Page 1

NEWS

ANIMAL HEALTH

MACHINERY

Benefits to pre-lamb shearing.

Fert control at the touch of a button. PAGE 29

PAGE 21

Have we hit peak dairy? PAGE 4

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS JULY 18, 2017: ISSUE 634 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

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ANIMAL HEALTH

MACHINERY

Benefits to pre-lamb shearing.

Fert control at the touch of a button. PAGE 29

PAGE 21

NEWS Have we hit peak dairy? PAGE 4

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS JULY 18, 2017: ISSUE 634 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Wool’s wretched woes PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

HAVING 60% of the nation’s wool exports going to China and continuing to sell wool as a commodity has left us exposed, says Wools of NZ chairman Mark Shadbolt. “The wool industry is in a very difficult position: China has reduced their imports significantly,” Shadbolt told Rural News. “That highlights the reliance certain sectors of the industry have placed on China alone. The world is our market, so as soon as you allow 60% of all exports to go into one country, then you are exposed. “China has over-produced, overbought and now they have stopped buying. That is having a real impact on wool sales and obviously the price. We are seeing ridiculously low prices way

below the cost of production. “We are very concerned about the current situation and how long it will take to remedy it. But the key thing is that if we continue to sell it as a commodity under the current model then we will always get the prices we are getting and quite frankly it is unsustainable.” Shadbolt says the industry needs investment. Wools of NZ is spending heavily on marketing and supporting its partners, right through to the consumers. And the industry must spend

more on technology to add value to wool and to find new uses for it. “We are making traction on those aspects, but we are only a small, new company. Unfortunately, most of the industry operates with a commodity trader mentality which doesn’t add value for the grower. “These are challenging times; our growers are very frustrated. We don’t represent all the growers in NZ admittedly but we represent guys who are focused on wool and they are frustrated about the prices they are receiv-

Winter’s here! Farm worker George Butterick feeds out to a mob of 1700 ewes on James Wright’s Rangitata Gorge farm, inland from Mayfield in Mid-Canterbury. The South Island was hit last week by the first big snow. But Wright had brought his flock down from the tops in preparation. With lambing still six weeks away he’s expecting no problems from the weather, but feeding out will now be a daily task for Butterick until the thaw. RURAL NEWS GROUP

ing. “The good news for us is that we have renewed contracts we have had in place for six years. We still have contracts out there that are well ahead of the current market. “But it is always challenging to renew those contracts when the market is so soft. We have renewed them and that is a good indication of the model we have and the relationships we have in the market. They keep growing every year; it just takes time and [ultimately] investment.”

LOST VEGE PLOTS PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

TAR AND concrete could spell the end of New Zealand growing leafy green vegetables such as lettuce and spinach if house building persists on productive land near urban areas. Horticulture NZ chair Julian Raine says leafy green crops need good soil and a frost-free climate, without which NZ may have to start importing such vegetables. He says housing’s competing for land means Kiwis must think more about where we build houses and grow food; the two must get on together. “We need to work out what the design of our cities should be to allow for food production and housing. The reason cities are where they are goes back in history: people could grow food where they lived, a key thing we have kind-of forgotten,” Raine told Rural News. “Urban sprawl out into the productive area around a town makes it a problem for future populations, so we are raising it with MPI, the government and councils.” More houses built on high-quality, productive soils mean less land for food production, he says. NZ in total uses 120,000ha for horticulture – no more than 1% of the land mass, “less than one eighth of the Canterbury Plains”. “All our apples, kiwifruit, other fruit and vegetables are grown on a very small area. Constantly putting concrete and tarseal on these TO PAGE 3

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

NEWS 3

Lost levy, lost opportunity

ISSUE 634

www.ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS���������������������������������������1-11 AGRIBUSINESS���������������� 12-13 MARKETS���������������������������14-15 HOUND, EDNA����������������������� 16 CONTACTS������������������������������ 16 OPINION�����������������������������16-18 MANAGEMENT��������������� 19-20 ANIMAL HEALTH�������������21-27 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS����������������������� 28-31 RURAL TRADER�������������������� 32

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 31.09.2016

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE WOOL industry might now be in a slightly better situation today had it voted for a levy in 2014, says Blenheim farmer Derrick Millton. Nevertheless wool may bounce back, just as dairy has done, he says. “The wool industry or the growers have very little say in the whole operation of our industry,” Millton told Rural News, when asked to comment on the low prices for wool. “It is really the result of not having that levy. The organisation of wool growers and the ability to work together is lost because of the lack of a collective with any funding at all. “NZ Merino was very keen to squash the levy, saying it was a dumb idea, back when we were trying to get it in place. That probably helped to make farmers vote against it. “If we had had some sort of levy organisations we might have been able to do a little more than we’ve done.” Millton was a member of the wool levy group which proposed a wool levy to set up an industry-good organisation. The vote for the levy was lost 57% to 43%. As a wool grower himself, Millton says it is now a very frustrating exercise growing wool, but the high price of lamb counters that somewhat. Shearing cross-bred second-shear sheep for probably a net return of zero after paying costs is something woolgrowers have to endure. “With the price of wool at the moment it feels like nothing will ever happen,” he says. “The problem is the

Derrick Milton

Chinese aren’t buying wool, and carpets are now being made more with synthetic material.” But he points out that when the price of dairy products dropped rapidly “we thought they were going to be there for ever and now it has turned around and they are on the way back”. “So don’t lose heart in wool. There might be a change when the supply

Big demand PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

and demand curves change. It may be slightly better than we are thinking at the moment, provided we can sort out the Chinese issue and the amount of wool they have in stock. “There are a lot of rumours and gossip about what is wrong with wool but basically it is just a wee hiccup I think. “Sheep are still pretty profitable at the sheepmeat price we are making at the moment, so I don’t think we will see a big drop in sheep numbers as a result of the wool price. “Not the whole wool industry is down: the Merino half-breed part of the industry -- which is not very much, probably about 9-10% -- is doing quite well. “That wool is still selling well and going into completely different areas than the rest of the clip. So it is not all wool – just crossbred wool, particularly second-shear -- that is having trouble.”

CONCRETE SQUEEZING OUT VEGES FROM PAGE 1

areas will force us to import produce and grow less and the consumer will face higher prices.” Raine notes that prices this season for vegetables have been higher because of the wet. Crop yields are down so prices have risen. Consumers want high quality, healthy, affordable fruit and vegeta-

bles, but they won’t get them unless the issue of land use is resolved. Horticulture foresees a bright export future, Raine says. “We are exporting large volumes of apples and kiwifruit: apples are heading for a billion dollar industry and kiwifruit four billion. Then we have cherries, avocados, onions, squash and potatoes becoming more important in value and volume.”

DEMAND TO get into the avocado industry is exceeding the supply of trees, says the chair of the Avocado Growers Association. Ashby Whitehead reports a wait as long as 18 months to get trees from nurseries, despite two new nurseries having started and the existing ones producing more trees. The industry recently held a function at parliament to thank its supporters such as MPI and to showcase its success to decision makers in Wellington. Whitehead says global demand for avocados is growing 10% a year. “It’s the new health food creating a real buzz in the market. Avocados are not only healthy, they are more versatile than most other foods... you can have them for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and even dessert.” There is big demand from Asia where consumers are just starting to see avocados in supermarkets; China and India are new markets. “There is a lot of headroom for avocados in these emerging markets.” Whitehead says the health properties of avocados make them a winner in Asia. They contain folic acid, desirable for pregnant women. Many commentators predict a bright future for the avocado industry, with good returns to growers. Some growers get the same returns as SunGold kiwifruit growers, Whitehead says. And the cost of running an avocado orchard is much lower than kiwifruit.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

4 NEWS

We’ve hit peak cow – LIC SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DAYS of high growth in New Zealand cow numbers are over, says LIC chief executive Wayne McNee. Numbers have dropped in recent years due to economic factors and environmental issues are forcing cows off farms in some regions. LIC is forecasting zero growth in cow numbers over the next five years. “We are calling it peak cow or cow equilibrium,” McNee told Rural News. “For forecasting purposes we are saying there will be no growth in cow numbers in the next five years; this forecast is corroborated by other information and what others are saying in the sector. “We are not seeing the [dairy] conversions for a variety of reasons – some economical, some environmental.” Over the last 23 years, on average an extra 100,000 cows were added to the national herd every year— an extra 2.3 million cows in the last 23 years. McNee doesn’t see that continuing. “We are seeing stabilisa-

tion; it may vary region to region -some will grow, some won’t.” McNee says the peak cow makes genetics and herd testing even more important. Farmers need to pick out the good cows in their herd; if the number of cows is down, let’s have the most productive. The most efficient cows will be those converting grass into milk, not waste. Farmers need to choose the right cows to breed from. “With our scheme at the moment, you can breed from the top 80% of your cows and

produce replacements and put the rest of them to a beef animal,” says McNee. “But to do that, you must know what are your best animals. you can’t do that by just looking at them in the shed and milking them; herd testing is the way to go.” McNee says peak cow aligns with what DairyNZ has been “saying for a long time”. “Identify your most efficient animals; focus on breeding from them and milk your best cows.”

LIC’s Wayne McNee says NZ’s dairy expansion is over.

the beef industry is seeing a growing number of dairy farmers breed cows, after replacements, to proven short gestation beef genetics,” Lineham says. “The figures speak for themselves: $20 to $40 for a bobby calf versus $150 to $275 which, over the average herd, equates to an increased calf cheque of $15,000 plus. “Dairy farmers wanting to take advantage of the demand for good dairy/beef calves can choose

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Otago farmer wins his dream title NIGEL MALTHUS

DEMAND FOR DAIRY CALVES DAIRY FARMERS are moving away from breeding bobby calves in favour of producing the quality dairy/beef calves needed by beef farmers. Doug Lineham, project manager for the Beef + Lamb NZ dairy beef integration programme, said demand for proven beef genetics was at record levels during the 2016 dairy mating season. “Traditionally dairy farmer focus is on producing milk, not calves, but the potential to treble their calf cheque by breeding calves in demand by

Milton sheep and beef farmer and eventual winner Nigel Woodhead competes in a practical section of the FMG Young Farmer of the Year 2017 at Massey University, Palmerston North.

between going all AI/high BW bulls to produce replacements, with the remainder of the herd going to short gestation beef genetics, or buy in naturally proven beef bulls.” Lineham emphasised, however, that ‘proven’ is at the heart of the value proposition. “Just because a bull has the looks doesn’t mean it is fertile or capable of siring the type of calf demanded by rearers and finishers.”

OTAGO FARMER Nigel Woodhead has won the FMG Young Farmer of the Year title after three days of intense competition in the national final. “I watched the Young Farmer of the Year when I was a child, so to win it is a childhood dream that I think will take a long time to sink in,” Woodhead says. “My wife Leanne and I worked really hard, and to win this is incredible.” Woodhead (28) farms the land he grew up on, having recently taken over the family’s 400ha sheep and beef farm about 10 minutes south of Milton. His father, Stephen Woodhead, the Otago Regional Council chairman, is a previous Young Farmer of the Year contestant. Schooled at Milton and Otago Boys High School, Woodhead graduated from Lincoln University with a BAgSc and worked at Midlands Seed in Ashburton for five years before returning to the family farm. He made the final after four previous appearances in a regional competition. Unusually, all seven of this year’s finalists were first-timers in the national final. Woodhead said he knew the competition would be tough, and that he would have to excel in the practical sections, knowing he was facing strong competition from the eventual secondplaced Hamish Best in the technical

sections. Contest chairman and former grand finalist Dean Rabbidge says he was thrilled to see an Otago Southland farmer take the title home for the first time in over 20 years. “History has been made tonight in a proud farming province and we couldn’t be happier.” NZ Young Farmers chief executive Terry Copeland says Woodhead is the epitome and pinnacle of what future leaders in the agri-sector need to be. “Nigel is an inspiring future leader who showcases the exceptional leaders we strive to develop.” To reach the final, about 400 contestants competed in 22 district contest and skills days, then seven regional finals in the Northern, Waikato-Bay of Plenty, Taranaki-Manawatu, East Coast, Tasman, Aorangi, and Otago-Southland regions. In the grand final, Woodhead was placed first overall ahead of Hamish Best, representing the East Coast, and Andrew Wiffen, from Tasman, third. Woodhead was also named the winner of the Ravensdown Agri-Skills Challenge, and Best also won the Agmardt Agri-business Challenge and the Meridian Energy Agri-knowledge Quiz and Speech Challenge. Northern’s Lisa Kendall took the Massey University Agri-Growth Challenge and Aorangi’s Arjan van’t Klooster the Hynds Agri-Sport Challenge.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

NEWS 5

More wool needed for a brighter future – WNZ PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

GREATER SALES volume is critical for Wools of NZ, says chair Mark Shadbolt. The trademarked scouring process Glacier XT will be a more volume-focused business, he says. “That will create lot more demand. It is creating a wool that is a lot whiter and brighter and is the sort innovation and technology we need to invest in to add value to the wool. “We have had a lot of interest in the market for it because the brightness is the key aspect that the industry hadn’t been able

Mark Shadbolt

to acquire until this technology became available.” If there was a quick fix for the wool industry it would have been done, he says. Many initiatives have been tried, unsuccessfully.

“Our strategy is very long term: we’ve been at it four and a half years. I think it will take another five years to gain any real traction and influence a significant volume of the NZ wool clip.”

But to make a difference requires building relationships right out to the consumer, spending money and adopting new technology, he says. “Trading wool as a commodity will never change the game. We have learned from 150 years of wool trading that [commodity trading] has never created real value back to the farmgate. “But from a farming point of view – sheep and beef -- we have been getting $6/kg for beef and $6 for lamb; that is helping but I would like to see $6/ kg for wool on a sustainable basis. “That would keep growers on their wool production.”

