Page 1

MANAGEMENT

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Weaning early benefits for both ewes and lambs. PAGE 28

Welsh/Irish alliance for trailer distribution in NZ. PAGE 32

NEWS WTO ruling a win for NZ beef exports. PAGE 13

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS NOVEMBER 21, 2017: ISSUE 642 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Wool bouncing back? PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

WOOL EXPORTERS say China has been back in the market in recent weeks. But the jury is out on whether it will continue, says Wool Services International chief executive John Dawson. Or will they take a breather and then come in later? China can be in and out – very active, then no activity at all, Dawson told Rural News. “It is difficult sometimes to pick the timings… but there has been more activity probably for the last six weeks.” That’s clearing both backlog and new wool. The strong wool price indicator is probably only 10-15 cents/kg off its low. But the Chinese tend to operate out of New Zealand in the finer crossbred

end of 30-36 micron, Dawson says. That area has shown more life. “So it is better but it is early days in the season. The weight of wool comes on the market January to April. Stocks are still being held by brokers, farmers and exporters. So as usual it is not a totally clear picture. “We just hope the market continues. We monitor that all the time and try to do our best to keep things moving.”

But ultimately those decisions will be made offshore and there is no clear trend at this stage. “So it is more positive. Obviously the last two years have been bad, especially price-wise. But you’ve got to be a bit wary about making brave predictions. You’ve got to see the evidence first.” CP Wool national wool manager Simon Averill agrees that sales to China are picking up and other mar-

Chips fly, sun shines Action in the team race between New South Wales, the North Island and the South Island in the Stihl woodchopping arena on the first day of the 155th Canterbury A&P Show, last week. At least 100,000 people were expected through the turnstiles during the show’s four days. Rain fell briefly on Wednesday morning, but cleared by early afternoon. The sound of livestock filled the big showgrounds as the sun shone, with MetService recording 27 degrees Celsius at 2pm on the first day.  – RURAL NEWS GROUP

kets are holding. “It would be fair to say the stockpiles of hold wool are now moving; we are selling more than we are receiving,” he says.  “We could see some volatility in the market over the next period as larger volumes come on stream. This combined with the price-sensitive Chinese buyers could cause some wool types to be in demand at the expense of other wool types.”

WATER ACTION FONTERRA HAS announced an “ambitious plan” to further improve waterway quality nationwide. Fonterra Farm Source chief operating officer Miles Hurrell says the co-op and its farmers, having worked hard to address water quality, are now ready and willing to do even more.   “Like all Kiwis we want healthy rivers. Our farmers have spent over $1 billion on environmental initiatives in the last five years and fenced 98% of significant farm waterways. “That’s a major undertaking that highlights our commitment to getting this right. We’re already seeing in some regions that our actions are having a positive impact on water quality. “All intensive land uses have affected water quality in this country, so we have to work together to address the issue. “We’re putting up our hands and promising to work with communities to promote healthy waterways for Kiwis to enjoy. Importantly, we’re backing up our words with action to... make a real difference,” says Hurrell. Fonterra’s six water commitments are: 1. Farm within regional environmental limits 2. Encourage strong environmental farming practices 3. Reduce water use and improve wastewater quality at manufacturing plants TO PAGE 3

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 3 ISSUE 642 www.ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS��������������������������������������1-18 MARKETS�������������������������� 20-21 AGRIBUSINESS���������������22-23 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 24 CONTACTS����������������������������� 24 OPINION��������������������������� 24-26 MANAGEMENT���������������27-28 ANIMAL HEALTH����������� 29-30 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS����������������������� 31-34 RURAL TRADER������������� 34-35

Landcorp records a $50 million profit THE FORMER Landcorp, no longer threatened with sales of some of its farms, has reported after-tax profit of $51.9 million for the year to August 31. Electioneering National had proposed selling some farms but Labour wouldn’t hear of it. Its 2017 annual report shows asset values rose to $1.81 billion in 2016-17, an increase of $27.9m on 2015-16. Debt fell from $219.6m to $206.9m. Recently re-branded as Pāmu Farms of New Zealand, the company’s chief executive Steve Carden says the 2017 result is very pleasing and reflects

Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 31.03.2017

but by adding value right along the food chain. “Agriculture needs to be changing and evolving in what it produces in response to consumer demand,” said. “Whether partnering with Spring Sheep Milk Co to offer a unique product range, or providing high quality wool to NZ Merino for the innovative brands they work with... Pāmu is always looking at ways to drive value and innovation.” Carden says the company is going from strength to strength and the last few years of intensive refocusing is now bearing fruit.

Dairy payout looking shaky PAM TIPA

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622

Steve Carden

higher returns from milk, beef and venison. “As we enter the halfway point of the financial year our business is tracking well. However, any downward pressure in commodity prices as we head into 2018 will impact our result.” Carden says the company has focused on cutting debt and reinvesting in the business recently as part of its overall strategy. Ongoing solid trading conditions indicate another profitable year ahead, he says. “Pāmu is looking at how we can enhance shareholder value, not just by being a price-taker at the farmgate,

pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S FORECAST milk price of $6.75/kgMS is looking shaky bank economists agree. The last GDT Event price index drop of 3.5% was the third consecutive decline.

BNZ senior economist Doug Steel points out that prices are down a cumulative 6.8% since September to about the same as a year ago. The annual comparisons are set to go negative from the next auction if the decline persists, he says. Chances are now higher that Fonterra will revise down its milk price

Water action FROM PAGE 1

4. Build partnerships to improve waterway health 5. Invest in science and innovation to find new solutions 6. Make the products people value most. Hurrell says each of the commit-

ments is underpinned by a set of clear actions: supporting regional councils to set environmental limits for water use, spending $250 million to cut water use by 20% at 26 manufacturing sites, and almost doubling the co-op’s network of sustainable dairy advisors.

forecast, says Steel. BNZ has highlighted this risk for some time. “The only potential saving grace has been a material dip in the NZD over the past month or so. “Any forecast update will, of course, include Fonterra’s (unknown) effective forex rate.” A business update from the co-op is due on November 22. BNZ’s current forecast is $6.30/ kgMS. Westpac last week downgraded its forecast by 30c to $6.20/kgMS. ANZ downgraded to $6.25 - $6.50/kgMS last month and advises further caution. ASB is sticking with $6.75/kgMS for now given the production outlook, but also warns of downside risk. BNZ’s Steel says rising global milk supply, potential changes to the EU intervention scheme and a relatively weak EUR are key factors behind the price pullback over recent months.

Rabobank dairy analyst Michael Harvey says the latest GDT result was the largest drop since the start of the year. While both NZ and Australia have had a mixed start to spring, the volume of product in the auction is increasing as Fonterra adjusts its product mix, Harvey says. “Also, Asian buyers have had a busy few months purchasing so now have some short-term inventory cover; and Chinese buyers have product ready for the FTA tariff window. Hence the biggest fall was for contract period 2 (January delivery).” But it’s not all bad news. The weaker NZ dollar would be partially offsetting some of the falls. For example, the average price of WMP on the GDT has fallen 9% since the August event. In the same period, the NZ dollar has depreciated 7.5%.

Don’t waste any grass this spring Help manage your pasture with a Maxam Mower The pressure to conserve the maximum amount of feed after a wet winter is a reality farmers are facing right now. Often the window of opportunity to harvest grass during spring is quite short, due to rain interruptions. A fast wilt time is essential to retaining the most Metabolisable energy in your silage or baleage. The MAXAM mower with the Wilter spreader wilts the grass faster than any other method, so these popular machines should be considered as part of your pasture management plans this year.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

4 NEWS

Farmers back Fonterra’s emissions goal SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS ARE supporting Fonterra’s push for net zero carbon-dioxide emissions from all plants worldwide by 2050. Federated Farmers climate change spokesperson Andrew Hoggard says farmers will be watching with interest how the co-op achieves the “bold” target. While farmer organisations work on promising emission-control options, much work remains. “The science we are attempting -- to reduce the methane produced

in a ruminant’s stomach -- isn’t simple stuff and there is no guarantee we will be able to achieve these options,” Hoggard says. “Even if we do, we still face hurdles in being able to prove it at the farm level for carbon accounting.” Reducing CO2 is not just a New Zealand issue, he says. “Fonterra has made these commitments based on what it aims to achieve worldwide, in its global business, not just onfarm and in factories in NZ. “Kiwis should be

Fonterra plans to achieve zero emissions by 2050.

proud that Fonterra and our country’s dairy farmers are prepared to step up and pull their weight to tackle climate change.” Fonterra has joined

the Ministry for the Environment to map a path to a low-emissions future -- identifying actions to reduce emissions, improve energy efficiency

and reduce costs. Fonterra’s chief operating officer Robert Spurway says it’s an “exciting and ambitious partnership that will materially impact on climate emissions”. “We are committed to helping NZ achieve its Paris Climate Agreement commitments. That’s why we’ve set new targets to reduce on-site and on-farm emissions. We’ve set a target of net zero emissions for our global operations by 2050, with a 30% reduction by 2030 from a 2015 baseline,” says Spurway. The co-op will hit

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AVOCADO BOOMING LIKE NEVER THE NEW Zealand avocado industry has grown from $70 million value to $200m in four years, says industry leader Tony Ponder. “The NZ avocado industry has seen unprecedented growth in demand for avocados globally,” Ponder told Rural News. “Key drivers of this demand are versatility, health benefits and the amazing taste of NZ avocados.” Ponder is the new chairman of the NZ Avocado Growers Association (NZAGA) and Avocado Industry Council (AIC). He replaces Ashby Whitehead (chair since 2013) and has been on the NZAGA executive and the AIC Ltd board since 2006. “The industry has experienced strong growth based on a well-developed strategy and I see my role as supporting... that strategy.” He plans to ensure that NZ Avocado services stay relevant and valuable to all stakeholders -- building the capacity and structure of industry governance, maintaining market access and addressing underlying risks to the industry. Crown investment and the Primary Growth Partnership: NZ Avocado Go Global scheme have been a key to the industry’s “fantastic growth in value right across the supply chain,” says Ponder. The industry is experiencing year-on-year increase in value, Ponder says, and is “excited about current opportunities in new markets”. – Pam Tipa

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an interim target of climate-neutral growth to 2030 for onfarm emissions in NZ, which means any growth in milk production will have its resulting carbon emissions reduced or offset. Hoggard says farmers would like to see more government funding to reduce emissions. “Before the election Feds challenged all political parties to spend more on research to reduce biological agricultural emissions, so if Fonterra is going to spend more on this it would be good to see the government match it,” he says.

this target by making changes at manufacturing sites and adopting new technologies -- greater energy-use efficiency and useing lower-emission fuels, e.g. running tankers on bio-fuel and bringing 100 electric vehicles into its light vehicle fleet by 2019. “We are also exploring low-emission energy supply options for our sites, such as electricity and wood biomass. We will only use coal as a last resort, with a target of no new coal boilers installed from 2030,” says Spurway. Fonterra has also set

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 5

Capture the value of grass “While we have a government that thinks about total research spend rather than its own research spend, we are not going to put enough money into making breakthroughs.”

PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

A BIG challenge New Zealand faces is capturing the value consumers place on grass-fed products, says NZ Grassland Association president Dr David Stevens, a senior scientist at AgResearch. He says NZ needs to leverage its system more and capture the value at the high end of the market, and meet the criteria of sustainability in all its forms. Some meat processing companies are already doing this, including Coastal Spring Lamb whose owner Richard Redmayne spoke at the conference. Coastal Spring Lamb and other companies are marketing high-quality, sustainably produced products to key high value markets. Stevens says getting good pastures is critical to making these gains in the marketplace. While a lot of research effort has gone into studying pasture species and management, and soil chemistry, a lot of discoveries remain to be made, he says. In particular, he points to the study of ‘microbiome’ – what happens to microbes in the soil; such research is expensive, ‘blue sky’ and long term, but fundamental to making the next step.

David Stevens

The key to breakthroughs in this research is government funding, says Stevens. “The research funding that comes out of the industries is absolutely fantastic in taking the fundamental discovery and tailoring that up to the business – no problem,” Stevens told conference-goers. “But while we have a government that thinks about total research spend rather than its own research spend, we are not going to put enough money into making breakthroughs.” He says it’s important that farmers, the agribusiness sector and scientists work

together and build a sense of community to ensure research meets the future needs of NZ. He noted that the dairy industry has the right structure to support its levy-paying farmers. “The discussion groups DairyNZ runs give them a direct link to their farmers and issues can be quickly brought to the attention of scientists – as they used to be in the old MAF days.” Stevens says the membership of Grasslands (900) is still strong, but they want to continue to build the links and fill the void left by dismembering MAF. He says much more progress was made before this happened than with the patchwork approach governments now have to funding agricultural science.

