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NEWS

MACHINERY

AGRIBUSINESS

Bright start to new velvet season. PAGE 23

Is engine re-mapping worth the risk? PAGE 42

AgResearch set to prepare New Zealand for the new era of digital agriculture. PAGE 27

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS NOVEMBER 7, 2017: ISSUE 641 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

No ‘dirty deal’ done PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE EUROPEAN Union ambassador to New Zealand has denied claims by the NZ meat industry that it has done the dirty on this country over access to the UK and EU markets for lamb and mutton when Britain leaves the EU. Rural News (Oct 24) quoted James Parsons, the chair of Beef + Lamb NZ, as saying that the two (EU and UK) had decided that after Brexit 45% of NZ’s tariff rate quota (TRQ) of 280,000 tonnes of lamb and mutton would go to the UK and the balance to the EU. Parsons was annoyed that a deal had seemingly been done without consulting NZ. The quotas come under the jurisdiction of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in Geneva. Under the present arrangement NZ has the flexibility to sell that 280,000 tonnes anywhere within the EU, but when Britain leaves a deal has to done to split this in some way between the EU and UK But Bernard Savage, who heads the EU delegation in NZ, told Rural News that no percentage split of the quota has been decided. All that’s been agreed to is a way to split the quota and how this is done will be up to members of the WTO – including NZ – to decide. Savage says this was never intended to be a fait accompli, but rather the starting point for negotiations. He says it’s up to the WTO to decide whether a split will be based on historical trade flows and over what period. “The important thing to understand is that overall market access across these different quotas will remain the

same and we will respect the historic commitments to the WTO,” he adds. “The issue of TRQs could not be discussed before it went to the WTO; that is the right place for this to happen. It is simply not feasible to do this beforehand, given the number of products and the number of holders of TRQs.” Savage says the EU and the UK will honour the underlying principles of the WTO and ensure that NZ retains the same level of market access as it has had historically. However, he stopped short of saying that NZ could have the same flexibility it has at present. While NZ will be able to move any quota around

the 27 EU nations, this will not extend to Britain and this is a sore point with the local meat industry. They point out this inflexibility could prove detrimental to the EU, UK and NZ. Savage describes this as a “technical” matter that strikes at the heart of the fundamental principles of the European Union and the concept of a single market. He adds that it is likely one of the consequences of Brexit. “The integrity of the single market is something we are not prepared to discuss; that is an internal matter and will be defended by the 27 members of the EU,” he says. The challenge now for NZ is to

TAKING OVER Appointing a primary industry council and a chief agricultural advisor to government are two of the top priorities for the new Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor. He admits the last nine years in opposition has been a battle and it’s nice now to be able to do things. However, he says, in some ways the future is daunting given the changes possible across the whole rural and agribusiness sector. In the new cabinet, O’Connor has the portfolios of agriculture, biosecurity, food safety, rural communities and associate trade and export growth. – More pages 6-7

somehow extract some sort of deal via the WTO, but it would appear that by leaving the EU, Britain has removed the option of flexibility from the UK/ EU sheepmeat market. This deal has served NZ well for many years. Other unknowns in this will be how Irish and British sheep producers will react and deal with the idea of a rigid quota in the UK if the market becomes depressed. It could be that the sheepmeat ructions of the 1970s and 80s may resurface. Also in the mix is what access arrangement, and on what terms, NZ may be able to negotiate in the pending FTA with the EU in the coming months.

CHANGE OR NO CHANGE? PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

MINISTERS ARE “working on proposals” for revamping the Ministry for Primary Industries, says the Minister for Agriculture Damien O’Connor. “Change will be made to enhance the focus in each of the respective and important areas of government responsibility,” he told Rural News. But O’Connor did not say whether the role of the minister would also involve restructuring MPI into separate departments. Under the coalition, government roles within the primary sector include O’Connor becoming Minister for Agriculture, Biosecurity, Food Safety and Rural Communities; Stuart Nash Minister for Fisheries and NZ First’s Shane Jones Minister for Forestry and Regional Economic Development. MPI director of market access, trade and policy division Tim Knox was asked at a conference on October 27 about the splitting of the primary industries ministry. He answered that at that stage there was no decision he was aware of to make any change to the structure of MPI. If there was a change to the structure of MPI, Knox said, “we would work very hard to ensure the good work done in the last five years is continued in whatever form it takes.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 3 ISSUE 641

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Getting down to work SUDESH KISSUN

NEWS������������������������������������� 1-23 MARKETS������������������������� 24-25 AGRIBUSINESS���������������26-27 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 28 CONTACTS����������������������������� 28 OPINION���������������������������� 28-31 MANAGEMENT���������������32-34 ANIMAL HEALTH������������35-37 CANTERBURY A&P SHOW���������������������������������� 38-41 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS���������������������� 42-46 RURAL TRADER������������� 46-47

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 31.03.2017

sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S TWO new farmerelected directors are looking forward to their new roles. Brent Goldsack and Andy Macfarlane were elected at the co-op’s annual meeting in Hawera last week. Macfarlane says serving on the board of New Zealand’s largest company is a great responsibility. Goldsack says he is humbled to be chosen to serve farmers. “Fonterra is in great shape and I look forward to serving farmers and New Zealand.” Shareholders voted to elect incumbent director John Monaghan and new directors Brent Goldsack and Andy Macfarlane.

New Fonterra directors Andy McFarlane (l) and Brent Goldsack (r), with re-elected director John Monaghan at the co-op’s annual meeting in New Plymouth last week.

Goldsack lives at Matangi and has farming interests in Waikato and Manawatu. Born in Taranaki and raised on a dairy farm in Inglewood, Goldsack is a chartered accountant and was a partner at PwC for at least 12 years. Macfarlane is from Ashburton and has extensive farming interests in Mid Canterbury. 

He runs a rural and farm advisory business and is a director of AgResearch and Ngai Tahu Farming and a councillor of Lincoln University. Goldsack and Macfarlane replace Leonie Guiney and David MacLeod on the board. Wairarapa farmer John Monaghan was re-elected for another three-year term by farmers.

DIRECTORS RETURNED DAWN SANGSTER and Russell Drummond have been re-elected unopposed to the board of meat co-operative Alliance Group. Ranfurly-based Sangster has served on the board since 2011 and is a director of Glenayr Ltd, farming sheep and beef on 2870ha in Central Otago. Drummond was first elected in 2014. He farms sheep and cattle on 3000ha in Southland. Alliance Group chairman Murray Taggart says the re-election of both directors unopposed indicated that shareholders have confidence in the co-operative’s business strategy. “We now have a much fitter co-operative and we are making good progress against our key measures. Alliance Group has a stronger balance sheet, improved profitability and better livestock pricing for our farmers.” Taggart says the co-op will release its annual result on November 22 and hold its annual meeting in Te Anau on December 14.