WINNY SPINS A WOLLY YARN USING WOOL in all government buildings is logical from a commonsense point of view, says Wools of NZ chairman Mark Shadbolt. “It is using a natural product produced here in NZ instead of synthetics out of oil wells somewhere else in the world. It is a good commonsense approach,” says Shadbolt. “I guess it comes down to practicality and affordability, but there’s a whole range of ways of looking at wool... what it costs... health and the insurance industry’s fire [rating]. “So wool has a lot of natural benefits other products won’t have. Everybody just looks at the cost of the product itself rather than weighing up

the real benefits. “Is it good for the NZ economy? If it is using NZ products – yes. Is it good for health? That has to be a saving in itself. Is it good for the insurance industry? If it ticks all those boxes it has to be a helluva lot better than manmade products.” NZ First leader Winston Peters initiated the idea, saying the party would prohibit synthetic carpets being installed in government funded buildings, instead requiring wool carpets and wool insulation to be specified. Shadbolt emphasises that Wools of NZ is not politically aligned. “We are a 100% grower-owned company and where we see benefit

to our growers we will certainly support those sort of initiatives. I think it is a common sense approach. “I acknowledge we get government support now as a company through NZTE so this isn’t indicating any political alignment. It is just common sense for farmers. “If every state house had wool in it, not only on the floor but in furnishings, and every government building had wool in it, you can imagine that would consume quite a bit of the clip; not that it will change the game that much but it does have an impact. “Governments have influence around the world so that may then flow into other governments using the same sort of initiatives.”

MILK ‘EM INSTEAD MASSEY UNIVERSITY sheep milking expert Craig Prichard’s fun exhibit at Fieldays -- allowing site visitors to milk a sheep -- had seriously optimistic intent. Behind the fun was positive news about the rapidly growing sheep milk industry in NZ. He noted that people have a sort of anxiety about food, prompting them to query its health properties and ponder whether it will make them feel better. People want to learn more about products made from sheep milk, Prichard says. The sheep milk cheese industry is growing; people like the elite products. At the same, he says, they are looking at the dairy cow industry -- labelled by some a polluter -- and comparing that to the sheep milk industry which they perceive is less harmful to the environment. Prichard says the sheep milking industry has strong relationships with farmers, the general public and customers. “We are connecting with people. What’s more the sheep milk industry

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has always been about food, not about animals. NZ farmers are in the habit of continuously thinking about production rather than the food they are producing; we are trying to make a transition [from production to food thinking] via sheep milking.” Prichard says farmers need to talk more about food and less about animals, and ditch the ‘dollars/kilo thing’. “That sends exactly the wrong message,” he explains. “You have to think about who you are trying to communicate with and the word ‘food’ is the one to use.” He says the food sector has to start thinking about how people will integrate its food products into their lives. Some may choose to be connoisseurs of cheese and that is great. “Others may respond to the industrialisation of their palette by some of the big companies in the food sector.” Prichard says the sheep milk industry is trying to show change can happen as it uses a different animal and produces different food. – Peter Burke

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

6 NEWS RUNNETH OVER? THE AMERICA’S Cup is a big opportunity for our food and beverage industry, says Meat Industry Association chief executive Tim Ritchie. “Lots of people will be coming down to this part of the world as a result of it and it is not necessarily those coming down just to watch,” he told Rural News. “There is all the preparation and all that. It provides a real opportunity for our food and beverage industries to be in front of them and convince them of our fine products and they will go home and be good ambassadors for them and want to get them. “So the real advantage is they will be here and sampling, not just looking at advertising on television or on paper. “The proof of the pudding is in the eating so it has to be positive in that sense. I guess that is one of the real benefits of tourism aside from the direct spend of those people here. “They will experience our fine wine, craft beer, good lamb and grass-fed beef; they will go back and go looking for it and tell all their mates. That’s got to be good.” – Pam Tipa

Innovation Massey’s focus PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MASSEY UNIVERSITY’s vice-chancellor Jan Thomas says she’s trying to induce a sense of innovation and entrepreneurship in the university’s graduates. Thomas is now consulting widely on a new strategy for Massey, within the university and with industry, to ensure its graduates and researchers create economic benefits for New Zealand. Her goal is to see industry and the university working hand-inglove, serving the needs of the community. She wants Massey graduates to be known for their capability and desirability as employees in a world where jobs are constantly evolving. Thomas says Massey

Massey vice-chancellor Jan Thomas.

is firmly in agri-food and agri-tech and is regarded as a world leader. “We are proud of that heritage and we intend to pursue it. The skill and capability within Massey is exceptional.” She wants senior students at Massey to spend time in industry to help develop their entrepreneurial skills to make them desirable employees. “I am trying to drive

that sense of innovation and entrepreneurship so that our students develop capabilities and networks by which to participate in the new economies, and so that our researchers are working handin-glove with people in the real world solving real world problems. We want Massey seen as the go-to university if there is a challenge or a problem that needs to be fixed.” Thomas says this

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requires unleashing the power of Massey University, a big part of which is working with industry. And there is the standard stuff of making sure the university’s teaching is excellent and its researchers are ranked as world class. All this, she notes, is future-proofing NZ in a rapidly changing world. Thomas this year made her first visit to Fieldays, seeing its great networking opportunity and the innovation and technology that makes NZ a quality exporter of land based products. She says Fieldays highlighted that many people growing up in NZ don’t have a lot of experience in the modern ways of producing food and fibre. She says debate over the use of the word ‘agriculture’ to describe the primary sector is interest-

ing: its heritage and roots no longer reflect the future because it is now envisaged as high-tech. “For me, the future of industries based on primary produce tend to be surrounded by high-tech, digital and so on. So we are dealing with businesses that are complex global systems. “Many other specialists skills are required for the primary sector so we should not be limiting our horizons about that. The workforce of the future is going to look very different and we need to be attentive to that and respond to it as educators and I think the sector needs to recognise that.” Thomas says while agri-food is often now used instead of agriculture she notes that this misses out fibre -- an issue still to be resolved.


RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

NEWS 7

Waikato ‘Inc’ approach urged to tackle water issues SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW WAIKATO Federated Farmers president Andrew McGiven is pushing for a united front to tackle water issues confronting the region. The Te Aroha dairy farmer says Feds aims to get the best outcome for the rural sector under the Waikato Regional Council’s Healthy Rivers/Wai Ora proposed plan change 1. The council aims to improve water quality in the Waikato and Waipa river catchments. Waikato Feds has at least 2000 members in dairy, sheep and beef, horticulture and forestry. McGiven says he wants a “Waikato Inc” approach so that small rural towns reliant on agriculture also get to have their say. The first round of submissions closed in March this year and the plan still needs to go through

hearings towards final decisions scheduled for next year. McGiven says his plan is to pull together the agriculture industry and the rural sector. “We are divided at the moment; we need a pansector approach from forestry through to horticulture, to understand what each sector’s submission is about and find Waikato Fed Farmers president Andrew McGiven. common ground. “I don’t expect every submission to be same but core riparian planting of waterways… drivers of each industry would be [we need to] find the same type similar when it comes to water of solutions for sheep and beef farmers, but they may be comand water quality.” McGiven says farmers will pletely different approaches in work with territorial authorities, order to achieve the same vision and scientists to further improve and goals.” The Waikato Regional Counwater quality in the hope that cil last month mailed brochures rules won’t be imposed. “As in the dairy industry, where to 10,000 landowners in the we have done lots of fencing and catchment, outlining the plan’s

?

key components and suggesting priorities for landowners’ thinking, to set them up for the time when final decisions are made. Those priorities include: • Registering all properties over 2ha in the Waikato and Waipā river catchments by March 31, 2019 • Providing a nitrogen reference point (NRP) by March 31, 2019. This will affect most properties over 20ha and commercial vegetable growers. Landowners who now keep good records may find it cheaper to prepare this information • Creating a farm environment plan (FEP). This will affect most properties farming over 20ha. FEPs are tailored to identify and manage the four key contaminants -- nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment and bacteria -- on a property, setting out specific timeframes for work to be done.

CANCER FUNDRAISER TWO BIG stock companies, PGG Wrightsons and Carrfields, will help support the cancer cause next month. The two companies, with the Feilding sale yards and The Cancer Society of New Zealand, Central Districts Division, have a scheme to encourage farmers to donate one or more animals at the biggest hogget fair in New Zealand, on August 9 at the Fielding sale yards. The money from each sheep donated will go directly to supporting cancer patients in the Manawatu, Rangitkei and Wanganui regions. “With over 400 rural

cancer patients per year in the central districts region seeking support from the Cancer Society, it is great to see the rural community get behind this event,” says Clare Crawly, chief executive of the Cancer Society, Central Districts division. Farmers wanting to donate a sheep for this sale can contact their local PGG Wrightsons or Carrfields Stock agent.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

8 NEWS

Uncertainty seems only certainty! PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

HRC’s strategy and regulation manager, Dr Nick Peet, says the court decision further increases the complexity and challenge of the consent pro-

“While governance can’t get involved in the design of the guidance documents, they have a role in stating whether the plan is fit for purpose.” has consulted planning experts and produced new guidance notes for new consent applicants, as required by law. But whether new applicants can meet these requirements -- even if they choose to apply for consent -- is an unknown.

cess for farmers. He says preparing the new guidance notes – the criteria on which a consent can be granted – has thrown up thorny issues. These relate to the ability of farmers to assess the cumulative effects of their operation on the

environment. “For example, where dairy farmers sit now if they apply for a consent we will have to consider -- and process their application,” Peet says. But he cannot give certainty on applications because the rules HRC must now abide by are tougher than those in force before the Environment Court ruling. Peet’s team has also prepared policy options for the council, including how it will give effect to the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management. And councillors are considering whether the One Plan should be changed -- in effect starting the 11-year, $10 mil-

lion One Plan process all over again. “While governance can’t get involved in the design of the guidance documents, they have a role in stating whether the plan is fit for purpose. Options to work through include a plan change, but even if a plan change was to be an option, the present plan as directed by the Environment Court remains operative and we have to give effect to it,” Peet said.

Given that Fish and Game and EDS have gained a ‘victory’ in the Environment Court, any plan change could be lengthy and costly. The present status of One Plan affects all farmers and horticulturalists. “The message from us to farmers is that we understand and appreciate [their] uncertainty and that they want to know what’s going to happen so they can move forward with certainty in

their businesses,” Peet says. “We are working to give them a clear pathway and guidance through the consent process.” However, despite the council’s best efforts, it clearly feels hamstrung by the court decision and requirement. A return to the past is almost impossible; the only certainty in the region is uncertainty and this is likely to prevail for years.

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HORIZONS REGIONAL Council’s One Plan has gone from complex to very complex and the chances of farmers getting the resource consents they want is still a problem. Farmers are now being told of the council’s understanding of an Environment Court decision earlier this year on the One Plan. Fish and Game and Environmental Defence Society successfully challenged the way HRC was implementing the One Plan; the Environment Court agreed, criticising the council’s moves. For the last three months

the council has sought to implement the One Plan in its present form and to the criteria set by the court. In light of this, HRC

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

NEWS 9

Rural NZ deserves better health support NIGEL MALTHUS

WITH 62,000 New Zealanders living and working rurally, their communities are the backbone of the economy, but they are poorly supported healthwise, says Otago University researcher Dr Fiona Doolan-Noble. The senior research fellow in the Department of General Practice and Rural Health is developing a national network aimed at sparking interest in this field; she is co-ordinating various research projects in rural health, hoping to get concrete improvements in rural health provision. With a nursing background and a PhD in primary health, Doolan-Noble was raised in a farming community in the UK, and still lives rurally, in Maniototo. She’s recruiting collaborators from such disciplines as business, economics and social geography, plus health professionals, rural organisations and “most importantly, rural communities”. “If this whole thing is going to work and make a difference for the health of rural communities and for health service provision, we need to have that

Rural health researcher Dr Fiona Doolan-Noble, pictured at home on her farm in Maniototo, is setting up a rural health research network to investigate and tackle rural health issues.

level of engagement with rural communities,” she says. She will also be seeking sponsorship and funding from businesses and philanthropists. Little research has been done on rural health issues, despite rural communities being pivotal to the

NZ economy. Doolan-Noble’s efforts have recently been recognised in the Health Research Excellence Awards: a grant of $100,000 has enabled her to employ a co-ordinator to get the network infrastructure up and running. Georgina

Richardson, trained in bioethics, also has a farming background. The network is active on social media and will soon pop up at field days and A&P shows, asking rural people directly what health issues are important. “I can come up with ideas that interest me, but they might not actually be the ideas that make a difference for rural where we want to make a difference; rural deserves it,” says Doolan-Noble. The network already has two projects underway. One, funded by the Southland Medical Foundation, is looking at rural people with implanted cardiac defibrillators (a form of pacemaker). Christchurch is the only South Island location where these be implanted. “We’re looking at what it’s like living with one of those defibrillators in rural Southland because it’s the furthest away from Christchurch you’re going to get,” Doolan-Noble explains. “So there may be a feeling of not feeling safe because you’re away from the expertise of the implanting centre. We’ve been talking to people who have them, and their partners, about what

life’s like. We’re about halfway through our data collection.” The other study looks at life for nurses living in rural communities. Doolan-Noble says overseas studies suggest this comes with “a level of moral distress,” due to the feeling of wanting to supply a service but being unable to because of the complications of the location. “As a nurse, when you live in a rural community and work as a health professional, those privacy relationship boundaries can sometimes be challenging,” she says. “We don’t know if rural nurses feel supported. And if they don’t, what would they like, to enable them to feel more supported?” Further studies awaiting funding include one aimed at investigating the various sources of stress that could impact rural people. Doolan-Noble is excited that her project is gaining momentum, after spending “over a year working the proposal up”. “To get it funded is very special because rural doesn’t attract the funding those other areas of health research attract normally.”