BRING BACK MAF – FARMER DAVID PEARCE, whose family runs a dairy and sheep and beef operation at Waitotara, near Whanganui, says the government in the 1980s did agriculture a huge disservice when it broke up MAF. When this happened MAF advisors largely went out and worked as independent consultants and took the ethos of the department with them. “These people are retiring and those of us who are sheep and beef farmers are bereft of good, independent advice.” Pearce says he’s had problems dealing with a fertiliser rep who was trying to persuade him not to buy a David Pearce cheaper product. He says farmers should analyse the advice they get and work out what might be missing; and they should note who is sponsoring an event and be aware that any advice may be leading to a commercial opportunity for such a sponsor. “The agriculture sector now lacks science funding allocated to grazing management. Much of the research done in this area is on good-quality land on research farms; whereas I believe this research should be done on second-class land where the biggest gains could be made. The amount of research done on secondclass land is pitiful.” Pearce is full of praise for DairyNZ, which he says has a complete package of unbiased advice for its dairy farmers; he notes that the service it provides is the nearest thing to that provided by the Ministry of Agriculture in the 1980s. He calculates that for every cow on his farm he pays about $13.70 to DairyNZ by way of the levy and says what he gets back in return represents real value for money.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

6 NEWS

Revamped TPP irons out bumps PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW revamped TPP agreement preserves the essential elements of the original agreement – particularly improved access to Japan, Canada and other markets – says New Zealand International Business Forum (NZIBF) executive director Stephen Jacobi. It also softens its impact in areas previously contentious in NZ, Jacobi told Rural News from DaNang, Vietnam, where the agreement was reached. Stephen Jacobi The 11 countries have agreed on core elements of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). Four issues are requiring more technical work and discussion. Jacobi says the crucial market access package of TPP remains unchanged, but other elements including intellectual property (copyright and

patents) had been suspended. The Government had also satisfied its concerns about overseas tax residents buying residential properties and investor state dispute settlement (ISDS). “This is a major achievement: CPTPP is essentially a new agreement which recognises that aspects of the previous agreement had been problematic for some in civil society, while not diminishing the economic impact and the new opportunities created for NZ exporters,” Jacobi says. Beef + Lamb NZ (BLNZ) and the Meat Industry Association (MIA) welcome the news of the deal. Sam McIvor, chief executive of BLNZ, says the CPTPP will deliver significant gains to the sector.   “Over 90% of NZ’s sheepmeat and 80% of our beef production is exported.  These exports support

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about 60,000 jobs on farms and in processing companies, and a further 20,000 jobs in supplying sectors.   “This deal simultaneously opens up multiple markets in Japan, Mexico, Peru and Canada and puts us on a level playing field with other major red meat exporters in the Asia Pacific region, such as Australia and the European Union.  Tim Ritchie, MIA chief executive, says since Australia’s 2015 trade agreement with Japan, their beef exports to Japan have increased by $1 billion, while NZ’s have fallen by $30 million.  “Demand in Japan for beef has been growing, but we have lost significant market share.  “The situation got tougher in August when Japan imposed a WTO safeguard on frozen beef, raising its tariff on NZ exports from 38.5 to 50%, while Australia only faces a tariff of 22%.  Since the safeguard was applied our frozen beef exports to Japan have fallen by 70%.”  The agreement captures all the market access gains of the previous TPP agreement, and it addresses some of the concerns of the NZers have about TPP – the preservation of

PHARMAC, foreign ownership of land and housing, and freedom to regulate to protect our environment. Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker says there will be no change to the goods market access outcomes contained in the original TPP. He says the new agreement achieves meaningful gains in market access for farmers and supports the 620,000-plus NZers whose jobs depend on exports. The CPTPP will also provide NZ for Sam McIvor the first time with preferential market access to Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, and Canada, Mexico and Peru.   “NZ will now be focused on working together with our partner countries toward signature, including on the four specific items to be finalised by the date of signature of the new agreement. “I expect negotiators will need to

meet again in the next few months to take this forward.” Parker says as with all free trade agreements, the foreign affairs, defence and trade select committee will scrutinise the CPTPP and Parliament will consider the necessary legislative changes needed. Jacobi says he hopes all parties in Parliament can support the newlook TPP. “With CPTPP we have an opportunity not only to restore the bipartisan consensus on trade, but also to move on to thinking more deeply about how this agreement and others in the pipeline can be made to work better for people. “The business community certainly hopes this can be a new basis for a better discussion about trade and its impacts in NZ and we look forward to working with the Government to complete the remaining work and to bring the agreement into force as soon as possible.”


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 7 Keep a competitive edge THE DAIRY Companies Association of NZ (DCANZ) has welcomed the progress on the CPTPP agreement. “Timely implementation of the CPTPP market access arrangements is necessary to ensure NZ exporters do not end up at a tariff disadvantage in one of our largest dairy markets,” says executive Kimberley Crewther director Kimberly Crewther. She says the trade dynamic for dairy in the trans-Pacific region has evolved in recent months with the European Union and Japan concluding negotiation of an FTA agreement. “This delivers market access gains to European dairy exporters similar to those agreed for NZ under

TPP. Maintaining a level playing field in the Japanese dairy market (worth at least NZ$630m to NZ dairy exporters in the year to June 2017) now depends on the timing of CPTPP implementation.” Crewther says the EU is also negotiating an upgrade to its FTA with Mexico, which is also a CPTPP partner country and NZ’s 11thlargest dairy export market. “Longer-term we hope CPTPP will provide a stepping-stone to eliminate all remaining barriers to regional dairy trade,” says Crewther. “While the agreement does not go as far as we would have liked in dairy access it does represent an important step forward.” – Pam Tipa

Fonterra to help young farmers SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA WILL soon introduce ‘financial innovations’ to help young farmers join the co-op. Chairman John Wilson told the coop’s annual meeting in Hawera this month of a scheme to enable young farmers to be fully share-backed owners. Fonterra’s milk supply is being squeezed by independent processors. In Waikato, New Zealand’s secondlargest processor Open Country Dairy (OCD) wants new suppliers for a plant it is building at Horotiu. To supply Fonterra farmers must own one share for every kgMS; but OCD suppliers don’t need to own shares. For young farmers, paying for Fonterra shares can be difficult. The co-op collected about 82.4% of NZ’s milk production in the 201617 season, down from 84.1% in 2015-16. Wilson says Fonterra will continue to defend and grow market share in NZ

John Wilson

and, importantly, grow offshore milk sources that complement NZ farmers’ milk. “We will continue to develop new financial tools for all our farmers... to provide flexibility for succession within our industry. And we will... protect the cooperative’s capital structure.” Wilson told about 150 farmers at

the meeting that Fonterra must remain a co-op but must continue to evolve. “It is vital that we stay strongly committed to our co-operative principles and steadfast on strategy. But we must also continue to innovate and evolve our cooperative.” He noted that the pace of global change is seeing the deterioration of some of the world’s largest organisations. The average lifespan of a company listed in the Standard and Poor’s index of leading US companies has dropped from 67 years in the 1920s to just 15 years. In October Fonterra celebrated its 16th birthday. Wilson says the board will challenge, mentor and support the management team in innovating across the supply chain. “Not every change we make will be successful. If we fail we will pause quickly, take the necessary learnings and then continue to drive our cooperative forward.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

8 NEWS

Rabbits will face the chop next autumn THE PLANNED release of a new strain of the rabbit calicivirus appears back on track for next autumn after missing a previous opportunity. The New Zealand Rabbit Coordina-

tion Group (RCG) had hoped to release the new strain this year, at the same time as an Australian release, but could not complete a complicated approvals process in time. However, the new strain still needs approval by the Ministry for Pri-

mary Industries under the Agricultural Chemicals and Veterinary Medicines (ACVM) Act 1997 and the Biosecurity Act 1993. Environment Canterbury, managing the approval process for the RCG, has applied to MPI for those approvals and

2018 Notice of B+LNZ Director and Directors Independent Remuneration Committee Elections and Annual Meeting Remits Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd (B+LNZ) give notice that nominations for B+LNZ and B+LNZ’s Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC) elections and written remits are now open. Under section 41 of the B+LNZ constitution, two electoral district directors will retire by rotation at the annual meeting. This year, Phil Smith (Northern South Island) and James Parsons (Northern North Island) must retire by rotation, but may stand for re-election. Nominations are being called to fill two Board of Director vacancies, one for each of the following electoral districts: Northern North Island (NNI) Northern South Island (NSI) This year there is also an election for the Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC). Nominations are now called to fill one vacancy on the DIRC. Derrick Millton, an existing member of the DIRC, will retire by rotation, and has indicated that he will seek re-election.

MPI has called for public submissions, closing on December 14. MPI says before it will register the new strain it will consider the benefits of the release to the agricultural sector, and risks to animal welfare, farming, trade and public health. “This includes the risk to pet and farmed rabbits and the availability of protection by a vaccine.” Calicivirus (RHDV1) causes a fatal rabbit haemorrhagic disease. of B+LNZ Director and Directors 2018 Notice Rabbit damage on farmland near Dunstan, Central It is widespread in New Independent Remuneration Otago. PHOTO: BOB DOUGLAS Committee Zealand after its unapElections proved release in 1997, and Annual Meeting Remits are no naturally immune gives somegive immunity. butBeef has +lost efficacy after Ltd Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) notice that nominations for B+LNZ’s Remuneration Committee newborn rabbits, and Graham Sullivan, theB+LNZ initialand spread andDirectors Independent (DIRC) elections and written remits are now open. carrot bait is then most ECan regional leader rabbit numbers have Under section 41 of the B+LNZ constitution, two electoral district directors attractive and it lasts biosecurity, says that recovered in many areas. will retire by rotation at the annual meeting. This year, Phil Smith (Northern better when(Northern this year’s hopedTheSouth newIsland) variant, RHDV1 and James Parsons North Island) must retireon by the ground. but may stand for re-election. Then also, UV light, for release was shelved it K5,rotation, is a Korean strain Nominations being called to considered fill two Boardimportant of Director vacancies, one the virus’s which affects was believed better are at overfor each of the following electoral districts: efficacy, is lower. to delay the release to coming the protective NorthernNorth Island (NNI) The RCG includes repeffects of a South benignIsland caliciNorthern (NSI) next autumn -- the time resentatives from regional of greatest virus occurs natuThiswhich year there is also an election for the effectiveness. Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC). are now called fill onecouncils, andtodistrict DuringNominations autumn there rally in feral rabbits and vacancy on the DIRC. Derrick Millton, an existing member of the DIRC, will retire by rotation, and has indicated that he will seek re-election.

Written remits for the 2018 Annual Meeting are now being accepted.

Written remits for the 2018 Annual Meeting are now being accepted.

Remits that, if passed at B+LNZ’s annual meeting would not be binding on the organisation, require the signatures of 10 farmers who are registered on the B+LNZ electoral roll.

Remits that, if passed at B+LNZ’s annual meeting would not be binding on the organisation, require the signatures of 10 farmers, who are registered on the B+LNZ electoral roll.

Remits that, if passed at the annual meeting, would be binding on B+LNZ, require the signatures of at least 1,000 registered farmers, or five percent of the total number of registered farmers, whichever is the lesser.

Remits that, if passed at the annual meeting, would be binding on B+LNZ, require the signatures of at least 1,000 registered farmers or five percent of the total number of registered farmers, whichever is the lesser.

All nominations and written remits must be made on the official forms. The official forms and other useful information regarding the elections are available by: • visiting www.electionz.com/blnz2018 • emailing iro@electionz.com • phoning 0800 666 032

All nominations and written remits must be made on the official forms. The official forms and other useful information regarding the elections are available by: • visting www.electionz.com/blnz2018 • emailing iro@electionz.com • phoning 0800 666 032

All nominations and written remits must be received by the Returning Officer by 5 pm on Thursday 14 December 2017.

