Farms) had made a secret submission to the Tax Working Group one month after submissions had closed. Landcorp was promoting – among other things – capital gains and environmental taxes on the agricultural sector. Rural News submitted a number of questions to the Government via the OIA regarding Landcorp and its taxpayer funded operations. However, despite these questions being lodged on December 6 last year, and the legal requirement for OIA requests to be answered within 20 working days of lodgement, no answers

have been received. The original OIA request was sent on December 6, 2018 to the two ministers responsible for Landcorp -- Winston Peters and Shane Jones. Peters’ office responded saying: “As your request relates to Landcorp/Pamu, for which Minister Shane Jones has associate ministerial responsibility, your request to the Office of Rt. Hon. Winston Peters is to be transferred to the Office of Hon. Jonesâ€?. Jones’ office acknowledged receipt of the OIA request on December 6, but then kept radio silence until Jan 16, when Rural News requested an update. Jones’ private secretary William Blacker replied that a response would be made by January 25 â€œâ€Śbecause the following days do not count when determining the deadline -- Christmas Day (12/25/2018), Boxing Day (12/26/2018), summer holiday (December 27 to January 15), new years day (1/1/2019) and January 2 (1/2/2019)â€?. However, on January 25, Blacker – responding for Jones – conceded to Rural News they would not be able to meet the Jan 25 deadline. “Unfortunately, it will not be possible to meet that time limit and we are therefore writing to notify you of an extension

of the time to make our decision to 31/01/2019. This extension is necessary because consultations necessary to make a decision on your request are such that a proper response cannot reasonably be made within the original time limit.� Yet, later that day Blacker emailed to say: “Your request has been transferred to Landcorp Farming Ltd, as it is more closely connected with

the functions of this agency. You will hear further from Landcorp Farming Ltd concerning your request.� However, in a classic case of the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing, Landcorp had already contacted Rural News on January 16 to say: “We have received your OIA request today from the Office of Hon Shane Jones. We will respond to your request as soon as possible and

no later than February 14, 2019 (as per the OIA 20 working day timeframe).� Rural News now waits to see if the supposed ‘openness and transparency’ promised by the Government is causing red faces in the offices of the ministers and the state farmer as the February 14 deadline looms. Shane Jones has ministerial responsibility for Landcorp.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

6 NEWS

Dairy sector loses a champion SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FORMER FONTERRA chairman John Wilson, who died on January 28, will be remembered for leading the co-op through some of its biggest challenges, says Ngatea farmer Mark Townshend. Paying tribute to Wilson, Townshend, a former Fonterra director, says many hold the view that he led Fonterra well. “He led the business far better than his opponents credited him for; independent directors of Fonterra rated him highly,” he told Rural News. Wilson was laid to rest last weekend in Hamilton (Feb 2); he stepped down as Fonterra chairman in July last year on medical grounds. He joined Fonterra’s board in 2003 and was chairman for six years. Townshend says his first dealing with Wilson was in the late 1990s on the then NZ Dairy Group Shareholders Council. Wilson later became the inaugural chairman of the Fonterra Shareholders Council, after which Townshend and others encouraged him to offer his talents to the Fonterra board.

“When elected, along with Stuart Nattrass he was affectionately known as one of the two young pups,” Townshend recalled. “In being elected as Fonterra board chairperson in what was apparently a tight two-way contest, he then had his job made harder by not having universal support; the dairy industry equivalent of the rugby ‘Wylie vs Hart’ years.” Townshend says Wilson was “highly intelligent, understood the Fonterra business very well, was sometimes brash, totally loyal, very hardworking, tough and resilient, sometimes a little arrogant, very committed and increasingly wise”. “John was totally committed to both his family and the NZ dairy industry.” Former Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy says the dairy industry has lost one of its greatest champions and a massive advocate for Fonterra. “I had a strong working relationship with John over nearly five years as minister and we dealt with food safety scares, trade missions, the dairy downturn and droughts. He was a straight shooter and never left me in any doubt

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of his thoughts. “John was such a unique guy: he was relaxed in all environments, whether he was meeting cockies at cowshed meetings, chatting to ministers in the Beehive, leading trade missions or smoozing international customers.” Minister for Primary Industries Damien O’Connor says Wilson was dedicated to the co-op and worked non-stop for dairy farmers. “We talked often over the years and I had great respect for John’s farming knowledge and views.” Fonterra chairman John Monaghan says Wilson was a man whose dedication and commitment to the cooperative ran deep. “We owe John and his family a debt of gratitude for all the time, energy and sheer hard graft he gave us as a farmerowner, inaugural chairman of the Fonterra Shareholder’s Council on merger, as a farmer elected director from 2003 and as our chairman from 2012. “On behalf of his fellow farmers he was the ultimate advocate for what we stand for.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Former Fonterra chair John Wilson and ex CEO Theo Spierings.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 7

Worst wool season in almost 50 years PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE MOST difficult season in 45 years. That’s how Central Hawkes Bay wool buyer Philippa Wright is describing the present season, which she says is due almost entirely to the weather. Wright told Rural News, from her base in Waipukurau, that the rain and heat in November and December completely changed the quality of the wool. And it delayed shearing by about a month, which is having serious flow-on effects. “The wool we are now receiving is longer, yellower and poorer quality,

Philippa Wright with some this year’s long, yellow wool.

simply because of the environment we have had,” she explained. “The price was down anyway and is pretty much on a par with last year, but the quality of the wool is

making it much more difficult. Normally in Central Hawkes Bay we have strong, clean, well grown wool. But this year, because of the poorer quality of the wool, it’s harder to sell.”

Wright says wool shorn in the area is normally 100150mm in length, but this year it is 120-170mm in length. While some of that may be due to late shearing, the weather has played

a role in the whole equation. “This year wool is harder to sell because as soon as you get extra-long wool you will generally get the colour and the faults,” Wright says. “Most of the wool goes for carpet, but once upon a time 80% of our wool in this area went to carpet; now it’s more like 15%.” According to Wright, NZ relies heavily on China finding new ways to use that type of wool. A lot of research is going into finding new uses for wool, but the challenge is finding manufacturers that will take the bulk of our wool. “We now have too much of a type that isn’t particularly easy to use.” she says.

WEATHER HAVOC WITH THE weather compressing the time available for harvesting wool there are flow-on effects. Wright says she feels sorry for shearing contractors, in particular, who have had to put on extra gangs to get the sheep shorn on time. They can’t keep up with demand for their services and many of the smaller farmers are waiting longer than normal. Wright says the season has caused problems for her as a wool broker. Good staff -university and school students – work their holidays for her, “but though we had all our staff here ready to run, they virtually sat around doing nothing for a month because there was no work,” Wright said. “I couldn’t lay them off because these are people we employ year-on-year, are trained and they rely on this work. They commit to working for me for four years over the university breaks, so my obligation is to have them employed. “But now, just when it’s getting busy, one of the staff has to go back to high school next week.” Wright says with wool prices low, there is often speculation that farmers will only shear once a year or delay shearing their lambs. But harvesting wool has an animal welfare and health component. “Most clients are doing it because you can’t leave wool on sheep with the risk of flies,” she says.

29/01/19 9:21 AM


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

8 NEWS

The green, green grass of the Bay Normally, at this time of the year, Central Hawkes Bay is bone dry. The hills are dull brown, sheep search for anything remotely green and farmers are often feeding out. But this season is the exception, as Peter Burke found a few days ago. “EVERYONE’S GOT grass,” said local Beef + Lamb NZ farmer council member Michael Hindmarsh, who farms up on the Napier-Taihape road. “It is unbelievable,” he says, and indeed it is. The hills are green and the sheep and cattle are gorging themselves on the oversupply of grass and crops. Copious supplements are being made. In fact, this sudden green wave has caught many farmers by surprise and too few stock are there to eat the feed.

“We have records back to 1958, and 2018 was the wettest calendar year,” Hindmarsh says. “We have had a lot of rain from the beginning of December until a few weeks ago. We would have tipped 450mm and we are now about 50% ahead of what we normally would get.” He says in October, the weather experts were warning to expect a drought and many farmers were twitchy about this given the hammering some had taken in

COST OF GREENING COMES AT A PRICE

Beef + Lamb NZ’s Steve Lys.

the September storm. But the drought never eventuated. “For us spring lasted about an hour and a half,” he says.

Hindmarsh says farmers are now happy with the good grass growth, steady prices for lamb, interest rates relatively low and the NZ$ look-

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ing not too bad. But such things farmers cannot control and there is always a ‘drought in waiting’ or some other challenge on the horizon.

THE GREENING of the region has come at a price. Because of the weather in September and October last year, an estimated 140,000 lambs died in the eastern North Island. This cost farmers at least $16 million in lost income, based on an average lamb price of $115. According to Steve Lys, Beef + Lamb NZ’s economic service manager for the region, the storm in Hawkes Bay, Tararua and Wairarapa hit right in the middle of lambing. “Those who lambed a bit earlier were ok, but for the farmers who condensed their lambing to occur in September – when the storm struck – it was disastrous,” he told Rural News. “Some lambs didn’t even get their first drink. Either side of the storm there was no impact.” The storm brought the lambing percentage down by 3.6%, similar to the losses suffered during a storm in 2012. Now the surviving lambs are doing reasonably well, says Lys. With the surplus of pasture, many farmers are taking their lambs to heavier weights and finishing them on their own farms as opposed to selling them as store stock. Hindmarsh reports stock agents as saying no stock are coming out of farm gates, affecting traders. TO PAGE 9


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 9

Environmental issue causing angst for farmers PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

CONCERN AMONG sheep and beef farmers about environment related issues is probably holding back production, says a Beef + Lamb NZ economist. Steve Lys, in Hawkes Bay, says typically sheep and beef farmers have a low environmental footprint. But they tend to get lumped in with dairy farmers and that is making them overly cautious on how they run their farms. “Some are afraid to use any nitrogen fertiliser because of the environmental impacts that come from it, when the reality is that a small amount – say 40 units of N – would have a beneficial impact at strategic times on their properties,” Lys told Rural News. “But they would rather not put it on because of the pressure they see on the dairy side.”

Briar Huggett

Briar Huggett, also from BLNZ, says there is a lot of misinformation about environmental issues in sheep and beef farming circles. They are subject to a lot of hearsay with

reports in the media and from colleagues and get a bit panicked about the rules. Huggett says any problems are often due to catchment differences

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as farmers try to work out what they need to do. She says while most farmers on larger holdings get advice early on environmental issues, smaller landholders tend to wait until the last minute to try to sort out their compliance matters. “It is quite hard to engage these people and I know that some people are not getting the information they need,” Huggett told Rural News. “While it may appear hard, it can be explained simply. }It’s just the learning process and fear of the unknown.” She says farmers suffer a lot of angst about regional council rules and the hoops they must jump through in compliance. And although many farming women play a large role in sorting out the paperwork on compliance matters, it’s important for male farmers also to be involved because to meet the new rules, practical actions have to be taken on farm.

“In the three ewe fairs held so far, they have only traded 19,000 ewes. A few years ago, there would have been five or six ewe fairs in Hawkes Bay and one fair may have had upwards of 15,000 stock for sale. Today people are hanging onto stock.” The other downside to the rain has been the effect on shearing with the season having been compressed, so the pressure has been on shearers. Wool quality is down. The warm, dry weather has also caused problems with flystrike. There is also now a risk of facial eczema with lots of dead grass in pasture providing near perfect conditions for a rise in spore counts. On the plus side, Lys says ewes will be going to the ram in top condition with the prospect of a good lambing next season – assuming the weather is good. Meanwhile, Lys says incomes in the last three years have been relatively good for farmers and they have caught up with deferred maintenance on their farms. But this also heralds the arrival of the tax man. He says many farmers may not have tax losses this year and they will have to carefully manage their tax commitments.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

10 NEWS

Bank picks flat prices for 2019 PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

GLOBAL PRICES for our primary products are likely to be flat this year but prices may rise for some products, says BNZ rural economist Doug Steel. One of those is dairy: the bank has lifted its forecast farmgate milk price 25c to $$6.25/kgMS in the face of possible supply tightness. Steel says world economic growth is likely to slow this year, but hopefully not slump as some are predicting. “Uncertainty indicators are very high. If the world economy can hold together well enough, NZ’s product prices are expected to be flat-to-up this year on average, aided by pockets of supply side tightness.”