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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

NEWS 11

Canterbury plan change unworkable NIGEL MALTHUS

ENVIRONMENT CANTERBURY’S proposed Plan Change 5 is unworkable, says Federated Farmers Mid-Canterbury chairman, Michael Salvesen. Plan Change 5 -- the nutrient management and Waitaki plan change -was publicly notified on June 24 and is due to progressively take effect in various zones until January 2019. ECan says it seeks to deal with the effects of land uses, particularly farming, on water quality at a regionwide level, and to ensure the effective management of water quality in the Waitaki catchment. It will apply in catchments not currently the subject of sub-regional plans (such as Selwyn Waihora), but is expected to impact about 5000 farms. ECan councillor Professor Peter Skelton said the plan change sets industry agreed good management practices (GMPs) as the minimum standard for all farming activities. Resource consents, including audited farm environment plans, will be required if the area of winter grazing or irrigation on a property exceeds permitted limits. “The nutrient management rules

are intended to address the effects of changing land use and promote improved water quality outcomes in the region. With this in mind, we need to be clear about what constitutes good management practice on farms. Industry groups have now described what this means for their sector,” Skelton said. All farmers should have, as a starting point, a baseline nitrogen leaching rate that reflects GMP. ECan has developed a website -Farm Portal -- to collate and calculate information, and the plan change requires farmers to register their farming activities on the portal. However, Salvesen said that while some parts are “quite good” there was also a lot wrong with the plan. Some of the fertiliser and irrigation proxies (calculation models) were unworkable. But he said ECan would have to discover for itself how it would not actually work onfarm. “We’ve told them it’s unworkable and we’ve said we’re not going to appeal because you’ve made it too difficult in law; you’ve written it in such a way that it’s unworkable, and you can

Ecan councillor Peter Skelton.

sort out your own mess.” “It says irrigation’s got to run at 100% efficiency and there is to be no drainage below the root zone; both scenarios are completely impossible in a natural system. Irrigation does not run at 100% efficiency no matter how good you are,” said Salvesen. “We can’t comply, full stop.” Salvesen said that if ECan had asked farmers a few more questions they “wouldn’t get it so wrong”. Farmers had thought they were

and farmers don’t understand it”. “The scientists -- some of them -- they don’t understand it. We don’t know if it’s all true because some of the science is in its infancy. Then on top of that we have all the calculations. It looks like some wizard is pulling it out of his hat.” In some cases the calculations make “no sense at all,” said Leferink. “You’re going to be judged against this hypothetical ideal model of your farm, where in a lot of cases it doesn’t make any sense to the current state of your property.” Leferink also referred to the impossibility of requiring 100% efficient irrigation. “They’ve set themselves up to fail.” He said farmers would have to spend $2000 - $5000 every two years just to get audits done because it would become too complicated to do it themselves. Meanwhile, DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle said DNZ acknowledges the significant water quality and quantity issues facing Canterbury dairy farmers, and supports the basic approach of using GMPs and FEPs to

consulting in good faith. “We thought we were, but it turns out they weren’t listening.” Trying to comply with the plan would be expensive, he said. 4000 applications for consents, lodged at a minimum cost of $1700 each, in addition to farm environment plans, would be a minimum of $20 million on paperwork that would be better spent on mitigation factors such as fencing and planting. Salvesen, who raises beef and deer in hill country in the upper Hinds catchment, said that while most of the impact would be on the plains, the plan change was not all good for the hills either “if you look at some of the fencing requirements they’re putting in that are completely impractical.” Outspoken Ashburton dairy farmer Willy Leferink is warning that some debt-laden farmers could face bankruptcy if the plan change forces them to cut cow numbers to comply with the new environmental limits. He said farmers understand they must do something, but greatly fear they will be regulated by a tool that is unreliable. Leferink said the portal is “not easy

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

12 AGRIBUSINESS

Chinese moving to higher value dairy PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

he says. “Within that category the basic type of milk, white milk, has been declining over the past few years,” he says. “Premium milk has been growing faster at high single digit rates. On average we are seeing the white milk category being quite stagnant in growth.

Sandy Chen, Rabobank.

Premium milk is more or less milk with 3.3% protein content and 3.5% fat content – pretty standard quality milk in NZ. In China the basic type of milk comes with a protein content of 2.9% to 3%. “But consumers are increasingly moving towards a premium

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CHINESE DAIRY consumers are increasingly turning to higher value added or premium dairy products, says Sandy Chen, Rabobank’s senior dairy and beverages analyst for Asia. Low single digit

growth can be expected in Chinese dairy consumption in volume terms. But New Zealand processors should be adapting rapidly to the structural change to higher value products now occurring, Chen told Rural News. In the white milk category UHT is dominant,

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white milk and imported UHT liquid milk which by default is at the premium end and has better protein content than the domestic basic type of milk. That is one structural change within the categories.” Yoghurt is another dairy category with rapid growth. That has been perceived as a value added product and health and functional features are being marketed around the product. Yoghurt is growing at about 10% a year. A major category, infant milk formula, will continue to grow but the growth rate will not be as high as it used to be. Between 2000 and 2013 the growth was about 15% a year but it will probably taper off to under 10% in 2020, Chen says. In the next two years it should be slightly above 10% but it could taper off quickly in 2020. “This is likely because of the mildly positive

impact the relaxed childbirth policy had on the infant milk formula growth,” Chen says. “The peak of the growth will be captured between 2016 and 2019 before it starts to slow down again. Response to this policy is lukewarm. I think there is still a fair bit of hesitation by young people as to whether to respond to this policy. One of the concerns is about the perceived high cost of bringing up children in China.” In overall liquid milk equivalent terms the dairy demand has slowed down significantly from the fast growth period between 2000-2008 when it was growing nearly 20% a year. However the dairy import gap in China will remain and a slight widening is expected from 20% last year to about 25% in 2022. In 2020, Chen says, the estimated gap will be 24%. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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monitor farm performance. It will work with ECan to support farmers implementing the changes, and is pleased the hearing panel has accepted its concerns over the timeframe and pushed out compliance deadlines by 12 months. DairyNZ also supports, “at the conceptual level,” the development of the Farm Portal system but has concerns that some of the equations used to model GMPs may lead to significant differences between a farm’s nitrogen losses when estimated by Overseer and the estimated nitrogen losses when the farm is operating at GMP. DairyNZ will resolve issues as they arise. Farmers should contact them for help if the Farm Portal model produces numbers “that don’t make sense.” DNZ also has concerns about the irrigation model within the Farm Portal. “We consider that for irrigated dairy farmers the compliance requirements under PC5 may be unachievable with the current irrigation infrastructure. We believe farmers may have to spend a lot in a short time to comply with the plan change requirements.” Plan Change 5 was publicly notified on June 24 and any appeals must be lodged by July 21. Salvesen said Federated Farmers sees appeals as ineffective or expensive for small gains but will consider joining any appeal lodged by another party. He said PC5 is a large and complicated document and that’s “part of the problem”. “Then there’s the language it’s written in: unless you’re qualified you can’t understand it anyway, and then you can’t challenge it on a legal basis.” DairyNZ said it is analysing the decision and has the option of joining any action by another party.


RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

AGRIBUSINESS 13

Chinese chilled meat trial starts PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

TEN MEAT plants have begun a six-month trial of sending chilled beef and sheep meat to China, says Meat Industry Association chief executive Tim Ritchie. “We will demonstrate our performance and we are confident that will open up the market to all in the industry,” Ritchie told Rural News. “It will enable us to take advantage or capitalise on a different part of the market as the industry has done in other parts of the world.” For instance chilled lamb to Europe or chilled beef to Pacific markets. “The whole business model is about extracting maximum value from an animal,” he says. “One way of doing that is to

have as many markets open as possible – or as few restrictions as possible which allows the processors and exporters to capitalise on the opportunities out there.” Chilled meat will have significant potential, says Ritchie. “It is a higher value business – a business with greater risk because you have shelf life issues and all of that. “You are servicing a significant part of the market but you also have to have confidence that the value chain or the distribution chain is such that it can handle that chilled product. Any minor variation in temperature has a direct impact on the shelf life of the product.” New Zealand has evolved a good system for lamb over the years, says

Ritchie. “Lamb is pretty sensitive to temperature fluctuations,” he says. “The shelf life is dependent on that so we have evolved systems which allow us to get from one side of the world to another and still have sufficient shelf life to enable it to be further processed, or repackaged, and retailed and for someone to buy it and sit it in their fridge for a few days and still have a good experience with it.” NZ has developed those technologies over the years to deliver good product around the world, Ritchie says. “Other countries have probably done more of the pioneering work in beef but NZ did the pioneering work in lamb over the years. “So access for chilled

Tony Egan, Greenlea Meats, Nathan Guy and Richard Carlson, marketing manager, Greenlea Meats with a sample of chilled meat which is heading to China.

meat to China will be really good because the business in China takes a third of our sheep meat and about 18-19% of the beef.” So far all of it has been frozen. “The sheep meat area tends to be the lower value cuts, which in itself is great in the sense that they place a greater value on lower value cuts than

other parts of the world so it is logical that those value items go there. “But the great thing about that is the reason they put that greater value on the product is because it is more attuned to their cuisine and their tradition. “Breast and flaps and things that go there -they pay far more than anywhere else in the

world. They go in and bone it out, make their lamb rolls and slice it very thinly for their hot pot, the traditional Chinese dish which is fantastic. That has been great there -- the mainstay of the business. “But now with access to chilled product we can start to open doors in other parts of that market – the higher value end.”

Again it all depends on the integrity of the distribution system -- being able to handle it because it is a perishable product and more susceptible to abuse than frozen product. “It won’t go from nothing to a huge amount overnight. It is going to evolve which is good. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Low risk to honey from Myrtle rust COMVITA BELIEVES the overall risk to the New Zealand manuka honey industry from myrtle rust is low, says Comvita chief executive Scott Coulter. This is based on information the company has been collating about the ongoing myrtle rust situation. The same species of manuka plant from which manuka honey is produced in NZ is also in Tasmania which has similar varieties and environmental conditions. Government, primary industries and environmental

agencies have not reported any myrtle rust there on those species since it was first discovered in 2015. Nevertheless Comvita is taking the myrtle rust incursion seriously and is working on several initiatives, it says. Meanwhile the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and Department of Conservation (DOC) say they are placing legal restrictions on the movement of myrtle species plants and green waste out of an area of the Taranaki region. MPI’s myrtle rust response inci-

dent controller David Yard says to help control spread from the most infected area around Waitara, MPI has imposed a controlled area extending 10km out from the known infected properties. “It is illegal to move any plants or trees belonging to the myrtle family and any garden waste, fruit (feijoa or guava) or prunings from those plants out of this area.” Myrtle rust affects only plants in the myrtle family -- pohutukawa, manuka, rata, ramarama, lilly pilly,

eucalyptus (gum trees) and feijoa. Meanwhile Comvita’s Coulter says myrtle rust hasn’t been found on manuka plants in the wild and so far has only been found in plant nurseries and domestic environments, including the one infection found on a manuka plant, which was in a nursery. “Plant nurseries tend to have young plants in warmer and more humid environments than natural sites, and so are generally more susceptible to fungal infections.”

Nevertheless, Comvita is taking the myrtle rust incursion seriously and is responding, investigating ways to introduce resistance in the manuka plants it has developed. This may include working with Australian partners and research institutes investigating the impact of myrtle rust on native species there. It also may include working with scientists in New Zealand to apply the learnings from Australia and model potential outcomes locally. – Pam Tipa

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

14 MARKETS & TRENDS L amb - PM 16.0kg

BEEF PRICES n/c

M 2 B ull - 300kg

n/c

5.65

5.65

5.40

c/kgCWT NI

LAMB PRICES Last Week 5.70

Change

P 2 Steer - 300kg

2 Wks A go 5.70

Last Year 5.50

S te e r - P2 300kg

n/c

5 .7 0

-1 0

5 .6 0

P 2 Co w - 230kg

n/c

4.55

4.55

4.50

B u ll - M2 300kg

n/c

5 .6 5

n/c

5 .2 5

M Co w - 200kg

n/c

4.55

4.55

4.50

Ve n is o n - AP 60kg

n/c

8 .8 0

n/c

9 .1 0

Lo cal Trade - 230kg

+5

5.70

5.65

5.40

-10

5.60

5.70

5.30

M 2 B ull - 300kg

n/c

5.25

5.25

5.10

P 2 Co w - 230kg

-10

4.20

4.30

4.10

M Co w - 200kg

n/c

4.30

4.30

4.10

Lo cal Trade - 230kg

n/c

5.90

5.90

5.40

North Island 16kg M lamb price

6.0

Slaughter 7-Jun

7-A ug

7-O ct

$/kg

5.0

7-Jun 5yr Ave

7-A ug

7-O ct

Last Ye ar

This Ye ar

6.0

20

5yr Ave

10-Sep 10-Oct 11-May

7-Jun

7-A ug

7-O ct

South Island 300kg steer price

5.5

7-Jun 5yr Ave

7-A ug Last Ye ar

7-O ct This Ye ar

5yr Ave

n/c +1

Last Year

2 Wks A go 238 719

3 Wks A go 238 718

Last Year 221 682

6.0 7-A pr

7-Jun

7-A ug

7-O ct

South Island 60kg stag price

10.0

204 633

Last Year This Year 150 $1.50 10-A pr 10-Jun 10-A ug 10-O ct 5-Jun 12-Jun 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Procurement Indicator -3.4 -2.5

2Wks A go 75.4 70.0

3 Wks A go 78.8 72.5

Last Year 80.9 73.4

5yr A ve 77.5 70.0

P rocu rement Indicator Procurement Indicator -- North North I.Island 95 90% 85% 80% 75% 75 Last Year 70% This Year 65% 60% 55 0… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 7-A pr 7-Jun 7-A ug 7-O ct

Procurement Indicator - South Island

8.0

7.0 6.0 7-A pr

7-Jun 5yr Ave

7-A ug Last Ye ar

This Ye ar

7-O ct

90 P rocu rement Indicator - South I. 85% 80% 75% 70 70% 65% Last Year 60% This Year 50 7-Jun 7-A ug 7-O ct 55%7-A pr 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 0-Jan 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

% of export returns

9.0

11 May

10 Oct

11 Jul Last Ye ar

UK Leg p/kg

n/c

Last Week 5.90

NZc/kg

n/c

9.26

Change

5yr A ve

% of export returns

7.0

10 Sep

5yr Ave

10 Nov

11 Sep This Ye ar

550

2 Wks A go 5.90

Last Year 5.40

9.26

8.27

5yr A ve 5.47 8.67

Export demand indicator - UK CKT leg

450

350 10 Jun

10 Aug

10 Oct

Procurement Indicator

% Returned NI % Returned SI

8.0

k 10 0Aug

250 10 Apr

Change

9.0

200

Export Market Demand

This Year

Export indicator - US 95CL D edemand mand Indicator - US 95CL Beefbeef

North Island 60kg stag price

10.0

S outh Island Weekly Lamb Kill

200k 300

11-May 10-Oct 11-Jul10-Nov 11-Sep 10-Sep 5yr Ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