Board of Directors, Directors Independent Remuneration Committee and Annual Meeting Resolutions and Remits Voting for the B+LNZ and DIRC elections and annual meeting resolutions and remits (if any) will all be conducted at the same time. Voting will be conducted by postal and internet voting, with voting papers being posted to all farmers who appear on the B+LNZ electoral roll on Friday 2 February 2018. B+LNZ and DIRC elections will close on election day and postal and electronic voting for company resolution and remits will close on the same date, Friday 16 March 2018 at 2pm. Farmers can vote in person on company resolutions and remits only, at the Annual Meeting on Thursday 22 March 2018. To be eligible to vote in the B+LNZ director and DIRC elections, and for annual meeting remits (if any), a livestock farmer must, on 30 June 2017, have owned at least 250 sheep, or 50 beef cattle, or 100 dairy cattle. Voters must farm within the respective electorate to be eligible to vote for the Board of Directors, but the DIRC is a national vote open to all livestock farmers on the B+LNZ electoral roll and meeting the minimum livestock threshold. To be eligible to vote for the annual meeting resolutions, farmers must be on the B+LNZ electoral roll and are not required to meet the minimum stock numbers stated above. To check if you are on the electoral roll please contact B+LNZ on 0800 233 352. The electoral roll will close at 5pm on Friday 2 February 2018. A copy of the roll is also available for inspection at the office of Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd, Level 4, Wellington Chambers, 154 Featherston Street, Wellington 6011. All queries regarding B+LNZ elections should be directed to the Returning Officer on 0800 666 032. All queries regarding annual meeting remits should be directed to B+LNZ Chief Operating Officer, Cros Spooner on 0800 233 352. Warwick Lampp Returning Officer – Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd 0800 666 032 PO Box 3138, Christchurch 8140 iro@electionz.com

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Board of Directors, Directors Independent Remuneration Committee and Annual Meeting Resolutions and Remits Voting for the B+LNZ and DIRC elections and annual meeting resolutions and remits (if any) will all be conducted at the same time. Voting will be conducted by postal and internet voting, with voting papers being posted to all farmers who appear on the B+LNZ electoral roll on Friday 2 February 2018. B+LNZ and DIRC elections will close on election day and postal and electronic voting for company resolution and remits will close on the same date, Friday 16 March 2018 at 2pm. Farmers can vote in person on company resolutions and remits only, at the Annual Meeting on Thursday 22 March 2018. To be eligible to vote in the B+LNZ director and DIRC elections, and for annual meeting remits (if any), a livestock farmer must, on 30 June 2017, have owned at least 250 sheep, or 50 beef cattle, or 100 dairy cattle. Voters must farm within the respective electorate to be eligible to vote for the Board of Directors, but the DIRC is a national vote open to all livestock farmers on the B+LNZ electoral roll and meeting the minimum livestock threshold. To be eligible to vote for the annual meeting resolutions, farmers must be on the B+LNZ electoral roll and are not required to meet the minimum stock numbers stated above.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 9

NZ food shortages in 5 years – report

WOOL EXPORTER BUOYED BY MARKET FRESH BACK from a trip to China, wool exporter Segard Masurel managing director Peter Whiteman says there’s been an upturn in demand. Whiteman told 130 woolgrowers in Napier recently that during his 10-day trip he managed to secure several good orders from China. He felt buoyed by what he saw in key wool processing regions.

Against the backdrop of a lower NZ dollar and steady demand for wool products from winter-bound Europe, it is hoped stockpiled wool will move early in the season, he said. This could bring relief to woolgrower returns. The wool sale held earlier that day had seen large volumes move through the auction system, a lift in prices across all types and ani-

mated bidding from the benches. Offerings of longer hogget wool saw gains of up to 5%. Whiteman explained the importance of formal one-onone meetings with wool customers in China. “It’s the best way to learn about their business aspirations and observe industry practice,” he said. “These insights help deter-

mine how to match various wool types with specific manufacturing criteria to lift product performance and improve quality outputs for competitive advantage. Early stage processors and manufacturers have a genuine thirst for knowledge and relish the exchange of market intelligence. This practice is critical to conducting business successfully in China.” – Pam Tipa

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

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NEW ZEALAND has no food security policy and will be short of some foods within five years, says a Horticulture NZ report on domestic vegetable production. “We complacently believe we will always be able to sustainably grow enough food to feed ourselves and contribute to the country’s economic wellbeing,” the report says. “However with prime production land being lost, climate change, competition for water resources, extreme weather events and the constant threat of pests and disease we must turn our minds to food security issues for the future of NZ’s domestic production.” While most of the vegetables mentioned in the report are sold only domestically, some such as carrots, onions and potatoes, are exported. “We may consider it a moral obli- Hort NZ chair Julian Raine. gation for growers to ‘feed NZ first’, but they are running a business that is market driven and [feeding NZ first may not always happen] depending on supply and demand pressures internationally,” the report points out. “Developing a food security policy requires us to take a wider perspective on the food chain.” Growers hold responsibility for the sustainability of the environment and for year-long production for the domestic market. Region-by-region supply of produce is not how it works, says Hort NZ. Instead, ensuring abundant fresh vegetables and fruit at reasonable prices “is a national issue that needs to be addressed by central Government”. “As the impacts of climate change and more adverse weather make growing more challenging, we also need to ensure the most appropriate land is used.” The report says with NZ’s population exceeding five million by 2020 (annual growth is 1.5 - 2%), domestic food supply will not be able to match consumption. On current consumption and production levels, food shortages can be expected in the next five years. “This further highlights the importance of food security, land production and future-proofing the availability of resources to supply our growing population.” Horticulture NZ president Julian Raine says in the report “a perfect storm is brewing for NZ’s supply of healthy food”. “Prime fruit and vegetable growing land is being squeezed by rapid growth in towns and cities and high demand for new housing. Emotional battles over water have the potential to leave growers high and dry. ” Raine says it is time to take stock. “There is an assumption that NZ is a land of plenty and we will always have enough locally grown food... supplemented by imported food where there is demand. “But things are changing fast. We need to look closely at our domestic food supply and be sure that town, city and regional planning decisions are seen in the context of impacting the whole NZ food supply.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

10 NEWS

Parsons pulls the pin after nine years BEEF + Lamb New Zealand chair James Parson won’t seek re-election at the director elections in March next year. When he steps down, Parsons will have been chair of BLNZ for seven

years and on the board for seven. He describes this time as a pleasure and a privilege representing farmers. “I feel the time is right for fresh leadership,” he told farmers in a recent

chairman’s letter. “We have a strong and capable board, which leaves me confident in the ongoing governance of BLNZ on behalf of farmers.” Parsons was first elected to the board of

BLNZ in March 2009, just when the organisation was going into the six-yearly commodity levy referendum. “The strong ‘Vote No’ campaign, sparked by several groups of farm-

BLNZ chairman James Parsons will standdown next March.

ers, was a baptism by fire in farmer politics,” he says. “The outcome was a narrow

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mandate to continue levy investment in beef and sheep meat, but a stop to wool.” Parsons describes this period as a “real low point” for the organisation. “We recognised we were out of touch with farmers and not communicating the value their levy organisation provided.  “Over the next six years, thanks to a concerted effort by the whole organisation and strong assistance from more than 100 BLNZ farmer council volunteers, we strengthened our connections with farmers and became far more relevant.” Parsons says he inherited a solid organisation, when he was elected chairman in 2014 on the retirement of Mike Petersen. “This was later reflected in the 2015 sheepmeat and beef levy referendum, when 85% of participating farmers voted for BLNZ to continue investing levies on their behalf.” He says BLNZ will work hard over the next few years on tangible outcomes for farmers, including telling the natural Red Meat Sector Story

in NZ and overseas. “We will be engaging much more strongly with the public of NZ and the Government, to build trust and credibility in the sector’s stewardship of 40% of NZ’s land estate and waterways.” BLNZ’s southern South Island farmer director Andrew Morrison, of Gore, is unanimously endorsed by the board to take over the chair when Parsons retires next year. A “thorough succession process” has gone on in the last 18 months to find his successor, Parsons says. “Andrew is well prepared for the role. Constitutionally, his appointment requires a vote of the board immediately following the BLNZ annual meeting on March 22.” Parsons will lead the board for the final four months of his term, including “engaging closely with the new Government, completing consultation on a Government Industry Agreement on Biosecurity Readiness and Response (GIA) with farmers and launching our natural Red Meat Sector Story” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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ROCK AND ROLL While technology has made most jobs a lot easier, some still need a touch of the old ways. Libby Geary, Hinds Ridge Farm, near Ashburton, gets things done with a venerable Ford 6600 of the late 1970s and a 12-tonne roller to deal to the age-old problem of Canterbury stones. – Mark Daniel


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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

12 NEWS

Sweet success in Manuka honey PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MANUKA HONEY could long term earn more money for a central North Island Maori trust than its sheep and beef

farming operation. Atihau Whanganui Incorporation, whose large land holdings range from the central North Island to the Whanganui River, is planting manuka on steep country largely

unsuitable, or less productive, for sheep and beef. Chief executive Andrew Beijeman says they are also letting land, which is naturally reverting back to manuka.

Atihau runs 75,000 ewes, 4000 beef cows and a 700-cow dairy farm near Ohakune. The incorporation manages 32,000ha, of which 21,330ha is in pasture. It employs 50 permanent

Manuku honey could soon earn more for a central North Maori Trust than its sheep and beef operation.

staff, has close to 9000 shareholders and its annual revenue is about

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$20 million. Beijeman says they started working with a major honey producer and processer Watson and Son, starting with 400 hives. This trial gave Atihau an insight into the honey business and, having liked it the plan is to expand it. “It’s working well economically and environmentally and is a good business to be in at the moment. The trial gave us more insight into how profitable the beekeeping business can be and because of this we have decided to keep on with it.” Beijeman says at the current market prices, on certain classes of land, honey is more profitable than sheep and beef farming. They continue to work with Watson but could move to another processor. The long-term vision is to accumulate 6000

hives on their property and possibly extend to other farms to further grow the manuka honey business. Atihau already has 14ha in manuka and is planting 50ha more, all on land that is steep and erosion-prone. “Manuka doesn’t seem to worry about land class when it flowers and we get the same flower off our steep country as we get off it on the flatter land,” he says. Beijeman says the foray into manuka has many benefits: it provides extra jobs and the revenue stream is good. This season manuka honey will earn $2.7 million for Atihau, but in the long term it will turn at least $5m profit, equalling the profit from the sheep and beef operation. But despite this Beijeman says they want a diversified business and so will always retain the sheep and beef.

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FONTERRA FARMERS will host a nationwide community event next month, inviting the public to visit 40 farms on ‘Open Gate’ day. Fonterra chairman John Wilson told the annual meeting in Hawera this month that the event is to help build the co-op’s reputation. “At 40 farms across New Zealand, Fonterra farmers will open their gates and welcome the public onto their farms to see first-hand the extraordinary farm systems, animals and hard work of the passionate people behind these businesses,” says Wilson. “It’s an opportunity for people to better understand the leadership dairy farmers have shown on environmental sustainability, and demonstrate that we can have a vibrant, prosperous dairy industry and positive environmental outcomes.” Fonterra’s media advertising this year has told its story, helping Kiwis better understand the co-op, Wilson says. “Today 1.5 million more NZers than last year feel positive about our cooperative; they trust farmers to do the right thing by the country.” Fonterra is an extraordinary business, holding an enviable position among international peers, he says. “We have a successful strategy that is delivering for our farmers and enabling us to grow our presence in key global markets. “We are earning the right to be there by having the most efficient farming systems and manufacturing practices, strong traceability and confidence in every step of our value chain, from our farms to the consumers.” – Sudesh Kissun


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 13

WTO ruling a win for NZ beef exports tone has been collegial and constructive. In the proceedings Indonesia also underlined the longstanding and mutually respectful relationship it enjoys with NZ and a desire to strengthen this important relationship. “I look forward to working with my Indonesian counterpart over the coming months to finalise resolution of this long-standing trade issue,” says Parker.

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE RED meat sector is celebrating a WTO ruling upholding the initial findings of a New Zealand-led dispute against Indonesia on a range of agricultural non-tariff barriers. The WTO’s appeal body confirmed on November 9 that several Indonesian agricultural trade barriers are inconsistent with global trade rules. Meat Industry Association (MIA) chief executive Tim Ritchie says these barriers have impacted on NZ beef exports to Indonesia, contributing to a decline of at least 80% since 2010 and costing the sector about $1 billion in lost trade.  “We welcome the [appeal] confirmation that Indonesia needs to act to bring these measures into conformity with global trade rules,” says Ritchie. “This reinforces the importance and value of the WTO in disciplining [countries that erect] pervasive nontariff barriers that plague the industry.”  Beef + Lamb NZ chief executive Sam McIvor says the sector knows that taking a WTO case is costly in money and resources, and he congratulated the Government and officials for pursuing the case. The decision upholds key findings of a WTO dispute settlement panel, which last December ruled in NZ’s favour,

Trade Minister David Parker.