Plenty has been happening offshore that could influence NZ primary export prices: a material drop in oil prices then a bounce, global equity markets going wobbly, Chinese growth indicators easing, US-China trade tensions remaining and the Brexit deadline looming. This all puts the markets on edge, Steel says. “The world economy certainly looks to be at an interesting juncture and it is slowing. The open questions are how far and how fast? We expect further slowing in global growth through 2019 which will be a headwind for primary product prices. This shouldn’t really be a surprise after such a long period of expansion. “But we do not back

the view of some that a deep downturn is imminent.” However, he says the BNZ will continue to monitor the risks of a US recession or significant global economic slowdown. For now, demand for NZ’s primary products has been holding up well, underpinned by China, Steel says. “This is highlighted by China’s market share rising for nearly all of NZ’s major primary export products over the past 12 months. This is despite a cooling in China’s macroeconomic indicators. “It suggests that the positive structural forces of food demand in China have been outweighing cyclical economic softness. We expect more of the same in 2019,

BNZ’s Doug Steel.

assuming further slowing in Chinese economic growth is orderly.” However, he says one important aspect to watch when -- or if -- Brexit occurs is what happens to NZ’s 228,000+ tonne European sheepmeat quota. “Despite all the trials and tribulations lurking offshore, it is important to recognise that not all is negative and uncertain on

the international trading front. Indeed, the CPTTP has just come into force,” Steel explains. “Officials estimate that this has the potential to ultimately deliver $222m per year in tariff savings for NZ once the deal is fully implemented over coming years. And the Government is looking to advance negotiations with the EU and RCEP group of countries, while also making progress in upgrading the existing trade deal with China.” Meanwhile, there are some signs of tightening supply for some key sectors, he says. “Dairy is an example. Stalled EU milk production and a rapid unwind in EU skim milk powder stocks, slowing US milk production growth and shrinking Australian milk supply bode well for some price improvement,” he explains. “Global dairy prices have already shown some bounce despite a very strong NZ milk season to date. The 11% lift in auction prices over the past four auctions

has been a touch more than we had previously forecast and also a bit earlier than anticipated. Solid demand and constrained supply appear to have been in play.” Steel says sheepmeat supply also looks tight beyond this season’s peak. “It is difficult to see a quick lift in NZ lamb supply in the year or two ahead given low breeding ewe numbers and a record lambing percentage this season. “Meanwhile, dry conditions saw elevated sheep and lamb slaughter in Australia last year which will limit supply when flock rebuilding occurs. “These supply-side factors should offer price support in the respective areas.” Steel sees world prices for NZ’s major primary exports being flat-tomildly-higher in 2019. The downside risk is ongoing disturbance in global financial markets or a sharper world economic slowdown than anticipated. “Assuming an orderly economic slowing offshore, we see the combined positives of structurally improving food demand in China and supply tightness as enough to generate price improvement. There will also be initial benefits from the CPTPP trade pact filtering through this year.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

TOO MANY EGGS IN CHINA BASKET? CHINA’S MARKET share of NZ’s primary exports is material and raises the issue of concentration risk, says Steel. “For agricultural and forestry products overall, China accounts for about 28% of NZ exports. “It’s not nearly as much concentration as NZ ran with the UK prior to the 1970s, but it’s not insignificant. Of course, this doesn’t mean NZ shouldn’t sell more produce to China just because it already sells a lot there,” he explains. “But it does pay to be aware of the rising concentration and potential fallout if conditions were to deteriorate rapidly in that market and plan accordingly.” Meat has seen big Chinese market share changes over recent times, including last year. “China now takes 30% of NZ’s sheepmeat exports and 24% of beef exports. Ten years ago these shares were 3.2% and 0.1% respectively. “Most recently, African swine fever in China may have generated extra demand for imported meats including beef and lamb, as consumers look to replace any shortfall in domestic pork supplies,” Steel says. “Gains in China’s market share for NZ sheepmeat has also coincided with the UK’s share dipping sharply after the June 2016 Brexit vote. The EU’s share has drifted lower.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 11

Human cost of M.bovis to be scrutinised NIGEL MALTHUS

THE MYCOPLASMA bovis outbreak has imposed a human cost on the farmers affected and a ripple effect into their wider communities, says University of Otago researcher Dr Fiona Doolan-Noble. “For the farmers themselves, one day their herd is there and the next morning they wake up and they’ve all gone,” she says. “That’s a huge loss on many levels: it’s an emotional loss, a sensory loss and a financial loss until compensation is received and they can start building up their herd again.” Others within rural communities are also affected, from agricultural suppliers and small rural businesses through to community groups. “Farming is at the core of many rural communities and when it takes a hit the whole community gets hit,” she says. Doolan-Noble, a senior research fellow in the university’s Department of General Practice and Rural Health, is about to start a two-year study looking at the the emotional, social and psychological impacts of the disease and the ongoing eradication. She says studies from the 2001 foot and mouth (FMD) outbreak in the UK show the outbreak was “not just an animal tragedy but also a human

one”. UK research identified feelings of distress and bereavement, concerns of a new disaster, loss of faith in authority and control systems, and annoyance at the undermining of local knowledge. Doolan-Noble says a key difference with the M.bovis outbreak was that the FMD episode was “short and sharp,” first being reported in February and all over by August. She says the time M.bovis was taking to eradicate “just adds another uncertainty”. “What we don’t cope with is long-term stress and stressors.” Doolan-Noble has previously set up a rural health research network looking at various health issues impacting rural communities. That included attending field days where she asked rural people about their concerns. Notably, people referred to decreasing human contact as farming became more technical and busier. An effect of the British FMD outbreak was a further loss of “social movements” and she expects that to also be a factor in the M.bovis outbreak. Funded to $120,000 by a Lotteries grant, the study will start in April and concentrate on the Otago and Southland region, which DoolanNoble called “ground

FINAL PROJECTS THE MINISTRY for Primary Industries (MPI) recently announced funding of $9.8 million for 31 Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) projects. MPI says the SFF provides funding for projects led by farmers, growers and foresters aimed at building economic, environmental and social sustainability in the primary sector. It has recently been replaced by MPI’s new Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures (SFF Futures) programme.  The latest 31 projects were in the pipeline prior to the launch of SFF Futures in October 2018. “SFF has [initiated] small and large communityled projects and [has laid] the groundwork for SFF Futures,” says Steve Penno, director of investment programmes. “The new 31 projects include apiculture, dairy, soil management and horticulture and are great examples of innovative thinking.

zero” of the outbreak. It will be co-ordinated by Doolan-Noble and her departmental colleague, medical anthropologist associate professor Chrys Jaye, and Winton veteri-

narian Mark Bryan. Information will be collected via interviews, logs kept by participants, and analysis of social and mainstream media coverage of the outbreak.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

12 NEWS

More milk means lower prices sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

STRONG MILK production in New Zealand is putting downward pressure on global dairy prices. Last week Canterbury processor Synlait dropped its forecast payout for the season by 50c to $6.25/kgMS. ASB’s senior analyst Nathan Penny says the bank is sticking to its forecast of $6/kgMS despite other banks raising their forecast payouts. Penny says after a strong December result he continues to expect 5% growth this season. “So far, 2018-19 dairy production has been very

strong. In the December month, production was 6.1% higher than 12 months ago,” he says. For the season to date, production is running 5.2% ahead of the 2017-18 season. Penny thinks there’s more to come. “Relatively healthy soil moisture levels suggest that production should kick on over the next few months. With that in mind, the risk of drought derailing production later in the season continues to recede. On this basis, we can reconfirm our 2018-19 season production growth forecast of 5%. Indeed and as we have stated previously, this season is comfort-

Synlait chief executive Leon Clement.

ably on track to set a new record. “We are more bullish than many other forecasters who are generally

forecasting nationwide production growth in the 3% to 4% range. However, our more bullish production forecast translates

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dairy prices. But Synlait chief executive Leon Clement says until recently commodity prices had been declining for some time. “This is in part due to global demand reacting to very strong production from New Zealand carrying into summer, alongside expectations of better production growth in the northern hemisphere.” Clement says its new forecast of $6.25/kgMS depends on commodity prices continuing to recover for the rest of the season but this is considered realistic in light of supportive global demand fundamentals. “Our milk suppliers will not be surprised by this change as we communicate openly with them about the fluctuations in global pricing on a regular basis,” says Clement. Fonterra’s current farmgate forecast is

$6-$6.30/kgMS. No other banks are revising upwards at this stage but say at least they won’t be going down. Rabobank is forecasting $6.25/kgMS for the 2018-19 season and says the last GDT result underpins that. ANZ says while it has yet to revise the result, at least it removes the downside risk to its $6.10/kgMS forecast. BNZ says a milk price over $6/kgMS for 2018-19 is now more likely. Westpac’s Anne Boniface says GDT dairy prices have now risen 7% over the last month and are up 11% from their November lows. The last GDT result was led by a 10.3% jump in skim milk powder (SMP) prices, while whole milk powder (WMP) prices were also up a solid 3% to US$2777/t, Boniface says. The recent lift in SMP prices is particularly notable given the 14.5% increase in the volume of SMP sold in the most recent auction. Usually the volume of SMP sold gradually falls at this time of year. ANZ’s Susan Kilsby says the latest auction and the upward run in prices over the last three months have removed most downside risks to their $6.10/kgMS forecast. “I am quite confident now that we will see a milk price over $6/ kgMS this season but we haven’t done an official revision yet,” she says.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

14 NEWS

Aiming to be the pick of the crop PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW horticulture recruitment and training cooperative has started in Te Puke, aiming to smooth the supply of

workers to orchards. It is expected to benefit employers and workers. Pick BOP is a collaboration between 10 kiwifruit growers in the region, some of which

also have contracting businesses. Manager Phillippa Wright says the cooperative aims to have high standards on employment compliance issues. It also hopes to attract

staff by better continuity of employment: workers can be shifted around between the orchards according to work flows. Wright told Rural News she sees more potential for training for

orchard workers. She previously mainly worked in post-harvest, but says growers attached to those companies would often ring up looking for training spots for their workers.

Pick BoP’s Phillippa Wright.

Wright says Pick BOP is an opportunity for growers to take a collaborative approach to training. “If someone asks me for training I can ring around and send out an email asking who else wants to do it instead of them relying on the postharvest or just doing their own individual training,” she says. In the future she hopes Pick BOP will have its own supervisor for on-job training. Wright says they looked at a couple of models for this kind of venture: one was a company operating in the South Island and another was a similar cooperative -- Pick Hawkes Bay -- which also has grower members. “We want to get RSE workers from the Pacific islands. This is another

way of doing that without each individual grower having to manage their own people. “I took some advice. Apparently, the Pick Hawkes Bay model works well particularly for RSE workers, so we decided to go down that track.” One aspect they hope will attract workers is the ability to move them among the 10 members. “For instance, you might have 20 workers picking an orchard. However, when they finish they may not have any more work for two-three days because the fruit is not mature enough or the weather has been bad,” she explains. “I will be able to move workers from one orchard to another within those 10 members. They will have more continuous work so hopefully that will be an attraction.”

CRUCIAL TO GET IT RIGHT WRIGHT SAYS breaches to workers’ rights and confusion about compliance have the potential to affect horticulture’s reputation and bottom line. She says the idea behind Pick BOP is to give members access to training and support in areas like recruitment, labour laws and Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) management. The co-operative will keep members up to date with the latest regulations and specialist knowledge so members can be confident they are on the right side of the law and are maintaining high standards. “We’ve all heard stories of exploited workers and that’s a bad look for the industry and New Zealand exports,” says Wright. “Pick BOP is a recruitment office with a commitment to best practice, offering high quality services specific to the horticulture industry. “International customers are also increasingly looking at a grower’s social responsibility. Making sure staff are well trained and safe are just as important for the bottom line as the product quality, so it’s win-win.” Pick BOP serves a different role to industry advocacy groups. “What I saw missing was a collaborative solution,” says Wright. “We want to make things transparent for members, by not accepting any non-compliant behavior.” 1673 NAIT Advert Jan19_280x187_FA.indd 1

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 15

100% NZ wool for Danish carpets PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND wool has now completely replaced British wool for innovative European carpet manufacturer Ege in its printed carpet process. Ege has blended NZ and British wool in the past to provide a higher bulk yarn. PGG Wrightson Wool’s worked with Ege to develop a specific wool blend to meet their requirements, replacing the British component with NZ Perendale wool. The company also recently joined PGG Wrightson’s Wool Integrity programme, following collaboration by the two companies to develop an optimum quality wool blend for Ege’s carpet printing process. “Ege have been using our wool for a long time but they have now joined our integrity programme,” says Palle Petersen, general manager of PGG Wrightson Wool’s inhouse export and marketing arm Bloch and Behrens Wool (NZ) Ltd. “Being in the wool integrity programme gives them clearer visibility on where the wool comes from,” he told Rural News. “They know that the farmers who have signed up to that programme meet certain criteria in animal welfare and that sort of thing. “Consumers are becoming more concerned about knowing how the product is made, where the raw material came from and how the animal and the environment were treated.

Palle Petersen of Bloch and Behrens (left) and general manager of PGG Wrightson Wool Grant Edwards inspect an Ege printed carpet taken from a photograph of the pre-quake Christchurch CBD.

“All of these we can verify; we know which farms we source the wool from so we have full visibility throughout the whole supply chain which you don’t have if you are using part-British wool from their wool marketing board. “We have a unique ability.” Farmers in Britain have to sell their wool through their marketing board which is graded according to breed, but does not have the same traceability back to individual farms. “The Danish company had issues with quality and consistency with British wool whereas we were able to recommend to them we could

replace this wool with Perendale which is a higher bulk, higher crimp wool than Romney.” Replacing with NZ wool “has got to be good because that is a few extra kilos coming from here”. “They use it in a reasonable volume and have done for a long time. They are committed to wool, have their own spinning mill and have the full process in-house.” Printing enables much greater detail to be included in the design of a carpet than traditional manufacture, at far lower cost, Petersen says. “Producing the best quality printed wool carpets requires the

whitest wool as raw material. “NZ wool surpasses all others in its whiteness and capacity to take dye.” Petersen says their processes, at all points, from the sheep’s back to the scour and beyond, have been refined to ensure that quality. Ege manufactures wool carpet tiles, wall-to-wall carpet and bespoke rugs for domestic and commercial use, including in high-end hotel chains and luxury cruise liners. It was founded in 1938, is represented in at least 50 countries worldwide and is headquartered in Herning, Denmark.