USc/lb

4.0 7-A pr

10 Nov 11 Sep

South Island w eekly lamb kill

400 250k

11 Mar

$2.00

4.5

This Year

10 Oct11 Jul

150k

$2.50 200

5.0

Last Year

10 Sep 11 May

100 50k

95CL USc/lb NZc/kg 250 $3.00

5yr Ave

k 0 1011 Aug Mar

100k

Change

6.0

$/kg

10-Dec 11-Sep

Export Market Demand

4.0 7-A pr

$/kg

10-Nov 11-Jul

South Island Weekly Cattle Kill

4.5

$/kg

This Year

S outh Island Weekly Cattle Kill

0 k 11-Mar 10-Aug

5.0

Last Year

10k40 30

5.5

200

100 50k

5k20 10

North Island 300kg bull price

300

100k

15k60 50

4.0 7-A pr

Last Year 5.31 5.33 5.35 5.36 2.60 5.23 5.23 5.23 5.23 2.50

150k

50

10 k 0 10-Aug 11-Mar

6.0

2 Wks A go 6.51 6.53 6.55 6.56 4.10 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 4.15

200k

40 20k30

South Island 16kg M lamb price

7.0

Thousand head

40k60

4.0 7-A pr

n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c -5

Last Week 6.51 6.53 6.55 6.56 4.10 6.48 6.48 6.48 6.48 4.10

North eekly lamb N ort hIsland Islandw Weekly Lambkill Kill

250k 400

North N ort hIsland IslandWeekly Weekly Cattle Cattle Kill Kill

Change

Slaughter Thousand head

5.0

$/kg

P 2 Steer - 300kg

Thousand head

$/kg

7.0

SI

c/kgCWT NI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 16.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1 - 21kg SI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 16.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1- 21kg

Thousand head

c /kgCWT

S o u th Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 6 .4 8

UKp/kg

No rth Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 6 .5 3

LAMB MARKET TRENDS

% Returned NI

+0 .4

2Wks A go 72.9

% Returned SI

-0.2

71.3

Change

85 80%

3 Wks A go 72.5

Last Year 67.7

71.4

65.8

5yr A ve 70.0 68.4

Procurement P rocu rementindicator Indicator-- North North Island I.

% of export returns

Me at

BEEF MARKET TRENDS

75 70% 65 60%

Last Year

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 7-A pr 11-Sep 11-Oct 7-Jun11-Nov 11-Dec 7-A ug11-Jan 11-Feb 7-O ct 75 80%

% of export returns

MARKET SNAPSHOT

Procurement indicator - South Island P rocu rement Indicator - South I.

70% 65 60% Last Y ear

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 7-A pr 11-Sep 11-Oct 7-Jun 11-Nov 11-Dec 7-A ug11-Jan 11-Feb 7-O ct 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Venison Prices NI Stag - 60kg

n/c

Last Week 8.80

SI Stag - 60kg

n/c

9.10

Change

2 Wks A go 8.80

Last Year 7.85

9.10

7.95

5yr A ve

Beef & venison prices are reported as gross (before normal levies & charges are deducted). Lamb & mutton prices are reported nett (after levies & charges are deducted).

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

MARKETS & TRENDS 15 NEWS

PRICE WATCH

BEEF:

Beef availability on the spot market in the US continues to be particularly tight and is keeping prices for this market particularly firm. This has been exacerbated by the complete ban of Brazilian beef imports. There is, however, more apprehension around the forward market, with orders taken now set to be delivered on what is likely to be a much softer August market.

WOOL PRICE WATCH Indicato rs in NZc/kg

06-Jul

29-Jun

Last Year

Indicato rs in USc/kg

Change

06-Jul

29-Jun

Last Year

-73

267

340

498

Co arse Xbred

-55

194

249

362

-

-

395

524

Fine Xbred

-

-

289

381

Lamb

-

-

390

-

Lamb

-

-

285

-

M id M icro n

-

-

-

-

M id M icro n

-

-

-

-

Wool trends Woindicator ol Indicator Trends

850 600

Fine crossbred indicator

600 CXI FXI LI

650 400

500

c/kg

750 500

c/kg

operating prices has slowed. While there are small increases still present in the North Island, the South Island looks to have levelled out for the moment. Processors have plenty of lambs around them for the current capacity, and also given the start of the bobby calf season. Dry ewes are also filling any gaps on processing chains, and these should keep coming out through July. Store lambs continue to trade at a firm level. However, with the number of buyers in the North Island dropping off, there is unlikely to be any further upside to the market, even as supply eases. The gentle rise in the South Island market through May and June looks to be slipping its way into July too. Breeding ewes continue to attract interest and $140-$160 remains a common range for the North Island, with the South Island sitting around $15 above this.

Change

Fine Xbred

Co arse Xbred

SHEEP: The rate of increase in lamb

Overseas Wool Price Indicators

400

550 300

300

450 2007-Jul 7-O ct42236 7-Jan 7-A pr42418 WeekNo 42110 42124 42138 42152 42166 42180 42194 42208 42222 42250 42264 42278 42292 42306 42320 42334 42348 42376 42390 42404 42432 42446 42459 CXI FXI LI

200 6-A pr

650600

crossbred indicator C oCoarse arse Xbred Indicator Last Year

600500

5yr ave

This Year

550400 500300

6-Jun

6-A ug Last Ye ar

6-O ct This Ye ar

Lamb w ool indicator

700 600

c/kg

INTERNATIONAL

Imported prices are steady this week, and are expected to stay this way through July and soften into August. One threat that has emerged is the onset of dry conditions in Australia. This has forced much larger volumes of beef into the US market.

c/kg

BEEF: The mood in the cattle slaughter market has taken a slightly softer direction. There are plenty of signals from processors that prices may see some downside in the short term. Export prime and bulls seem to be weak points, and processors are limiting the number of these killed, not helped by the low levels of capacity on-hand in the lead up to the bobby calf kill. Local trade is bucking the trend through the South Island, making around 20c/kg more than export prime. Store markets are tracking along at a relatively high level considering it’s the middle of winter. The softer tone to beef schedules may go some way to keeping a lid on prices, however the very real shortage of any good quality store cattle, may outweigh the impact of easing slaughter prices.

500 400 300

4502006-A pr Oct Dec 5yr ave

6-Jun Feb

6-AJun ug Apr Last Ye ar

Aug 6-O ct This Ye ar

200 6-A pr 6-May 5yr ave

6-Jun

6-Jul

6-A ug

Last Ye ar

6-S ep

6-O ct

This Ye ar

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

16 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Woolly thinking IT’S NO secret that current wool prices are awful, but the outlook for the fibre has been terrible for many years. For some types of wool, more has been put in storage than has sold in the last nine months, mainly due to lack of demand from China. According to reports, current wool exports to China are 40% lower than last year. This highlights the folly of the industry relying on China alone. As Wools of NZ chair Mark Shadbolt says, “The world is our market so as soon as you allow 60% of all of our exports to go into one country then you are exposed.” Things are not flash, especially at the stronger-wool end of the spectrum: sale prices for 39 micron wool have been about $3.25/kg versus $5.80 a year ago; 35 micron $3.35 vs $5.85; and 29 micron $6.65 vs $7.85. These prices make wool basically worthless. How is it that a natural fibre with huge environmental positives and other benefits is worth nothing? In the dark, distant past, NZ’s economic prosperity was put down to ‘coming off the sheep’s back’ – meaning wool – but not so for decades. Today, Beef + Lamb NZ estimates that wool only makes up about 9% of sheep and beef farm income. This figure is likely to fall further if the current market for crossbred wool does not improve. Blame for the dismal state of the wool sector is pinned to over-reliance on China, the industry’s lack of added value and poor promotion. Growers are not without blame. They basically gave up on wool promotion when they voted to can the wool levy a few years back. Others gave up completely on sheep, changing to dairy farming, hence the huge drop in the national sheep flock and the growth of the national dairy herd in the past decade. The sheep flock’s drop from 70 million to below 30 million in 20-odd years has done more than anything else to slash wool’s annual earnings from $1 billion to $500 million. Cheap political stunts such as proposing that public servants be forced to specify woollen carpets in government offices is about as forwardthinking as were carless days and forcing people to get a doctor’s prescription in order to buy margarine. Such schemes may sound good to struggling wool producers, given the sector’s parlous state, but do farmers really want to go back to the days of relying on the whims of self-styled, political demi-gods for their economic survival? If so, the wool industry deserves to go the way of supplementary minimum prices, the Berlin Wall and party telephone lines.

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THE HOUND Horsing around

Junket science?

Not a puff

Nasty lot

YOUR OLD mate hears the Poms are in trouble again over the quality of meat going into their burgers. Media reports from the UK say some supermarkets have admitted there is horsemeat in their ‘home cooked burgers’. Even places like Burger King have had to admit to “small amounts” of horsemeat in their burgers. Tesco, the giant UK supermarket chain, is in the spotlight. Within hours of the news that Tesco’s ‘all beef hamburgers’ contained 30% horsemeat, many quips hit the internet, such as: • Anyone want a burger from Tesco? Yay or neigh? • Not entirely sure how Tesco are going to get over this hurdle. • These Tesco burger jokes are going on a bit: talk about flogging a dead horse.

IMAGINE YOUR canine crusader’s surprise to find that a so-called expert and arch-critic of agriculture brought into NZ by organics activist Brendon Hoare is considered a bad joke by genuine scientists. ‘Professor’ Don Huber makes a living doing publicity tours sponsored by organic, alternative health and anti-GMO groups. He claims glyphosate and GMO herbicide tolerant crops are killing humans and animals by the thousand. The trouble is, there is no peer-reviewed science or a shred of evidence to support his fantasies. Huber is also accused of taking data out of context, using discredited and junk science – anything to bolster his shaky theories. Which is probably why Hoare hosted the ‘professor’ recently in that hotbed of credulous lovies and foodies, Grey Lynn, Auckland.

WINSTON PETERS, has proven again to be all hat and no trousers. The latest example is the member for North Korea’s – sorry, Northland’s – deafening silence over the sale of a farm in his electorate to Johnny Foreigner. While the tiny MP is quick to rail against Chinese ownership and farm sales, no one has heard a peep out of him over the sale of a 316ha farm within his electorate to Andreas Calantzopoulos, the Switzerland-based chief executive of tobacco giant Philip Morris. Peters was recently on the road – care of the taxpayer and not fronting up in parliament – on a regional bus tour, with his stump speech bagging “the massive sell-off of New Zealand land” and the “land grab by foreigners”. However, he failed to say a word against the sale to Calantzopoulos. Perhaps if he spent more time in Northland he may know about these things.

YOUR OLD mate reckons multinational, tax-dodging political activist lobby group Greenpeace is proving just how nasty it can get when people disagree with its worldview. This follows Wairoa farmer James Jarden filming himself drinking water from a stream on his farm in a bid to prove water quality issues aren’t confined to farming and asking other farmers to do likewise. But Greenpeace ‘anti’-agriculture campaigner Genevieve Toop claimed it was risky for these people, and encouraging others to do it is also risky and farmers should take a more “scientific” approach to the water quality issue. Ironic considering Toop and Greenpeace – when it suits their purposes – are only too happy to quote unscientific claims such as dairy cows cause cancer or that the campylobacter outbreak in Hawkes Bay was caused by dairying.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

OPINION 17

Real progress can be made at catchment level – Rolleston NEW ZEALAND, as we all know, is blessed with abundant water and we have it to ourselves. We have abundant water, but not always in the right place at the right time.  For example, North Canterbury had been in drought for three years, affecting not only farmers who had to turn off their irrigators, but also rivers like Selwyn – the subject of intense media scrutiny over the early part of this year.   In the final Selwyn

ag twits

River hurrah, before the rains came and ruined all the fun, The Press, in Christchurch, ran a front page article on the Irwell River where fishing had been destroyed. Buried deep in the article were two small observations: nearby Heart Creek had been destitute for some ten years before, but farmers had got together and rehabilitated it; and the complaining fisherman travelled to South Canterbury’s Opihi River to fish, yet no mention was made of its being supplemented

Even Horizons was achieving water quality progress as they implemented their plan but at the point they were dragged off to court. by the Opuha Dam built by farmers. This raises a question: how is the primary sector achieving on-the-ground behaviour change to meet the challenge to improve fresh water? Farmers have seen the problem of over-allocation of water in the Selwyn River and are

Rural News’ irreverent and hypothetical look at what’s happening in the farming world