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MIA chief executive Tim Ritchie.

“We welcome the [appeal] confirmation that Indonesia needs to act to bring these measures into conformity with global trade rules.” causing Indonesia to appeal. NZ and the US brought the case in 2013 in response to a range of next-generation agricultural ‘non-tariff’ barriers applied by Indonesia to imports since 2011. These included import prohibitions, behind-the-border use and sale restrictions on imports, restrictive import licensing and a domestic purchase condition. Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker says the WTO case illustrates the value that NZ gains from inter-

national trade rules. The last case NZ brought to the WTO challenged an Australian ban on our apples exports there. Parker says these barriers affect opportunities for many NZ agricultural exporters, including producers of onions, apples and beef. “This decision from the WTO’s highest dispute settlement body is an important result for our agricultural exporters and should pave the way to grow NZ exports to the Indonesia market.” In 2010, before Indonesia began throttling

imports from NZ, that country was NZ’s second-largest beef export market by volume, worth $180m a year, Parker says. But that trade subsequently plummeted by 85%. This case aims to secure more open and predictable access to Indonesia for our exports. “NZ has a strong and mutually beneficial relationship with Indonesia, and this trade disagreement is only a small part of that broader bilateral relationship. “Indonesia’s approach to these WTO hearings has been exemplary: the

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

14 NEWS

One more positive M.Bovis result NIGEL MALTHUS

ONE OF the two new South Canterbury dairy farms placed under restrictions recently has tested positive for Mycoplasma bovis infection. The Ministry for Primary Industries says testing is ongoing on the second property in Waimate, which is under precautionary restrictions due to its association with the new infected farm. In addition to these two farms, MPI has placed another farm in the area under the same controls while further testing is underway to determine if it too is infected. MPI’s incident controller of the Mycoplasma bovis response, David Yard, says all three farms are in the same district and a couple of them neighbour Van Leeuwen Dairy Group properties. “All these farms are under Restricted Place Notices, controlling the movement of animals and other risk goods on and off the farms. “We still have a lot of work to do ascertaining the source of infection at the confirmed infected property and building a picture of animal movements between all three farms and

“This is exactly why we are doing this testing work – to know where the disease is in order to contain and remove it.” possible other farms.” All three farms were identified through the ministry’s comprehensive surveillance and tracing programme, which has now tested at least 40,000 samples of milk, blood and swabs. MPI director of response Geoff Gwyn says despite the latest development it is still hoping to contain and eradicate the disease. “This is exactly why we are doing this testing work – to know where the disease is in order to contain and remove it,” Gwyn says. “We do not believe the new suspect properties represent a game-changer. These farms are in the same area as all the known-infected properties and neighbouring Van Leeuwen Dairy Group farms. “Our investigators are still build-

Geoff Gwyn

ing a picture of how animals on the farms could have been infected, if indeed they are, and what stock movements may have taken place onto the farms.” Mycoplasma bovis is spread during close and prolonged contact between animals and by direct movement of stock. “The discovery of the new potentially positive properties has not changed our position on this. We do

not believe there is a significant risk of disease spread across fences,” Gwyn says. So far only seven farms are confirmed with the disease, five of them part of the Van Leeuwen Dairy Group, where the disease was discovered in July for the first time in New Zealand. However, the new development brings to 22 the number of properties under Restricted Place Notices. Last month MPI announced a deci-

sion to cull all cows from infected farms – about 4000 animals. It says the cull is “progressing steadily and to plan.” Meanwhile, the total number of samples required is being revised upward, largely because MPI has decided to test more low-risk properties than first estimated. Gwyn says MPI is still working to find the source of the outbreak, across six broad possibilities – germ plasm (semen and embryos), feed, live animals, biologicals (veterinary medicine), fomites (machinery and equipment surfaces) or other animals. The strain is also being genotyped to help identify the likely overseas origin, expected to be known by the end of November. “My position would be that the public of NZ want us as much as possible to eradicate this disease. And just because we can’t specifically identify an entry pathway I don’t think that would change.” Gywn says if M.bovis was found to be endemic there would be no point in culling stock, but instead management. “But we’re not in that space. We’re quite confident it is localised.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NEWS 17

Land-use restrictions will squeeze fruit and vege supplies – PLUG A FARMER lobby group says land-use restrictions proposed in the Waikato Healthy Rivers Proposed Plan Change 1 (PC1) could lead to fruit and vegetable shortages. The Primary Land Users Group (PLUG) says it agrees with public comments on rising fruit and vegetable prices, and that many New Zealanders are struggling to afford enough fresh produce for a healthy diet. PLUG co-chairman Bruce Cameron says when land-use restrictions on horticulture businesses affected by the Healthy Rivers Proposed Plan Change 1 (PC1) are taken into account, this will create serious food security problems into the future. “A huge percentage of the country’s population rely on the Waikato region’s fruit and vegetable producers for security of food supply, and with the restrictions on horticultural land use imposed by the PC1 they will lose the security of supply that they now have. “[Under the changes] the Waikato Regional

Council has effectively declared that horticultural land use is a noncomplying activity and should be prevented from expanding into new areas of the region. This will have the effect over time of reducing the amount of land available for horticultural production, so reducing the supply of fruit and vegetables.” Cameron says the shortage will cause prices to rise and supply will have to come from outside the region. He says the new Government’s competition law will have little effect if there is no security of supply. “And that is exactly what we will have as a result of PC1’s restrictions on the horticultural land use.” Cameron says the new Government is also wrong to think that raising the minimum wage would make it easier for many parents to feed their children a healthy diet. Under the land-use restrictions in PC1, the raising of the minimum wage, although in itself a great help to low income

families, will not have any effect on feeding children a healthy diet because of a shortage of locally produced food.

“Food security is only one of the many economic challenges should PC1 be approved in its current form.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

18 NEWS

Europeans in a pickle over glyphosphate MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

A MOVE in the EU over licensing the use of glyphosate is bothering the farming industry. While 16 European

states say they would be prepared to vote for a licence renewal of up to 10 years, France and Italy plan to vote ‘no’ and Germany will abstain. The doubts arise from a WHO call for a ban on

the product, prompted by a 2015 report by The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which said “Glyphosate is probably a human carcinogen”. But much of the sci-

ence in the study is said to have been de-bunked -- the results’ statistical significance did not have the necessary accuracy. The European Commission on November 9 proposed a renewal of

the licence for an interim five years, allowing more time to understand the perceived problem. A poll

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says European politicians appear to have lost their understanding of agriculture. “For so many to disregard science in favour of blogs and tweets has taken us back to a time when we may as well dunk scientists in water to see if they are witches or wizards, before we consider what they have to say.” Meanwhile, a report for New Zealand’s Environmental Protection Agency by the National Poisons Centre concluded that glyphosate is “unlikely” to be a carcinogen and should not be classified as a mutagen or carcinogen under the HSNO Act.

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IT IS amazing how many New Zealand businesses interested in exporting to China seem to assume the Chinese consumer has very low knowledge, says Pier Smulders, Alibaba’s business development director for New Zealand. He says the infant formula industry is generally very aware of China, and now other would-be NZ exporters he speaks with are also. “Chinese consumers are probably among the most informed consumers in the world now because of the way they consume information, particularly online, and the way they all share their experience with products and brands,” he told an Infant Nutrition Council conference in Auckland recently. Internet user numbers are massive: 731m in China versus 739m in Europe and 326m in the US. “What is really exciting in premium products from anyone in the world is a doubling of those middle class consumers,” says Smulders. “The internet population is growing also… the explosion of the middle class population is massive.” Alibaba’s online Tmalls offer a way for brands to target Chinese consumers, like a shopping mall with big brands. The internet allows companies to showcase their brands to China and increasingly to sell them. “The cross-borders space into China is very complicated – a lot of regulator questions – but very exciting commercially,” he says. China is very big in e-commerce, in shopping and consumers’ engagement with brands and learning about products. “Clearly consumers are looking to purchase foreign goods… and quality and safety are the two most important factors,” Smulders explained. “That is something all of you will focus on every day in the products you produce.” – Pam Tipa


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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

20 MARKETS & TRENDS L amb - PM 17.0kg

BEEF PRICES n/c

M 2 B ull - 300kg

n/c

5.60

5.60

5.25

c/kgCWT NI

LAMB PRICES Last Week 5.75

Change

P 2 Steer - 300kg

2 Wks A go 5.75

Last Year 5.45

S te e r - P2 300kg

n/c

5 .7 5

n/c

5 .5 0

P 2 Co w - 230kg

n/c

4.35

4.35

4.00

B u ll - M2 300kg

n/c

5 .6 0

n/c

5 .1 5

M Co w - 200kg

n/c

4.35

4.35

4.00

Ve n is o n - AP 60kg

n/c

1 0 .0 0

n/c

1 0 .3 5

Lo cal Trade - 230kg

+5

5.80

5.75

5.35

n/c

5.50

5.50

5.20

M 2 B ull - 300kg

n/c

5.15

5.15

4.65

P 2 Co w - 230kg

n/c

4.25

4.25

3.75

M Co w - 200kg

n/c

4.25

4.25

3.70

Lo cal Trade - 230kg

n/c

5.55

5.55

5.30

6.0

Slaughter

5.0

8.0

40k50

11-O ct

11-Dec

11-Feb

15k20

4.0 11-A ug

15 10k 10

11-O ct 5yr Ave

6.0

11-Dec Last Ye ar

11-Feb This Ye ar

North Island 300kg bull price

5yr Ave

10-Sep 10-Oct 15-Sep

11-Dec

11-Feb

South Island 300kg steer price

11-Feb

5yr Ave

11-O ct

11-Dec

11-Feb

South Island 60kg stag price

$/kg

8.5 7.5 6.5 11-O ct 5yr Ave

11-Dec Last Ye ar

200

k 10 0Aug

This Ye ar

11-Feb

10 Sep

5yr Ave

2 Wks A go 226 714

3 Wks A go 217 691

Last Year 208 634

15 Sep

10 Oct

15 Nov Last Ye ar

10 Nov

15 Jan This Ye ar

Export Market Demand

This Year

UK Leg p/kg

n/c

Last Week 5.90

NZc/kg

-0.1

9.87

Change

5yr A ve 212 657

Export indicator - US 95CL D edemand mand Indicator - US 95CL Beefbeef

550

2 Wks A go 5.90

Last Year 5.40

9.95

8.14

5yr A ve 5.37 8.54

Export demand indicator - UK CKT leg

450

350 250 14 Aug

14 Oct

14 Dec

14 Feb

Procurement Indicator

Last Year This Year 160 $1.50 14-A ug 14-O ct 14-Dec 14-Feb 5-Jun 12-Jun 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Procurement Indicator -1.6 -1.4

2Wks A go 78.7 72.3

3 Wks A go 80.3 73.8

Last Year 80.9 73.8

5yr A ve 78.1 71.4

P rocu rement Indicator Procurement Indicator -- North North I.Island 90 90% 85% 80 80% 75% Last Year 70% 70 This Year 65% 60% 60 0… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 11-A ug 11-O ct 11-Dec 11-Feb

Procurement Indicator - South Island

9.5

5.5 11-A ug

Last Year

% of export returns

$/kg $/kg

6.5

10.5

+9 +23

% Returned NI % Returned SI

7.5

S outh Island Weekly Lamb Kill

200k 300

15-Sep 10-Oct 15-Nov10-Nov 15-Jan 10-Sep 5yr Ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Change

8.5

10 Nov 15 Jan

South Island w eekly lamb kill

400 250k

15 Jul

North Island 60kg stag price

9.5

This Year

10 Oct 15 Nov

100 50k

USc/lb 11-Dec Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Last Year

10 Sep 15 Sep

100k

$2.00

11-O ct 5yr Ave

5yr Ave

k 0 10 15 AugJul

150k

$2.50 200

4.5

5.5 11-A ug

10-Dec 15-Jan

South Island Weekly Cattle Kill

95CL USc/lb NZc/kg 240 $3.00

5.0

10.5

10-Nov 15-Nov

S outh Island Weekly Cattle Kill

Change

5.5

4.0 11-A ug

This Year

90 P rocu rement Indicator - South I. 85% 80% 80 75% 70% 70 65% Last Year 60% This Year 60 11-A ug 11-O ct 11-Dec 11-Feb 55% 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 0-Jan 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

% of export returns

6.0

Last Year

Export Market Demand

11-O ct

200

100 50k

4.5 4.0 11-A ug

North eekly lamb N ort hIsland Islandw Weekly Lambkill Kill

100k

k 0 15-Jul 10-Aug

5.0

Last Year 5.51 5.53 5.55 5.56 2.90 5.43 5.43 5.43 5.43 2.75

300

5k 5

5.5

$/kg

40

5.0

2 Wks A go 7.16 7.18 7.20 7.21 4.75 7.13 7.13 7.13 7.13 4.80

150k

10 k 0 10-Aug 15-Jul

6.0

n/c n/c n/c n/c +5 n/c n/c n/c n/c +10

Last Week 7.16 7.18 7.20 7.21 4.80 7.13 7.13 7.13 7.13 4.90

200k

30 20k 20

South Island 17kg M lamb price

7.0

$/kg

Thousand head

4.0 11-A ug

Change

Slaughter 250k 400

North N ort hIsland IslandWeekly Weekly Cattle Cattle Kill Kill

Thousand head

$/kg

7.0

P 2 Steer - 300kg

Thousand head

8.0

North Island 17kg M lamb price

SI

c/kgCWT NI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 17.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1 - 21kg SI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 16.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1- 21kg

UKp/kg

c /kgCWT

S o u th Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 7 .1 3

% Returned NI

+0 .5

2Wks A go 75.6

% Returned SI

+0 .5

74.1

Change

85 80%

3 Wks A go 75.1

Last Year 71.0

73.6

67.9

5yr A ve 75.5 71.9

Procurement P rocu rementindicator Indicator-- North North Island I.