Research key to wool’s fight-back LACK OF demand and animal activism are having a negative impact on NZ’s wool industry, says the Wool Research Organisation of New Zealand (WRONZ). “The NZ wool industry is traditionally a significant contributor to the country’s economy,” WRONZ chairman Derrick Millton says. “However, the latest quarterly forecast from MPI showed wool exports fell 28% to $550m to the year through June, as a lack of demand from China weighed on prices.” He says this decline – combined with PETA’s recent anti-wool cam-

paign highlights challenges the industry faces. “It shows how essential it is we continue to promote the value of wool as a natural 21st century fibre, and the high animal welfare standards in NZ that protect our sheep and other animals,” Millton adds. “R&D is vital to the future of the wool industry in NZ. WRONZ is committed to developing innovative solutions that showcase the intrinsic natural properties of wool, find new and novel uses for it, and enhance fibre, fabric and product performance.”

Meanwhile, NZ wool is following the coffee, honey and wine industries in funding research for a test that determines traceability. A test that can confirm the authenticity and origin of wool is among $3m of research funded by WRONZ to protect, enhance and grow the industry. Using concepts already commercially proven in other agriculturally based industries, traceability of wool can now be determined by measuring stable isotopes. The distinctions between conditions in which the fibre is grown are ‘hard wired’ into the chemical nature

of the fibre. Temperature, altitude, rainfall levels, soil and air purity combine to generate unique reproducible levels of stable isotopes in the fibre. Millton says the ability to verify the source of a product is increasingly important to consumers, and tests have already been widely adopted by the coffee, honey and wine industries. “It’s a step forward for the NZ wool industry that we can now do the same. The test will provide NZ wool users with a tool to protect their marketing initiatives in the future.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

4 NEWS

PGG Wrightson optimistic on outlook PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE 2018 financial year has begun with confidence high among dairy, beef and horticultural clients due to good commodity prices, says PGG Wrightson in its first quarter guidance update

mates from Beef + Lamb New Zealand warn of a significant contraction in forecast production throughout NZ, the update says. BLNZ estimates the total number of lambs tailed in the spring of 2017 at 23 million head, down 1.3% (0.3 million

to shareholders. But price is only half the story, it says. Currently the forecast dairy payout stands at a healthy $6.75/kgMS, and gold kiwifruit orchards continue to sell for at least $1 million per canopy hectare. But recent esti-

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head) on the previous spring, reflecting fewer breeding ewes. “This drop contrasts with previous indications that the lamb flock might be up about 1.1%,” the update says. “In addition, beef production is expected to be static year-on-year. “For dairy, early season milk production has been hampered by weather conditions being generally too wet over recent months. “August NZ milk production was down 1.5% on last year (which was down 3% on the year before that). “Milk production is ramping up for spring, but the BNZ, for example, suspects it will not be as strong as it usually is given recent weather conditions. This is tempering their forecast for the season as a whole.

Outgoing chief executive Mark Dewdney.

“They still expect milk production this season to be higher than last season but not quite as much as they had previously thought -- maybe up in the 1 - 2% range rather than a 3 - 4% range.” Wet conditions through winter and early spring is delaying the key spring sales season, the update says.

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GOLD COIN/Zuellig Agriculture head Ian Glasson has taken over as PGG Wrightson’s chief executive, succeeding Mark Dewdney, who signalled his departure in June. Glasson has long worked in agriculture including Gold Coin, where he ran a billion-dollar animal feed and farming ventures, and related Zuellig business CB Norwood Distributors in Australia and New Zealand. “Ian brings impressive qualifi-

cations for leading an agricultural business such as PGW and we are pleased to have him join,” chair Alan Lai says. “He will remain an external director of SunRice, the large branded rice food company.” Dewdney, a former chief at Livestock Improvement Corp, replaced George Gould in charge of Wrightson, coming in just after the rural services firm wrote off $321m

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“While the delay is not yet significant enough to suggest lost sales, the risk of a poorer spring for PGW is somewhat heightened compared to a few months ago. “Currently PGW is about $2m behind the same time last year but there is confidence of making up this ground as the spring season accel-

erates.” The company is forecasting a full year operating EBITDA to June 30, 2018 similar to 2017 earnings of $64.5m. Its 2017 net profit after tax included nonoperating items of $9.5m, of which $8.74m related to capital gains on the sale of properties. As this is now largely complete PGW is expecting net profit after tax to be about 30% lower than 2017. “It is important to note that it remains early in the financial year to be forecasting, with most of the year’s trading still ahead.” PGW deputy chairman Trevor says Ian Glasson, appointed chief executive, was scheduled to start last Wednesday (November 1).

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from the goodwill accrued in the 2005 merger with Pyne Gould Guinness. Since then, Wrightson has posted stable earnings despite last year’s dairy price slump. Wrightson increased annual profit 5.7% to $46.3m in the June 2017 year, even as sales were weighed down by wet autumn conditions hampering the NZ harvest and dragging on the firm’s seed and grain business.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 5

Re-define the word ‘commodity’ MPI’s latest Situation and Outlook Report (SOPI) sounds a positive note: primary exports are expected to rise 9.3% to $41.6 billion in the year ended June 2018. And this rise should continue, to reach $42.5b by June 2019. Peter Burke reports. NEW ZEALAND needs to redefine the word ‘commodity’, says MPI policy advisor Jarred Mair, director of sector policy. He says what NZ’s current exports no longer fit the old definition of ‘commodity’. Rather, exports are all about ‘value-add’ and in some cases the best returns are obtained from goods that are not processed but are in fact natural. Mair’s comments come in the light of MPI’s updated Situation and Outlook Report that predicts primary exports will rise by 9.3% to $41.6 billion in the year ended June 2018. MPI expects this trend to continue, with the value of primary exports reaching $42.5b by June 2019. He says some exports, even in what NZ calls a natural or unprocessed state, are achieving premium prices greater than those of other countries, hence the need to redefine what commodity actually means. “Admittedly some of

By the numbers Top five export markets by value (June 2017) ■ China - $9.18 billion ■ Australia - $4.27 billion ■ USA - $4 billion ■ Japan - $2.2 billion ■ EU - $2.7 billion (the UK takes $1.1 billion). Our biggest earners (as at June 2017) ■ Dairy - $14.6 billion ■ Meat and Wool - $5.4 billion ■ Forestry - $5.4 billion ■ Horticulture - $5.1 billion ■ Seafood - $1.7 billion.

the milk powders can be seen as a commodity, and some of our cheaper cuts of meats. But in terms of NZ as whole, we are not doing too badly in both our price position and our mix of products,” Mair told Rural News. “We are seeing a lot more of them starting to come through in that higher value-market capacity and that is beneficial for NZ.” Dairy exports are rising, and MPI predicts returns of NZ$17.3b

for the 2018 season (vs NZ$14.6b last season). Driving this increase is a world-wide demand for butter and other fat products. Europe is short of butter, a far cry from the ‘butter mountain’ of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Mair says butter is seen as a natural product. “We are seeing great demand for butter in Asian countries which great for us. They are looking for more personal, natural nutrition

MPI policy advisor Jared Mair.