Top Bleats view all @benglishpm: I’ve about as much responsibility for Todd Barclay’s recording things in his electorate office as @littleandylabour or @winstonfirstandlast have for Shane Jones recording blue movies in his hotel room. #nothingtodowithme @shanejones: Hey @winstonfirstandlast thanks for the free ride into parliament. You won’t regret it and I have a great list of movie titles I can recommend. As the Jones boy likes to say, free porn for all. #shanerisesagain @gmorgantop: Listen up you bunthch of dropkicthz: I hate catthz and they must all be enthanizthed! Justh asthz all cowthz must die and all farmerths must drink water full of e-coli until all our riverthz and thsreamthz are as clear as my thspeech. #allgoodpoliciethz @winstonfirstandlast: I recently told farmers that the Lions were led by some Johnny Foreigner donkey called Warburton. But if they vote for NZ First they’ll get a bunch of monkeys led by a stupid, old goat. Ohhh… I’m all confused; it happens at my age #overthehill @littleandylabour: Here’s Labour’s water policy: when I’m fronting Fed Farmers we’re definitely not going to charge farmers a royalty for water. However, when I am safely back in my office and away from farmers we’ll definitely be charging farmers for water. Got it? It’s as crystal clear as Auckland’s waterways. #clearasmud @greenpeacenz: As you all know Greenpeace is a facts-based organisation: we just make up the ‘facts’ based on our ideology; for example all dairy cows are bad because they cause cancer and aids. #fakemoos @jwilsonfonterra: Imagine if all those NZ politicians who are quick to put the boot into the Chinese or President Trump and the US showed the same kind of vitriol and criticism towards the Canadians and their oh-so-spunky PM Trudeau for the way they are gaming world dairy prices! #silenceisdeafening #won’tholdmybreath @kmilnefedfarmers: Apparently it’s not the fact that I’m a successful farmer in my own right, or that I’m deputy chair of the country’s second-largest dairy company, or that I’ve been a national board member for a while that makes me suitable as the new head of Feds, but the fact that I have 2 X chromosomes. #getoverit #farmingisnotgenderspecific

working hard to address this. They recognise the effect nutrients are having on Te Whaihora and are working to fix that too. In my own patch of coastal South Canterbury, farmers reacted strongly and negatively to the potential imposition of rules restricting water use and allocating nutrients.   However once they had became engaged and understood the issues, they moved quickly from reaction to proaction. They worked together to achieve the best solution which in my view needed to pass two critical tests: first, any regime would not affect the business value of the high emitters; second, any regime would not affect the land value of the low emitters.   We did pretty well in those regards, but only because the farmers worked from the catchment up to find solutions. No one is saying farmers and farming have no effect on the environment.   What I am saying is that up and down the country farmers get it and are working hard to address the problem. Dairy farmers have spent at least $1 billion fencing rivers, riparian planting and improving effluent management.   Their dryland cousins have contributed most to setting up QEII cove-

nants protecting private land for conservation at a real and opportunity cost of $1.2b to $1.4b; our levy bodies spend millions of dollars on research, much of it now focused on water issues. Catchment by catchment, farmers and other locals are working together to come up with solutions that are sensible, practical and affordable. They are on a journey. Despite this effort there are still catchments which need work and we need

to concentrate our efforts there. But I contend that behaviour change is already under way: 80% of our catchments have water either improving or stable in quality. Even Horizons was achieving water quality progress as they implemented their plan but at the point they were dragged off to court. On-the-ground behaviour change happens when the players are engaged constructively, not forced to keep

a narrow set of unworkable rules. On-the-ground behaviour happens when the problem is viewed from the ground up (catchment by catchment) not from the top down. And on-theground behaviour change happens when it is led by good science, not activist rhetoric. • This is an edited version of a speech given to Local Government NZ in June by former Federated Farmers national president William Rolleston.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

18 OPINION

Annual conference provides plenty QUEENSTOWN HAS attracted many different visitors over the past month or so. The British and Irish Lions recently took time out from their test series against the All Blacks to spend a few days of R&R in the resort town, while the Winterfest festival saw a myriad of visitors from New Zealand and overseas hit the tourist town. But not before about 200 agricultural contractors from all around the country had dropped into Queenstown in late June for this year’s Rural Contractors NZ (RCNZ) annual conference. This was a record attendance for an annual conference – up on last year’s previous best turnout of 153 contractors. I was delighted but unsurprised by the huge conference turnout in Queenstown given the stunningly location and improved rural economic climate over the past year. It seems many rural contractors took the opportunity not only to network with their colleagues and industry people but also to visit this

stunning part of the world. Neither the outstanding scenery nor the conference was anything but first class. The theme for this year’s conference was ‘Keep Healthy and Informed’. It had an exciting agenda of relevant and pertinent issues to the rural contracting sector, and many of top-line speakers. Presentations over the three days covered a myriad of topics including men’s health, insurance, worker health, stress management, employment law, succession planning and looking after your workers and yourself. However, it was not all serious business with a fair bit of fun had over the week as well. One of the highlights was helicopter pilot and local legend Sir Richard ‘Hannibal’ Hayes’ entertaining and enthralling after-dinner speech at the famous Skyline Restaurant on the Tuesday night. We also had a field trip across Lake Wakatipu for lunch at the historic Walter Peak Station and on one eve-

Rural contractors from around NZ turned out in record numbers to attend this year’s conference in Queenstown.

ning were entertained by international rugby referee Paddy O’Brien. Meanwhile, our annual charity auction raised at least $35,000, this year split 50:50 between the local St John and the Southland and Queenstown Lakes Region Air Rescue Trust. The auction is each year a part of RCNZ’s annual conference, the proceeds going to St John in the region. Sponsors provide gifts for the sale and RCNZ members then bid for them. The wonderful range of products had our members digging deep to benefit St John.

I am always amazed at the generosity and willingness of our members to support St John; it shows the high regard rural contractors hold for the service. Over the last five years RCNZ has raised nearly $130,000 for St John all over New Zealand. A big tribute must go to the local organising committee who planned and ran the conference. They put in a huge amount of work and set up a hugely successful and interesting event. On behalf of all RCNZ, I want to thank them for doing such an outstanding job.

The conference finished with with the annual RCNZ awards dinner and dance. Next year’s conference will be held at Solway Park in Masterton from June 25-28. If you have never attended a national conference before I can highly recommend it as a great opportunity to network with contractors from all around the country, learn new stuff and have a bit of fun. • Wellsford-based agricultural contractor Steve Levet is the president of the Rural Contractors New Zealand (RCNZ).

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

MANAGEMENT 19

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Foundation for Arable Research chairman David Birkett addresses attendees on a field trip to Lake Ellesmere during FAR’s Growing Sustainable Futures Conference at Lincoln University. RURAL NEWS GROUP

Challenges ahead for arable there?” Birkett said protein replacement is a “really interesting” development BIG CHANGES are coming in world because of arable farming’s environfood supply, says Foundation for mental footprint. Arable Research (FAR) chairman “It’s important that we try to David Birkett. understand what those advantages With growing interest in synare and that we front-foot wherever thetic foods replacing traditional we can. Our international collaboprotein sources, the arable industry rations allow us to do is well-placed because that, and through FAR most of the opportuAustralia we are able to nities are plant-based “It’s important that we try to get access to research material, he said. understand what those advantages we would never get “Plant-based mateare and that we front-foot done here because of rial [is good in respect the scale of our indusof] environmental wherever we can. Our international try.” losses and I think that’s collaborations allow us to do that, He predicted further where a lot of the drive gains from agronomy will come from – the and through FAR Australia we are improvements of 1-2% public’s demand for able to get access to research we but 5-10% gains from sustainable and effiwould never get done here because market opportunities. cient food production. Birkett, a Leeston “The question for of the scale of our industry.” cropping farmer with us is how does the a recent but unoffiNew Zealand arable cial world record wheat yield to his farmer fit into that, because a lot of them and have the proof at hand. The issues facing the industry name, also addressed conference the production will come from the goers during a field trip to the nearby big commodity growers around the have become far broader, he says. “As we’ve seen over the last 10 shore of Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora. world. We can’t compete with them He recommended farmers form so we’ve got to find the point of dif- years, climate seems to be changing whether you believe in climate community groups to deal with ference NZ has in that area.” FAR recently held its two-day change or not. The fact is the distri- issues in their areas, explaining how he and his neighbours formed a national conference at Lincoln Uni- bution of rainfall is changing. “We need to understand what group to liaise with ECan. versity, on the theme ‘Growing SusAmong other achievements, their those changes mean, how we manage tainable Futures’. Birkett said that over its 20-year them and whether those changes lobbying had helped simplify Ecan’s history FAR had moved as an give us opportunity – perhaps new environmental compliance paperorganisation from its beginnings crops that may be grown in areas work. concerned with simple crop where they previously weren’t. And Meanwhile, the country’s 2500 how do we maximise those crops to arable farmers were being urged to agronomy. About five years ago it had started get the most out of them? vote ‘yes’ in the upcoming referen“Markets are changing as well. dum to confirm FAR’s mandate to to look at the whole farm system, rotations and how they interlinked. We’ve got to understand the levy its members for the next few Looking at that big picture had demands of the markets we’re sell- years. brought big gains, he said, and the ing into. Birkett expected the referen“If we don’t we’re not going to hit dum to pass but said it wasn’t just a strategy for the next few years would those markets correctly. be to look wider still. rubber stamp. “It’s always good “There’s a lot of talk now about to check the pulse.” “We’re now starting to shift to the next area of the whole farm business, proteins replacing meat and milk in @rural_news because there are components out- the marketplace. What is our role facebook.com/ruralnews NIGEL MALTHUS

side the farmgate that are having a big influence on how we operate. We need to integrate those issues into the farming business and address them.” Opening the conference, Birkett said FAR’s front-footing of the issues would put arable farmers in a position to answer questions asked of

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

20 MANAGEMENT

NZ precision ag firm expands NIGEL MALTHUS

CropLogic chief executive Jamie Cairns.

THE LINCOLN precision agriculture company CropLogic is expanding into the North American market via its takeover of a Washington State firm. CropLogic, which markets a “predictive decision-support system for agriculture”, has bought Professional Ag Services Inc (ProAg), in Pasco, in the Columbia River basin region of southern Washington. Because ProAg has clients throughout Washington and the surrounding areas of Oregon, Idaho and Canada, CropLogic says the deal will give it immediate access to the lucrative North American agricultural industry, and an established channel to develop in those key regions. CropLogic chief executive Jamie Cairns says

the takeover gives it a team of experienced agronomists with an established client base. It would otherwise have been “a long road” to get a foothold in the American market. Using aerial imaging and in-field sensors, ProAg has at least 40,000ha under management, including 24,000ha of high-margin crops, and employs 16 staff. “Strategic acquisitions provide CropLogic with immediate market access, relationships and acres under management, and have always been a fundamental part of our market entry strategy,” said Cairns. “This acquisition meets many of our initial North American goals, and both parties are excited with the plans for the upcoming years. “We believe this first acquisition demonstrates CropLogic’s ability to execute the company’s international growth strategy.” Cairns says a common criticism of technology ventures is their questionable ability to convert technology into revenue. “Our strategy provides us with the opportunity to firstly use our tech-

nology to transform and optimise the business model of the acquisition target itself, before then introducing additional services to its clients. It is a two-phase approach that we believe reduces the cost and risk of market entry.” In a statement released by CropLogic, ProAg’s co-founders Roger McCary and Mike Stephenson say they are looking forward to bringing CropLogic’s innovative technologies to growers in the American Northwest. CropLogic gathers data via lowpowered wireless networks and satellite systems from in-field sensors. Using plant growth modelling originally developed by Plant & Food Research, its software processes the data with proprietary algorithms to provide growers with real-time decision support. Cairns emphasises the software’s “predictive” power. “With that plant model it allows us to ascertain what the likely yield impact of decisions being made throughout that growing season, so we can potentially reverse-engineer some problems -- maybe stabilise some yield

projections for that particular year. “And in a limited resource-type environment, perhaps you’ve got restrictions on how much water or nitrogen you are able to apply. We are able to relate that back to that plant model and ensure that the grower is able to apply those resources to the maximum possible yield benefit at the other end.” CropLogic has mainly worked with potatoes so far but is ready to begin field trials in corn, wheat, soybean and cotton. Cairns says the purchase was funded from capital; about $3.5 million has been raised from various investors since he joined the company about a year ago. It intends listing on the Australian Stock Exchange in August. Based at the Plant & Food campus at Lincoln, CropLogic has an agreement to continue to use the CRI for research. “Our relationship with those guys is extremely positive and I imagine it is only going to be built on over the coming years,” said Cairns. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH 21 Water-based MAGNUM® Nil meat witholding. Nil Lice. Nil worries.

Research has shown that shearing ewes in mid pregnancy can increase multiple-born lamb birthweights.

Benefits of shearing pregnant ewes Research shows that increasing the birth weight of otherwise lightweight lambs – mostly multiple born – increases their survival. Professor Paul Kenyon from Massey University explains how shearing pregnant ewes can play a part in this. INDUSTRY FUNDED studies in New Zealand have shown that mid-pregnancy shearing can increase multiple-born lamb birthweight by up to 0.7 kg and lamb survival by 3 to 5%. In those individual studies, ewes were shorn as early as day 50 of pregnancy and as late as day 110. This relatively long period for a response suits most farms where ewes are bred over a 34 to 51 day period. Ideally timing should occur so that shearing is done 100 days after the ram is first introduced to the ewes for breeding. Other production advantages reported from mid-pregnancy shearing include increased colostrum production and lamb growth to weaning by up to 1 kg and less ewe casting. Timing is not all that ensures success with mid-pregnancy shearing. Multiple-bearing ewes

are more likely to respond than singleton bearing ewes, as their lambs are most likely to be lighter. Therefore if farmers wish to limit the numbers of ewes they shear in the winter, not shearing singleton bearing ewes is an option. Increasing birth weight of singleton born lambs could increase dystocia rates. Studies have also shown that ewes need to have some ‘spare body reserves’ to partition towards increased foetal growth and that ewes need a body condition score of at least 2.5 at shearing to respond. Additionally, to limit the risk of ewes being lost due to coldstress immediately post shearing, they need to be shorn with a cover comb (or snow comb or blades) and provided good pasture allowances (above 1200kg DM/ha). Good pasture cover also increases the likelihood of

enhanced foetal growth occurring, resulting in heaver lamb birthweights. Shelter should be provided post shearing and farmers should aim to minimise the time ewes are off feed. Consideration should be given to stopping shearing while it is still light to ensure ewes have a feed before it gets dark. Monitoring of the weather forecast is another important aspect. Many farmers may be unwilling to shear ewes in winter if it increases feed demand during the winter period. Studies have shown that mid-pregnancy shearing has been found to either not increase ewe intakes, or to only slightly increase intakes by less than 10%. The birth weight response has been found without an increase in ewe intake. Mid-pregnancy shearing can be used in ewe hoggets, but care

must be taken as there is a risk of increased lamb birth size and dystocia if the hogget is not well grown. Hoggets also often do not have the spare body condition to partition towards enhanced foetal growth. Shearing ewes in the last 30 days of pregnancy (often called pre-lamb shearing) has been used as a management tool to ensure high wool quality. Shearing that late in pregnancy will not increase lamb birthweight. A lamb survival response can still occur, but because the ewes feeling the cold seek shelter at lambing. However, this survival advantage will only occur if the ewes have shelter to utilise. It is advisable that shearing not be done too late in pregnancy, as there is increased risk of losses due to pregnancy toxemia, especially in multiple bearing ewes. On a farm shearing in late pregnancy, it is important to limit the period of time ewes are off feed. Ewes shorn between days 50 and 100 of pregnancy will not seek shelter at lambing due to depth of fleece by lambing.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