% of export returns

No rth Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 7 .1 8

75 70% 65 60%

Last Year

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 11-A ug 11-Sep 11-Oct 11-O ct11-Nov 11-Dec 11-Dec11-Jan 11-Feb 11-Feb 85 80%

% of export returns

Me at

LAMB MARKET TRENDS

BEEF MARKET TRENDS

Thousand head

MARKET SNAPSHOT

Procurement indicator - South Island P rocu rement Indicator - South I.

75 70% 65 60% Last Y ear

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 11-A ug 11-Sep 11-Oct 11-O ct 11-Nov 11-Dec 11-Dec11-Jan 11-Feb 11-Feb 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Venison Prices NI Stag - 60kg

n/c

Last Week 10.00

SI Stag - 60kg

n/c

10.35

Change

Beef & venison prices are reported as gross (before normal levies & charges are deducted). Lamb & mutton prices are reported nett (after levies & charges are deducted).

We know your weekends are workdays too.

2 Wks A go 10.00

Last Year 8.15

10.35

8.20

5yr A ve 7.56 7.77


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

MARKETS & TRENDS 21 NEWS

PRICE WATCH

imported market has gone against expectations again, making up all of the ground lost in the downturn of recent weeks. It appears that the US market had inflated expectations regarding the volume of imported meat set to arrive before the end of the year. The spot

WOOL PRICE WATCH Change

09-Nov

02-Nov

Last Year

+8

302

294

429

Coarse Xbred

Ewe - 35 micron

-

310

-

555

Ewe - 35 micron

Ewe - 37 micron

-5

295

300

555

2nd Shear 37M

+20

265

245

475

Indicators in NZc/kg Coarse Xbred

likely to keep operating prices from reflecting the end of the Christmas chilled shipments in the short term. Continuing solid demand for lamb, frozen as well as chilled, will support the higher prices for the extended period. The decline will eventually come, but processors need some lambs on their chains first. Mutton’s benefitted heavily from the low lamb supply, helped by extremely positive interest from China. Operating prices have now climbed to all-time highs throughout the country. It's not been uncommon for top prime ewes sell at $180-$200 through the Canterbury yards. Mutton prices are expected to remain firm until mid-December, when the last shipments for the Chinese New Year holiday leave NZ. New season store lambs have begun on a strong note. Most have been traded through Stortford Lodge yards averaging $100, roughly $25 more than a year ago.

09-Nov

02-Nov

Last Year

+1

220

219

309

-

226

-

400

Ewe - 37 micron

-8

215

223

400

2nd Shear 37M

+11

193

182

342

Indicators in USc/kg

Wool indicator trends Wool Indicator Trends

850 600

Change

Second shear - 37 micron

600 CXI

750 500

500

c/kg

FXI

c/kg

SHEEP: A lack of lambs to kill looks

Overseas Wool Price Indicators

LI

650 400

400

550 300

300

450 200 10-Nov 10-Feb 10-May 10-Aug WeekNo 42110 42124 42138 42152 42166 42180 42194 42208 42222 42236 42250 42264 42278 42292 42306 42320 42334 42348 42376 42390 42404 42418 42432 42446 42459

200 10-Aug

CXI

FXI

LI

- 37 micron Coarse Ewe Xbred Indicator

650700

600

Last Year

600

10-Oct Last Year

This Year

10-Dec This Year

10-Feb

Ewe - 35 micron

700 600

500 c/kg

INTERNATIONAL BEEF: The US

market is particularly tight, and the level of forward offers has been low. Come January, the imported beef market may see another change in direction, as imported supply lifts.

c/kg

BEEF: Cattle operating prices have stayed steady or firmed a little over the past fortnight. A lack of supply is still the main driver of the firmer prices, but a turnaround in the US imported market will be providing support for manufacturing beef. Production levels are gradually increasing for bulls and prime cattle, but there’s still not enough numbers around to fill the capacity onhand. Numbers have tightened a little through the South Island, but supplies are still a little easier to find than in the North Island. Low supplies should continue to keep prices firm through November. Store cattle demand is solid. Bulls are hard to find in the North Island, pushing prices there upwards, but oversupply through the South Island is putting a cap on the market there. It’s a similar story for 100kg bull calves, with North Island demand firm while the South Island is a little flat.

550

400

500300

500 400

300

450200 10-Aug Dec 10-Oct Oct Feb Apr 10-Dec Jun 5yr ave Last Year

200 10-Aug 5yr ave

Aug 10-Feb

This Year

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

22 AGRIBUSINESS

East Coast farm expo up for threepeat TIM WARRINGTON

IDEAS AND products for farming innovation and excellence will return for a third season at the East Coast Farming Expo next April at Wairoa.

Hosted by Wairoa A&P Society, the expo will run at their showgrounds on April 11 and 12. The company sites and public seminars will allow East Coast and Hawke’s Bay farmers to

talk to industry innovators and experts.   “If you are an East Coast or Hawke’s Bay farmer wanting to keep your business moving, or an agricultural innovator wanting to spread your

message, this event is perfect,” says event director Dave Martin. “The expo acknowledges the importance of face-to-face interaction in learning about new technology. [Otherwise]

Expo organisers Dave Martin and Sue Wilson.

farmers on the East Coast miss out a lot. There are huge opportunities for technology uptake, especially in sheep and beef farming.” The expo is an ideal venue for launching new products or releasing new research and technology directly to a target audience.  “Exhibits must showcase innovative or technology based products and/or services for the East Coast sheep and beef industry,” Martin says.  “Trade sites have been designed for exhibitors to showcase their products and services.  “Equally, farmers and landowners will get to explore new ideas and have their questions answered.”   The expo sponsors are Eastland Group, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council and Rural News

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RURALNEWS

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PAGE 24

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Group. Martin says exhibitors’ keenness to hold the event again was amazing and provided the motivation for the Wairoa A&P Society to host the expo for the third time.  “It shows how important the expo is to businesses and farmers. It’s an event where innovation and technology know-how can be shared with those who will benefit from it the most.”  The seminar line-up is developing with excellent speakers and inspiring topics. “We have made slight changes to speaker timing so farmers can see exhibitions and attend seminars.”   Tickets will be available online closer to the event, or there will be a $10 gate charge.  www.eastcoastexpo.co.nz. 

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Q: What publication did you see this promotion in? Answer: .......................................................................................................................... Name: .............................................................................................................................. Address: ........................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ...................................................................... Phone: ...................................................... Email: ............................................................................................................................... Terms and Conditions: Information on how to enter the competition forms part of these terms and conditions. Entry in to the Win a New Ride quiz is deemed acceptance of these terms and conditions. Entry is open to all New Zealand residents except for employees of Rural News Group and their immediate family. Each entrant may enter more than once. To be valid, each entry must contain the correct answers as determined by the Rural News Group. The competition opens on Monday 4th September, 2017 and closes Friday 24 November, 2017 at 11pm. The prize winner will be drawn on Monday 27 November, 2017 and will be contacted by phone and email by Wednesday 29th November, 2017. The winner will be announced to all entrants via email by Friday 1st December, 2017.The promoter’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to. By accepting the prize, the prize winner consents to the promoter using his/her details, photographs and recording of the prize acceptance for promotional and media publicity purposes. There is one prize, of a 2017 Yamaha AG125 motorbike. The winner may be required to pick up their prize from their nearest Yamaha dealer. The prize is valued at more than $4,000. The prize is not transferable or redeemable for cash. All insurance and any on-road costs are at the winner’s expense. All entries become the property of the promoter. The promoter is Rural News Group, First Floor, Bayleys Building, 29 Northcroft St, Takapuna, Auckland 0622

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

AGRIBUSINESS 23

Show launch for latest sheep breed NIGEL MALTHUS

NEW ZEALAND has a new sheep breed, shown last week at the Canterbury A&P Show. The Beltex, or Belgian Texel, has been farmed for about 18 years in the UK, where it is prized for its notably heavy hind-quarters and high meat yield. Bringing it to New Zealand is the BeltexNZ partnership -- Mount Somers farmer Blair Gallagher, former Invermay head Dr Jock Allison, and farm advisor John Tavendale. Gallagher says they first looked at bringing the breed here about ten years ago but quarantine and other requirements made it prohibitively expensive. Changed protocols now make it practical, but still expensive. Imported Beltex embryos and semen have been introduced into the Perendale, Suffolk and Poll Dorset flocks on Gallagher’s Rangiatea farm, near Mount Somers in Mid-Canterbury. The first lambs were born in early

Purebred Beltex lambs (with their Perendale surrogate mothers) show off their heavy rear ends in the yards at Blair Gallagher’s Mount Somers farm. The ram lambs’ tails have been left undocked, standard English practice for the breed. Inset: Mount Somers farmer Blair Gallagher has formed a partnership to bring Beltex sheep to NZ.

as the pure-bred, but the poll Dorset or the Suffolk cross will be closer to 52%. So there’s a huge lift in yield and that’s the real potential of the Beltex.” UK meat companies are prepared to pay a 10-15% premium for Beltex cross lambs, Gallagher told Rural News. He took 16 animals to the Canterbury Show last week, including four pure-bred Beltex lambs born to surrogate mothers from embryo implants, some AI crossbred lambs and their mothers.

Although the animals were not entered in competition classes, Gallagher expected the display at the show to attract a lot of interest. The Beltex is believed to be the first new sheep breed brought to New Zealand since the Charollais about a decade ago. “It’s a million-dollar project over two years, but I can see real benefits for the greater NZ sheep industry. There’s a huge amount of interest in what we’re doing.”

EARLY LAMBING “Hopefully we won’t have to go back again because it’s a pretty good way of emptying your bank account,” Gallagher jokes. He believes that as a meat breed the real potential lies in using Beltex terminal sires through NZ flocks to lift the quality of carcase conformation and meat yield. While traditional breeds give killout percentages of 42 - 43% (Texel achieved closer to 46%), pure Beltex gives up to 58%. “The half-crosses won’t be as good

August and Gallagher now has 55 from five different sires. He admits they did not have a “brilliant” take on embryo implantation, achieving only 37% when hoping for 50%. So they went back to the UK to get more semen and embryos from another three studs – two unrelated sires each – to further spread the genetic base.