and butter fits that criteria. There is also a demand for the products butter is going into, such as baked goods.” He says there is a growing trend globally for products that fit into the niche called ‘personal nutrition’ and believes that NZ must take advantage of that trend. Not surprisingly, horticulture, in particular kiwifruit, apples, pears and wine are leading the growth spurt. By 2019, horticultural exports are

SHEEP, BEEF, WOOL THE SOPRI report says beef and lamb will remain relatively static over the next couple of years. Wool is suffering, with exports predicted to be down this season and improving slightly in 2019. Jarred Mair says prices for finer wools are good, but coarser wools are a

problem. “In sheep wool globally, it appears in the last couple of years the market got out of sync,” he told Rural News. “When they were short of wool they overpurchased; now they have an oversupply in the market and they are

expected to be worth NZ$5.7b (NZ$5.1 billion). “We are seeing increased plantings and,

ironically, a lot of irrigation leading to greater use of crops and different forms of farming. I’d

drawing back on their purchasing and it will take time for this to correct.” But Mair believes the long-term picture for the uses of fibres is still sound. Still, he says, NZ must more quickly look for higher value niche markets and at other uses for wool.

see horticulture growing exponentially for the next five to ten years,” Mair says.

NO PROBLEMS WITH CHINA MAIR SEES no risk for NZ’s increasing trade with China. It takes 24% of our primary products – double that of our two other customers Australia and the USA. China takes the biggest slice of our dairy products (25%), meat and wool (21%, the same as the USA) forestry (43%) and seafood (31%). “It’s a juggernaut in its own right. It just continues to grow and we are a long way from exhausting that market,” Mair says. “It’s not matured yet. “However, from a global perspective, I think we will see greater balancing out and greater demand coming out of Africa and other parts of SE Asia over the next 10 years.” On Brexit, Mair says it’s important to ‘disentangle’ the issue. On one hand there is separate negotiation between Britain and EU on the terms under which UK will leave the EU. At the same time, the EU and NZ are talking about securing an FTA. But Mair concedes that until the EU and the UK sort out their negotiations, there will be a degree of uncertainty for NZ.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

6 NEWS

Life under Labour and O’Connor PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

APPOINTING A primary industry council and a chief agricultural advisor to government are two of the top priorities for the new Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor. He admits the last nine years in parliamentary opposition has been a battle and it’s nice now to be able to do things. However, he says, in some ways the future is daunting given the changes possible across the whole rural and agribusiness sector. In the new cabinet O’Connor has the portfolios of agriculture, biosecurity, food safety, rural communities and trade and export growth (as associate minister). “I have stated publicly – and it’s no offence to individuals – that there

have been lots of leaders but not enough leadership,” he told Rural News. “At a time when the world is changing very quickly and disruption is constant, we have too many people, too many companies and too many institutions determined to hang out for as long as they can on the basis of the current paradigm. “We need wake up, look out, listen and be in touch with the trends, values and expectations of customers and consumers.” O’Connor says there are many organisations across the primary sector all doing their own job for their members, shareholders and industry. But he believes there is a need for greater collaboration and coordination. “We have seen ad hoc attempts at this, but we need to form a body with

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A lifelong Coaster DAMIEN O’CONNOR (59) was born in Westport. He did his schooling St Bedes College, Christchurch and Lincoln University. He first entered parliament in 1993 and apart from being briefly out in 2008-09 – when he lost his seat but later became a list MP – he has been in Wellington ever since. He served as Minister of Tourism, Minister for Rural Affairs, Immigration and Associate Health in Helen Clark’s government. He is now the MP for West Coast Tasman.

mana and authority to provide wisdom and leadership directly to government and back through the sectors,” he says. He forces a new role — chief agricultural advisor — akin to that of the chief science advisor held

by Sir Peter Gluckman. As for biosecurity, O’Connor says this function is too important to compromise on and it will be among his top priorities. He has stopped short of saying definitely that biosecurity

Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor.

will be split from MPI in the short term, but has hinted that the issues of biosecurity need to be better understood. Constant reviews of government departments by National have destroyed the passion,

commitment and motivation of good public servants, he says. Fisheries and forestry are likely to be separate entities. O’Connor is promising to address the perceived urban/rural divide, some

of which has been driven for political purposes, he says. He now hopes to work on a long term social marketing campaign that informs rural and urban people of the challenges facing society.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 7

Primary sector ready to work with new govt BEEF + Lamb NZ chair James Parsons sees forestry as a potential fishhook in the new coalition agreement. Tree planting appears in many places in the agreement and while Parsons agrees there is a place for this, he has reservations. “There is a place for trees, but not at the expense of productive hill country farmland. We will be urging the new Government to recognise what sheep and beef farms already contribute to carbon sequestration – through shelter belts, wooded gullies, and permanent pastures – before looking to sheep and beef farmers to retire productive land into forestry.” Parsons says news that the proposed water tax is off the agenda is good for farmers who rely on irrigation. But he says BLNZ will continue to play a part in the water debate to keep such a tax off the agenda for the next three years.

“The decade ahead will be transformational for the dairy sector.”

Beef + Lamb chair James Parsons.

And he warns that while BLNZ supports freshwater quality improvement, there is a risk of a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. “BLNZ will continue to develop and promote an approach to improving freshwater quality based on identifying and managing the specific issues faced onfarm or in a catchment. We need to act to make a difference, not enforce uniform requirements that ‘everyone has to do’.” 
Parsons sees scant mention in the

coalition agreement of trade, in particular links between foreign ownership in NZ and trade. He says the issue needs to be carefully thought through so that any new policy does not jeopardise our FTAs. 
Meanwhile DairyNZ’s chief executive Tim Mackle says he’s looking forward to working with the new ministers on key issues facing the dairy sector. He says the new Government is promoting a new direction for the country at a time when the dairy sector also faces a new and exciting future. “The decade ahead will be

transformational for the dairy sector. We have a strong mandate to concentrate on productivity – to produce more from less, and to do so sustainably. We support initiatives that incentivise farmers to use the best environmental practices. “We’ve been openly welcoming the discussions on water, and we know agriculture has a role to play in ensuring New Zealand meets its climate change targets,” he says. Mackle says government and dairy need to work together to identify what an emissions reduction pathway looks like before identifying what the right policy is to implement the change. “We are confident that with Mr O’Connor’s thorough understanding of the issues facing the dairy sector we will continue the good work already underway with the Government to ensure a productive and sustainable primary sector,” he says.