22 ANIMAL HEALTH

Lambs good for training pups LAMBING IS looming closer and if you have a young dog that isn’t showing much enthusiasm for sheep take advantage of the window of opportunity this season offers. There seems to be something about small, frisky lambs and waggling

have allowed your young dog to freely explore the empty area you are going to work in; he needs to be relaxed in the surroundings before introducing sheep into the equation. Have four - eight ewes with their young undocked lambs in a secure medium sized

long tails that will jolly up even the most halfhearted pup; to me anything is worth a go before reaching for a gun. Often something simple can solve a problem and on occasions I have tried these tricks with great success. It is important to

yard; remove any troublemakers that are inclined to charge dogs. Initially lead your dog as you move the sheep about, and when they have his attention drop the rope. It is important that he is trailing a thin rope at least 5m long; if things get a bit chaotic you are

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There seems to be something about small, frisky lambs waggling long tails that will jolly up even the most halfhearted pup.

able to catch him. Don’t look directly at your dog, look at the sheep and get them moving briskly around so those wee tails are waggling. Maybe make a few ‘shi shi’ sounds, but don’t talk to or distract your dog. The whole idea of this is to encourage enthusiasm into your dog. Let him chase and play if he wants to. If you start shouting commands, correcting or growling you will defeat the purpose; you can tidy the rough edges later, just let him ‘want’ to chase. That doesn’t mean chew and worry; if that happens, calmly get hold of the rope and quit for the day. You will teach him not to bite by working with sheep in the race as I have described in a previous column. Shouting, hitting, throwing things and electrocuting, in my mind, is not the way to stop biting; you will probably do more harm than good. Don’t let him chase them around until they are all exhausted or he gets bored. Short and sweet works wonders and a couple of these lessons will probably see him happy and keen, which he wasn’t before. Now he is ready for some ‘proper’ lessons on your normal training sheep. A few years ago I acquired a young Head-

ing dog that wasn’t in the slightest bit interested in sheep, even with lambs at foot; this led to a new idea that immediately worked a treat. I carried a young frisky lamb into another pen away from its mother and called the dog over. I then knelt on the ground and held the lamb by the back leg. Naturally it tried to get away -- leaping and bouncing all over the place. Naturally instinct kicked in and the dog focused on and tried to get the lamb. It was playing with it rather than worrying and we only did this for a couple of minutes. Combined with lots of praise it was all that was needed, the dog was now interested in sheep and I was able to start ‘proper’ training. It is important to kneel on the ground rather than stand in an intimidating pose. Look at the lamb; the dog will see you are interested in it and hopefully copy. Don’t growl, speak or talk – maybe a quiet ‘sis sis, get it, get it’ – don’t distract the dog. Important: only do any of this in small controlled environments; don’t let uncontrolled dogs chase lambs in open spaces. • Anna Holland is teaching people dog training. For more information www. annaholland.co.nz or Ph. 027 28 44 639 or annaholland@xtra.co.nz

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01687MSDMRN

RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH 23

Little benefit to prelamb drenching LATEST RESEARCH is challenging the popular belief that drenching ewes around the time of lambing will consistently provide production and financial benefit, AgResearch scientists say. At the recent Beef + Lamb New Zealand AgInnovation conference in Palmerston North, AgResearch parasitologist Dr Dave Leathwick reviewed the science on the production benefits from drenching ewes at lambing, and showed some new data on the benefits of focusing drench treatments on ewes with low body condition scores. “Around this time of the year farmers are bombarded with promotions about the benefits of treating ewes pre-lambing,” Leathwick says. “Reviewing all the onfarm trials done in NZ since the 1960s, there is one common theme all the way through: there is no consistent production benefit from drenching ewes around lambing time. This applies whether you’re talking about an oral drench, a long-acting injection or a capsule.” This means sometimes there is a measurable benefit and sometimes there isn’t, he says. “But it’s a bit more complicated than that, because many of the trials didn’t actually measure all the variables necessary to make a proper decision on the benefits of treatment.” Leathwick reckons this was clearly seen in recent trials by farmers in Wairarapa -- the ‘Wairarapa Anthelmintic Trial’. “This study was largely run by farmers and was funded by a complex of industry agencies

and companies. It was by far the most comprehensive study ever conducted in NZ on this topic,” he explains. “The key outcome from this work was that in nearly 50% of the trials there was a net financial loss as a result of drenching ewes. This came about because while treated ewes and their lambs tended to be heavier at weaning, there tended to be fewer of them, i.e. ewes treated with long-acting drenches, on average, weaned fewer lambs.” The fewer lambs effectively cancelled out any benefit from the heavier ewes and lambs. “Financial analysis showed that the biggest driver of dollar return on investment was, in fact, the number of lambs weaned rather than ewe or lamb weaning weights. The results showed the biggest driver of financial benefit was lamb survival.” Another interesting and unexpected result from the Wairarapa study was that the response to treatment was independent of ewe body condition score pre-lambing, i.e. all ewes responded the same regardless of their condition. AgResearch scientists have been following up on this finding over the last year and have further analysed data from both the Wairarapa study and other trials. Their recent findings show that over the period from pre-lambing to weaning, some ewes increase in condition, some lose condition and some stay the same.

“The proportions following this pattern are exactly the same whether the ewes were drenched or not, and the type of drench was irrelevant,” Leathwick says. “We interpret these data as telling us that low body condition in ewes at this time of year is unlikely to be caused by worms. Even when skinny ewes are given a long-acting drench, many of them don’t improve in condition and some lose condition.” The take-home message seems to be that illthrift in ewes is probably due to other factors. Work from Massey University has suggested subclinical pneumonia and facial eczema are more likely to be involved. “While the causes of ill-thrift remain uncertain, it does appear worms are not important. So, if you try to solve an ill-thrift problem in your ewes by drenching you will probably fail. “Therefore, while farmers may in some situations see some benefit from drenching ewes around lambing, they should be cautious because a financial benefit is not certain. The benefits of treating ewes pre-lambing are not at all reliable or consistent and there may be much better ways to spend money.” Leathwich adds that currently the best recipe to maximise kg lambs weaned/ewe mated seems to be to get as many ewes as possible to condition score 3 before lambing starts.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

24 ANIMAL HEALTH Sheep Internal Parasites Treatment 2017 PRODUCT NAME

COMPANY NAME

AVAILABLE FROM

ACTIVE INGREDIENT

CONCENTRATION

INGREDIENT DOSE RATE

FORMULATED DOSE RATE

WITHHOLDING PERIOD (MEAT) DAYS

SAFETY MARGIN (DOSE RATE)

OVICIDAL

BOMATAK • C.

Bayer NZ Ltd

All outlets

Oxfendazole

90.6g/L

4.5mg/kg

1mL/20kg

10

3x

YES

ALLIANCE®

COOPERS

All major outlets

Oxfendazole Levamisole HCI Abamectin

45.3g/L 80g/L 2g/L

4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

1mL/10kg

14

3x

YES

CONVERGE®

COOPERS

All major outlets

Levamisole HCI Abamectin

80g/L 2g/L

8mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

1mL/10kg

14

3x

NO

SCANDA®

COOPERS

All major outlets

Oxfendazole Levamisole HCI

45.3g/L 80g/L

4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg

1mL/10kg

10

3x

YES

SCANDA® SELENISED

COOPERS

All major outlets

Oxfendazole Levamisole HCI

45.3g/L 80g/L

4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg

1mL/10kg

10

3x

YES

ZOLVIX PLUS

Elanco

PGW and Veterinary Outlets

Monepantel and Abamectin

25 g/L Monepantel 2g/L Abamectin

2.5mg/kg Monepantel 0.2mg/kg Abamectin

1 mL/10kg

14

3x

No

PYRIMIDE 3 WAY COMBINATION DRENCH

Elanco

PGW and Veterinary Outlets

Abamectin, Albendazole, Levamisole

0.8g/L, 20g/L 30g/L

200mg/kg, 5mg/kg 7.5mg/kg

1ML/4kg

21

3x

YES

ARREST

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Albendazole, Levamisole

23.8g/L, 37.5g/L

4.75mg/kg, 7.5mg/kg

1mL/5kg

10

3x

YES

BIONIC HI MINERAL SHEEP CAPSULE

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, Albendazole, Selenium, Cobalt

160mg, 4.62g, 26mg, 120mg

1.6mg/0.0462g/0.26mg/ 12mg Cobalt/day

1capsule 40-80kg liveweight

128

3 Capsules

YES

EXODUS 1% INJECTION

Merial Ancare

Veterinary Clinics

Moxidectin

Moxidection 10g/L

0.2mg/kg

1m/50kg

28 days

10x

NO

EXODUS LONG ACTING INJECTION

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Moxidectin

20g/L

1mg/kg liveweight

1mL/20kg liveweight

91

5x

NO

EXODUS SE

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Moxidectin Selenium

1mg/mL 0.5mg/mL

0.2mg/kg

1mL/5kg

10

10x

NO

EXTENDER JUNIOR SeCo

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Albendazole, Selenium, Cobalt

2.24g Ab, 11.7mg Sel 58mg Cob/cap.

0.5mg/kg/day

1 capsule 20-40kg

0

5 capsules

YES1

EXTENDER SeCo

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Albendazole, Selenium & Cobalt

4.62g Alb cap, 24mg Se, 118mg Co

ABZ 0.5mg/day Se 0.24mg/day Co 1.18m/day

1 capsule 40-80kg

0

5 capsules

YES 1

FIRST DRENCH

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Albendazole, Levamisole, Praziquantel

25g/L, 37.5g/L, 18.8g/L

5mg/kg, 7.54mg/kg 3.75mg/kg

1mL/5kg

10

3x

YES

GENESIS ORAL GENESIS HI MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin

1g/L

0.2mg/kg

1mL/5kg

14

5x

NO

GENESIS INJECTION

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin

10g/L

0.2mg/kg

1ml/50kg

28

5x

NO

GENESIS INJECTION + B12 & SE

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, SE & B12

10g/L

0.2mg/kg

1ml/50kg

28

5x

NO

GENESIS ULTRA HI MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, Closantel

1g/L 50g/L

0.2mg/kg 10mg/kg

1m/5kg

56

3x

NO

IVER MATRIX TAPE HI MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

14

3x

YES

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

0.2mg/kg Iver, 8mg/kgk Le, 4.5 mg/kg Ox, 3.76 3.75m/kg Prazi 0.2mg/kg

1ml/5kg

IVOMEC LIQUID FOR SHEEP AND GOATS

Ivermectin, Oxfendazole, 1g/L Iver, 22.7g/L Oxf, Levamisole, Praziquantel 40g/L Le, 18.9g/L Prazi Ivermectin 0.08% w/v solution

1ml/4kg

10

20 x

NO

IVOMEC MAXIMIZER CR CAPSULES LAMBS

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Ivermectin

0.02mg/kg/day

1 capsule 20-40kg

126

3x

NO

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

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TRICH. AXEI

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NOTE – The Rural News Sheep Internal Parasite Control Anthelmintic Survey is compiled from information supplied by animal health companies. Although the information has been checked by our independent animal health advisor, Rural News accepts no responsibility or liability for inaccuracies. THE EFFICACY CLASSIFICATIONS RELATE ONLY WHERE NO RESISTANCE IS PRESENT. If a concern exists please contact your veterinarian. COMMENTS:

KEY TO SURVEY:

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★★★ COOPERS ALLIANCE is a triple combination oral drench for cattle ★★★ and sheep. ALLIANCE contains: 25mg Cobalt and 5mg Selenium

per 5mL dose. Note 1.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★ ★ Blank N/S N/D

= 95% to 100% efficacy. = 75% to 95% efficacy. = 50% to 75% efficacy. = No registered claim = Information not supplied = No data

COOPERS CONVERGE is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. CONVERGE contains:25mg Cobalt and 5mg Selenium per 5mL. Note 1.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ COOPERS SCANDA is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. Note 1. ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ COOPERS SCANDA Selenised is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. SCANDA Selenised contains: ★★★ 2mg Cobalt, 6mg Zinc and 5mg Selenium per 5mL dose. Note 1.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ MATURE IMMATURE MATURE IMMATURE

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Also contains Selenium and Cobalt.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★ ★★

Adult liver fluke at standard dose rate combination drench. Arrest Hi Mineral also has additives (Se, Co, Copper, Cobalt). Note 1.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Provides at least 35 days protection against Ostertagia circumcincta and Haemonchus contortus and at least 7 days against Trichostrongylus colubriformis

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ★★★

Injection site is high on the neck, at the base of the ear. Prevents re-infection with Haemonchus contortus for 91 days, Ostertagia circumcincta for 112 days & Trichostrongylus colubriformis for 42 days. Effective against inibited larvae of Haemonchus. Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Hi Mineral additives: Iodine, Selenium, Cobalt, Copper, Zinc. Note 1. Prevents reinfection with Ostertagia circumcincta for a minimum of 21 days and Haemonchus spp for 35 days.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 2 IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 2

1. Gives continuous protection against all major species of worms for at least 100 days and treats and prevents selenium and cobalt deficiency. 2. Efficacy not yet established.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 2 IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 2

Gives continuous protection against all major species of worms for at least 100 days (120 days including worm prepatented period) and treats and prevents selenium deficiency. 2. Efficacy not yet established.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ Milk. Note 1. First Drench Hi Mineral - each 10ml ★★★ containing 5mg Selenium, 2.5mg Cobalt and 21mg Copper.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Hi Mineral additives: Iodine, Selenium, Cobalt, Copper, Zinc. Note 1.

MATURE IMMATURE MATURE IMMATURE

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

0.1ml per 5kg. Milk. Note 1.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

0.1ml per 5kg. Milk. Note 1. Genesis Injection B12 + Se contains 2mg/ml Vitamin B12 and 4mg/mL Selenium.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND

★★★ ★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Effective, sustainable anthelmintic use requires expert input. Your vet is the person to best advise how and when to use BIONIC capsules - which is why they’re only available through your vet.

Zealand

BIO-087.

BIONIC has proven to be a reliable productivity tool for the last 10 years. Backed by 20 years capsule experience and an assurance that BIONIC capsules are available when you need them.

42 days haemonchus contortus control. Note 1. Effective against mature and immature liverfluke. ★★★ Contains 2.2g/L Cobalt, 0.5g/L Selenium ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ ND IMMATURE 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ ND

NOTE 1: Sheep milk intended for human consumption or manufacture for human consumption must be discarded during treatment and for 35 days following last treatment. NOTE 2: Must not be used undiluted.