THE WRITING ON THE FLOOR PETERSEN SEES a big future for printed carpet. The traditional colourful carpet process has been slow and labour intensive and generally the manufacturers preferred large runs. “In producing a white carpet and putting it through a printer, there are no limitations,” Petersen says. “It is like putting a piece of paper through your inkjet printer. What you print is only limited to your imagination. “It is a very cost effective way of achieving a unique one-off pattern. They are very successful worldwide in the commercial sector – hotels, cruise ships, casinos, airports... where people want a unique design that is only theirs.” However he understands Ege also does some residential work. “There are people who are prepared to pay to have their own design or it might be to match certain things in their house. They actually can design their own carpets. “Printing something on a carpet doesn’t require it to mass produced; it can be done as a one-off.” The technique is 30 years old but Ege would be the leading user of that technique, Petersen says. “The equipment is expensive so there is a fair bit of investment in it and a lot of old traditional companies have investments in weaves so they are sticking with that. “People who invest in this new technology are probably future-proofing their business. “But it does require very good white wool. If you put a dirty piece of paper into your printer and tried to print a photo on top of it you would not get a good result. You have to start off with very white wool. That is where New Zealand wool is better.” The yarn is also treated with a process during the spinning so the wool takes up the dye more accurately. It needs to penetrate right down to the bottom of the carpet. “It is not as simple as buying any wool and putting it through. There are some strict quality requirements that need to be met in the wool, the spinning of it and the treatment of the yarn before you make the carpet. That is something Ege has developed very successfully.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

16 NEWS

Livestock numbers to remain static PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

BEEF + LAMB NZ expects the total numbers of beef and dairy cattle and sheep to be static for the next five to six years and into the future. The latest figures from Stats NZ show beef cattle numbers were up and dairy cattle numbers down in the past year. Sheep numbers were also down. But the short and long term outlook is for little change, according to BLNZ. “Through to 2024-25, we expect overall sheep, beef cattle, and dairy cattle numbers to be about static,” chief economist Andrew Burtt told Rural News. “However, price differentials could influence slightly more sheep and slightly fewer cattle but this will likely be marginal over that timeframe. “We expect dairy cattle numbers to hold but any shift to lower-input regimes may result in numbers being slightly lower. Beyond 2024-25, overall,

we expect numbers to hold subject to any changes in land use. “While there was a decline in sheep numbers last year, it’s worth noting that 2017-18’s lamb production was just 5% less than in 1990-91 despite there being 52% fewer sheep overall. “Efficiency gains like this have also seen greenhouse gas emissions from the sheep and beef sector decrease by over 30% since 1990.” Stats NZ says the number of dairy cattle dipped for the second year, while beef cattle numbers increased strongly in 2018. Provisional figures from the 2018 agricultural production census showed dairy cattle numbers fell 1%, to 6.4 million in June 2018. “This followed a similar small dip in 2017, though overall dairy cattle numbers have been relatively steady since 2012,” agricultural production statistics manager Stuart Pitts says. Total dairy cattle were at their highest level in 2014 at 6.7 million.

Sheep numbers continue to fall.

“Dairy products are a huge export for New Zealand. The value of milk powder, butter and cheese exports for the year ended June 2018 was $14.1 billion.” Beef cattle numbers rose for the second year in a row, up 5% to 3.8m in 2018. Total sheep numbers eased again in 2018, down 1% to 27.3m. “Sheep numbers have fallen in 10 of

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the past 12 years, in total down about 12.8m from about 40.1m in 2006,” Pitts says. “New Zealand now has 5.6 sheep for every person, after peaking at 22 sheep for every person in 1982.” A large fall in sheep and beef cattle numbers since 1990 means overall stock units have fallen in the past 28 years, despite a rise in dairy cattle numbers.

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A ‘stock unit’ means different types of animals can be compared, based on the food they eat and how much they weigh. The stock unit is based on the annual feed needed for a 55kg ewe rearing a single lamb. A dairy cow is the equivalent of about seven ewes, so is counted as seven stock units, compared with just one stock unit for a ewe. In 1990 there were 100m stock units in total; at least half of those sheep, with most of the rest in beef and dairy cattle. Deer make up a small part of the total. By 2004, total stock unit numbers fell to 94m and in 2018 that was down to 86m. “The large drop in stock units since 1990 mainly reflects a halving in sheep numbers, down from 53m stock units to 25m,” Pitts says. “In the same period, dairy stock units almost doubled to 41m. By 2018 dairy cattle made up almost half of all livestock units.”

MANY FARMERS in the lower North Island and Taranaki are a bit embarrassed by the oversupply of feed on their farms. DairyNZ’s Rob Brazendale, head of extension for that area, says huge amounts of supplements and pasture are being produced and it’s a great season. Maize crops in particular are doing very well. “The early sown crops have done fantastically well and are flowering, but the later sown ones have a suffered from being a bit too wet and are a bit patchy. But overall we can expect good yields providing we get some heat from now on,” he told Rural News. Normally at this time of year, the winds are from the north, he says, but this season the winds have mostly been southerly though

FARMER MORALE LOW DESPITE A relatively good milk price and ideal weather, Brazendale says he and his staff are puzzled by the low morale of dairy farmers in many parts of NZ and on his region in particular. He says given all the positives the low morale comes as something of a surprise. “Ongoing public pressure on dairying, the impacts of environmental and compliance issues and the sluggish land market all seem to be factors,” he says.

not cold. Not only are maize crops doing well; the turnip crops are great and farmers are feeding these out earlier than normal. Brazendale says the sight of extra baleage and silage on farms is really good. But bumper feed hasn’t necessarily translated into milk. “The cows have continued to milk well, but just prior to Christmas there was a bit of a drop in milk production, probably due to pasture quality which went off a

bit,” he explains. “It has been quite hard to maintain pasture quality hence the earlier slight drop in per cow production. But now this has picked up and the cows are holding well.” Meanwhile the wet, warm weather has a bit of a sting in its tail -- facial eczema (FE). DairyNZ says the risks of FE are relatively high now and farmers need to be vigilant and take prevention measures in case of an outbreak.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

18 NEWS

Pressure to remain on rural connectivity PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

RURAL WOMEN NZ (RWNZ) is keeping up the pressure over rural broadband and mobile coverage despite recent

Government announcements. RWNZ president Fiona Gower says the news that the Government plans to extend rural broadband and mobile coverage to 99%

of the population is good, but even more is needed. She says rural communities need geographic coverage and only about 50% of NZ’s geography is covered and that is where rural families live and

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work. “It is 99% of the population, but there’s a lot of geography in NZ that won’t be covered,” Gower told Rural News. “There will be pockets of the population that

won’t be covered and we are looking at things like health and safety and business. “Few New Zealanders [will be] left without it, but we are concerned to make sure that [the new] coverage is affordable for NZers and [that no rural areas will lack coverage.” She believes it is a health and safety, and an economic issue. “Out onfarm or on roads between properties there are areas where there is no cellphone coverage. If there is an accident or an incident and you have to get emergency services, where do you have to go to get that coverage?” Gower adds. “It is great having broadband, but the whole connectivity passage is important. We have

Better connectivity in rural NZ is essential for business and health & safety.

talked to Government a lot about this and were involved in the Rural Broadband Initiative 2 process.” She says RWNZ is pleased the wireless internet service providers (WISPS) are getting a

look in. “They are the ones that can get the coverage out into the wider community because they are a lot more agile in getting infrastructure out into the rural remote areas than the big telcos.”

RWNZ TO KEEP THEM HONEST RWNZ AIMS to keep up the pressure. “We will be keeping [the Government] to task to make sure it does happen... for education for our children, the economic benefit of having broadband for farmers, everything for real-time farming,” Gower told Rural News. She says it is important for ensuring the health and safety of all people living rurally. “If you have an accident on the farm, how can we ring to get help? And if you are at the back of the farm trying to get information? We all talk about what you can download on your smartphone these days [but] if you haven’t got that connectivity to get that information it is frustrating.” Gower has promised the RWNZ will be keeping the pressure on. “We are excited this is happening. We realise that technology is upgrading all the time. It is getting better and cheaper every

time something is done. So let’s make sure it does happen. And it would be nice if it even happened sooner than 2022.” She says if rural people in remote areas can access tele-health they won’t have to travel long distances to appointments to talk to a specialist, a doctor or a counsellor. “They are not having to give up their time at work… that is a huge bonus in getting extra connectivity out there. All those opportunities for rural that we haven’t had up to now. We have had to down tools and drive to town because we haven’t had the access.” Affordability is also important, says Gower. She believes the announced expansion of the mobile black spots fund will be very helpful. “There are some areas unavailable at the moment that will be covered. Many rural communities will get access through being a mobile black spot.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

NEWS 19

Trees can help erosion problems TIM WARRINGTON

HILL COUNTRY farmers’ efforts to prevent soil loss through erosion are increasingly scrutinised by environmental regulators and people wanting cleaner rivers and coastlines, says Northern Hawke’s Bay catchment manager Nathan Heath. “And there is likely to

Bay is a key driver of the fund. But keeping organic matter on the hills is also important for pasture production and to store nutrients and soil moisture. “While excess nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are important on the easier country and flats, sediment is a more important contaminant of

agricultural innovator wanting to spread your message, this event is perfect,” says event director Dave Martin. Details of the popular evening Muster will be announced soon;

the event enables expo attendees and exhibitors to socialise with presenters and keynote speakers. For more information on the expo or to buy tickets go to: www.eastcoastexpo.co.nz

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“Some ECS work will include fencing and planting around waterways and native bush areas, which will add biodiversity benefits such as protection and creation of indigenous habitats.” be increasing regulatory pressure put on landholders who are not doing anything about erosion on their properties,” he says. “But there is money available for landholders to do soil conservation works on their properties.” This topic will feature at the East Coast Farming Expo at the Wairoa A&P Society showgrounds on March 6 and 7. Hawke’s Bay Regional Council (HBRC) spokesman Peter Manson says it has a new funding scheme aimed at helping hill country landowners to plant more trees for soil conservation. “A grant rate of up to 75% is available this year from the Erosion Control Scheme (ECS) for activities that will help to keep productive soil on the hills and out of waterways,” he said. “Depending on the situation and type of country, funding may be available for tree planting, fencing, associated weed and pest control and in some cases earthworks and structures.” Manson says this is the highest grant rate made to hill country land owners in 30 years and demand is strong. “It is likely the grant rate will lessen in the next year or two so the funds can be spread over more properties, so now is the time to get in.” He says improving water quality in Hawke’s

rivers flowing out of East Coast hill country. That same sediment often represents loss of productive potential,” Manson says. “Some ECS work will include fencing and planting around waterways and native bush areas, which will add biodiversity benefits such as protection and creation of indigenous habitats. “There are some criteria to be met including an assessment of the erosion risk, completion of a simple erosion control plan and finally getting the application approved for funding. Wairoa staff at the HBRC office can help with all of these.” Another incentive designed, in part, to tackle erosion is the One Billion Trees programme; and it’s not just focused on pine trees, Heath says. “It’s about the right tree in the right place for the right reasons. “The challenge for farmers is to identify what is the right tree for them and their farming systems,” he says. The expo is also an ideal venue for launching new products or releasing new research and technology straight to the target audience. Farmers and landowners can explore new ideas and have their questions answered by experts on the ground. “If you are a Hawke’s Bay or East Coast farmer wanting to keep your business moving, or an

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

20 AGRIBUSINESS

New technology will help PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

BLOCKCHAIN AND distributed ledger technologies have the potential to help our primary industries capture high-value niches, according to a new report. They can help the sector connect more directly to consumers through supply chain innovations. The report was commissioned by the Callaghan Innovation and blockchain venture studio Centrality. The report ‘Distributed Ledgers and Blockchains – Opportunities for New Zealand’ by author Joshua Vial from entrepreneurial company Enspiral, outlined several blockchain initiatives now being used in the primary sector. One example of primary sector work given in the December report is the AsureQuality Food Trust Framework. NZ Post, AsureQuality (AQ) and NZ Trade and Enterprise have joined forces with Alibaba and local blockchain companies Trackback and Sylo to provide an export and tracking service for local, high-quality food producers.

Research farm up for sale New technologies have potential to provide and export and tracking service for high-quality food producers.

“The project has been in development for over 14 months and is currently in a pilot phase. Chinese consumers consider fraudulent activity to be pervasive and a primary barrier to accessing safe food,” the report says. “By scanning an AQ Assured Assurance Mark on their mobile phone a consumer can confirm their purchase is genuine and safe. Additionally, the project aims to connect NZ producers directly with Chinese consumers and remove

intermediaries while maintaining high margins on premium products.” The first participant is the HUI Maori collective to launch a broad offering of highquality wine, manuka honey, natural snack bars and tonic water direct to Chinese consumers through an ecommerce platform. The report says several projects here and overseas are focused on solving supply chain problems with distributed ledgers, which could have a significant impact

on NZ’s primary industries. NZ Post and Fonterra are also partnering with Alibaba to use blockchain technology to track consumers’ orders in an effort to increase food safety. Centrality’s Trackback project is in live trials of a supply chain traceability solution to showcase NZ products in international markets. Australian-based Blockgrain uses blockchain technology to help participants in the grain supply chain make better

informed decisions, eliminate paperwork, reduce inefficiency and risk, open markets and increase profits. Provenance is a blockchain company from the United Kingdom that is creating and fostering open, accessible information about products to transform the global economy. The company has completed pilot projects focused on tracing sustainably caught tuna and proving that farmers have received fair compensation.