GALLAGHER LAMBED the Beltexes early, partly so the ewe lambs would be big enough by autumn to have embryos taken from them. “If we can get two or three embryos out of each ewe hogget that’ll really lift our numbers.” The second batch of embryos coming from the UK will also be put into recipient ewes in the autumn. All the crossbred ewe lambs will be kept to have another infusion of Beltex. “We’ll be doing another quite big

insemination programme so we can ramp up the numbers quickly after this year,” Gallagher said. Another reason the ewes were lambed early was so Beltex can put up for sale some of the purebreds, possibly some semen and the crossbred ram lambs by March. “We haven’t decided how many purebred rams. We’ll be retaining all the ewe lambs and there will be the crossbred ram lambs. They’ll be Perendale-cross, Suffolk-cross and Poll Dorset-cross.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

24 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Clayton’s changes THE CPTPP deal announced last week at the APEC conference in Vietnam can be described as a ‘Clayton’s TPP’ – the Trans Pacific Trade deal you sign when you don’t want to admit you’re signing the Trans Pacific Trade deal. However, the Government’s willingness to sign the newly (re)named Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) shows that much of Labour’s posturing and protesting against the deal when in opposition was just petty politics. Farmers will be happy the new government has moved on from its opposition politicking, choosing instead the reality of office. New Zealand is a trading nation and any liberalisation in market access, particularly for our agricultural and horticultural exports, is good for all the country and its people. It’s hard to see any real difference between the TPP and the CPTPP; the biggest change appears to be the meaningless rebrand. While Trade Minister David Parker and PM Jacinda Ardern have valiantly tried to spin the “crucial gains” they achieved that allowed them to sign the deal, this is again semantics. The CPTPP retains  the investor state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions that so upset Labour when it was in opposition that many of its MPs – including David Parker – took to the streets in protest. There are fewer of these, but most remain. Not signing this new trade deal would have our beef industry facing big challenges in major markets; notably, our rivals would enjoy better access to Japan. That threat appears to be gone; if a deal is done NZ is set to be part of it. That’s great. As Federated Farmers’ Andrew Hoggard says, the outcome is great not just for the primary sector but for all Kiwis. He points out that trade deals like this give us equal footing globally, particularly with Australia and the European Union. For example, the current trade rules have NZ’s frozen beef into Japan facing a tariff of 50%, but Australia’s only 22%. Now Parker and Ardern face the politics of getting the CPTPP across the line at home. Already its coalition partner the Greens has said it will not support the deal; and NZ First is weirdly silent, but its consistently anti-trade, anti-foreigner, nationalistic rhetoric makes it hard to see the party supporting it. Thankfully, NZ First’s vote is irrelevant because National says it will support the deal and give Labour more than enough numbers to pass any legislation through Parliament. Bring it on!

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“So how do you see tweaking the ISDS clauses in the TPP impacting the RCEP within the broader context of the Neo-Liberal agenda?”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Change of tune?

Glammies dead

Change the record

Pussycats

IN A case of poacher turned gamekeeper, the Hound notes that dairy farming critic Alison Dewes has been appointed Landcorp’s new head of environment. Dewes was running a ‘sustainable farming consultancy firm’, but says she will no longer be involved. She starts her new job in January in Wellington. Your old mate wonders if Dewes will soon appoint her good mate Mike Joy (also an arch-critic of dairy farming) to join her on the public teat at Landcorp. Stranger things have happened.

YOUR OLD mate hears there has been much wailing and gnashing of teeth over Beef + Lamb NZ’s decision to pull the plug on the Golden Lamb Awards, better known as the Glammies. For the last ten years BLNZ has funded the event but will do so no longer. In the last six months BLNZ has been reviewing its long-term strategy and has now decided to redirect its spending to more ‘pressing priorities’. Chief executive Sam McIvor believes the industry-good group can assist farmers more directly in other ways. While the Hound is sad to see the Glammies go, he agrees that BLNZ can probably get farmers better bang for the buck than by this local event. Surely local suppliers and foodies can pick up the tab if it’s so worthwhile.

THIS OLD mutt is getting a little bored with the claim by the newly minted Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor -- that farmers “always do better” under Labour governments. While O’Connor is seen as one of the few credible and farmerfriendly members of the new government, the Hound reckons he will soon fall out of favour if he keeps re-inventing history. Perhaps O’Connor was on another planet during the 1980s when the then Labour Government’s reforming policies hit agriculture harder than other sectors and forced thousands of young and not-so-young farmers off the land. Maybe the West Coast MP would be better off spending his time building a bridge to rural Kiwis who feel they were carved off from the rest of NZ by Labour’s politicking during the election campaign. Better that than making a stuff-up.

The Hound was contacted by a farmer concerned at the complete silence of supposed rural and farming advocates NZ First – especially list MP Mark Patterson – over the recent sale of the iconic NZ company Icebreaker to US interests. Your old mate’s correspondent reckons Patterson and NZ First were quick to put the boot into such overseas takeovers when they were in opposition, e.g. their failed campaign to prevent Shanghai Maling taking a 50% stake in Silver Fern Farms (which has turned out to be a roaring success). However, the informant told your old mate he hadn’t heard a peep from Patterson and Co about the sale of Icebreaker (an important outlet for NZ Merino wool) to the Yanks. He reckons this shows these NZ First clowns may be roaring lions in opposition, but lapdogs and poodles in government.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................. Ph 09 620 7811 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER: Stephen Pollard ....Ph 09 913 9637/021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ......... Ph 04 234 6239/021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .......... Ph 07 854 6292/021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland Ph 03 337 3828/021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 31/03/2017

WEBSITE PRODUCER: Jessica Wilson ........................ Ph 09 913 9621

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

OPINION 25

Time for a culture change

During the past seven years 36 people were killed in quad bike accidents.

too powerful, too big, and too heavy for youngsters to be in full control.

Again, we hear the cry ‘its different out on the farm’. However, a logging oper-

ation would be quickly shut down if a 12-year-old was even on site, never

mind found operating a machine. WorkSafe and its

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to start back when someone buys such a unit. Manufacturers and retailers must insist on some form of compulsory rider training programme. This might have to be incorporated into the cost of the machine. Likewise, insurers must consider charging a premium for untrained operators or discounts for those who have been trained. Some will say far too many machines are being sold second-hand, but we must start somewhere. In a similar vein, while it’s heartening to see riders wearing inexpensive aghats, it needs to be understood that they are only rated to 30km/h and need to be changed for a good quality, certified helmet. We hear the plea that ‘proper’ safety helmets are too heavy, too hot and no use on the farm. The same argument was initially used by motorcyclists on the road, but they must wear one, or face a fine, so why do we have to make exceptions for a sub-sector of the community who are at real risk? We also need to stop the practice of allowing underage children being allowed to ride full-sized machines. These are just

ambassadors have done good work over the last three years to bring safety awareness to the forefront. But many of us still seem to suffer from a bravado that says ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it, and never got hurt’. However, who in all honestly that has spent any time on a quad, can put hand on heart and say they have never thought “blimey, that was a close thing” or taken a knock they’ve not told anyone about because of making a silly mistake? Not many, I would wager.

MA DE

IT MAKES grim reading to see that agricultural deaths have numbered 124 over the last seven years – about four times higher than in construction or forestry. Drilling down in these numbers shows 36 people were killed in quad accidents. At the time of writing, quad related deaths were tracking behind those of 2016 and the terrible year of 2015, but reports of two quad related deaths during the weekend of October 14-15 suggests that the year-end numbers are likely to be similar. Much has been done over the last few years to promote safe use of this type of vehicle. Many employers now seem to be buying into safety and the use of some type of helmet is becoming more obvious, but there are still too many people dying. The fact that we have already equalled deaths caused by ATV accidents for the 2016 year, with two and a half months to year end, does not make palatable reading; the crux of the matter is that our loved ones are still dying. We need to get all sectors of agriculture to buy into safety, particularly the over-60s, who make up a disproportionate number of all types of farm deaths and, no doubt, still carry a ‘she’ll be right’ mentality. Safety must become a first thought and not an afterthought, which in the case of quads needs

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

26 OPINION

Let’s do things differently Professor Jon Hickford, from Lincoln University’s faculty of agriculture and life sciences, gives his view on where the new government should focus in its primary sector policy. some cautionary notes, and some plaudits to hand out. I am keen to see a

EXAMINING THE primary sector policies of Labour, there are a few things on my wish list –

clearer overarching strategy. The last few years of neo-liberal free-market approaches have left

us a bit directionless in agriculture and horticulture, especially where a high degree of postfarmgate processing is required (e.g. meat, wool and dairy). The establishment of a primary industry council and chief agricultural advisor may facilitate

improvement in priority and direction setting. But I am wary of the creation of another layer of bureaucracy and/ or increasing barriers for those industries that can and do set about helping themselves. I would hope that the primary industry counJohn Hickford

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cil and chief agricultural advisor work industry by industry to find and consolidate leadership that is already within that industry, thereby working from the ground up to improve the value of those industries. It is fantastic that a ‘pathway to success’ initiative is being proposed. Progress has already been made in this space with GrowingNZ, the Primary Industry Capability Alliance (PICA) and the Soil Makes Sense programme from Lincoln University. However, the challenge is to further the reach of these programmes into the urban community. There are three reasons for this: • so we do not further enhance the urban/rural divide • so urban consumers better understand how and why food production and agricultural practices are used (i.e. removing the mystique and misunderstanding) • and because there are insufficient young people coming from the rural sector to sustain, let alone grow, the rural sector.

The emphasis cannot just be agribusiness. Practical skills and agricultural and horticultural science are critically important too. I am also pleased to see the Primary Growth Partnership going under the spotlight. At its cynical worst, it was simply a corporate welfare scheme and I don’t think it added a lot of value onfarm. Re-emphasis on, and growth of, the Sustainable Farming Fund is very desirable. This better delivers sustainable social, environmental and economic benefits to the farming community. It is a success story already. If we are going to create an independent food safety authority, I would want its brief to broaden from a simple focus on contaminant, chemical and microbiological safety issues. It needs to either directly include an emphasis on nutritional value (e.g. high sugar foods), or indirectly be strongly mandated to align with the medical fraternity and dieticians to ensure that food is, to the best of our abilities, of good nutritional value. New Zealand needs to better differentiate its philosophy and direction in agriculture and food production. I believe we need to focus on lowintensity/high value production systems that maintain the highest health, welfare, carbon footprint and consumer acceptance standards.

RURAL NEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

MANAGEMENT 27

Lucerne advocate proves a point PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

LONG-TIME LUCERNE expert and advocate Professor Derrick Moot of Lincoln University says he’s now getting interest in his work from around the world. He told Rural News, at the recent Grasslands Association conference in Whanganui, of his work in Victoria and South America. He says a lot of the interest in legumes, such as lucerne, is from farmers looking for ways to cope with summer dry periods and because of environmental concerns about the use of nitrogen fertilisers. “I have made several visits to Australia, especially Victoria, looking at the grazing management of lucerne and how they can do this better. There has also been some interest from South America, but not North America where they tend to cut and carry lucerne and it’s used in mixed feeds to

“I think our farmers have always been reasonably early adopters of science, but you have to prove something to them.”

put into the dairy ration,” he explained. “The Europeans don’t tend to be there yet, due to their types of agriculture being different from what we are used too. Their tentative inquiries relate more to getting legumes into their system and reducing nitrogen fertiliser.” Moot says he’s had some interest from France where there are drier and hotter areas and where lucerne may work.

Derrick Moot

NZ farmers in the traditional areas – Otago, Marlborough and North Canterbury – are interested, as are farmers in Hawkes Bay and some western areas of the North Island where soils are sandy and silty. In the past people haven’t considered growing lucerne in these areas, he says. “The inquiries are now broader than when I started. So traditionally it was a sheep and beef systems thing,” he told the conference. “But I now have people who are milking goats and sheep and recognising that traditional ryegrass white clover pasture is not giving them the level of milk production they

require, so they are looking for alternative forages and are embracing lucerne or chicory or red clover in pastures.” Moot says farmers experiencing summer dry are looking for high quality forage. “So if we can get legumes into a system they can increase either milk production or liveweight gain of animals, and mitigate the effects of summer dry.” He says farmers have access to lots of information via publications such as Rural News, or via newsletters and field days. While field days work for some, they don’t for others: some farmers are extrovert and others introvert – the two getting their information in different ways. Moot says 20 years ago he foresaw climate change, hence his looking at and later promoting lucerne. Milder winters and droughts are signs the climate is changing; the big issue for farmers is to adapt to these changes.

FARMLANDS YOUNG SCHOLARS A YOUTH Olympic Games gold medallist, a Smedley Station cadet and a former New Zealand junior squash player are among five students to getting a Tom Cranswick Memorial Award from Farmlands Co-operative. The awards honour Tom Cran-

swick, a founding Farmlands director until 1985, including 20 years as chairman. This year’s winners are Courtney Bragg from Te Puke, Rory Harrigan from Feilding, Emily Fraser from Palmerston North, Zac Johnston from Kakanui Valley and Nick

Simpson from Tuakau. Each will get $2000 to spend on their education for careers in agriculture. Award applicants must be the child of a Farmlands shareholder or staff member and should already be studying to work in the rural sector.

Interest in lucerne – particularly in summer dry areas – is growing.

“I think our farmers have always been reasonably early adopters of science, but you have to prove some-

thing to them,” he added. “It’s their business and you find that successful people will be fast followers. It’s the science

and agribusiness communities’ job to find these early adopters and highlight them so that we get fast followers.”