1. Effective against L3 stages. 2. Effective against inhibited (L4) stages. Also effective against BZ, Levamisole and Morantel resistant strains of Haemonchus, Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus Spp and BZ resistant Namatodirus also Itchmite. (Meat withholding period for goats is 14 days.) Plain and selenised available. Note 1. Aids in control of dags and blowfly strike in the breech area and reduces pasture contamination from worm eggs for at least 100 days. (120 days including worm prepatent period.) Also effective against strains of H.contortus, O.circumcinta and T.colubriformil resistant to BZ, levamisole and morantel anthelmintics and strains of T.axei and N.spathiger resistant to BN anthelmintics. Effective against itchmite and keds. 1. Effective against L3 stages. Milk 126 days.

Developed and tested right here in New Zealand. BIONIC has proven itself over the last decade with Kiwi farmers north and south - trusting it to protect their stock year after year.

BIONIC HI-MINERAL SHEEP CAPSULES. A WELL EARNED REPUTATION.

The detailed multi-national requirements of Boehringer Ingelheim and Argenta ensure we deliver the complex parameters required for quality and precision.

FOR MORE INFO VISIT: WWW.BIONIC-COUNTRY.CO.NZ


RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

Sheep Internal Parasites Treatment 2017 PRODUCT NAME

COMPANY NAME

AVAIL. FROM

ACTIVE INGREDIENT

CONCENTRATION

INGREDIENT DOSE RATE

FORMULATED DOSE RATE

WITHHOLD- SAFETY OVICIDAL ING PERIOD MARGIN (MEAT) DAYS (DOSE RATE)

IVOMEC MAXIMIZER CR CAPSULES ADULT IVOMEC INJECTION

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets Veterinary outlets

Ivermectin

160mg/capsule

0.2mg/kg/day

1 capsule 40-80kg

126

3x

NO

Ivermectin

10g/L

0.02mg/kg

1ml per 50kg

35

5x

NO

LEVICARE HI MIN

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Levamisole

40g/L

7.5mg/kg

3ml/16kg

10

3x

NO

MATRIX TAPE HI MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Oxfendazole, Levamisole, Praziquantel

1g/L Iver, 22g/L Oxf, 40g/L Le, 18.9g/L Prazi

0.2mg/kg Iver, 8mg/kg Le, 4.5 mg/kg Ox, 3.76 3.75m/kg Pr

1ml per 5kg liveweight

14

3x

YES

MATRIX Hi MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, Oxfendazole, Levamisole

1g/L Ab, 40g/L Le, 22.7g/L Ox

0.2mg/kg Ab, 8mg/kg Le, 4.5mg/kg Ox

1ml per 5kg liveweight

14

3x

YES

OXFEN C PLUS

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Oxfendazole Levamisole

90.6g/L 150g/L

4.5mg/kgs 7.5mg/kg

1ml/20kg

10

3x

YES

OXFEN Merial Ancare OXFEN DBL STRENGTH

Veterinary outlets

Oxfendazole

22.65g/L 45.3g/L

5mg/kg

1ml/10kg

10

5x

YES

TRIMOX HI-MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Moxidectin, Albendazole, Levamisole, Selenium, Cobalt

1g/L Mox plus 40g/L Le HCI, 23.8 g/L Ab, with 0.5g/L Se and 2.2g/L Co

0.2mg/kg 4.76mg/kg 8mg/kg

1ml/5kg

28

3x

NO

SWITCH HI MIN

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, Levamisole, Selenium, Cobalt

1g/L Ab, 40g/L Le, 0.5g/L Se, 2.2g/L Co

0.2mg/kg 8mg/kg

1ml/5kg

14

3x

NO

Q-DRENCH

Jurox NZ Ltd

Selected retailers

Abamectin, Albendazole, Levamisole HCI, Closantel

1.0g/L Abamectin, 25.0g/L Alb, 40.0g/L Lev, 37.5g/L Clos

0.2mg/kg Ab, 5.0mg/kg Alb, 8.0mg/ kg Lev, 7.5mg/kg Clos

1ml/5kg

28

3x

YES

STRATEGIK COMBO DUAL ACTION MINERALISED

Jurox NZ Ltd

Selected retailers

Albendazole, Levamisole

24 g/L Alb, 37.5 g/L Lev

4.75 mg/kg Alb, 7.5mg/kg Lev

1ml/5kg

10

3x

YES

CYDECTIN PLUS TAPE

Zoetis

OTC, Moxidectin Veterinary Praziquantel outlets

1mg/mL 18.8mg/mL

0.2mg/kg liveweight 3.76mg/kg

1mL/5kg

7

> 5x

NO

DECTOMAX INJECTABLE

Zoetis

Veterinary Doramectin Outlets

10mg/mL

0.2mg/kg

1mL/50kg liveweight

35

x15

NO

EWEGUARD, EWEGUARD PLUS SE B12

Zoetis

OTC outlets Moxidectin Veterinarians and 6 and 1 vaccine

5g/L

0.2mg/kg liveweight

1mL/25kg liveweight

49

3x

NO

CYDECTIN INJECTION

Zoetis

OTC outlets Moxidectin Veterinarians

10g/L

0.2mg/kg liveweight

1mL/50kg liveweight

28

10x

NO

CYDECTIN LONG ACTING Zoetis INJECTION FOR SHEEP

OTC outlets Moxidectin Veterinarians

20g/L

1mg/kg liveweight

1mL/20kg liveweight

91

5x

NO

CYDECTIN & VETDECTIN Zoetis ORAL DRENCH

OTC outlets Moxidectin Veterinarians

1mg/mL

0.2mg/kg liveweight

1mL/5kg liveweight

10

>10x

NO

STARTECT

Veterinarians Derquantel, Abamectin

10mg/mL 1mg/mL

2mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

1mL/5kg

14 days meat 3x 35 days milk

Merial Ancare

Zoetis

No

THE ULTIMATE 3 WAY DRENCH MATRIX HI-MINERAL

Triple combination oral drench for sheep

It’s time to evolve to a superior drench. MATRIX® is the ultimate three way oral drench with unsurpassed efficacy against mixed infections of gastrointestinal parasites, including those with single or dual resistance to any of the three major drench families.

MATRIX MINIDOSE

Triple combination oral drench for sheep or cattle

MATRIX C

Triple combination oral drench for cattle

FOR USE IN: SHEEP OF ALL AGES INCLUDING LAMBS

FOR USE IN: CATTLE & SHEEP OF ALL AGES

FOR USE IN: CATTLE OF ALL AGES

DOSE RATE: 1mL/5kg B.W

DOSE RATE: 1mL/10kg B.W

DOSE RATE: 1mL/20kg B.W

WITHHOLDING PERIODS:

WITHHOLDING PERIODS:

WITHHOLDING PERIODS:

MEAT: 14 DAYS MILK: 35 DAYS

MEAT: CATTLE - 14 DAYS MEAT: SHEEP - 21 DAYS

MEAT: 14 DAYS MILK: 35 DAYS

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: ABAMECTIN (1g/L), LEVAMISOLE

MILK: 35 DAYS

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: ABAMECTIN (4g/L), LEVAMISOLE

(40g/L), OXFENDAZOLE (22.7g/L)

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: ABAMECTIN (2g/L), LEVAMISOLE

(160g/L), OXFENDAZOLE (90.8g/L)

MINERALS: AVAILABLE WITH OR WITHOUT SELENIUM

(80g/L), OXFENDAZOLE (45.4g/L)

MINERALS: SELENIUM (2g/L), COBALT (8.8g/L)

(0.5g/L) AND COBALT (2.2g/L)

MINERALS: SELENIUM (1g/L), COBALT (4.4g/L)

PACK SIZES AVAILABLE: 1L, 5L, 10L & 20L

PACK SIZES AVAILABLE: 1L, 5L, 10L, 20L & 50L

PACK SIZES AVAILABLE: 5L, 10L & 20L

Both sheep and cattle parasites are demonstrating varying levels of resistance to the commonly used drench families costing New Zealand agriculture an estimated $300m annually. Triple combination drenches are the ultimate tool for slowing this down. Choose MATRIX® to help prevent resistance on your farm, now available with dose rates suitable for sheep and cattle.

Proudly available from your local veterinary clinic. Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand. Trading name of Merial New Zealand Limited. Level 3, 2 Osterley Way, Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand | www.boehringer-ingelheim.com | MATRIX® are registered trademark of Merial New Zealand Limited. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997 | No’s. A9390, A10132, A10131 | ©Copyright 2017 Merial New Zealand Limited. All rights reserved. NZ-17-SWI-131.


RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ND IMMATURE 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ ND MATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 1 IMMATURE 1★★★ 1★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★ ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ 1 1 ★★★ 1★★★ 1★★★

TAPEWORMS Moniezia

FLUKES Fascioia

NASAL BOT Oestrus ovis

DICTYOCAULUS

LUNGS

TRICHURIS

CHABERTIA

OESPHAGOSTOMUM

LARGE INTESTINE

TRICHOSTRONGYLUS

BUNOSTOMUM

STRONGYLOIDES

COOPERIA

SMALL INTESTINE NEMATODIRUS

TRICH. AXEI

OSTERTAGIA

PARASITE MATURITY

HAEMONCHUS

ABOMASUM

Comment same as above (Ivomec Maximizer Cr Capsules Lambs)

1★★★ ★★★

COMMENTS:

NOTE – The Rural News Sheep Internal Parasite Control Anthelmintic Survey is compiled from information supplied by animal health companies. Although the information has been checked by our independent animal health advisor, Rural News accepts no responsibility or liability for inaccuracies. THE EFFICACY CLASSIFICATIONS RELATE ONLY WHERE NO RESISTANCE IS PRESENT. If a concern exists please contact your veterinarian.

Also for use in cattle and pigs. Effective against itchmite. Effective against L3 stages. Also effective against inhibited L4 stage Ostertagia. Note 1.

★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ Contains 2.2g/L Cobalt, 0.5g/L Selenium ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Contains 2.2g/L Cobalt, 0.5g/L Selenium

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

2 2

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

HHH

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★1 ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★

★★★ ★★★

ND ND

★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★

Minerals (Cu, I, Co, Zn, Se) Milk 24 hours.

★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ★★★

Also contains 0.8g/L Selenium

★★ ★★

Also available with minerals (Cu, Co, Zn, I, Se) Oxfen Hi Mineral. Note 1. Prevents reinfection with Ostertagia circumcincta for a minimum of 21 days and Haemonchus spp for 35 days.

= 95% to 100% efficacy. = 75% to 95% efficacy. = 50% to 75% efficacy. = No registered claim = Information not supplied = No data

NOTE 1: Sheep milk intended for human consumption or manufacture for human consumption must be discarded during treatment and for 35 days following last treatment. NOTE 2: Must not be used undiluted.

Also available non mineralised. HHH H HH H

★★

★★★ ★★★

ND ND

★★

KEY TO SURVEY: ★★★ ★★ ★ Blank N/S N/D

★ ★

Contains, cobalt, copper, iodine, selenium, zinc

★★★ ★★★

★★★2

1 Includes inhibited stages and BZ-resistant parasites. 2 1st, 2nd & 3rd Instars. 3 Aids in protection of blowfly strike. See label for details.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ★★★ ★★★ ND

ND ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ND ★★★

★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ★★★ ★★★ ND

ND ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ND ★★★

★★★

Non-irritant injection. Prevents re-infection with Haemonchus contortus and Ostertagia circumcincta for at least 35 days and Trichostrongylus colubriformis for at least 7 days following a single subcutaneous injection. Use in sheep that have been vaccinated against footrot is not recommended. Effective against inhibited larvae of Haemonchus, Ostertagia and Trichostronglus.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★

★★★

Injection site is high on the neck, at the base of the ear. Prevents re-infection with Haemonchus contortus for 91 days, Ostertagia circumcincta for 112 days & Trichostrongylus colubriformis for 42 days. Effective against inibited larvae of Haemonchus. Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus.

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ★★★ ★★★ ND ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ★★★ ND ★★★

MATURE ★★★ ★★★ IMMATURE ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ND ND ND ★★★

Additives: contain antigens of 5 clostridial diseases and cheesy gland. Available with or without selenium and with selenium and vitamin B12 (vet only). Prevents reinfection with Haemonchus contortus and Ostertagia circumcincta for a least 35 days and Trichostrongylus colubriformis for at least 7 days following a single subcutaneous injection. Use in sheep that have been vaccinated against footrot is not recommended. Recommended for use in adult sheep. Milk withholding period 49 days. Effective against inhibited stages of Haemonchus, Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus.

Prevents re-infection with Haemonchus contortus for 35 days and Ostertagia circumcincta for 21 days. Available with or without Selenium. Effective against inhibited larvae of Haemonchus, Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus. 84 hours milk withholding.

★★★

New family of drench in a combination. Controls worms resistant to macrocyclic lactones (ML), levamisole/morantel (clear), benzimidazoles (white), and closantel based drenches and combinations of these. Also controls itch mite. Accurately dose young lambs < 15kg. Use drench guns with silicone “O” rings. Extremely toxic to horses.

N O I T C U D O R P SWITCH ON E C N A T S I S E R F SWITCH OF mbination

tive dual c a n r e lt a l fu r e w o p The

o

Proudly available from your local veterinary clinic. Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand. Trading name of Merial New Zealand Limited. Level 3, 2 Osterley Way, Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand | www.boehringer-ingelheim.com | SWITCH® are registered trademark of Merial New Zealand Limited. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997 | No. A9970 | ©Copyright 2017 Merial New Zealand Limited. All rights reserved. NZ-17-SWI-132.


RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

28 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Perky pivot places loads precisely WHILE TELEHANDLERS are gaining acceptance in New Zealand, they still only sell in relatively small numbers compared to the UK, where 50% of agricultural operations are reckoned to use them. In the 1980s and 90s pivot steer telehandlers were popular with livestock farmers, who preferred their improved visibility; they weren’t always looking for large lift and reach capacities but did want to be able to place loads precisely in tight spots. Over time, the more common side boom machines gained popularity for their bigger lift capacities, and the pivot steer layout became a rare beast. Fast forward to 2013, when the Northern Ireland company NC Engineering launched a clean-sheet design for a

pivot steer handler with a centrally mounted boom; now at least 300 units are working in the field. The FH225 offers lift capacity of 2400kg, lift height of 4.7m and forward reach of 2.84m. The drive train has a Tier3B, 4-cylinder Deutz engine with 100hp and 410Nm torque, coupled to a Dana-Spicer 6F-3R speed powershift transmission, available in 30 or 40km/h configuration, and limited slip differentials on both axles. Said to be more capable than hydrostatic layouts, particularly on slopes or steep silage clamps, the FH 225 has permanent 4WD, planetary hub reductions and oil-immersed brakes on both axles. Direction control and powershift steps are easily activated by push-button on the main joystick control.