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A SLICE of New Zealand’s agricultural history is for sale in the form of AgResearch’s Winchmore Research Station, northwest of Ashburton. However, AgResearch says its science programmes will not be affected by the sale because onsite research has dwindled in recent years. It is now run as a commercial operation, leased to a private farmer until the end of the 2019 harvest. “Until recently we were farming it ourselves, but effectively as a commercial farm because the research had already largely moved off to other places,” says AgResearch national manager of farms, Ron Pellow. “There’ll be no change to our research outcomes after the sale.” The grazing and arable property, one of a dozen run by AgResearch, has contributed to at least 500 agricultural science publications over 72 years. It was acquired in 1946, primarily for research into the use of border dyke irrigation. It was converted to pivot irrigation in 2017. Infrastructure includes four houses and buildings such as offices, meeting rooms, workshop and implement sheds, a woolshed and covered yards, and a new set of cattle yards with a concrete base. Crops onfarm this season include potatoes, wheat, barley, maize, peas and specialist seed crops, and a small area in lucerne and permanent pasture. “It’s a fantastic piece of land in the heart of Canterbury with great opportunity for a variety of land uses. It’s a good-sized property in the middle of the Ashburton growing area,” Pellow says. A long-running fertiliser trial there will continue, run by the Fertiliser Association of NZ since the 1950s. That will continue on a 4.1ha portion of the property under the terms of their lease agreement with AgResearch. Fertiliser Association chief executive Vera Power says the site has been providing extremely useful information for almost 70 years. “This has allowed us to track changes to pastoral land as agriculture evolves and supports our evidence base for sustainable management.” Winchmore’s fertiliser trials are NZ’s longest-running fertiliser trials under pasture. They complement another long-term fertiliser trial on North Island hill country near the Manawatu Gorge. AgResearch director of infrastructure John O’Dea said the combination of Lismore soils and spray irrigation at Winchmore would enable a wide range of future cropping and grazing options. “Modern de-stoning technology now means the stony Lismore soils are regarded as some of the most soughtafter and productive soils for intensive vegetable and arable production.” The 308ha farm is being subdivided into two parcels, either side of the Dromore Methven Road, with the larger parcel of 247ha on the north side subject to the current open-market sale offer. It is to be sold by deadline private treaty, with offers to be received by the end of February (if not sold prior). AgResearch is not yet revealing its plans for the smaller parcel on the southern side. – Nigel Malthus


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

AGRIBUSINESS 21

Students excited about Ag careers PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

AN AGRI-LEADERSHIP course, held last month, had secondary students ‘buzzing’ about career opportunities in agriculture even though many already came from farms. Completely different perspectives on the sector were given at the Rabobank Waikato Agri-leadership Programme, says coordinator Celine Walters a Waikato University agribusiness student. She says a presentation by KMPG’s Julia Jones on the future of food was an eye-opener for the 22 Year 11 and 12 students from the Waikato region. “There are many different things you don’t know are happening out there like marijuana olive oil that she was talking about,” Walters told Rural News three days into the fourday course. “Talking about alternative meat and milk sources it was incredible looking at where New Zealand is actually going to sit in the future. It is such a revolutionary time for agriculture worldwide. “I think it sparked an interest [in primary sector careers] because they

Last month’s Agri-Leadership course had students buzzing about career opportunities in agriculture.

could see there will be jobs in a couple of years that don’t exist right now which is exciting for them. “There is so much potential for them; they have realised that from talks like that.” Walters also hopes the programme has opened their eyes to the variety of jobs. “We have gone to Silver Fern Farms, DairyNZ, LIC, Fonterra and Zealong [tea]. At all those organisations they have talked about the different opportunities within those areas

– from research to science to farm work and even law.” She says the companies and organisations made a big effort to connect with the students. “Whenever I say the visit is for high school students they alter the programme to show them opportunities and also what they actually do. So there is always an interactive component.” Although all but about five students were from farming backgrounds many

learnt new aspects of what happens after the farmgate. “If you are from dairy what happens to the produce after you’ve milked the cows? And who else is behind the scenes they didn’t really know about before?” Walters adds. More leadership components were added this year to the course, says Walters, who was also involved in organising the course last year. The 2019 programme is the fourth time the event has run following the inaugural

event held in 2016. “This year we had a leadership coach from Rabobank come along to one of our talks and Nicole Rogers, a Paralympian who spoke about all she had gone through in life because she lost a hand in a mowing accident when she was five.” Walters says that how Rogers has overcome her battles and how she got to be a Paralympian, was quite a different perspective for the programme. “When she left everyone was buzzing about such an inspirational story. “ She says great feedback about the course has been received from the students. “Obviously not everybody is going to like every company. But there is always something they say was ‘really amazing’ or coming to me after and saying ‘I really liked this’.”    The programme is an initiative of the Rabobank Waikato Client Council, a group of leading  Rabobank clients who meet regularly to identify and discuss the challenges facing the agricultural sector and to develop activities that contribute to a sustainable food and  agribusiness industry for future generations.

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22 MARKETS & TRENDS

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global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

Commodity outlook for 2019 Climate FORTUITOUS WEATHER conditions have set paddocks up in great shape for summer. With feed aplenty, the extraordinary conditions have been reflected in higher milk production volumes, strong prices for store stock and tighter slaughter numbers. However, the combination of ample rain and warmer

temperatures, have seen rapid grass growth. Ensuring appropriate pasture management will be key for livestock farmers over the coming months, along with watching the timing of buying trading stock. Temperatures are forecast to be above average for the top of the North Island through to March 2019. All other regions of

New Zealand are about equally likely (40-45% chance) to receive above average or average temperatures over the same period. From January to March 2019, rainfall for the West Coast and Southland is about equally likely to be in the near-normal or abovenormal ranges. The north of the North Island is about equally likely to receive near-normal or below-normal rainfall. The remainder of the country is expected to receive normal rainfall levels. Soil moisture levels through to March 2019 for most of New Zealand are forecast to be nearnormal range.

Dairy RABOBANK’S FORECAST payout for the

2018/19 season stands at NZD 6.25/kgMS. This is within Fonterra’s forecast payout range of NZD 6.00-6.30kgMS. This would be the third consecutive farmgate price at or above NZD 6.00/kgMS, underpinning a third season of profitability. The 2018/19 season still remains on track to deliver record milk collections, with the season-

to-December volumes up 4.4%. Providing the weather holds, Rabobank anticipates around 1.9 billion kgMS to be collected from New Zealand farms for the full 2018/19 season. However, milk flows over the coming year will have a tough act to follow. With the extraordinary weather conditions exhibited in 2018 unlikely to be replicated,

it will be very difficult to match milk flows. Rather, the anticipated 2018/19 record season will be an anomaly and the slowdown of New Zealand milk production growth will continue as the milk price no longer outweighs the barriers to growth - particularly stronger competition from other land uses and intensification of environmental constraints.

Beef RABOBANK EXPECTS farm-gate beef prices to hold above their longterm average despite some softening in 2019 resulting from increasing global beef supplies and downward price pressures in the US market. Global beef production is forecast by Rabobank to continue to grow in 2019, albeit at a slower rate than experienced in 2018. Increased US beef production is a significant driver of this growth, and will see increases in both US beef exports, and domestic beef supplies. Rabobank is also expecting YOY production increases for US pork (+5%) and poultry (+3%). This increase in the overall availability of domestic protein supplies will create some downward pressure on

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MARKETS & TRENDS 23

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New Zealand exports to the high value Japanese market are also expected to grow in 2019.

US imported beef prices during 2019. China’s significant growth in import demand over recent years is set to continue in 2019. With flat domestic production unable to keep pace with China’s growing rates of beef consumption, New Zealand can again expect strong export returns from this key export market, particularly for prime beef. New Zealand exports to the high value Japanese market are also expected to grow in 2019. Tariff reductions under the Comprehensive

and Progressive TransPacific Partnership now put New Zealand on and even footing with Australian exporters and at an advantage over other key competitors. Tight domestic supplies will create some degree of procurement pressure throughout 2019, helping to strengthen farm-gate returns. Rabobank is forecasting New Zealand production to decline marginally in 2019 (-3%).

Sheep and wool RABOBANK EXPECTS farm-gate prices for lamb

and mutton to remain within a similar range to the elevated levels experienced in 2018 as market fundamentals generally remain in New Zealand’s favour. The diverging fortunes of coarse and fine wool exporters look set to continue in 2019, with little light on the horizon for coarse wool prices. Strong procurement pressure domestically, combined with tight global supplies of export lamb, will be two of the key drivers supporting prices in 2019. Beef and Lamb NZ estimates that New Zealand’s 2019 lamb slaughter will be down 4% YOY to 19.05 million, as a result of the continuing decline of the national ewe flock (-2% YOY). With tight supplies also anticipated from New Zealand’s major export compet-

itor, Australia (due to drought conditions disrupting flock rebuilding efforts), the volume of export lamb available for buyers on the international market is set to

remain constrained for the coming year. Growing consumer demand in key export markets should continue to underpin strong global demand for sheepmeat throughout 2019, although consumer resistance means it is unlikely that in-market prices will lift higher than they are currently. Sentiment

from New Zealand’s largest national export market, China, remains positive as China continues to absorb increasing volumes of New Zealand sheepmeat. The US is another market whose strong 2018 performance is set to flow on into 2019. The UK and the EU are two markets that do have some clouds

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hanging over them. High inventories levels and post-Brexit uncertainties do have the potential to negatively impact the performance of these two crucial markets. Rabobank expects coarse wool prices to improve only marginally in 2019, as weak demand and readily available supply continue to create a challenging environment for exporters. Strong consumer demand should ensure that fine wool producers continue to receive the health returns enjoyed in 2018. • Next issue we take look at prospects for wine, horticulture, fertiliser and foreign exchange. Stay ahead of developments in your industry by subscribing to Rabobank’s podcast channel on your favourite podcast app. Most Apple devices have the Podcasts app pre-installed – if not, you can find it in the App Store. On Android devices, Stitcher and TuneIn Radio are popular podcast apps

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

24 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Stop the sniping THEY SAY when you point a finger at someone in condemnation you have three fingers pointing back at yourself. Fishing and hunting lobby group Fish & Game NZ has spent the best part of the last two decades pointing the finger at the farming sector and blaming it for the degradation of the country’s waterways. There is no doubt that the intensification of farming – particularly dairy with its increased application of nitrogen and phosphorous fertilisers and shonky farming practices -- has all led to a decrease in the quality of waterways over the decades. However, it is also true that the agriculture sector in general – and dairy especially – has lifted its game in environmental practices. Nothing is perfect, it never will be. Some 97% of waterways on dairy farms are now fenced off from stock, and farmers have worked thoughtfully and hard to put in riparian margins and wetlands. Many during the last ten years have also spent hefty sums on effluent management systems. Dairy, sheep and beef, arable and horticulture organisations all have spent millions of dollars on science, research and development and technology in an effort to protect and improve the nation’s waterways. New regulations are being implemented NZwide restricting land use, fertiliser application, irrigation, winter grazing and a myriad of other practices; all this is intended to improve water quality. The above-mentioned new regulations now being implemented by regional councils have come on the advice of collaborative catchment and water zone committees made up of farmers, local government and wider community representatives – many of these being local Fish & Game NZ officers and /or councillors. One has to question the huge disconnect between Fish & Game’s head office people who continue to take pot-shots at the farming sector and its people on the ground, many of whom are working with farmers and others in their local communities NZ-wide in a combined effort to improve water quality. It is long past time for the Fish & Game head office wallahs to stop their incessant, negative finger pointing and emulate the collaborative stance of their people in local communities.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Air miles

Pot, kettle

THE HOUND was astounded to learn that the supposed climate change advocates at the Ministry for the Environment spent $45,000 a month jetting – often first class – its staffers around the globe during the past year or so. According to an Official Information Act request, made by the Taxpayer’s Union, the MoE spent $769,955 on international travel to meetings between July 2017 and December 10, 2018; no doubt most of these ‘meetings’ were to discuss climate change. Apparently ‘policy experts’ from the MoE were sent on 116 individual international trips to, for example, Korea, Jamaica, Germany, France, Africa, Canada, the US and China. Yet the MOE website says, “New Zealanders looking to reduce their carbon footprint should fly less, work remotely and use video conferencing”.

ON THE topic of hypocrites, your old mate cannot believe the gall of former Green Party leader and current head of environmental activist group Greenpeace NZ ‘Red Rusty’ Russel Norman. Recently, Norman was asked by mainstream media to comment on claims that some farmers were escaping prosecution by regional councils for breaches of regulations. “Farmers are breaking the law without consequences,” Red Rusty was quoted as saying. However, this old mutt notes these same media types did not question Norman about certain environmental activists who break maritime laws and put at risk workers’ lives during protests against legal offshore oil exploration, and then they get let off prosecution or fines.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................ Ph 021 842 220 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

If the shoe fits YOUR CANINE crusader was amused to hear that the spin doctors at Twitch & Tweet – more commonly known as Forest & Bird – were unhappy with the way one of its activists was described in a story run in Rural News in December last year on the way the government farmer Landcorp is playing politics and sucking up to the environmental sector. The ‘offending’ article referred to Forest & Bird’s Annabeth Cohen as an ‘anti-farming advocate’. “This is incorrect and misleading,” Twitch & Tweet’s PR hack whined in an email to the editor, demanding that Cohen be described as a ‘fresh-water advocate’. However, the Hound believes the initial description is apt and one need only look at Cohen’s public utterances about farming to see this.

Delay tactics WHILE YOUR old mate is on the topic of Landcorp – or Pamu as it likes to call itself these days – he reckons farmers and others are getting a little tired of the poor performing state farmer’s virtue signalling, but lack of real action where it counts. Not content with spending taxpayers’ funds on giving cushy, over-paid ‘advisory roles’ to anti-farming types, or giving secret submissions to the Tax Working Group advocating for a swath of anti-farming taxes, it is now understood to be hiding behind the bureaucracy of government and the Official Information Act to stall providing answers to some pretty basic questions – posed by this fine organ – about how it runs its business. However, this old mutt has been told by the editorial team at Rural News that they will not be deterred by such obfuscation. All will be revealed very soon.

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER: Stephen Pollard ....Ph 09 913 9637/021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ......... Ph 04 234 6239/021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .......... Ph 07 854 6292/021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland Ph 03 337 3828/021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,599 as at 30/09/2018

DIGITAL STRATEGIST: Jessica Wilson ........................ Ph 09 913 9621

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

OPINION 25

Proposed immigration changes a win-win RECENT PROPOSALS by the Government to make it easier for regions to get workers look like a step -if not a leap -- in the right direction. Our members help farmers get in enough winter feed, stay on top of weeds and a host of other tasks which allow our nation’s farms to stay productive. Just like industries such as pipfruit and kiwifruit, we struggle every year to get enough workers locally. Unlike those industries which are stretched for a few weeks over harvest, we need skilled people to drive our machinery from spring to autumn; getting approval to employ such people from overseas through the hoops of WINZ and Immigration is an annual and frustrating nightmare. So the proposals, one week before Christmas, by Immigration Minister Iain Lees-Galloway to introduce a simpler, employer-led system for temporary work visas for skilled regional workers seems, at face-value, capable of enabling the sorts of changes which are desperately needed. The RCNZ understands the Government’s wish to stop some of the rorts that go on with migrant labour. That said, this largely applies to lower-skilled people where often English is an issue; our imports are skilled machinery operators who are mostly from

He also wants threeyear sector agreements in place by this time next year for key shortage areas – residential aged care, dairy farming, tour-

English-speaking countries or have good fluency. Our members are so keen to have them that often they become part of an extended family for a few weeks or months. We also share the Government’s wish to employ as many New Zealanders as possible. Our 500 members regularly provide opportunities for Kiwis to train to drive machinery. Unfortunately, ours is a seasonal industry with long hours when conditions allow; you need the aptitude to drive big machinery day in, day out and many aren’t cut out for it. I trust this will all be taken into account as the Government considers submissions on its new regional work visa proposals. RCNZ will be making a submission by the March 18 deadline. We will be asking officials to recognise the particular demands rural contractors face. The Cabinet paper has Minister Lees-Galloway wanting to implement the new Regional Skills Shortages lists in April this year.