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28 MANAGEMENT The research has shown that under the correct conditions, early weaning allows the lambs to grow faster and ewes to regain more body condition.

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Weaning early benefits for both ewes and lambs NEW RESEARCH from Massey University suggests that lambs can be successfully weaned lighter and earlier, with benefits for the mother as well. The university’s Sheep Research Centre has shown lambs of ewes feeding on a legume-based diet can be successfully weaned at about 50 days old when they are as light as 16kg. Under the correct conditions, the early weaning allows the lambs to grow faster and the ewes to regain more body condition before the next breeding season. Traditionally, weaning occurs at 10 - 12 weeks after lambing, when the milk from the ewes reduces; this is a critical factor in the future performance of lamb and ewe. The study, funded by Beef + Lamb New Zealand, is the work of Massey’s Dr Rene Corner-Thomas, Dr Lydia Cranston, Professor Steve Morris and Professor Paul Kenyon. Corner-Thomas says that early weaning can have advantages for ewe and lamb. “There is a gradual decline in milk production after ewes reach peak milk production within three weeks of lambing. Weaning early allows the ewe more time to gain body condition before the new breeding season starts in the autumn,” she explains. “This is important when summers are dry and late spring is the only chance a ewe has to gain good condition before the next breeding season. “For the lamb, earlier weaning is an advantage when their growth rate is restricted by ryegrass and white clover pasture covers below 1000kgDM/ha in late lactation.” Corner-Thomas says in these conditions weaning early onto a legumebased diet will increase the growth rates of the lamb. The ewe will also maintain her

Researchers (left to right) PhD student Jay Ekanayake, Dr Lydia-Cranston and Dr Rene Corner Thomas.

“There is a gradual decline in milk production after ewes reach peak milk production within three weeks of lambing. Weaning early allows the ewe more time to gain body condition before the new breeding season starts in the autumn.” body condition. The legume-based diet can either be a herb clover mix or a pure lucerne stand. “If ryegrass pasture masses are above 1400kgDM/ha however, there is likely little benefit from early weaning for the lamb, but it is still positive for the ewe.” Previous studies have shown that when early weaned lambs are slaughtered at a traditional weaning age the dressing out percentage of lambs did not differ from those sent directly to slaughter off their mother. The Massey team will do further research this spring to determine the optimum management of early weaned lambs. This study by PhD student Jay Ekanayake will have three main focuses. Firstly, to determine if lambs

can be weaned as light at 14kg onto a herb clover mix and still achieve suitable growth rates. “Studies have also successfully used herb and clover mixes and lucerne monocultures to grow these young lambs. Many lambs can be finished to slaughter weight on a relatively small area of these crops,” explains Corner-Thomas. Secondly, the researchers will look at the best management of the lamb prior to early weaning, to ease its transition. And thirdly, it will determine if there are any negative impacts of early weaning on the health of the ewe’s udder. Further studies are planned for 2018 to examine potentially lighter weaning weights and ages.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH 29

Better care a key to ram survival PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

IMPROVING BASIC animal husbandry and health care in rams would likely increase longevity regardless of breed or strain of breed, a study found. Poor body condition, lameness, teeth abnormalities and age are key factors that influence whether rams remain in the flock year after year. But of these, lameness is a key factor and dental issues also stand out, say David Robertson, Hamish Newton and Bridget Roulston from the Veterinary Centre in Oamaru. They outlined in a paper to the NZ Veterinary Association conference a study they did on nine farms in OtagoSouthland, sponsored by Beef + Lamb Genetics. The aim was to measure body weight changes and health and husbandry factors that may be associated with ram survival and culling rates. In the paper the three vets say there are many anecdotes regarding performance and health of rams. A preliminary survey of 22 sheep farms in Otago by Robertson and Lee (2016) showed an average culling rate among rams of 26% for maternal sires and 29% for terminal sires per year. The main causes

of culling reported were feet issues, age, teeth and poor condition. The average mortality reported was 5% (range 0-28%). With the follow-up study, objective measurements on rams were sought to examine whether there is a correlation between the degree of weight loss and the level of culling or deaths. The study also sought to define any differences between breeds and strains of sires, as this was a common theme in anecdotes given by farmers. The causes of ram wastage such as teeth wear, lameness, poor body condition, injuries, fly-strike and worm-burdens were also quantified. Ewe flock size on the nine farms in the study ranged from 3,000 15,000 ewes. The terminal meat breeds were Dorset down, Suffolk, Hampshire down, Southdown, Poll Dorset, Suftex, Texel and South Suffolk. The maternal sires (that bred ewe replacements for the farm) were Romney, Romney-texel, Coopdale, Perendale, Coopworth and Whiltshire. Three visits were made over the course of the year: pre-mating, postmating and six months post mating. Following detailed reporting of results in the paper to the NZVA

conference, the authors summarised results in a discussion section. They say ram death is a topic that evokes frustration and many opinions. “Rams are expensive on an individual basis and have a big impact on the profitability of sheep

breeding operations through their genetic influence.” Poor body condition, lameness, teeth abnormalities and age are key factors that influence whether rams remain in the flock year on year, they say. “At the farm level,

during mating ram teams lost on average 13% of liveweight with a wide range from -6% to -25%. This range could not be attributed to factors such as breed or strains of breeds within the farm. “There was only a modest relationship between degree of body

condition loss and survival. Over the mating period, maternal and terminal breeds showed no significant differences in changes in body condition. “The majority of rams had regained the weight they lost over mating by December. The postmating gain may have been assisted by a more favourable spring-summer period. The previous years had been dominated by droughts. “Rams that went into mating lame were twice as likely to have been culled or dead by December. “There is a trend suggesting that terminal breeds are more affected by lameness than mater-

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nal rams and more likely to be culled for lameness. “The area of ram lameness is contentious with farmers: there is the anecdotal suggestion that rams are more likely to go lame over the autumn period. Extra moisture, ram activity and testosterone levels may be contributors to this. “Rams are more difficult to tip over and inspect, leading to less inclination to inspect the feet. There is also a reluctance amongst some farmers to prevent or treat lameness. “From the survey (Robertson and Lee, unpublished) those farms that put effort into preventative foot TO PAGE 30


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

30 ANIMAL HEALTH

Heading off flystrike resistance PAUL McKEE

THE PROSPECT of having to manage fly populations resistant to poisons is becoming a reality for more New Zealand farmers. If we do not change the way we use chemicals we can expect the costs of fly-strike to rise markedly.  One critical strategy will be to make it more difficult for flies to develop resistance to treatments. The best way to do this by applying chemicals correctly and

at recommended rates. In other words, there is always a cost when taking shortcuts to save a few cents in volumes of chemical used or seconds to apply the product.   Farmers can also change from relying on single active treatments to innovative combination treatments designed to slow the development of chemical resistance. As recommended in controlling parasitic worms, exposing flies to simultaneous treatments of different actives will

make it harder for them to develop resistance. Ravensdown has worked with a NZ company to develop two combination products to protect against flystrike and reduce the development of fly resistance.   First, Saturate Gold is a dip concentrate combining the long acting insect growth regulators (IGR)cyromazine and diflubenzuron. It is for use in showers and jetting units on sheep up to six weeks off shears, providing up to 12 weeks

protection from fly strike. This product is recommended for summer fly strike prevention.  With the inclusion of diflubenzuron farmers also get the extra benefit of long term lice control (something that cyromazine or dicyclanil cannot do). Second, Fleeceguard is a water-based pour-on that combines the actions of an IGR (diflubenzuron) and synthetic pyrethroid (deltamethrin) to provide up to 14 weeks protection from flystrike. Both actives also kill lice. 

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This product can be applied to sheep immediately off shears and up to six weeks of wool growth. The inclusion of deltamethrin provides a rapid knock-down for fly and lice compared to IGRonly pour-ons. Also, its short (seven days) meat withholding period gives farmers more options with their stock.   To get the full benefits of combination products, the best time to start using them is when no resistant fly populations exist on your farm. Developing an integrated flystrike management programme will

Paul McKee says the prospect of flystrike resistance is becoming a reality.

lead to improved animal health and farm profitability.

• Paul McKee is an animal health technical manager for Ravensdown

BETTER RAM SURVIVAL FROM PAGE 29

measures such as regular foot troughing and inspections had lower issues – if any – with feet-related culling. “Correcting lameness prior to the mating period along with preventative measures and early detection of lameness throughout the year is one management area that will improve longevity of rams. “Tooth condition in rams is associated with the age of the ram (older rams are more likely to have abnormal dentition). 19% of rams with abnormal dentition at the pre-mating visit did not survive mating (versus 5% in normal rams). “There was a notable drop-off of ram survival after five years on age.” “Because there was an under-report-

ing of natural deaths versus culling in this study despite reminders to farmers to record deaths, established causes of deaths were not defined in this study,” the paper says. “Improving the health and welfare of rams by focusing on the basics of animal husbandry is likely to increase their longevity on farm with minimal time and economic investment. “From a veterinary perspective the routine ram breeding soundness examination is a good opportunity to discuss the basics of -- and maybe also administer -- routine worm control, fly prevention, clostridial boosters and preventative or curative hoof treatments. “Raising awareness of minimum pretupping weights and post-mating feeding will also benefit ram outcomes.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 31

Skoda to give SUV market a shake-up MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WITH ITS availability appearing to be the only barrier to more sales, the Skoda Kodiaq, launched in the first quarter of 2017, is giving some rival manufacturers’ marketing teams sleepless nights in the booming SUV market. Its claiming bragging rights to Car of the Year awards in the northern hemisphere suggested it was going to be good. Now we know it’s better than good and it would be a travesty if it’s not the New Zealand Car of the Year, to be announced later this month. Outwardly, this seven-seater doesn’t look overly big, but the tape shows it’s bigger than a Hyundai Sante Fe and slightly smaller than a Toyota Prado. Looking at the product mix for the NZ market it looks like Skoda NZ has it about right. Three trim levels (Ambition, Ambition+ and Style) combine with three engine outputs -- turbo-petrols of 110kW and 132kW and a turbo-diesel of 140kW. Interestingly, the 110kW unit has only 1400cc engine capacity, which sounds undersized, but it pulled the

The Skoda Kodiaq has already picked up a number of Car of the Year awards in the northern hemisphere.

‘rabbit out of the hat’ at the recent NZ media launch when a wise old motoring hack swore he had been driving the 2.0L model by mistake. The entry point Ambition starts out with front wheel drive only and the 110kW engine, matched to a 6-speed DSG transmission as mirrored in the 110kW Ambition+. Moving up the scale to the Style Trim level, the choice becomes a 132kW turbo petrol, or the 140kW turbo-diesel, both with the 7-speed DSC box. In use, either choice was smooth, refined and easy to use, either in full auto mode or when prompted by the steering wheel

mounted shift paddles. Living with the car for a week, the overwhelming impression was of a smooth comfortable ride with great road-holding and a church-quiet lack of noise. The seats are Teutonic, being firm and supportive, particularly on the twisty stuff, and dependent on model come in half-leather, full leather or full leather with a perforated finish. The Ambition+ takes things a notch further with heating, and the Style has heating, ventilation and electrical adjustment with memory for both front seats. Then there’s the small stuff: the ice scraper built into the fuel cap, a pop-

out torch in the rear load bay which is magnetised so it can be attached to the vehicle, cup holders that grip bottles so they can be opened with one hand, picnic trays integrated into the rear of the front seats, and a pair of umbrellas hiding in the front doors. Add to this pop-out strips that emerge when doors are opened to protect against damage, and a sound system that amplifies the front occupants’ voices to those in the rear, ideal for getting kids or pooch under control. As one would expect, the interface in the centre of the dashboard is clear, logical and offers a grass touch screen

from edge to edge. Easy control of audio and driver aids is a given, and is complemented by displays for vehicle settings and condition, and receiving a thumbs-up from domestic management was the ability to change the mood lighting through all the hues of the rainbow. A pity that it appeared to be mainly red in her case. Combine these features with two gloveboxes, one of which can be cooled, and heated steering wheel, panoramic roof, park assist and trailer assist for sloppy reversers, and you get an idea what this car is about. Rounding out the range as we approach the end of the year are two new additions, the Kodiaq Ambition+ TDI, a 110kW, with 8-speed DSG transmission and all-wheel drive, all leather interior, upgraded entertainment system and integrated SatNav. Making an appearance in the first quarter 2018 will be the Kodiaq SportLine, with a choice of 140kW turbo-diesel or 132kW turbo-petrol, 20-inch Vega wheels and performance tyres, and a motorsport inspired feel throughout with leather trimmed bucket seats, performance monitors and chrome and aluminium detailing.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