Subsoilers

The that Shatter pan layers allowing surface water down through the profile Avoiding ponding & retaining moisture for use in dry periods ~ FEATURES~ • Rugged high tensile blades • Replacement ripper tine point (pinned on) • Delta type wings provide increased shatter • Large diameter skieth leaves clean cut surface • Skieth cuts surface trash avoiding blade build up • Optional pipe chutes

Pivot steer handlers are said to be capable on slips or steep silage pits.

The centrally mounted ROPS/FOPS cab is set high on the machine and gives far better visibility than side-boom machines, by eliminating blind spots. Said to be spacious,

with easy access to the air suspension seat from either door, the layout is ergonomically designed for long productive hours, with features like the adjustable steering column, armrest

mounted joystick and fully adjustable driving position. Standard fitments include tinted glass, heated front and rear windscreens with wipers, CD/radio and a load moment indicator

for safety. Hydraulic power is supplied via a load sensing/on-demand Rexroth hydraulic system, delivering 91L/min, which should help with fuel consumption over a long working day. The two-stage telescopic boom is fabricated from high tensile steel and carried on nylcast wear pads for a long service life. Standard fitment is a double-acting hydraulic spool valve plumbed to the headstock to power auxiliary implements. Fitted with 20 inch

tyres, the machine utilises a 43-degree steering lock, achieved by double acting hydraulic rams, to manage an extremely tight turning circle of only 1.75m; stability and operator comfort are gained by an oscillating rear axle. A range of options allow easy configuration to suit specific tasks -- air conditioning, boom suspension, weighing systems accurate to +/- 3%, reversing camera, tyre upgrades and preferred headstock-to-implement coupling systems. www.nc-engineeering. com

JD OPENS ITS CHEQUE BOOK MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

MERGERS AND acquisitions are a given in the challenging farm machinery market, but global giant John Deere has blindsided some of its followers with news of its deal to buy the German Wirtgen Group for US$5.2 billion. Wirtgen, a privately owned family business, sells gear for all aspects of road construction, from quarrying to laying the finished product; it employs 8000 people in 100 countries and turns over Euro2.6b.

Known for brands such as Vogele, Hamm, Kleenmann, Benninghoven and Ciboa, the company looks a good fit within Deere’s construction and forestry division, known for its wheeled loader, grader and tracklaying products. The two companies have worked together for ten years, having many synergies -- factories in Pune, India, and in adjacent locations in China and Brazil. The join-up will save JD money as it integrates its engines, hydraulic and electrical systems where appropriate. The move is also intended to

place Deere in the top three of the roading sector, now growing faster than general construction and likely to keep on, assuming President Trump’s policies bear fruit. The purchase will also help reduce Deere’s exposure to farming, which generates 79% of its revenue versus 21% from construction and forestry. This ratio is expected to change to 70:30, respectively, after the amalgamation. Meanwhile in farming JD has also opened its wallet to buy Mazzotti, a privately owned self-propelled sprayer manufacturer in

Ravenna, Italy, which sells mostly in Europe and has an 85% market share in Italy. The company also builds skid-units for other manufacturers, such as Vicon for the iXdrive range. Rural News hears that the business will retain its name, trademarks, manufacturing agreements and distribution networks. The deal will not affect the Mazzotti or John Deere factories at Ravenna, Italy or Horst, Holland. It will allow Deere to expand its customer base in European markets, apart from the UK and Ireland, and allow synergies in R&D and production.

www.james-engineering.co.nz

E A S YCU T DISC MOWERS

Standard Subsoiler & Chute For tractors up to 100hp Optional sliding back chute can lay up to 40mm alkathene

KRONE EasyCut disc mowers have proven exceptionally well around the world. Delivering perfect results, these mowers feature genuine and exemplary KRONE innovations including: • SafeCut disc protection system - prevents damage to the spur gears and neighbouring discs • Quick-change blades • Fully welded cutterbar • DuoGrip centre-of gravity suspension

Super Subsoiler & Chute For 100 + hp tractors Optional chute lays up to 50mm alkathene

CONTACT US FOR YOUR LOCAL DEALER

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 29

Built for speed and more!

Giltrap Engineering design engineering Gary Campbell.

Fert control at the touch of a button MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

GILTRAP FERTILISER spreaders can spread a wide range of materials accurately, calling on features like a heavyduty independent chassis and stainless steel bins for a long working life, and positive delivery of materials to the spreading discs by a wide delivery belt. The recently introduced touch screen control, fitted as standard to all machines in the extensive range, offers greater functionality, allowing operators to adjust on the move and as conditions change. With a colour graphic touch display, the main screen offers access to four submenus covering all variables such as belt speed, gate opening and spinner rotation speed. This allows the operator to adjust spreading rates while monitoring delivery rates, belt and spinner speeds, and receive audible and visible warnings should the

machine deviate from the pre-set rates. Touch screen control allows easy adjustment of the left and right spreading spinners for control of overall spreading widths or border control. Using it with an optional weighing system, the operator can see precise information about weights loaded, amounts spread, and can carry out automatic rate calibration. Likewise, an upgrade to GPS will provide proof of placement showing areas covered, rates applied, date, total tonnages, and the ability to use pre-programmed prescription maps for variable rate application. The controller is configured to allow transfer of field or office data via the USB port, and the integral memory can be used for auto-calibration by name or product, and spread widths and application rates set with a touch of a button. www.giltrapag.co.nz

VEHICLE SALES MARCH ON SALES OF new motor vehicles march on at a relentless pace and industry observers predict sales could hit 150,000 by year end. With May figures at 13,132 vehicles sold, the year to date numbers appear 14% higher (63,244 registrations) than the same period in 2016 (55,435). Then there’s New Zealand’s love

affair with the ute, which has morphed into a dual-purpose vehicle carrying loads during the working week and kids and clobber at the weekend. Looking at the top 10 for May, four of the top five positions were taken by utes, and the whole list shows five utes, three SUVs, one van and a lone saloon car --the enduring Toyota Corolla.

BEST KNOWN for its enduring off-road ability, the Toyota Land Cruiser has added another plaudit to its CV – notching up the title Fastest SUV. A custom-built Land Speed Cruiser started life as a standard USspec machine, but was heavily modified to beat the record in California, driven by NASCAR driver Carl Edwards. Starting with the chassis, the main frame was narrowed up by 3 inches to accept oversized Michelin Pilot Super Sport tyres, the suspension was upgraded, and the body was lowered to reduce turbulence under the car. Modifications to the US-spec 5.7L V8 engine

saw changes to the pistons, rods and inlet manifolds, before two bucket-size Garrett turbochargers were bolted on to give a whopping 55psi of boost pressure. And a purpose-built racing transmission was

installed to deal with the huge stresses while feeding power to the ground Said to be tuned to 2000hp, the Speed Cruiser hit 370.5km/h, beating the previous record by 30km/h before running out of tarmac

on the 4km runway at the Mojave Air and Space Port. Unfortunately NZ customers will have to make do with a V8 of only 4.5L and 200Kw. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

30 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Tyre tech delivers CENTRAL TYRE inflation systems on some high-end tractors have allowed tyre maker Michelin to field test in Europe to demonstrate quantifiable benefits from the use of its UltraFlex tyres for tractors and trailers. The tests were done on a Fendt 939 tractor coupled to a high-spec tri-axle tipping trailer; they looked at operating at conventional tyre pressures versus Michelin’s ultra low-pressure AxioBib and Cargo Bib high flotation tyres. The testing saw the tractor fitted with 650/65 R34 fronts and 710/75R42 rear Alibi’s, while the trailer ran on 600-55R 6.5 CargoXBib tyres. In the paddock, tyre pressures for the ‘conventional’ runs had the tractor set up at 20psi front and rear, and 35psi on the fully loaded trailer; in contrast the ‘reduced’ pressures were adjusted to 12psi, 15psi and 13psi respectively. The combination then made five passes at the two pressure options, travelling at 10km/h on heavy blue clay, gently uphill.

Drill helps set record wheat crop MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

The results showed that the lower pressure set-up reduced rut depth by 36% and pass times by 3.7%, and reduced fuel usage by 9% and wheel-slip by 29.2%. From an agronomy point of view, a 290% improvement in water infiltration was recorded, and the soil profile was found to still retain an open structure with plenty of vertical fissuring. Meanwhile, Michelin has also released details of its latest tyre, the RoadBib, aimed at the agricultural contractor market. Expected in 2018, the tyre is claimed a first

for 200hp+ tractors; it is designed for performance, traction and longevity on tractors often driven on the road. Michelin says agricultural contractors can typically spend 50% of their time on the road, equating to about 80% of the total distance they cover. Typically the prime mover is also pulling heavy implements which can stress the tractor’s tyres. Rural News understands that whereas a traditional tyre lasts about 4000 hours, the new RoadBib will run for at least 5000 hours. – Mark Daniel

ERIC AND Maxine Watson set a Guinness World Record by producing a wheat crop of 16.79 tonnes/ha on their 490ha farm at Wakanui, southeast of Ashburton. Their crop beat the previous record of 16.52t held by a UK grower; typical NZ yields are about 12t/ha. Watson takes a non-inversion approach to farming, resisting intensive cultivation and minimising the number of passes and compaction on the land. He attributes much of the record achievement to the use of a Horsch Pronto 8 DC seeder, renowned for seeding at consistent depth. Planted in mid-April 2016 with an 8.0m-wide Pronto 8 DC drill used on the farm for eight years, the crop was harvested in February 2017. The Pronto DC is fitted with 52 staggered disc openers, each with its own press wheel; it’s a compact, universal seed drill with low weight despite its 4000L capacity seed hopper, and precise in seeding in min-till, no-till and full cul-

tivation systems. Generally the unit drills at 12-13km/ h, but it was slowed to 10-11km/h for the record crop. “The soil conditions were very good -a dry autumn for sowing crops, which I’m sure helped the result,” Watson explains. Visiting from Germany, Horsch representative Matthias Coufal explained the Pronto drill has a layout of front cultivation discs followed by a tyre packer that reconsolidates the ground in front of the seeding coulters. “The wheel packer creates a uniform surface so all the coulters are working at the same depth. Consistent seeding depth gives consistent germination which is necessary to get the kind of yields Eric has achieved.” Watson believes the layout of discs followed by tyre packer is a great feature of the drill. “The double row of discs fines up the soil, the tyre packer firms everything up and we seem to get a far better strike,” he says. www.horsch.co.nz

Eric Watson attributes much of his crop success to using a Horsch Pronto 8 DC Seeder.

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RURAL NEWS // JULY 18, 2017

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 31

Double cab, 2WD ute has plenty to like about it MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

SWEET AS! CLEARLY THE world retains a sweet tooth, judging by the size of the Brazilian sugar cane industry. Around 9.5 million ha -- about nine times the agricultural land in New Zealand -- produces in total 667m tonnes annually, making Copacabana the world’s largest producer. Farms are typically large scale, such as the Sao Martinho Group, near Sao Paulo, which farms 300,000ha in four blocks and uses a staggering 183 Case IH cane harvesters, each producing 1000t/day to achieve a total annual output of 23 million tonnes. A key player in the market, Case IH’s 104,000sq.m plant at Sorocaba makes about 8000 units annually, and vast quantities of cane harvester componentry. Machines are supported by a 56,000sq.m inventory of 150,000 line items, Case IH’s largest facility of its kind in Latin America. Brazil is also the world’s largest producer of canederived ethanol, replacing 40% of petrol. www.caseih.co.nz

THE UTE market’s red-hot run suggests the former ‘humble hack’ is now for many drivers the vehicle of choice. A big chunk of these sales will be for effect rather than purpose: many are 2WD, whose only offroading will be mounting the kerb on the daily school run. With this in mind, Rural News decided to live with a Mitsubishi Triton VRX 2WD double cab for a week, and we were pleasantly surprised at its capabilities. First up, you either love or hate this vehicle’s looks. If you want to blend with the crowd and drive a big, box-shaped American style ‘truck’, then the Triton’s not for you. The many sweeping lines on the first model at first seemed unconnected, but this latest version has seen a re-design: panel

joins are softened and it has a big smiley chrome grille up front. This appears... well, normal; either that or Mitsubishi’s sticking with this look means we must now accept the Triton looks a little different. One thing you wouldn’t overlook is the 10-year warranty; that combines with a starting price of about $52,000 that settles down to about $40,000 when you get the chequebook out at the dealership. Looking at the basics, the latest Euro 5, 2.4L, 4-cyl motor churns out a useful 135kW and 437Nm

torque at 2500rpm, burning about 7.6L/100km and only rising to 10L/100km when we hitched up the 2-tonne family boat. Towing capacity is rated at 3t braked and load capacity on the well-deck is 985kg. A 5-speed auto transmission with sports mode and paddle shifters under the steering wheel make everything work smoothly on the open road, but can be hurried-up if required, depending on how you use the shifters. This flagship of the Mitsubishi XX 2WDs, the VRX is well

equipped: auto headlights, rain sensing wipers, dual-zone climate air conditioning, keyless entry, push-button starting, daytime running lights, cruise control and rear-view camera. Safety features abound: ABS, EBD, stability control, traction control and trailer sway control, although none of the more soughtafter active systems are available, such as blind-spot monitoring, lane departure warning or active cruise; but keep in mind the price. Further safety is assured by seven airbags, located at the front, side curtain and around the driver’s knee areas. Overall the Triton is quiet and well balanced, and front and rear passengers enjoy comfortable seats; the front pair are leather and wouldn’t look out of place in a high-spec saloon. What’s not to like? Not a lot. Did I mention the price? You’d be barking not to look.

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Rural News 18 July 2017  
Rural News 18 July 2017  

Rural News 18 July 2017