Read us until the cows come home!

ism and hospitality, road freight and transport. Other sectors such as forestry, fishing and meat may be included. RCNZ will shortly

engage with allied organisations, such as Federated Farmers, to assess the case for rural contracting to be put alongside the dairy farming,

❱❱ Breaking news ❱❱ Management ❱❱ Agribusiness ❱❱ Machinery & Products reviews ❱❱ Competitions... and much more

All the latest stories and more at www.ruralnews.co.nz HEADER

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RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEADER Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu.

PAGE 24

RCNZ will do its best to ensure its members – and New Zealand – get the best outcomes. • David Kean is president, Rural Contractors NZ

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

26 OPINION

Need to tell the full story AS THE holiday season passes (some people in the rural sector wonder what the word ‘holiday’ actually means) the cities are returning to ‘business as usual’ -which is no longer a feature of agriculture and horticulture. New year resolutions about staying positive might be fading in the face of reality. So it is important to maintain a sense of perspective: the food and fibre we produce on the land in New Zealand meets the descriptors of what people say they want; the challenge is to market our product to gain the appropriate reward. Sadly this has been a challenge for some time, so the question should be how do we improve the marketing? Do the marketers actually understand how we produce food and fibre, and that our systems are different from those in other countries? Or is it simply that consumers aren’t being truthful when they say they will pay a premium for food that meets their requirements and matches their values? The latter point is a problem in NZ. Up to 60% of pig products consumed here are produced overseas. The Pork Industry Board estimates that 95% of the imported meat doesn’t comply with NZ

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

laws on the standard of farming. Similarly, eggs from barns and free-range hens contribute less than a third of consumption: conventional cages are still almost 45% of the market, while colony cages are almost 25%. The issue for the consumer is still price. For some consumers choice is also a matter of education: they simply don’t realise the background to what they are eating or wearing. Social media should be able to make education simpler. But the facts are being outstripped by the fiction – magnified in the echo chamber that is Twitter, Facebook and all the other methods of instant communication. Good news is that a ground swell of truth has started. In its latest Feed4Thought survey, animal nutrition company Cargill found that twice as many Y-generation (18-34 years old) respondents in the US and China reported knowing a farmer in com-

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Pork Industry NZ estimates that up 95% of pig meat exported to and consumed in NZ does not live up to our environmental and farming standards.

parison with those over 55. Trends in Mexico and France were similar. Young respondents in every country surveyed were more likely to have visited a farm than those over 55. This is despite the fact that, globally, there are fewer farms to know or visit today than there were a generation ago. Gen-Y is also putting knowledge into action. Almost three times as many Gen-Y participants (52%) said they had changed their eating habits for sustainability reasons in the past year versus older US respondents (19%). Cargill also found that having children at home made participants in all four sample countries more likely to make valuesbased changes.

Chinese survey participants (59%) were the most open to paying a premium based on factors such as animal feed and housing; Americans (31%) the least. The number one concern for all respondents to the Cargill survey is still food safety. Add this information to the ‘hot trends’ identified by Eat Well Globally (a food industry communications agency) and New Zealand is poised to reap the benefits. The trends are that food should be good for the consumer, ethically sourced and have minimal environmental impact (from production to packaging); taste remains the main motivator and verification of claims should be possible. In addition, authenticity

(the production system is ‘what we do’ as Kiwis – grass fed) must be part of the story. The true story. New Zealand can do this. There is an increasing number of activities NZ-wide that will help, notably the Rabobank school leaders’ agri-camp, Young Farmer teachers’ days and Fonterra farms open days. Together we can counteract the falsehoods and get to the premium markets. It will take collective action, but the foundation has been laid, which is a great way to start the new year. • Dr Jacqueline Rowarth CNZM CRSNZ HFNZIAHS has a PhD in soil science and has been analysing agri-environment interaction for several decades.

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THE NZ Landcare Trust will have a strong role to play with the increasing national focus on farm environmental issues, says the trust’s new chair, Fiona Gower. Gower, who is also Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) national president and its environmental spokesperson, says chairing Landcare will be an exciting challenge. “It ties in with a lot of what I do which is on environment and community; they are my passions,” she told Rural News. “Environmental awareness and sustainability are key words at present. There is a great place for the Land- Fiona Gower care Trust to get NZers together to work collaboratively; many of their activities are farming projects. We can show that farmers are environmentalists, that we care about where we live and what we do, and we can show the projects we can help with. “The trust can work as a conduit to all those people getting together collaboratively and give them support and knowledge and get them what they need; and support them through the process of getting more healthy rivers or catchments. “If we build a healthy catchment in small patches it is going to make it better in the big picture with the large catchments. “Because there is such a big focus on the environment there is a role for us to play in connecting the dots between central and local government and community groups. “Our team out working in the field are amazing; they do a great job.” Gower became involved in Landcare Trust three years ago when she became the environment spokesperson for RWNZ. RWNZ national chair Penny Mudford says Gower is well suited for the role of chair of NZ Landcare Trust. “She has been RWNZ’s representative on the trust since 2016, has a deep understanding of farming and is passionate about sustainable land use and improving water quality,” says Mudford. “RWNZ works to build and support rural leaders and provide opportunities for leadership development and growth. Fiona’s experience as RWNZ national president, board member and a former coordinator of the rural environment portfolio provides a great foundation for her new role at NZ Landcare Trust.” Gower was elected unanimously as trust chair late last year, after long-time chair Richard Thompson retired after being with the trust since its inception in 1996.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MANAGEMENT 27

Kiwis outstanding in their fields NIGEL MALTHUS

TWO NEW Zealanders were named as winners in the recent trans-Tasman 2018 Growth Awards run by agriculture multinational Syngenta. Murray Turley, of Temuka-based Turley Farms, was a joint winner in the productivity category. And Jim Walker, of the NZ Institute for Plant and Food Research, was presented an award in the sustainability section. Turley Farms is a 2930ha operation growing cereals, potatoes, and hybrid vegetable seeds. The judges noted that Turley Farms has been one-hectare grid soil testing for a decade and applying variable rate fertiliser to ensure no nutrients are lost, so improving profitability and enhancing the environment. Turley Farms is a founding shareholder of onion and potato packhouse Southern Packers, which can process 40,000 tonnes of onions a year. Turley also has interests in irrigation, dairy and other property, and has appeared in the National Business Review’s annual rich list. Jim Walker, a researcher with Plant and Food Research, based in Hawkes Bay, was honoured in the sustainabil-

ity section. The judges commented that Walker demonstrated a lifelong passion for safe fruit production through his work on pesticide applications. He led a team which introduced integrated fruit production and has helped growers adopt practices that decrease pesticide residues. “Jim’s advice is regularly sought by NZ government officials,” said the judges. Turley and Walker were among eight winners from NZ and Australia honoured at a function in Sydney, held in early December, having been chosen from 26 regional winners in three different categories – productivity, sustainability and community and people. “This is our fifth year of running the awards and such is the quality of nominees that it is only getting harder to narrow down our winners,” Syngenta Australasia’s Paul Luxton said. “Times have rarely been harder than they are now for farmers and their advisors, who are dedicated to growing the food and fibre that helps feed and clothe us all in NZ and Australia,” Luxton added. “Growing seasons are less reliable than ever and the rural hubs they call home continue to

shrink, contributing to feelings of isolation and even depression, yet our winners demonstrate a tremendous capacity to do more with less as real innovators, while caring for the land and each

other.” The winners get opportunity to join a week-long study tour of the UK and Europe, which the company says will help foster stronger working relationships.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

28 MANAGEMENT

Promising results from denitrification wall A WORLD-FIRST denitrification wall at Silverstream, North Canterbury is designed to reduce high groundwater nitrate levels. The trial is led by the Institute of Environmental and Scientific Research (ESR). So far the nitrate levels in groundwater have been reduced from 7.1mg/L to 0.5 mg/L by the wall at Silverstream Reserve. The 25m-long wall, installed eight weeks ago, is a world-first: no denitrification wall has ever been tested in a fast-flowing gravel aquifer system such as the one at Silverstream. ESR senior scientist Lee Burbery says the wall is working as anticipated. “The wall itself is effectively removing all of the nitrate in the groundwater that passes through it. We are seeing a plume

of treated groundwater extend down-gradient from the wall.” The denitrification wall acts as a groundwater filter. Woodchip mixed with gravel removes nitrate from groundwater passing through the wall. Carbon from the woodchip provides a food source for bacteria within the ground to convert nitrate in groundwater to a harmless di-nitrogen gas (N2), which makes up 80% of the atmosphere. The wall is split into two 12.5m sections, each filled with a 50:50 mix of woodchip and gravel. The wall is 3m deep x 5m wide, the width being determined by groundwater velocity and nitrate concentration. Burbery says two different mixes are being tested within the wall to determine which type of

Construction of the denitrification wall at Silverstream Reserve using a mixture of woodchip and gravel

material is the most cost effective and efficient at removing nitrates. “One has 20-40mm gravel rounds mixed with chipped wood. The other is material dug out of the site, screened and mixed with hogged wood. “The second option could work better for landowners as it’s more

cost effective.” The test site was selected because of its shallow water table and high nitrate levels and it is far enough from Silverstream to ensure that the operation of the wall will not adversely impact the waterway. “We have 34 monitoring wells on the site

which will be increased to about 50. It’s important to ensure that there won’t be any adverse effects with pollution swapping from the woodchip, but we haven’t seen any evidence of this so far.” Environment Canterbury (Ecan) North Canterbury zone manager Andrew Arps says the project typifies joint work by the Waimakariri Zone Committee and partner groups to deal with high nitrate levels in local waterways.

“We’re pleased with the positive results to date and this ties in with other projects in the Silverstream catchment – including the joint ECan-WIL infiltration trial and monitoring sites set up along the waterway. “This year we’re focusing on ‘Clean and Green Silverstream’... cleaning up the stream and greening the banks... everyone working sideby-side to cover the entire catchment from the springheads to the Kaiapoi and Waimakariri rivers.” The trial will run for two years, while the actual wall itself is expected to work for about 30 years. ESR lead scientist Murray Close expects the site to function as a demonstration model to show landowners how the concept works. “We’re trying to establish guidelines on how denitrification walls work, and this site will provide a practical example.”

Due to the expense of sheet piling when constructing the wall, Close says denitrification wells could be a more costeffective option for landowners. “One possibility is offset lines of wells. You could drill one-metre diameter wells and fill these with a mix of gravel and woodchip. The casings would then be removed, and this would work in a similar way to denitrification walls, but without the cost of sheet piling.” He believes that denitrification walls could be part of the answer to reducing Silverstream’s high nitrate levels. “All of the work being done at Silverstream addresses different parts of the puzzle. Our piece of the puzzle is what we can do to address the nitrates that are already in the groundwater. It will take a combination of approaches to deliver the improvements that we want to see for Silverstream.”

SUCCESS FOR TRIAL MEANWHILE, AN infiltration trial near Silverstream -- a joint effort by Ecan and Waimakariri Irrigation Ltd (WIL) -- is succeeding. It shows water flow of 80L/ second reaching the aquifer via a 1.5mdeep trench. The trial has run for four months at a site seven kilometres east of Silverstream; it will run for three years. WIL’s environmental manager Paul Reese says initial results encourage them to use infiltration to augment and recharge the aquifer leading to Silverstream. “So far it’s shown us that the infiltration method can be used to add low nitrate Waimakariri River water to the aquifer,

which hopefully will reduce levels of nitrate in Silverstream.” Ecan senior hydrogeologist Zeb Etheridge says no extra water is being added to the trench due to the irrigation season starting. The team is designing a monitoring system to track where the clean water goes and which part of the springfed stream system the water ends up in. “We plan to install the monitoring system next year prior to winter and then start a managed aquifer recharge trial. So far, we’re pleased with the positive results we’ve seen since the trial started.” Rees says WIL shareholders are keen to help reduce nitrate levels in Silverstream.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MANAGEMENT 29

‘Spray and walk away’ atttitude must change “Excellent. That’s a step forward.” Boutsalis’s main message was that if farmers are relying heavily on herbicides they should rotate them, mix them and “keep up the good work they’re doing” in diversifying agriculture. “Cropping in Canterbury is quite diverse still,” he told the expo. “That’s why resistance has been delayed so much compared to in Australia, where they’ve got continuous cropping and very limited crops.” Boutsalis says a big difference between NZ and Australian practice is that Australia has moved to a low-tillage system -- simply drilling into the stubble. He said this helps with mois-

NIGEL MALTHUS

THE FIRST step in tackling herbicide resistance in arable farming is admitting you have a problem, says Australian specialist Dr Peter Boutsalis. Boutsalis, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Adelaide who also runs a private plant science consultancy for Australian farmers, was the featured overseas speaker at the Foundation for Arable Research (FAR) 2018 CROPS expo held at FAR’s Chertsey research site in December. He says a few of the NZ arable farmers attending the event admitted to having a resistance problem and put their hands up when asked.

ture retention and erosion control (and gives some assistance to preemergent herbicides since weed seeds remain confined to top layers) but means they are generally heavily dependent on herbicides for weed control. Boutsalis said nonherbicide techniques being used in Australia include capturing seeds at harvest, removing seeds before they mature with hay or silage and concentrating weed seeds into windrows that are burnt or used as feed. Glyphosate can sometimes be used in wheat and barley, if the crop is mature enough not to be affected by it, but the weed species are still young.