FEDS KEEN TO CONSULT FEDERATED FARMERS president Katie Milne says the new Minister of Agriculture, Food Safety & Biosecurity, Damien O’ Connor, is obviously well-versed in agriculture, which many of her members and farmers in general will appreciate. Milne knows O’Connor reasonably well and says he has been a farmer, has brothers still farming and is well connected to the industry, which Fed Farmers national makes him easy to president Katie Milne. talk to about issues affecting farmers. “He speaks about rural-proofing things that go through government and that sits quite close to what our role is as we see it,” Milne told Rural News. “This involves making sure that a rural lens gets properly applied to everything, and we are looking forward to working with him and his team to get the best possible outcomes.” On climate change, Milne says farmers need assurance that any new regulation still enables growth, innovation and productivity as the sector seeks to lower emissions. Feds hopes to start talking soon with ministers whose roles affect its members.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

8 NEWS HOPES FOR WOOL IN CHANGE THE RECENT change in government will be positive for carpet manufacturer Cavalier, claims chief executive Paul Alston. “We have over 40 years of established history of manufacturing and adding value to the New Zealand wool clip with significant regional operations and employment,” he says. “We welcome the stated focus to support NZ owned and oper-

ated businesses, exporters and manufacturers.” The company is building capacity for the “potentially market leading high-end felted product range,” Alston says in the company’s annual report released last week. “The opportunities we see in Australia, in particular, are significant and increasing our penetration in that market remains

a priority,” he says Alston says Cavalier’s performance in 2017 was disappointing, with revenues and earnings well down on the previous year. “The result reflects an ambitious undertaking to rationalise and consolidate our manufacturing operations and realise production efficiencies,” his report says. “Bedding in these changes

took much longer and we are only now achieving production levels planned from the rationalisation. “The other significant factor that impacted FY17 and will continue into FY18 was the collapse of the NZ wool market, which affects both our scouring joint venture and our wool buying business.” – Pam Tipa NZ’s WTO ambassador David Walker.

Get Brexit right – UK dairy farmers BREXIT PRESENTS “the biggest seismic change” to the dairy industry in the UK, says Tomas Pietrangeli, UK managing director of Arla Foods. Speaking at the International Dairy Federation world dairy summit last week in Ireland, Pietrangeli described the end of free trade as a major risk. The UK is negotiating to exit the European Union and the dairy industry faces potential tariifs after Brexit; accessing non-UK labour after Brexit is also a looming issue. Arla, a European dairy co-op, is jointly owned by 11,200 farmers in Denmark, Sweden, UK, Germany, Belgium, Luxemburg and the Netherlands. An independent economic impact assessment of Arla’s UK business had shown that the company generated £6 billion gross value for the UK, and nearly 120,000 jobs, directly and indirectly. Pietrangeli called on the UK government to publish its future plans for agriculture there via a parliamentary bill “at the earliest opportunity early next year,” adding that any delay would be detrimental to the industry. “We need to have the best possible trading conditions with the EU; we need to get Brexit right. Trade with the EU is the most important market for UK dairy businesses and UK dairy should be recognised as a key player in Brexit negotiations. “We do not want to see a situation where dairy businesses come under pressure because of restrictions on trading conditions.” Pietrangeli highlighted the need for access to non-UK labour, citing the fact that 56% of farms had employed non-UK nationals in the last five years, as had 41% of processing businesses and 60-80% of third party logistics businesses. “Don’t disregard dairy,” Pietrangeli said. “There will be opportunities from Brexit but we need time to adapt, assurance and our voice to be heard.” David Walker, New Zealand’s ambassador to the World Trade Organisation, told the Summit that NZ had been agreeing to free trade deals since 1983 and also worked through the WTO. He said NZ hoped to make progress on a deal with the EU and in the event of the UK leaving the EU, a deal could be arranged between NZ and the UK. Michael Dykes, president and chief executive of the International Dairy Foods Association, told the summit that in the US “significant uncertainty” persisted over trade arrangements. He said a proactive trade policy is essential for the US.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 9

Landcorp off the market example of what can be trialled and developed and used as a showcase across the wider farming sector,” O’Connor told Rural News. “I know some farmers out there

PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

LANDCORP WILL not be sold, nor will any of its farms. That clear message came from Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor speaking to Rural News at a Landcorp function in Wellington last week. The new minister’s comments came in response to the last-minute announcement by the National Party during the election campaign that some Landcorp farms would be sold to young farmers. But O’Connor has poopoohed the idea. Landcorp chief executive He also suggested that Steven Carden, Agriculture the previous government Minister Damien O’Connor and Landcorp chair Traci had tried to kick LandHoupapa at the Pamu food corp around and demanded tasting session in Wellington money by way of a dividend. last week. He says it should have sat down with Landcorp and worked are a bit cynical about a big player owned by government, but what we out a proper strategy. “In my view Landcorp has huge have to do is to bring them in and potential and what they are doing explain to them what’s going on and with the new Pamu brand is just one the reasons behind it.”

He says Labour is planning to talk to Landcorp and see how its strategy can be aligned with the new government’s to get more value in all the primary sectors.

O’Connor has also questioned a plan announced recently by Beef + Lamb NZ to set up a model farm to showcase new technology and farming systems to farmers.

PAMU DELIGHTS

“It begs the question ‘why don’t we do it with the Landcorp farms we own now?’ It’s a simple development of the asset base we have and we don’t need to go and reinvent the wheel.” O’Connor says the past week has been exciting and he, like many new ministers, is in the process or recruiting new staff. He says once this is done he’ll be able to spend more time engaging with industry. “The diary is getting full and I don’t mind that. It’s a case of mixing the reading and listening and sorting out priorities. In the meantime, ministers are learning as much as they can, as quickly as they can,” he says. O’Connor is also Associate Minister of Trade and Export Growth. He hopes to work closely with his friend and minister for that area, David Parker, to learn and contribute to opening the doors to get better access for NZ primary exports.

THE LANDCORP function was, once again, used to showcase the high value, quality food products being produced on its farms. It was a foodie’s delight with items such as venison parfait profiteroles, beef fillet cornetto, candied oregano marinated lamb loin and for dessert a mouth-watering deer milk ice cream to name just a few. Landcorp chief executive Steven Carden says its Pamu farms are food producers and the company is keen to understand how it can move the value of its products to consumers who love what they produce and are prepared to pay a premium for them. “People are determined to find food that tastes really good, is highly nutritious, is good for them and comes from a natural source as well as having a strong environmental and animal welfare story,” he told Rural News. “There is a lot of innovation happening in food and onfarm and our role as Pamu foods and Pamu farms is to link innovation onfarm to food and to consumers who want new products.” Carden says a lot is being done to produce innovative foods, but he concedes more needs to be done to tell the success stories and promote the value of natural products. Sheep and deer milk, which Pamu produces, are examples of innovative foods. Carden says NZ also has to factor in the need for food that is easily prepared.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

10 NEWS

OCD looks at new milk price model SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

MILK PROCESSOR Open Country Dairy is looking at a ‘farm price’ model for paying its farmer suppliers.