32 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Welsh/Irish alliance for trailer distribution in NZ MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WELSHY CONTRACTING is well-known in the South Canterbury region, for 16 years offering nononsense earthmoving, site clearance, trenching, directional drilling, vacuum excavation and fencing. Run by Mark and Andrea Davies, the fleet of tractors, excavators, trenchers and rollers presented the couple with an ongoing logistics challenge, which they set about solving by looking at what was on offer to

transport their high value equipment. Market research led them to Northern Irish company NC Engineering, manufacturers of a range of industrial and agricultural equipment; they customised some commercial low-loaders and dump trailers to the Davies’ specifications, which in due course arrived in New Zealand. Running the units daily convinced Mark (Welshy) Davies that the superior build quality, practicality and durability of the trailers would be a great fit for other

civil and agricultural contractors and farmers. So much so, that he has set up a new venture to promote, retail and import NC trailers to NZ. A family owned business, NC Engineering was set up in 1976 and operates from a 3.25ha site in County Armagh. Alongside a range of commercial trailers, the company specialises in low-loaders in single, tandem axle and tridem formats. Gross vehicle weights can be accommodated from 8.3 tonnes with the single axle unit, through 24 tonnes on a dual to 33

Above and below left: NC trailers superior build quality, practicality and durability make them a great fit for agricultural contractors and farmers.

tonnes on a triple-axle. Attention to detail sees standard equipment including 50mm floors, beavertails with spring-assisted 700mm wide ramps, hydraulic brakes, full lighting kits and sprung drawbars. Optional upgrades include bolt-on bale cheese wedges, track guides, front and side outriggers, mantis ramps and hydraulic beavertails. In the dump trailer sector, in which NC offers five targeted ranges, the 300 series trailers find favour with agricultural contractors

moving into civil work. With capacities from 10 25 tonnes and volumes of 4.3 - 11.20 cubic metres, the 300 series are built wide and low for stability and easy loading, and have a high rear pivot point that combines with tip angles of up to 77 degrees for easy stockpiling of spoil. The body of the 300s is built with an 8mm thick floor, 5mm sides with heavy duty horizontal bulge bars, and the patented tail door which operates without the need for hydraulics. Running gear uses

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axles from 80mm to 127mm section, spring drawbars, hydraulic brakes up to 420mm x 180mm and tyre equipment up to 445-65 x 22.5 For transport operations, commercial spec step-frame trailers are available in tandem or triple-axle set-ups with ratings of 28 -- 38 tonnes, with a range of options making them customisable for specific operations. Summing up the decision to enter into a new venture, with Jeff Hill appointed sales manager, Welshy says the company

set out to solve its own logistics problems, which it did via the expertise offered by NC. “The family-owned business operates with the same principles as our own, which includes having continuous contact with the customer to keep them informed how a job is progressing,” he told Rural News. “The addition of the NC trailer ranges to our offering will allow other contractors to see the quality of European engineering.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 33

Harvester hoes through spuds MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW PowerCombi separation system from Grimme is claimed to be capable of efficiently and accurately processing up to 100 tonnes of potatoes an hour. Incorporating a three-way separator that removes up to 98% of waste material, three steplessly adjustable polyurethane rollers help to break up lumps and separate loose soil and smaller, waste potatoes, before two rotating rollers then seperate the smaller potatoes from the main crop. At this point, the infrared Field Potato Sorter identifies and removes remaining lumps, stones or other waste products. As a back-up, an electro-mechanical sensor mounted over the main product conveyor prevents foreign objects, such as large stones or wood, damaging the system. The 2.4m wide separation belt ensures high throughput and gentle handling, while a spacious control platform with a

large FPS terminal gives a good all-round view of the separating operations. The company claims that the PowerCombi can easily be operated by one person and, in theory, this system could replace up to eight workers, saving big on labour costs in the packing shed. Also new, the company has released a transfer aid that minimises the risk of damaging potatoes during handling. SoftFlow combs, easily fitted to new and existing conveyors, consist of highly elastic, hardwearing polyurethane fingers that are mounted at the delivery point of the conveyor belt to gently cushion potatoes as they roll to the next conveyor. The soft and flexible fingers independently adjust themselves according to the weight and angle of the falling potatoes, also offering a cleaning effect by loosening remaining soil deposits. The high elasticity and constant movement of the fingers ensures that stones, lumps or weeds can’t get trapped and the tilt angle can be easily

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Grimme’s PowerCombi separation system is capable of processing up to 100 tonnes of potatoes in an hour.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

34 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER

Cameras and sensors keep eyes on job MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ATTENTION TO detail in preparing seedbeds for crop establishment is vital to achieve soil-toseed contact, which will lead to good germination and healthy plant growth. Seedbeds generally need to be as coarse as possible; too fine can result in ‘capping’ which inhibits the flow of air

and water or leads to excessive erosion in high rainfall. Austrian manufacturer Pottinger has developed a camera-assisted seedbed preparation system to allow users to deliver optimal seedbeds for best seed placement, regardless of changing conditions across the same paddock. The system measures ‘roughness’ by using

stereo camera system mounted between a power harrow and the seed drill. Images are analysed from where the tractor’s ISOBUS III system is used to regulate the rotor speed of the power harrow and the forward speed of the tractor, so adapting to changing conditions and resulting in a uniform seedbed. The system is said

Pottinger has developed a cameraassisted system to allow the optimal preparation of seedbeds.

to reduce the operator’s workload and fatigue, as it removes the need for constant monitoring and manual adjustment found in traditional set-ups. The system is particularly helpful for working at night and will ultimately help reduce establish-

ment time and fuel costs. In another development, the company has published details of its SensoSafe system for protecting wildlife, particularly deer fawns, that may be hidden in grass paddocks when the mowing season starts, which is at

the same time as the deer breeding season. A sensor bar, carrying optical infra-red sensors with LED lights, is mounted above and ahead of the mowing unit. When an animal is detected in the crop, a signal passes to the hydraulic system, which lifts the mowing ele-

ment to protect the animal. Said to be effective in all conditions, including bright sunlight, the system ignores any ground irregularities such as mole hills. Both systems have been awarded Agritechnica Silver Innovation Awards in advance of the November 17 event.

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WHILE WIDTHS and outputs of the humble plough have increased a lot over the years, the perennial problem of ‘ins and outs’ at the headland has persisted. The Z-shaped pattern that develops because of the time it takes the last furrow to cross the headland mark in relation to the first, results in an uneven ploughing depth, remaining crop residues and the risk of volunteers in following crops. Machinery giant Kuhn has used section control to develop its Smart Ploughing system, which uses clever electronics that combine with the company’s non-stop hydraulic break-back system – normally used to avoid obstacles – to sequentially control the entry and exit timings of individual bodies to eliminate the effect. Controlled by GPS data, the result is a perfectly straight furrow edge which lends itself to easier following operations such as headland ploughing, drilling, spreading and spraying. As a bonus, the system is said to reduce operator fatigue and load on tractor rear axles, and to reduce the strain placed on linkage systems in the case of mounted ploughs.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 21, 2017

RURAL TRADER 35 GET SOCIAL WITH RURALNEWS

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Rubber Safety Matting • ATV Carrier Mats • Exit/Entry Areas • Calf Trailers • Horse Floats & Trucks • Weigh Platforms • Bale Mats • Comfort Mats for Wet & Dry Areas • Utility Deck Matting

4 Fix it with Fuel Right.

Phone: 0800 80 8570 www.burgessmatting.co.nz

 Minimal Sweating  Longer Lasting  No Rust

 Fast Easy Assembly  No Blockages

 Polyethylene

Full Range of Sizes: From 1,600 L (1 tonne)

Fuel Right is the complete diesel system treatment that deals with diesel bug and keeps your expensive equipment running smoothly and efficiently.

J000060_BDMA Revolution

POLY SILOS to

PH: 0800 777 551

❱❱ Feeders available from 2 bales to 24m3 ❱❱ Universal stock feeders-feed all feed types

Phone 03-688 2900 sales@scarlett.co.nz

QUADBAR

595

$

+GST delivered

Proven beyo nd do ubt!

“I have no doubt that if I did not have a Quadbar fitted, my accident would have been fatal!” – Rozel Farms “The Quadbar saved our employee from significant injuries.” – Colin van der Geest

For a Quadbar, call me, Stuart Davidson, owner of Quadbar NZ, on 021-182 8115. Email sales@quadbar.co.nz or for more info go to www.quadbar.co.nz

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

QUADBAR 5 YEAR SURVEY

PO Box 73 Tuakau 1892 ROLLOVERS NUMBER OF NUMBER OF DEATHS QUADBARS Tel: (09) 236 8414 Stainless Structure 61 479 0 PO Box 73 Tuakau PO Box 1892 73 Tuakau 1892 construction Fax: (09) 236 9321 Industries Ltd Tel: (09) 236 8414 Tel: (09) 236 8414 1,000 + Email: sheep/hr PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Fax: (09) 236 Fax: 9321(09) 236 9321 Wipe Out Fantastic Industries Industries Ltd LtdEmail: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Penetration Walco Can Help You to Wipe Out Your Weeds Automatic Super Jetter

40,000 L (30 tonne)

Innovative Agriculture Equipment

TM

$7,500 plus GST

Call: 0800 668 534

With Davey Pump & Honda Motor

Rangiora

PO Box 73 Tuakau 1892 Tel: (09) 236 8414 Fax: (09) 236 9321 Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz

Chemical in the Breeze PO Box 73Apply Tuakau 1892 Only Apply Chemical to weeds Tel:Easy (09)to236 Dairy Use 8414 PO Box 73 Tuakau PO Box 1892 73 Tuakau 1892 Easy to set up Fax:Easy (09)to236 9321 Flush System after use Free Range & Barn Eggs Feed Systems Tel: (09) 236 8414 Tel: (09) 236 8414 Dairy Dairy Dairy Two rows of Wicks for double contact with weeds Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Feed Systems Bruise bar to scrape plant SUPPLIERS OF: (09) 236 Fax: Fax: 9321(09) 236 9321 for better Chemical application Feed Systems Feed SystemsEmail: • Nest boxes - manual or Strong & Durable Frame PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz automated

www.advantageplastics.co.nz

Industries Ltd

sales@pppindustries.co.nz

0800 901 902

www.pppindustries.co.nz

PO Box 73 Tuakau 1892 Tel: (09) 236 8414 Fax: (09) 236 9321 Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz

• Poultry Equipment

PO Box 73 Tuakau 1892

Tel: (09) 236 8414 Feed & Drinking Fax: (09) 236 9321 Email:trays PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz • Plastic egg

2.4m or 4.8m wide 2 Year Warranty -

QUALITY PRODUCTS MADE IN EUROPE OR BY PPPPO Box 73 Tuakau 1892

We’ll Look After You

Ring Walco NOW for Your Nearest Stockist of these Robust Wipers A trusted name in Poultry Industry Tel: (09) 236 8414 Poultry for over 50 years Ph 0800 853 002 info@walco.co.nz PO Box 73 Tuakau PO Box 1892 73 Tuakau 1892 Fax: (09) 236 9321 Equipment Tel: (09) 236 8414 Tel: (09) 236 8414 Poultry Poultry Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Fax: (09) 236 Fax: 9321(09) 236 9321 Equipment Equipment Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz Email: PPP.LTD@xtra.co.nz ❖

TM

Helping Farmers Boost Production

www.walco.co.nz


E

P E D F OR

L

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AN

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DEV

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THE NEW HD5

TOUGH. CAPABLE. CLEVER. THE NEW MID SIZE ENGINE DEFENDER HD5 STARTING AT:

$15,261

*

EXLC GST

CLASS LEADING FEATURES:

ERGONOMIC FOLDABLE 3 SEATER BENCH

CARGO TRAY 96.5 X 138.4 X 30.5 CM

TOW RATING 680 KG

EXCLUSIVE TO CAN-AM:

200

HOURS SERVICE

INTERVAL

WWW.CANAMOFFROAD.COM

0800 020 074

*Price on offer for HD5 Base. Offer only available for participating authorised Can-Am dealerships, for vehicles sold between September 1st 2017 and November 30th 2017, $1500 Rebate on MY17 Defender HD5 DPS and HD5 Base. ^3 year warranty covers MY16/17 Can-Am Defender models only. Always ride responsibly and safely. Always wear protective gear & approved helmet. BRP reserves the right to change the promotion at any time.

FUEL CAPACITY 40 LITRES

GROUND CLEARANCE 26.7 CM

Rural News 21 November 2017  

Rural News 21 November 2017