Boutsalis says 2018’s severe drought in New South Wales provided an unexpected weed control opportunity for South Australian farmers, because the price of hay doubled to $300 a tonne and made it financially worthwhile for them to bale up their entire crop before it was mature – along with any weeds before they had set seed – and sell it as feed to NSW. “So for one year, you got 100% control of weeds. And that is a very effective strategy,” he said. Annual ryegrass is the most problematic weed in southern Australia, followed by wild oats and chickweed. In his presentation to

Dr Peter Boutsalis, of the University of Adelaide, gives a presentation on herbicide resistance at the FAR CROPS Annual Expo held at the Chertsey research site, MidCanterbury, in December. SUPPLIED.

the expo, Boutsalis tabled figures from ten years of pot tests done on 2000 randomly chosen ryegrass samples, showing resistance to various herbicides ranging from zero or low single figures, up to 60 and 65%. Cross-resistance is also becoming problematic, he said. “Furthermore, clethodim (Arrow), also a Group A herbicide, has some unique differences

to other Group A herbicides. Arrow will often control wild oats and ryegrass resistant to other Group A herbicides. Additionally, there is often a rate response with Arrow, with higher rates controlling individuals not controlled with lower rates. This is quite unique to Arrow.” As part of his consultancy business, Boutsalis offers a pot test service for farmers who can send

weed samples for testing so they can be advised which herbicide to use in the current season. “That’s the power of the commercial pot test. You can actually fine tune what the situation is in your particular field,” he said. “Resistance can start slowly and unnoticed, then one year – bang, it just explodes because enough of the survivors have set seed.”

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

30 ANIMAL HEALTH

Ban sheep semen imports - breeders FROM PAGE 1

Zealand and that others are perhaps not so watertight,” she says. “But here we are allowing levels of potential incursions that no other countries will allow. “It keeps me awake at night, it really does.” Smith is a member of the Perendale Sheep Society but says she’s speaking as a private individual. However, society president Mike McElrea says

the breed organisations back Smith’s call. “We had a crew of Australians buying stud rams from our [Perendale breeders] stud ram fair in Gore until last year. Once this happened they couldn’t,” McElrea told Rural News. “They were coming every second or third year and buying eight or ten rams, to introduce new genetics into their operations. But since this

has happened they’re not allowed to take them into Australia so that’s an end to that.” Unlike straws, frozen pellets cannot be individually packaged, sealed and labelled. “So there can be doubt about the identity and health status of their donor ram. This poses a serious risk to New Zealand’s biosecurity,” Smith explains. “Ironically, MPI does

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not allow New Zealand semen to be exported in this pellet form as it does not meet the OIE standards under the World Organisation for Animal Health, yet we allow other countries to bring it onto our shores in this form. To me that is unbelievable.” Sheep and deer breeding specialist Julia Aspinall, founder and chief executive of Genetic Gains, Southland, said

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there is absolutely no benefit to NZ from imported pelletised semen. It is cheaper for the producer but more costly for the end user, she said. “To anybody who’s handled pellets it’s an absolute no-brainer that they’re outdated.” Aspinall said that while semen pellets had been imported from Australia for many years with no adverse incidents, they were now coming in from places with far higher dis-

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ease loadings. “The inseminators -the people who use it -all those I’ve spoken to

agree with me but none of them will stick their head up and say so.” Aspinall said she had frequently voiced her concerns to MPI and politicians to no avail. Smith said the former MPI chief executive Martyn Dunne (now retired) wrote her in September saying MPI had “general confidence” in the procedures in place, but she believed that was a low standard. “I’m hoping with the changing of the guard that there’s a higher level of scrutiny of this,” she said. “If MPI is determined to continue to allow imports from these countries, I ask them at the very least to reduce the risk by allowing only importations of semen which meet international standards to be imported i.e. packaged in sealed, clearly labelled straws.”

MPI PROMISES MORE ACTION MPI SAYS it will do more inspecting of imported ovine germplasm to meet industry concerns. It says it has also tried to persuade Australian authorities that their concerns over NZ’s ovine genetics exports are unfounded. In a statement, MPI says it is confident of the biosecurity measures in place. “MPI takes biosecurity extremely seriously and our Import Health Standards for the importation of sheep and goat semen and embryos are based on, or exceed, top international standards.” MPI says it had listened to the concerns of the farming sector regarding pelletised sheep semen. “As a result, we’re planning additional inspections of consignments to ensure that certification, documentation and packaging meet the Import Health Standard (IHS).” MPI says the new IHS had been in response to a long-standing industry request for an improvement in sheep and goat genetics in NZ, for both milking and meat purposes. The ministry claims this was widely consulted on and developed with input from industry. “In addition, MPI did rigorous risk analysis and found the risks of introduction of diseases via germplasm could be appropriately managed. The only country that disagreed was Australia, who subsequently imposed import restrictions on ovine germplasm from New Zealand,” it says. “This was due to perceptions of the risk of spreading scrapie. We have presented Australia with scientific evidence to reduce their concerns, however the restrictions remain in place.” MPI denies increased risk from pelletised semen. It says pellets had been imported and used in NZ for decades, and a 2013 risk assessment for pellets concluded the risk was “appropriately managed” by the requirements of the IHS. The IHS can only be used if the country of export has been approved by MPI in a rigorous process, including assessing their systems and their animal disease status. MPI noted that none of the four countries now exporting ovine germplasm to NZ has foot and mouth disease.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

ANIMAL HEALTH 31

Herd testing offers peace of mind WHETHER A herd test heralds bad news or signals resounding success, whatever’s possible from a drop of milk is ultimately good for a farm’s viability and for a farmers peace of mind. So say Rachel and Carl North, of Southland, who are strong advocates for the convenience of regular herd tests and what

tives and positives, and we kept the suspects because of the inkling we might cull a healthy cow. Of the suspects we kept, they all came up positive over calving and we lost them all.” The Norths now immediately cull all their high-positives, positives and suspects.  “It’s heart-breaking;

results just came through the post or email; we never had to take the cows out of the paddock, it just happened. “Any of the suspects we had -- because of the way the dates fell -- we

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just got the vet in for them.” Aging the pregnancies isn’t an issue, Rachel says, because her husband Carl is disciplined with mating recordings, and dates are self-evident. 

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“The cows are our major assets, and that’s the way we’ve always viewed them since our sharemilking days.” their cows’ milk is telling them. “The cows are our major assets, and that’s the way we’ve always viewed them since our sharemilking days,” Rachel says. “Herd test information is really important to us because we use it to monitor and manage the cows’ health.  “Somatic cell counts aren’t a problem for us, and we want to keep it that way. We don’t have any need to do blanket treatment because when we get a report with high somatics on it we deal with the issue immediately by targeting the treatment with the vet.”  While somatic cell counts haven’t been a problem for the Norths, a more sinister problem has haunted them in the recent past.  “When we bought the herd we had a major Johnes problem and we were losing 30 to 50 cows a year.  “Then we found out about the Johnes test using the herd test milk. It was quite scary for us, because at first we got a long list of high-positives, positives and suspects.  “In the first year we culled all the high-posi-

it’s really hard to stick a cow on the cull truck when she’s in supreme condition, doing 2.5kgMS, she’s fed, she’s pumping, but you know she’s got Johnes; she’s got no future and she’s going to do damage to the herd.”  Rachel says there’s good reason to hope the disease is no longer an issue.   “This year our Johnes test results came back with no cows affected. But we’ll keep testing; for us it’s invaluable. We’d rather any affected animal is found out and culled humanely than have her get to the clinical symptoms of this awful disease and die a horrible painful death.”  The Norths are big fans of herd testing for another reason.  “The milk pregnancy test is simple, non-invasive and convenient. It’s huge value for us because the cows need not stand on the yard for up to half a day, being non-productive in the heat; and it’s not normal for them to be doing that so they can get distressed.  “Last year was our first year doing milk pregnancy testing, it was amazing because the

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

32 ANIMAL HEALTH

Prevention best for flystrike and lice FLYSTRIKE WILL likely occur in New Zealand in most unprotected breeds and classes of sheep. Timing of treatment(s) and correct application of products play an important part

in preventing or reducing the damage flystrike causes and the stress to flock owners. With animal welfare a key aspect of livestock farming, treatments to prevent flystrike and kill

lice combine as crucial in sheep flocks. The new generation of flies that emerge after overwintering in the soil appear in the warmer temperatures. After mating, the females are

attracted to sheep by the odour of wool grease, green dags or urine odour on the breech wool. Initial strikes mainly occur in these areas, e.g. shoulder strike from the wool grease odour and

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Shearing, crutching and dagging sheep in early summer can lesson the risk of flystrike.

bacterial action at the skin level or dag strike/ urine strike around the base of the tail. Unchecked, these strikes occur with up to 200 eggs deposited by one female fly. The eggs hatch in less than a day and then larvae develop

chemical for the claimed protection period on the dip label. Note that the length of protection claimed on the label of flystrike dip products will be stated as “up to” a number of weeks. At certain times of moist and warm weather,

At certain times of moist and warm weather, particularly in sheltered paddocks or locations where flystrike can be severe, shorter periods may necessitate shorter treatment intervals. by moulting, with each larvae stage aggressively damaging the skin layer and penetrating the tissues. All this damage is compounded by the attraction of more flies and sheep not previously treated with a flystrike preventative die a painful death. In the summer the complete life cycle of Lucilla spp flies can be as short as four weeks. Shearing, crutching and/or dagging lambs, two-tooths and ewes in early summer alleviate the risk of flystrike. The tell-tale signs of a flystrike sheep are biting, twisting and irritation caused by the early larvae attack; this will indicate the need to check the whole mob and use a flystrike dressing treatment on affected sheep after clearing up the struck areas with a shearing handpiece. The best way to prevent flystrike is by saturation methods, jetting or the use of pour-ons with a T-bar applicator along the backline and around the breech – preferably with a dual action (fly and lice) combination product. Timing of application for flystrike is important (generally within 4-6 weeks of shearing) when the wool length will retain the flystrike

particularly in sheltered paddocks or locations where flystrike can be severe, shorter periods may necessitate shorter treatment intervals. One often-used procedure with lambs is to run them through a jetting unit as they leave the race (after drenching with an anthelmintic in the race at 28 day intervals). Another way to efficiently cover the backline and breech with chemical is by using a conveyer to space the sheep as they are jetted or the pour-on is applied. The application of a pour-on for flystrike also needs care. Coverage as indicated on the product label needs to be meticulous and done carefully, with the farmer wearing recommended chemical-proof over-trousers -- not shorts. Pushing large numbers through the application procedure often leads to failures in the sheep receiving the correct placement of the chemical. Reading the application rate or the dip mixing rate is important, as is use on the same day of mixed dip wash, because overnight settling out of the active chemical will markedly reduce the protection benefit.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 33

Tractor These boots are made sales on for working in comfort a roll MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TRACTOR IMPORTERS and distributors have a healthy 2018 report card from the Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA). Retail sales in all categories were 4640 units sold during 2018 – up 14% on 2017 (4079). (In the dairy boom year -- 2014 -- sales were 4062.) A breakdown of the figures shows the sub-60hp category had 1227 sales (+23% on 2017), the key 60-120hp sector had 1505 (+4.5%) and 120-250hp had 1753 (+14.5%). The high horsepower (250hp+) prime movers moved the most -- 156 units (+50%) eclipsing 104 sales in 2017. TAMA president TAMA president John Tulloch. John Tulloch says the trend is likely to continue into 2019 provided there is no sudden global impact or bad weather. UK new tractor registrations were 12,102, about 1% higher than in 2017. But December 2018 saw a 38% decrease on the same month in 2017. December 2017 many pre-registrations to beat new regulations imposed by the European Union. Sales in Ireland were largely static, reports the Farm Tractor & Machinery Trade Association: 1762 units were registered in 2018 versus 1796 in 2017 (-2%). In a larger view, the Agrievolution Alliance released numbers for 2017 showing sales of 2.1 million tractors -13% higher than the 1.9m sold the previous year. China and India combined sold one million units -- 490,000 and 600,00 tractors respectively. US tractor sales were up 4% at 220,00 units. Europe sales were up 13% at 190,000 tractors, with major increases in the key markets of France and Germany.

SAFETY FOOTWEAR was always a source of dread to this reviewer -- a child of the 1960s, apprentice of the 70s and grafter of the 80s. Thirty years later, although boot technology has come a long way, I was still a little reluctant to ‘test drive’ a modern pair of safety boots. I relented and gave it a go. Supplied by Oliver Boots (founded 1887) of Victoria, Australia, these boots were AT 55s (all-terrain) -- and an eye-opener, so much so that the excuse “safety boots pinch my feet” is a goner. The boots are substantial but the overwhelming impression is one of comfort: it’s easy to forget these really are safety boots. The boots came through with flying colours while your reviewer lived in them during the Christmas/new year holiday, working at removing a 120m, ten-

Tough, safe and comfortable – Oliver’s latest work boots tick all the boxes.

year old hedge and a couple of big trees. The design of the AT 55 combines zippered sides and a frontlacing system, making them easy to get into and quick to tighten for work.