In its October newsletter to suppliers, OCD chief executive Steve Koekemoer says while it has the “fixed milk price” option already available, a farm price model will be based on farm costs

2016-17 FINAL MILK PAYOUTS 1. Tatua $7.10/kgMS 2. Synlait $6.30/kgMS average 3. Miraka $6.23/kgMS 4. Fonterra $6.12/kgMS (plus 40c/share dividend) 5. Open Country Dairy $6.06/kgMS to $6.10/kgMS 6. Westland $5.18/kgMS.

and guaranteed margin at farm level. “This is still in its infancy and our milk supply team will be arranging workshops with farmers during the season to get feedback on how this could work effectively,” he says in the newsletter. The “farm price” model is another option that we would like to have available to those farmers interested in stability, he says. “It gives the additional benefit of milk paid for in full on a monthly basis.” Last season OCD paid its suppliers a final milk price of $6.06 - $6.10/ kgMS. This puts the company just behind Fonterra, which paid

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$6.12/kgMS. Koekemoer, who recently returned from a sales trip to Algeria, Australia and the EU, says customers value OCD as “a highly credible supplier”. “Our continual drive for efficiency and quality is certainly noticed and has put us in a great position as the supplier of choice for many. “We continue to forge strong relationships with key customers and widen our product offering which is cementing our position long-term in key markets. Our sales team continues to do an outstanding job to ensure we have a balanced supply across the globe.”

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PLANTTECH, THE new technology-based regional research institute in Tauranga, expects to start work on its first projects over summer. Shane Stuart, innovation manager jointly for Priority One and University of Waikato, says there is a strong focus on getting PlantTech up and running with some speed. Initial work will be on technologies that support precision, automation and customisation in growing systems. He says PlantTech will work on accelerating innovation in horticultural and related technology for the region and throughout New Zealand. “Negotiations are ongoing to finalise an establishment contract with the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment and, concurrently, to incorporate PlantTech as a private company,” says Priority One, the economic development agency for Western Bay of Plenty. “This will include the appointment of a chief executive, board of directors and independent chair. “PlantTech will be headquartered in the Western Bay sub-region and will employ a team of experts in data sciences and automation to focus on premium, natural plant production, in collaboration with local industry, research organisations and international partners.” Led by Priority One and University of Waikato, with a commitment of $8.4 million from central government, PlantTech has been formed by a mix of technology companies, exporters and multinationals.


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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

12 NEWS

Iran comes back for more PETER BURKE

ANUGA BRINGS NEW SALES

peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

A TRIAL shipment of frozen lamb to Iran, sent earlier this year, has led to another order on the Wellington exporter, Taylor Preston. Its chief executive, Simon Gatenby, visited the capital Tehran recently, and met with the buyer, who placed another order. The buyer had profitably sold all the product in the trial shipment and so is in the market for another shipment, likely late November or early December. “It’s just a matter of waiting until the livestock price settles down to a level that doesn’t have the winter premiums in it and makes it sustainable for him,” Gatenby told Rural News. “At that time, the quality and price will be right.” He says the order will be about four container loads (100 tonnes). Some tweaking of the specification may be needed to meet the needs of the Iranian importer. When the Iranian buyer visited New Zealand earlier this year seeing the trial

GATENBY REPRESENTED Taylor Preston at the huge food and beverage fair Anuga in Cologne, Germany. This five day event attracts 160,000 international visitors and 7400 exhibitors, including Taylor Preston and two other NZ meat companies – Alliance and Affco. Gatenby says it was a very positive show with buyers from China, USA, Eastern Europe and Russia. He says while people were keen to buy lamb, they were concerned about its high price and what might happen if the price dropped. “We told them the only thing that would push prices down would be more lamb coming on the market,” Gatenby told Rural News. “We don’t see that happening because NZ doesn’t have any more lamb than it had last year and we are not aware of any other countries with extra lamb to sell.” Gatenby says since returning from Anuga he has been following up inquiries and buyers have been contacting the company. “Its early days, but there is a lot of correspondence flying back and forth.”

shipment being prepared, he said NZ lamb was of good quality, that he was impressed by our food safety and quality control and that he found NZers good people to deal with. Gatenby says he sees a prospect of selling chilled lamb to Iran. But this depends on MPI and Iranian officials working out certain technical issues and he’s hopeful this can be resolved. The past and present shipments are

going mainly into the food service sector, restaurants and small catering businesses. “It’s not setting the world on fire, but is going along nicely. I don’t know what the other NZ meat companies are thinking, but we are happy for it to develop at its own pace,” Gatenby adds. “We are not necessarily going to push hard but having done one shipment we’d like to do more.”

Taylor Preston’s Simon Gatenby.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 13

Massey’s vet school to go it alone PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MASSEY UNIVERSITY is to create a new standalone vet school, separating it out from the present Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences. The non-veterinarian functions will be merged into the existing Institute of Agriculture and Environment headed by Professor Peter Kemp and renamed the School of Agriculture. The new vet school is expected to have at least 1000 students and 260 staff and will come into being in the 2018 academic year. Both schools will come under the College of Sciences headed by pro vice-chancellor Prof Ray Goer. Geor says Massey has a proud history in agriculture and is a recognised global leader in sustainable agriculture and food systems. “Establishing separate schools of agriculture and veterinary science are small things in terms of the label, but actually it’s

big because it sends messages about what we want to be and how we want to grow and where our strengths are,” he told Rural News. “Underneath that, of course, we want to make sure everyone is able to be their very best and we can continue to get the great outcomes we have had in the past.” Massey chancellor Professor Jan Thomas says the aim is to ensure that agriculture and veterinary science are not diluted in any way because both are critical for the success of the primary sector. She says one of the great things about Massey University is that it has world-class experts in all facets of the primary sector value chain – soil, animal and pasture production, precision agriculture, the environment and food technology. Thomas says such expertise will enable Massey to play a major role in serving the primary sector. “We want to build on our heritage and success in these areas and further

develop our strengths to meet the changing needs of the sectors. “Agriculture at Massey is big and integrated across the university. We have expertise across the food value chain includ-

ing in pastoral-based animal production, plant and soil sciences, horticulture, genetics, water quality, animal health, agri-technology and farm business management,” Thomas says.

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AG SECTOR NEEDS TOP STUDENTS PROFESSOR PETER Kemp, who heads Massey University’s Institute of Agriculture and Environment, says industry is chasing good agricultural graduates. He says he’s unsure whether the public knows the primary sector is booming. Meanwhile the sector keeps telling the university about a persistent shortage of talent. Kemp says this applies not only in the dairy industry, but also in the horticulture and sheep and beef sectors. He says over the past five years, ag student numbers at Massey have been good, but he’d like to see more students take up horticulture. Kemp says Massey is now revising its agriculture and horticulture degrees to link better with industry. “We are really pushing hard, linking to industry via internships. And we are emphasising agri-technology and what you might call the whole understanding of the regulatory framework — compliance, greenhouse gases, etc.”

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Massey University chancellor Jan Thomas.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

14 NEWS

Fonterra no longer big cheese in Aus SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S SHORT reign as Australia’s biggest milk processor could be over early next year. The co-op’s bid to buy

troubled farmer-owned cooperative Murray Goulburn (MG) has failed; MG’s board is recommending farmer shareholders approve an A$1.3 billion bid from Canadian dairy giant Saputo.