Comfort is provided by the Coolstep interior lining that uses a close-knit, moisture-wicking lining to keep feet dry and free from odour. A padded heel guard offers stability and protection, and a Soft-

stride comfort system absorbs the impact of each step, using a low-density urethane foam layer that moulds to the foot’s shape for comfort and support. As the All-Terrain moniker suggests, the boots have a deep tread profile for good grip on difficult ground. They resist mineral oils, acids, alkalis and animal fats and are heat resistant to 300 degrees Celcius. The front of the boot is protected by a Type-1 Natureform toe-cap with a wide profile for comfort, and the comfort is further improved by a latex toe cap liner over the key areas, giving the impression that these are just standard work boots. These are among the lightest boots offered by the company, and the quality is up there with the best in all respects. All seams are double-stitched, with a triple Kevlar thread where stresses are high. – Mark Daniel

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

34 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Weed wipers get an upgrade MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ROTOWIPER MANUFACTURES a wide range of weed wipers -- from 1.8 to 12m in several configurations. And the company can custom manufacture to suit specific needs, e.g. a 500mm wide unit for use under grapevines. Formats include linkage mounted (LMU), fold-up (FU) and trailed (TR) versions. Working based on a spray line and mounted above a reverse-rotating, carpeted roller, a sprayer moistens the roller with herbicide which then ‘wipes’ targeted weeds. This targeting incurs none of the costs of traditional blanket spraying with its risk to an existing crop. With a strong focus on R&D, Rotowiper recently released its new TR series to replace the well-known WCF range. The TR range comprises five key models -- TR18 (1.8m), TR24 (2.4m), TR28 (2.8), TR32 (3.2M) and TR45 (4.5m). Functionality is a key feature -- a single, ratchet height adjuster and a spring-loaded roller drive engage-

Rotowiper produces a range of machines from widths of 1.8 to 12m and in several configurations.

ment system help speed up the transition from transport to work. The former will also ensure that the working height is set correctly, allowing maximum contact with weed plants without damaging the crop beneath. Tank levelling is also in the new design to allow the reservoir to be kept level when working at different heights or when fitted to different towing vehicles. Also, storage and ease of transport

are addressed with the fitment of foldup drawbars on all models. Greater durability is addressed by a double frame to handle tough, high-country conditions, and strong RHS single wheel legs and solid stub axles fitted with high-speed wheel bearings. Purchasers are offered the option of a high-quality paint or zinc finish to the frame; the latter prevents cor-

rosion and extends the working life of the unit. For operators looking to cover large areas, the new 12m heavy-duty trailed model should be welcome. This comprises a single 2m central unit and four 2.5m outer sections that are driven hydraulically. The unit also has hydraulically adjustable depth control legs. A heavy-duty frame carries a spray tank of 400L, said to cover 20 - 40ha

per fill; its transport width is just 3.1m. Control of this high output machine is via one control box overseeing the individual 7.6L/min pumps fitted to each roller assembly, with fully automatic control or manual control for the whole unit or individual sections. A second control box looks after transport and depth control wheels and the hydraulic folding function. www.rotorwiper.co.nz

25 YEARS OF SELECTIVE SEEDING AFTER 25 years in electrical seed metering, Kverneland claims more knowledge in electric drive systems than any other precision seeding company. Early designs stemmed from the development of the Unicorn Synchro Drive, first seen in 1993 and now evolved into the company’s e-drive II that we see today. Other introductions have been section control and greater computing power, that ultimately led to KV’s Geoseed technology. Geoseed is a patented control system that allows seeds to be placed either in parallel rows or alternately spaced between the rows. In the latter format, a diamond pattern is created, said to offer better uptake of nutrients, light and water. When used with the company’s Geocontrol software, such precise

planting can also help reduce seed rates and eliminate overlaps that lead to densely cropped areas. Electric drive remains front of Kverneland’s precision seeder ranges. It is used in the Optima and Monopill ranges aimed at maize and beet growers. Interestingly, the capability of the precision seed placement offered by these systems is also being exploited by farmers and growers who plant ‘amazing mazes’ to make more money. To complete the picture, all KV precision seeders can work in combination with the ISOBUS compatible iXtra LiFe front tanks and liquid fertiliser applications. The company also offers two of its own universal ISOBUS terminals for use with its own or any other ISOBUS compatible machinery. – Mark Daniel


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 35

A new standard in sprayers markd@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW range of trailed and self-propelled sprayers from German manufacturer Horsch is now available in New Zealand from distributor Norwood. Four trailed machines, the AX, LT Light, LT and GS – with tank sizes from 4000 to 8000L – make up the trailed Leeb range. Meanwhile, the self-propelled model PT has an 8000L spray tank. Depending on the model, booms can be specified from 18m-42m working widths. “Advanced boom control is one of the key advantages offered,” says Norwood brand manager Jamie Hanna. “They use sensors to read contours, making the Leeb the only sprayer in the world able to vertically manipulate each boom to follow those contours, allowing the use of wider booms in more undulating terrain.” The levelling system is said to work consistently at the lower height of 30cm above the target. This is because nozzles are spaced at 25cm along the boom versus the traditional 50cm, which are unable to provide ade-

quate coverage at 30cm working heights. Lower application heights reduce spray drift by up to 80%, so more chemical hits the target and this can reduce application rates and costs. Leeb sprayers are offered with three levels of boom control --- BoomControl Eco, BoomControl Pro and BoomControl Pro Plus. The simplest system – Eco – uses fewer height control sensors, while Pro and ProPlus have up to six sensors across the full width to offer more precise control, with individual vertical movement. The Horsch Leeb’s Autoselect system can automatically self-select the spray rate or change nozzles to maintain the programmed spray rate. The layout sees each holder carry several different spray nozzles, chosen automatically to best fit the forward speed, the desired spray rate or a prescription map. All Leeb sprayers can handle liquid fertiliser, and different pump options are available depending on whether they will be used primarily for chemicals or liquid fertiliser. There is a range of

MORE EFFICIENCY EFFICIENT SPRAYER technology will continue to be the way of the future, given the current moves by many of the industry’s key players. The Kuhn Group, formerly a minor shareholder in French sprayer manufacturer Artec, has now bought the remaining 62% of the family owned business. Artec builds two SP ranges -- the F40/R40 and RS 20 models. The 40 Series utilises a Deutz 6-cylinder engine with outputs from 215 to 250hp, tank sizes of 4000 or 5000L and boom widths of 24 to 50M. By contrast, the more compact 20 Series, uses a 4-cylinder Volvo engine of 180hp, tanks of 2000 or 2800L and booms from 24 to 36m. Meanwhile, in Germany, Lemken has signalled its future in the sprayer market by buying Steketee, a maker of mechanical weed control gear. This brand has three sprayer models -- Primus, Albatross and Vega; upgrades will see a new control system and the central integration of all major connections. The Albatross, a mid-range professional machine with tanks of 4000 to 6200L and booms from 15 to 39m, sees key upgrades to the CCI-50 terminal, with the option of CCI apps to allow section control and tracking assistance. All Albatross and Primus 12 models now have ISOBUS system control as standard.

suspension systems for differing terrain or road use, while steering axles provide accurate tracking in tramlines. Continuous cleaning

forms part of the operating system, while five wash programmes can be accessed on the side of the sprayer or from the cab.

Leeb’s new range of trailed and selfpropelled sprayers from German manufacturer Horsch is now available in NZ.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

36 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

HSV ute a cohesive upgrade made the hard-lid and HSV integrated its lock into the vehicle’s central locking, so there’s no fiddly lock with a separate key. They also added a rubber strip at the front to prevent water dripping into the tray when the lid is lifted. A nice touch, as is the strut that prevents the tailgate from crashing down when you open it. Inside, the dashboard is unchanged from standard except for the suede inserts on the dashboard – a touch repeated on the door inserts and centre console cover. The steering wheel is leather

ADAM FRICKER

THE AFTER-MARKET options for utes are extensive, but there’s a big difference between a properly engineered package and a ute with a bunch of accessories bolted on. This is the approach HSV engineers have taken with the Sports Cat: they started with a Holden Colorado Z71 and transformed the looks and handling, producing a cohesive package that feels like a different vehicle altogether. Sure, the running gear remains unchanged – the same 2.8L Duramax diesel as the Z71, producing 147kW and 500Nm – but it rides and handles in a way the Z71 cannot. HSV achieves this with stiffer front springs, front strut braces and performance dampers. The SportsCat+ also gets a special decoupling anti-roll bar at the back, which does a great job in reducing roll in corners. It decouples when lowrange is selected, allowing more wheel articulation for off-road driving. HSV increased the ride height by 25mm and added great-looking 18” forged alloy wheels and

dence in the bends that few utes can match. The ride is stiffer as a result but never uncomfortably so and the better body control makes a road trip less tiring than in the standard ute as passengers are not biffed about so much. Uncharacteristically, HSV has not made this truck faster, deciding to aim for overall capability than speed. However, they have made it stop better by adding front

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4-piston forged AP Racing callipers with 362mm x 32mm rotors and a bigger brake master cylinder. The pedal requires a hefty shove, but the enhanced anchors are strong. While some after-market body kits look a bit tacky, the overall look of the SportsCat hangs together very well. It’s an aggressive look, and the stance achieved by the 25mm lift and bigger wheels is just right. A Hamilton company

Aerostar Exact

U LT I M AT E W E E D I N G S O L U T I O N S . P R O D U C E E X C E L L E N T R E S U LT S W I T H CHEMIC AL-FREE WEED CONTROL.

P R E C I S E F U L L CO V E R W E E D I N G Aerostar and Aerostar Exact offer precise pressure control and contouring to remove weeds and leave your crop intact.

Chopstar / Rowguard

P R E C I S E I N T E R - R O W W E E D CO N T R O L Chopstar offers numerous configuration options for effective weeding in row crops ADD the Row Guard Camera Guidance system to achieve unbmatched precision.

Fo r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a c t

www.tulloch.nz

@rural_news

Toyota New Zealand was crowned New Zealand’s automotive market leader for 2018 making it 31 consecutive years for being NZ’s favourite brand.

The new HSV ute is an overall convincing package.

specially-made Cooper Zeon LTZ All Terrain tyres that grip well on tarmac and off-road but aren’t noisy. They also modified the electronic stability control and traction control systems to make interventions less aggressive. As a handling package it all comes together nicely. The steering, turn-in and roll resistance are much sharper than the standard Colorado, inspiring confi-

wrapped and the front seats have been re-bolstered to give more support. All seats are covered in leather and suede with red stitching. A nicer cabin than a standard Z71, although it’s a ute so has its share of hard plastic surfaces. Overall it’s a convincing package. As for the question of power, it’s got plenty for what is still a high-riding ute, but if you must, you could always chip it. Prices range from $73,990 to $82,990.

06 370 0390

DEALERS NATIONWIDE

TOYOTA AND ISUZU TOPS IN 2018 TOYOTA NEW Zealand was crowned NZ’s automotive market leader for 2018. The company sold 33,045 vehicles in 2018 – up from 32,278 units in 2017. This result sees Toyota celebrating 31 consecutive years as NZ’s favourite brand. During 2018, the company launched or updated five models, including the Camry, Corolla, C-HR, Hilux SR5 Cruiser and its first new plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, Prius Prime. With a market that is relentlessly moving away from traditional saloons, Toyota keeps leading SUV sales with a wide range of models such as the compact C-HR, the RAV4, Highlander, Fortuner, Land Cruiser Prado and the Land Cruiser 200. The increase of Toyota’s SUV sales, namely C-HR and RAV4, aided the 2018 sales record. Alongside this, the introduction of the Prius Prime saw an increase of 109% in the Prius family in 2018. For those using bigger toys, Isuzu was – once again – the undisputed King of the Truck world in New Zealand for 2018. The brand claimed the light, medium and heavy commercial truck segment trifecta on its way to cementing its position as NZ’s number-one supplier of new trucks for a record-breaking 19th consecutive year. Key to the success of the brand is said to have been enhanced vehicle reliability, as well as a renewed focus on the end-user. Further to the success of Isuzu is a continuation in the growth of the service side of the business, and much investment in the brand by dealers NZ-wide.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 37

South Canterbury agricultural contractor is impressed after just one season using a Strebel SAG 16 strip tiller.

Thumbs up for strip tilling MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TO FARM more sustainably and profitably, many farmers and contractors are exploring the advantages offered by strip tilling. Tulloch Farm Machines is looking to meet this demand with a new strip tiller designed to work in pasture -- the Strebel SAG 16. Most crops require a fine seedbed for reliable germination, but traditional cultivation can damage the soil structure, while exposed soil can be eroded by wind or rain. Strip tillers cultivate strips for a seedbed without disturbing the soil between them, so minimising soil damage and retaining moisture which have the potential to increase yields, reduce costs and ultimately result in healthier soil profiles less prone to pugging. Tulloch Farm Machines’ Strebel SAG 16 is based on a subsoiler with rotary hoe blades on either side of the subsoiler leg. The layout is said to break up the soil pan, while the hoe creates an ideal seedbed. The result is a shallow seedbed with shattered ground below, promoting easy

root establishment with excellent nutrient and water flows. Waimate contractor Josh Bleeker is into his first season with a Strebel SAG 16 strip tiller, after running other strip tillers for the past two years in his business Bleeker Ag Services. “The Strebel is a better designed machine with a better driveline and is a lot easier to work with,” he says. “Where the cultivation occurs there is a more room for soil-flow, whereas with our other machine space is a lot tighter and prone to plug in wet conditions.” By mid-December, driver Danny Walker had completed about 500ha of fodder beet and maize with the Strebel and was getting more requests from clients for strip tilling. “We will do about 1000ha this year, building on the 800ha of last year, weather and time permitting” Bleeker says. “Strip tilling works well, as it cuts down erosion, particularly on the steeper ground prevalent in the area. The Strebel tiller does everything the crop needs. It creates a loose seed bed and fertiliser is incorporated into the planting zone. This has resulted in yield increases of 3 - 5 tonnes compared to traditional methods.”

WE TALK YOUR LANGUAGE! Communications experts WRITEHERERIGHTNOW know and understand NZ’s rural and agribusiness sector. With more than more than 25 years’ experience servicing the agribusiness and the rural sector we have provided specialist communications and public relations advice and services to a range of rural and agricultural clients across New Zealand. We are skilled communications professionals who are passionate about the agribusiness and rural sectors. WRITEHERERIGHTNOW are experts in communicating with rural and agribusiness audiences via newspaper and magazine columns, online, media releases, client newsletters and blogs. WRITEHERERIGHTNOW is experienced in managing media enquiries, interviews and providing media advice for companies and organisations. We can prepare and brief appropriate spokespeople on how to respond to and/or front media enquiries. WRITEHERERIGHTNOW prides itself on its relationship management with key business and political personnel, from chief executives and senior management, to chairmen of top companies, as well as mayors, councillors and MPs.  

With numerous contacts at both local and national government level, we’re also able to help with networking and relationship building.