If MG shareholders vote ‘yes’ at a special meeting early next year, Saputo will become Australia’s biggest milk processor; it already owns Warrnambool Cheese and Butter Company in Vic-

Fonterra has lost out to Canadian company Saputo in buying the troubled Australian dairy processor Murray Goulburn.

toria. Australian dairy analyst Steve Spencer, FreshAgenda, says Saputo could end up processing 2.8b - 3.0b L, nearly onethird of Australia’s total milk.

Spencer says Fonterra is expected to be the

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second largest processor at 2.5b L. “Saputo’s milk intake will depend on whether they make further asset sales and let some milk go with those units (such as fresh milk plants and other sites that don’t fit their business),” Spencer told Rural News. “One hard question is whether they can win back some milk that has recently left MG for other processors; part of the deal [with Saputo] is a loyalty bonus aimed at retaining and rebuilding supply.” Following the turmoil over low milk payout over the past two years, some MG suppliers switched to other processors; Fonterra saw its milk pick-up jump from 1.6b L to over 2b L, making it the biggest processor. In September Fonterra chairman John Wilson told Rural News that its Australian plants have reached capacity and now have a waiting list of would-be suppliers. MG’s milk supply had fallen from 2.7b L last year to under 2b L this year. MG’s demise signals the loss of the last major dairy co-op in Australia. Warrnambool Cheese and Butter was also once a farmer-owned co-op, before listing on the ASX and ending up in the hands of Saputo. Spencer says MG’s

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

16 NEWS

Court decision a ‘dogs breakfast’ PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

AT LEAST 170 dairy farms and 30-plus commercial growing enterprises in the Horizons

Regional Council (HRC) area cannot get resource consents because of an Environment Court decision on the council’s One Plan several months ago. HRC chair Bruce

Gordon describes the situation as a ‘dog’s breakfast’ with little immediate hope of sorting out the issues. He says the courtimposed nitrogen limits are unattainable for many

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farmers and growers and this is creating economic problems for the whole region. “Who’s going to invest in a region when that uncertainty exists?” Gordon says. The kerfuffle began when Fish and Game (F&G) and the Environmental Defence Society (EDS) took the HRC to court for what they saw as its failing to implement the One Plan that had earlier been agreed to. The court sided with F&G and EDS, so HRC must now do its best to do what the court has determined, but this is proving nigh impossible. Gordon says dairy farmers who want to intensify their farming

“Who’s going to invest in a region when that uncertainty exists?” or others who want to convert to dairying have virtually no show of getting a consent under the court-imposed rules. And this is not just a dairy problem, he says. Sooner or later sheep and beef farmers will also get caught, especially if they use irrigation and try to intensify. “Horticulture is in a lot of trouble and worse than dairy,” he told Rural News. “Nobody can come close to the new limits, and none of our growers in Levin — a food bowl of NZ — can meet the new limits.” The regional coun-

cil is in a ‘complete pickle’ and is hamstrung by the plan as it stands, Gordon says. One option is a ‘plan change’, but says this could take years to resolve because it requires all parties to agree on a solution and that is not happening now. The council has tried to get alongside F&G and EDS without much success. “EDS won’t talk to the council’s elected members, but they have spoken to our officials. As for F&G, we addressed its annual meeting in Palmerston North and invited

them to come and speak with our council but so far they have refused, which disappoints me terribly,” Gordon says. “If people sit around the table and eyeball each other they will come to a practical solution. But the plan we have now doesn’t have any practicality and we are struggling with it.” Farmers and growers will meanwhile keep producing while the regional council works on a solution. The council has made clear at public meetings that it is not shutting anybody down. Gordon says farmers must farm tightly and do all they can to mitigate the known problems on their farms. Failure to do so could see them taken to court.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 17

Need to better trace Chinese exports PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

WHAT HAPPENS inside the border in China is something this country needs to understand much better, says Tim Knox, MPI director for market access, policy and trade. “It is a very, very complex and tightly held distribution system,” he says. The infant formula industry probably has a better grasp, but more broadly we all need to get more savvy. Chinese regulators are moving to more regulation in the post-border environment. “Some provinces are putting in place regional traceability schemes, for example, to try to deal with unbelievably complex and not very well structured distribution systems that I have observed in the market,” he told an Infant Formula Council conference in Auckland. “Any confidence I had that our products sortof flowed up through the supply chain and ended

up with the consumer in the way they left… in the main I would say that is not the case.” The infant formula industry it is probably much better, but for some of the other primary products we export it is just not possible to have that confidence. It is “a risk to New Zealand” and something we need to get more focused on. Knox says maintaining and building relationships is key for MPI. “We need to keep pace with the fast moving environment and consumer expectations up there which then drive the regulators.” Having a strong team in Beijing is important for monitoring that. The Belt and Road initiative – a trade pathway from Oceania through Asia to Europe planned by China — will provide NZ with opportunities to get in behind some of its trade facilitation ambitions. “If we can provide win-win benefits for China as well, it can provide significant

RED CHINA! A SIGNIFICANT shift from white meat to red meat is occurring in China, says Knox. More beef is on the menu and pork is gradually reducing. The gap between domestic supply and demand for food and other primary products is expected to continue in China. “We see significant opportunities for growth in the value and range of products into that market,” says Knox. The market also presents risk and MPI aims to get advanced warning of thinking and change that might be in the wind. He says care for the environment is a big trend in China. They are dealing with environmental damage which occurred during the industrial period of China’s growth. “I think we are going to see a massive shift and emphasis by the Chinese Government to lift environmental standards and look to producing in a much more sustainable way.” Knox also says organic production is on the rise in China and seen as an important part of the agricultural agenda. Significant generational changes are occurring in attitudes towards purchasing and consumption. The origin, safety and authenticity of food is critical to Chinese consumers. He says sustainability of the production of that food will also become an issue on which Chinese consumers are focused particularly as they look to improve that domestically.

benefits.” Companies need to play their role, Knox says. Infant formula manufacturers play a very active part. “But all need to be

as savvy as they can be because it is a very different part of the world to operate in.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

18 NEWS

Triumphant Skippy leaves no ‘calling cards’ PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

Kate Stewart with Rural News Group’s Peter Burke

KATE STEWART, helped by a pet ram lamb Skippy, won this year’s Massey University Rural News Group-sponsored video meme competition.

This encourages students to create a ‘commercial’ to encourage students in secondary schools to choose a career in agri and Massey University as the place to do this. Good entries poured

INTELLIGENCE INGRAINED

ing,” she told Rural News. “I’d stay out with my grandparents every weekend so that sparked the love of agriculture.” Stewart says she saw others making videos and after taking Skippy along to campus she decided he had a good story to tell. “So I put the footage together and entered it in the competition. I enjoyed making the video as I hadn’t made one since I was at secondary school. It was quite a challenge at times, but Skippy cooperated and didn’t leave any ‘visiting cards’ in the library,” she says. Stewart also won the Young Farmers Sally Hobson Award.

in, but none could head off Skippy the lamb, who led viewers on a tour of the university, on field trips and even to the Massey/Lincoln exchange visit. This was the clear and popular winner. Stewart, who has now completed her ag science degree, hales from Palmerston North and is heading to Te Awamutu as a DairyNZ trainee consulting officer. While she doesn’t come from a farm, her grandparents do. “I went to Palmy girls college, but my grandparents have a dairy farm 20 minutes out of the city and I love the people and animals – especially calv-

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JAMES ROBERTSON from Waikato is Massey University’s top agricultural student for 2017, announced at a function attended by 250 students, academics and agri representatives. This is the 24th year of the event — the biggest ever. The evening is to reward and celebrate the top students, many of them new graduates heading into the agri sector. Robertson grew up on a dairy farm in Waikato and already has a job with Fonterra. He also won the university’s William Gerrish Memorial Award. Erica van Reenen received the Massey Agriculture Alumni Achievement Award and Sarah Ross won the Massey University award for excellence in horticulture. Massey vice-chancellor Professor Jan Thomas, attending the awards for the first time, says it was a great event and lovely to celebrate success. She says she loves seeing the students bringing such energy and creativity to the university. “One of the joys of working at a university is that you get to experience young people and the next generation of leaders — remarkable young people. “And this is such a natural environment for us to connect with our industry partners.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

20 NEWS

Farmers fight back it’s been a campaign this year. It’s been unrelenting and it doesn’t appear to have stopped yet and I’m not sure it will.” ‘Proud to be a Farmer’ was launched at a function at Greta Valley, North Canterbury. The group has been organised by local woman Claire Inkson in response to what she called a general feeling of low morale in the industry, and the negativity often seen in mainstream and social media about agriculture. “There seems to be so much negativity, when

NIGEL MALTHUS

FARMERS HAVE had to endure an unprecedented and unrelenting attack on their industry, says Hurunui mayor and farmer Winton Dalley. Speaking at the launch of the ‘Proud to be a Farmer’ group in late October, Dalley said he was probably the oldest person in the room but had never experienced such a campaign in his lifetime. “It’s been unrelenting since January this year. It preceded that but

HEADER

there’s actually so much good stuff happening that just doesn’t get so much exposure,” she said. The group takes over from a previous campaign launched in 2015 by Allflex & Platinum Primary Producers, which Inkson said had lost some momentum. With a new website and Facebook page set up, Inkson said she’s now looking at getting some structure, membership and sponsorship to “take it to the next level” and spread it nationwide. Inkson told the launch

the scheme is to raise morale, remind farmers they have much to be proud of and help bridge the urban-rural divide, by “constantly and consistently telling our stories in a positive way”. Also speaking at the event were local farmers Charles Douglas-Clifford and Lyndon Matthews, both former Ballance farm environmental award winners. Dalley appropriately attended the event sporting gumboots and with a bush jacket over a collar and tie.

Hurunui mayor Winton Dalley speaks at the launch of ‘Proud to be a Farmer NZ’, at the Fossil Point Cafe in Greta Valley. RURAL NEWS GROUP

“I’m proud to be a farmer. It doesn’t mean I’m proud of all farmers and all that farmers have done,” he said. “I’m not necessarily proud of everything I’ve done as a farmer, but the proud thing is that we recognise that.” However, Dalley says as an industry, and as individuals, farmers are actually facing that and doing something about it. “A lot of that, of course, is in the environmental area and there’s a huge amount being done by many farmers. “It’s a very small minority now who I believe are not being responsible.” Dalley said it is a privilege to be a steward of the land. Farmers should not take that lightly, but be prepared to share it, “particularly with our city

‘Proud to be a Farmer’ organiser Claire Inkson.

cousins”. “I don’t believe in the rural-city divide – or don’t want to believe in it. “We’ve got to work hard to make sure that’s not a reality. It doesn’t

need to be.” “Farming and farmers have been part of the strength, development and wealth of this country and nothing and nobody can take that away from us.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 21

Food business on track for $5b in sales SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA SAYS its food service business is on track to earn $5 billion by 2023. Backed by $850 million investments in production capacity, the co-op is seeing increasing demand for products used by chefs. Fonterra’s foodservice business, Anchor Food Professionals, became New Zealand’s sixth-biggest export business, having generated $2b in annual revenue over the past year. Chief operating officer consumer and food service Lukas Paravacini says that over the past four years Fonterra has invested $850 million in new production capacity for foodservice, $700m of this in NZ.

These expansions are at Waitoa in Waikato for UHT creams, Eltham in Taranaki for slice-onslice cheese, Clandeboye in Canterbury for extra stretch mozzarella, and Te Rapa in Waikato and Darfield in Canterbury for cream cheese. “These are helping us to match increasing demand for our products and ensuring we remain on track to meet our annual revenue target of $5b by 2023,” said Paravacini. He puts the booming business down to changing lifestyles by consumers and Fonterra chefs around the world working with food service providers to help their businesses succeed. Foodservice is one of the largest industries in the world and encompasses food and beverages

consumed in restaurants, cafes and bakeries. In the US at least 50% of spending on food and beverage is now out of home and in China the market has grown by 30% over the last five years. As a result, the global industry is predicted to be worth US$3 trillion in 2021, Paravacini says. “We have taken advantage of this eating-out trend and currently Anchor Food Professionals is growing 10 times faster than the global total foodservice market.  “It is part of our strategy of focussing on adding more value to…

milk. The gross margin from foodservice is two to three times what we can earn from basic ingredient products,” he says. Paravacini points to Fonterra working with tea houses in China. There Chinese prefer tea topped with a fluffy blend of cream and cream cheese; consumers queue up to three hours for the tea macchiatos. Last year the tea houses sold 200 million serves. Paravacini says the functional superiority of Fonterra cream and cream cheese is allowing the co-op to capture a large part of the market.

Lukus Paravacini

MODEL WORKING FONTERRA’S NEW model of business based on customer insights is central to the success of its food service business. The co-op’s global director foodservice, Grant Watson, says it has 56 chefs in 50 countries who go into kitchens to demonstrate the products. “They get to know their customers, work to understand their issues and challenges, and help us design more new products to help address those problems. “We know the smallest things can make a difference, so we make our products last longer, stretch further, work faster, waste less, withstand more. We bring together world class dairy products and the deep expertise of our people to work alongside the food professionals who are driving the foodservice industry to new heights,” says Watson. Fonterra also has a ‘channel-led’ system, providing foodservice kitchens around the world with ingredients for some of the largest categories in the business — Asian style bakeries, Italian kitchens and quick service restaurants. “Our ingredients include extra stretch mozzarella, UHT culinary and whipping creams, laminated butter sheets and cream cheese,” says Watson.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

22 NEWS

Chinese leadership good for NZ - MPI PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

CHINA’S PRESIDENT Xi Jinping being reaffirmed as that country’s leader for the next five years is positive for New Zealand trade, says Tim Knox, MPI director of market access, policy and trade branch.

“China is particularly important to us as a market and we are trying to do our best to work with China as they are going through some substantial change,” Knox told the recent Infant Nutrition Council in Auckland. “Many things are happening in China which

are influencing its thinking and ultimately our trade.” Knox says President’s Xi reaffirmation as leader at the 19th Party Congress “was an important step in being clear about the direction for the next five years and potentially more”. “His agenda and his

power base have been well and truly reinforced. And I think we will see a continued trend on the sorts of issues he has been focused on.” President Xi’s Belt and Road initiative – one Knox says he heard about every day while in Beijing – is a big geopolitical move by China.