TALK TO US TODAY E david@writehererightnow.co.nz or W www.writehererightnow.co.nz

Everyday just got better. CLAAS ARION 600/500/400 is everything you want in an ‘everyday’ tractor – and a whole lot more! With your choice of 15 models from 90 to 205 hp, a range of super-efficient six and four cylinder engines, smooth continuously variable or powershift transmissions, operating systems, deluxe cabins and a host of clever equipment options, ARION 600/500/400 series makes every day more productive and comfortable. Contact your local CLAAS Harvest Centre and find out how ARION 600/500/400 is arguably the best value mid-range tractor available.

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RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

38 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Turbinepowered drone aimed at farming sector GCH (formerly Garden City Helicopters) was showing off a Swiss-made SD50 at last year’s New Zealand Agricultural Show, carrying a $500,000 price tag. It has two contrarotating intermeshing

NIGEL MALTHUS

THE WORLD may be going all-out on electric vehicles, but GCH Aviation, Christchurch, is trialling a large, gas turbine-powered drone to service farming clients.

rotors so no tail rotor is required. It can fly for 2.5 hours and carry a payload of 40kg. That endurance is a game-changer, claims Darryl Hodgson, general manager of GCH’s UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) division.

GCH Aviation’s Drone Operations manager Rob Duff with the large gas turbine drone the company is trialling for a range of applications including agriculture. RURAL NEWS GROUP

SUM Higher Productivity + Lower Servicing SACosts LE N MER OW O N!

“At the moment, it doesn’t matter what [drone] you’ve got, they’ve all only got a battery life of about 20-30 minutes.” And the battery life will be even less in a drone that must power, say, a big multi-spectral camera or high-end LIDAR unit. However, uniquely, the SD50 carries its own generator. GCH Aviation has bases NZ-wide and experience in helicopter and fixed wing services. It entered the UAV sector in Marlborough about two years ago and now flys electric drones to map farms and vineyards

= AES Waterblasters TORNADO RANGE

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POSTDRIVER SPECIALS SERIES 5 200° ROTATIONAL INCLUDES • 3.1m-5m Expanding Mast -No Hinge to lower • 200 degree Rotation • 340Kg Lead hammer – Over 25,000 kg of Driving force • Two Hydraulic legs • Rock Spike and Auger Kit compatible • Simple, Strong, and Fast – Designed by fencing contractors • Plastics Slides and Fully adjustable wear pads • Can be rotated from the Tractor cab

40

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• 4m 180UB Mast • 3 Bank Valve • Top Link Ram and Angle Adjustment With 40 different models, • 227kg Hammer And over 40,000 machines • Adjustable Legs sold Worldwide, • Free Side Mount It’s easy to see why frame KINGHITTER is NZ’s Favourite Postdriver Ye a r s

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SERIES 2 WITH ROCK SPIKE INCLUDES • 4 bank valve hydraulic top link and angle adjustment • 4.25m 150UC beam • 270 kg Hammer • Adjustable legs • Rock Spike Kit with 90mm spike

16,750

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Hydraulic folding mast 900mm side shift 4.2m beam with 227kg Hammer Hydraulic top link and Angle Adjustment rams

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to monitor for pests, diseases and growing stresses such as moisture and nitrogen deficiencies. At first it met resistance from farmers who had been burned by “backyard guys” who flew off-the-shelf drones and sold the farmers nothing more than “pretty pictures”. Now it can provide collected data and proper analysis of that data. GCH contracts this part of the service to an experienced US partner company which delivers a report to the farmer in the preferred format. An example is delivering instructions for a GPS-

enabled, variable-rate fertiliser or spray application. The SD 50 can also be configured with a spray boom for use on highvalue crops or weed control in areas of poor access, typically where a full-size manned helicopter would not be economically viable. Hodgson says that while the concept is not new, having a seamless package was preferable to dealing with several providers. He says the SD50 gasturbine power unit opens the door to survey a farm of 200ha in one go and at very high accuracy.


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER 39

No-till drill gets an upgrade MARK DANIEL

KEEP YOUR WORKING DOGS ON THE JOB

markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE JOHN Deere 750A All-Till drill is a popular choice in New Zealand, offering high outputs in conventional, minimal and no-till regimes and precise seed placement. In the northern hemisphere, the limited disturbance created by the drill is also favoured by farmers trying to beat blackgrass infestations. The company reports having sold two million units globally. At the heart of the drill, single disc openers are used to great effect. For the 2019 season, the introduction of PROSeries openers will help increase performance and these can also be fitted to existing machines. Designed to cause less disturbance, more consistent seeding depth, better seed to soil contact and an improved slot closure, the new units will find favour with existing users. The re-design starts with a narrower seed boot that fits more snugly to the disc, creating less soil-throw and providing 40% more consistent seeding depth. Wear rates are also improved as the seed boot is now protected more by the opener disc, so subjected to less soil contact. Also, the press-wheel has a narrower section and larger diameter, allowing it to fit into the seed trench more precisely. With a double-row bearing set-up, the layout is said to help seed-to-soil contact and more con-

Up to 6 rechargeable waterproof collar units & remotes • Model SD-1825 – 1.6 Kms range (1 mile) • Model SD-1225 – 1.2 Kms range • Model SD-825 – 800 Metre range All with Tone & Vibration options 24 levels of correction – 3 year warranty

GREAT VALUE SD-1825 with 1 collar ................$695.00 SD-1225 with 1 collar ................ $595.00 SD-825 with 1 collar ..................$495.00 Extra collars $375.00 – PRICES INCLUDE GST

The Pro-Series openers are said to help increase performance and can also be fitted to existing machines.

sistent depth, leading to more even emergence and a potential for higher yields. At the rear of the unit, a more aggressive serrated closing wheel is said to be 50% more effective. Further design changes see the seed bolt mounting replaced by a flag pin that stops the boot from moving, improving accuracy and reducing wear. The seed tab that stops seeds bouncing out of the trench now fits the contour of the trench more precisely and offers a doubled service life. The manufacturer says discs can be changed in about half the time of previous units, so this helps to reduce maintenance schedules. New control systems offer full ISOBUS compliance with John Deere and third-party displays. These also offer the ability to manage section control, overdosing and a pre-dosing function. In previous versions, when tramlining, the

same amount of seed was diverted to adjacent openers leading to overdosing in these rows. The new software maintains

the correct seed rate over the whole field. In addition, a new pre-dosing function prevents gaps from a stand-

ing start by pre-charging the system at the press of a button @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

The Mule V is Versatile The Mule V Post Driver connects to Tractors, Excavators, Skid Steer Loaders and also Telehandlers without special plumbing. The Hydraulic power and dump hoses are normal 1/2” quick connector fittings.

From only $12,500 + GST for Standard Mule V. Rig in photo includes optional Rock Spike Extractor, and Digger hitch.

New Activeblock® eliminates rope whip A Breakthrough in block design eliminates the rope whip often experienced when the Post Driver is operating efficiently.

Enquire today more about this latest technology. CALL 0800 36 27 76 www.farmgear.co.nz

Culvert Pipes New Zealand’s CHEAPEST Culvert Pipes! FREE joiners supplied on request. ONE STOP WATER SHOP 300mm x 6 metre ................................ $410 400mm x 6 metre ................................ $515 500mm x 6 metre ................................ $690 600mm x 6 metre ................................ $925 800mm x 6 metre .............................. $1399 1000mm x 6 metre ............................ $2175 1200mm x 6 metre ............................ $3475 ALL PRICES INCLUDE G.S.T.

• Lightweight, easy to install • Made from polyethylene

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FENCEPRO Tough • User-Friendly • Versatile

Phone

0800 625 826

for your nearest stockist

Joiners supplied FREE with culvert pipes


RURAL NEWS // FEBRUARY 5, 2019

40 RURAL TRADER - Made in NZ - Saves lives - Flexible

CRAIGCO SENSOR JET • Robust construction • Auto shut gate • Total 20 jets • Lambs only 5 jets

• Side jets for lice • Adjustable V panels • Davey Twin Impellor Pump • 6.5 or 10hp motors

Save Time and Money – Flystrike and Lice Cost $$$ Guaranteed Performance Quick to Setup – Easy to Use – Job Done SHEEP JETTERS SINCE 1992

Ph 06-835 6863 • Mob 021-061 1800 Jetter Video: www.craigcojetters.com

FLY OR LICE PROBLEMS? The magic eye sheepjetter since 1989

Quality construction and options • Get the contractors choice Featuring...

• Incredible chemical economy • Amazing ease 1500+ per hour • Unique self adjusting sides • Environmentally and user friendly • Automatically activated • Proven effective on lice as well as fly • Compatible with all dip chemicals • Accurate, effective application

07 573 8512 | dipping@electrodip.co.nz – www.electrodip.com

Free Range & Barn Eggs SUPPLIERS OF:

• Nest boxes - manual or automated • Feed & Drinking • Plastic egg trays QUALITY PRODUCTS MADE IN EUROPE OR BY PPP

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Rubber Safety Matting • ATV Carrier Mats • Exit/Entry Areas • Calf Trailers • Horse Floats & Trucks • Weigh Platforms • Bale Mats • Comfort Mats for Wet & Dry Areas • Utility Deck Matting

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Accommodates up to 4 dogs 6 individual air vents Removable centre board 2 lockable galvanised gates In-house drainage Tie down lugs on each side Fits all wellside & flatdeck utes (2 models) ❱❱ Raised floor for insulation ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱

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HARD WEARING SEAT COVERS

For details contact: JULIE BEECH Ph 09-307 0399

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HARD WEARING 12OZ CANVAS | EASY TO FIT TAILORED SPECIFICALLY TO THE VEHICLE WATER PROOF AND ROT PROOF NO MORE SHUFFLING ON THE SEAT UTES | VANS | WAGONS | QUADS | ATV’S | EXCAVATORS

tunnel houses

t/f

For information contact... Nick 022-083 3579 • Stu 027-432 3834 or 0800 4 SEEDS www.cridgeseeds.co.nz

0800 782 3763 | info@atvlifeguard.co.nz

julieb@ruralnews.co.nz

Grow vegetables all year round Very affordable and easy to install New Zealand designed and made 35 years producing tunnel houses Range of models sized from 2m - 8m

ALL DRESSED UP, READY TO GO... These guys could be seedy or cut by the morning but they know how to dress this season’s grass which is now on the seed dresser. Cutter Tetraploid Italian is a top favourite for annual growing

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NEW - BUFFALO BOOTS!!! introductory offer!

New Buffalo Boots have thick buffalo hide uppers which are 175% more crack and water resistant than normal leather. This means they last longer and offer you better value for money. The nitrile rubber outsole won’t crack, split or break down in soil. And it is traditionally stitched to the leather upper so it won’t fall off. To make extra sure of this - the stitching goes all the way through the tread. The Lace Up boot offers superb ankle support on hill country, and a calfskin tongue & collar for great internal comfort. The Slip On boots are ideal for any work application. Both models have a traditional full length back stay for optimum durability around the heel area. Due to time constraints we only have a very small quantity arrivING 15 FEBRUARY. Please order now to avoid disappointment. PHONE 9am-5pm

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Buffalo Leather - Dark Brown Nitrile Rubber Outsole Traditional Stitched on soles Wide Fit Calfskin Tongue & Collar (Lace Up) Heavy Duty Elastic Sides (Slip On) Outsole won’t Crack or Split 175% more crack resistant Leather Deep Tread

sizes: 7 - 13 (NZ) CHEQUES

earthwalk, r d 2, palmerston north

please add $12 freight per order


Te Pari for precision animal health

Integrated EID readers Cattle Crush

The patented Te Pari eRail ‘dual gate’ system is an EID antenna that is integrated into the Cattle Crush side gate system. The eRail system provides a large read field ensuring all stock are read accurately, even those moving quickly or with their head down low. As the antenna is actually part of the steel gate, it is extremely robust and there are no visual restrictions that can be caused by panel readers

Sheep Handler

The ePanel antenna is integrated into the side wall of the sheep handler. The ePanel reader is a compact, unobtrusive antenna that ensures the EID ear tag is accurately read, no matter where the sheep’s head is positioned. The antenna is very close to the sheep’s EID tag, making false reads very rare. The reader can be retrofitted to any current model Racewell Sheep Handler.

The FIRST Powered Dosing Gun brought to you by Te Pari For the first time in history the dosing gun is now digital and self-powered. Just like a cordless drill, a battery pack set in a robust casing powers the plunger mechanism and with one simple touch of the button (as opposed to a hand pump on the handle) an accurate, fully calibrated dose is delivered to the animal. Just set the dosage on the digital keypad and after this is delivered the plunger shoots back with incredible speed to refill the chamber, ready to deliver the next dose.

Te Pari Dosing Gun App

The new Te Pari Dosing Gun App connects the Te Pari Revolution Dosing Gun with an Android smart phone and most Bluetooth livestock scale systems to provide an auto calibrated dosing system.

Go to www.tepari.com or give us a call on 0800 837 274 to find out how we can help you farm better with EID.


PRECISION LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT

GET 50% OFF TE PARI LOADBARS*

WHEN YOU BUY A TE PARI RACEWELL SHEEP SYSTEM FOR MORE INFO CONTACT US ON 0800 837 274 OR GO TO WWW.TEPARI.COM Ts & Cs Apply.

The Te Pari range of precision sheep handling equipment allows you to measure, manage and market your sheep with greater accuracy whilst reducing labour costs and improving on-farm profitability. Both the Racewell Handler and Auto Drafter offer precision design and efficiencies to help you manage your sheep. Plus, the integrated ePanel EID reader gives you optimum reading accuracy to identify and weigh your stock confidently. For precise information on the full Te Pari sheep handling range, call us on 0800 837 274 or go to www.tepari.com

Terms & Conditions: The 50% off Loadbars offer only applies when loadbars are purchased at the same time as a Te Pari Cattle Crush or Racewell Sheep System. The offer applies to Te Pari Loadbars only and is based on current retail price excluding GST. Offer only valid for New Zealand customers on confirmed orders placed between 1st February 2019 and 30th April 2019. Not available with any other special offer or quotation. Some equipment may be shown with optional extras. If you are tied into another brand, we can still discount your preferred loadbars, please call us to find out how we an help you.

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