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“Many things are happening in China which are influencing its thinking and ultimately our trade.” This megainfrastructure project is intended to create a China-centred trade network connecting Asia, Africa and Europe. It would encompass about 60 countries and Oceania is included. “It is also a great opportunity in our view, for countries like NZ, to leverage the desire to facilitate trade,” says Knox. “We see the cooperation agreement that the NZ government signed with China on Belt and Road as a fantastic opportunity to push ahead our trade facilitation agenda focusing on not just the rules but how things get cleared into the market and the cost of doing that. “There is a big effort

going on here and in China to look at where China and NZ can get together to progress Belt and Road initiatives and trade facilitation.” Knox says President Xi has made it clear he expects the regulators to work harder to facilitate trade. “We are already seeing a shift in attitude from some of our counterparts there as a result of that. “China is in transition from a production to consumer economy. That is expected to continue and increase the demand for high quality products and services. The top 5-10% of Chinese consumers are expected to continue to increase in wealth and purchasing power,” he added.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

NEWS 23

Bright start to new velvet season THE NEW deer velvet season has opened strongly, with farmers reporting early enquiry from buyers at prices 10-15% above last season’s close. Deer Industry NZ (DINZ) Asia market manager Rhys Griffiths says the price recovery is timely. “Regulatory changes in

ucts in China. “The market has the potential to be huge. Chinese HFF companies are strong and in some cases bigger than their Korean health food counterparts. To date they have held off from developing velvet-based HFFs because of regulatory barriers. These have been largely resolved, so we are opti-

“Korean and Chinese companies are now actively buying to ensure they get the velvet they need.” China last season led to a loss of buyer confidence and a dip in prices that did not reflect the steady growth in demand for NZ velvet from China and Korea, our major markets,” he says. “Indeed, overall demand was such that some buyers who held off making their purchases in the belief that prices would fall further nearly missed out on supply. Lesson learned. Korean and Chinese companies are now actively buying to ensure they get the velvet they need.” Griffiths says DINZ estimates production will reach 675 tonnes this season, up slightly on last season. “This increase will be needed to meet growing demand for velvet as an ingredient in health foods in Korea, which we estimate accounts for 150 tonnes of velvet a year. “Health food products are bringing in new consumers; it’s not just a case of velvet consumers moving from a traditional to a more modern form of product. “The growing consumer demand is also attracting more large manufacturers, all seeking NZ velvet for new health food products of their own. Some are also using our NZ velvet quality mark prominently on their packaging and in mass media advertising.” He says an important industry goal is to encourage the development of a market for NZ velvet-based healthy functional food (HFF) prod-

mistic.” In the meantime, South Korea remains the dominant market with about 60% of all NZ velvet consumed there. Some of this is velvet bought frozen from NZ, processed in China and re-exported to Korea. “As last season’s market dip showed, potential regulatory changes are an ever-present risk for the NZ industry,” Griffiths says. “There is also the geopolitical risk. War on the Korean peninsula would clearly have an immediate and significant impact.” These risks aside, the use of velvet in Korea and China is culturally ingrained. Also the enthusiastic consumer response to new velvet-based products bodes well for future demand. For this reason, DINZ does not see a need to make major changes to its market development strategy, which is to build demand among consumers who have a cultural connection to velvet. “We are seeing growth in enquiry from South East Asian countries where there is a deep respect for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and velvet’s role within it. Vietnam, for example, has a population of 100 million, a rapidly growing economy and a firm understanding of TCM. Taiwan and Japan also hold potential that DINZ will be exploring,” Griffiths says. “The path to success for the NZ industry comes from working with

businesses in the marketplace that see an opportunity for velvet-based products. We can help them find suppliers of quality assured NZ velvet, explain the benefits of NZ velvet and provide them

with promotional support. “One Korean health food company is alone spending millions of dollars on the promotion of its products based on NZ velvet.”

The new deer velvet season has opened strongly.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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10 Oct

3 Aug

3 Oct Last Ye ar

UK Leg p/kg

n/c

Last Week 5.80

NZc/kg

- 0 .1

9.48

Change

5yr A ve 220 690

10 Nov

3 Dec This Ye ar

550

2 Wks A go 5.80

Last Year 5.40

9.57

8.28

5yr A ve 5.37 8.71

Export demand indicator - UK CKT leg

450

350 26 Aug

26 Oct

26 Dec

Procurement Indicator

Last Year This Year 150 $1.50 26-Jun 26-A ug 26-O ct 26-Dec 5-Jun 12-Jun 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Procurement Indicator 1.6 1.5

2Wks A go 79.4 73.6

3 Wks A go 77.8 72.1

Last Year 86.1 81.2

5yr A ve 78.1 72.8

P rocu rement Indicator Procurement Indicator -- North North I.Island 95 90% 85% 80% 75 75% Last Year 70% This Year 65% 60% 55 0… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 3… 3… 3… 2… 3… 3… 14-Jul 14-S ep 14-Nov 14-Jan

Procurement Indicator - South Island

9.0

k 10 0Aug

250 26 Jun

% Returned NI % Returned SI

7.0

10.0

2 Wks A go 220 662

Export indicator - US 95CL D edemand mand Indicator - US 95CL Beefbeef

Change

8.0

6.0 14-Jul

+3 +0

North Island 60kg stag price

9.0

200

Export Market Demand

This Year

USc/lb 14-S ep 5yr Ave

S outh Island Weekly Lamb Kill

200k 300

10-Oct 3-Oct 10-Nov 3-Dec Last Ye ar This Ye ar

% of export returns

$/kg

10.0

Last Year

3-Aug 10-Sep 5yr Ave

$2.00

4.5

10 Nov 3 Dec

South Island w eekly lamb kill

400 250k

3 Ju n

$2.50 200

5.0

This Year

10 Oct3 Oct

100 50k

95CL USc/lb NZc/kg 250 $3.00

Last Year

10 Sep 3 Aug

100k

Change

14-S ep

5yr Ave

k 0 10 Aug 3 Ju n

150k

Export Market Demand

5.5

4.0 14-Jul

10-Dec 3-Dec

90 P rocu rement Indicator - South I. 85% 80% 75% 70 70% 65% Last Year 60% This Year 50 14-S ep 14-Nov 14-Jan 55%14-Jul 19-Jun 26-Jun 3-Jul 10-Jul 17-Jul 24-Jul 31-Jul 7-Aug 14-Aug 21-Aug 28-Aug 4-Sep 11-Sep 18-Sep 25-Sep 9-Oct 16-Oct 23-Oct 30-Oct 6-Nov 13-Nov 20-Nov 0-Jan 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

% of export returns

6.0

10-Nov 3-Oct

South Island Weekly Cattle Kill

4.5 4.0 14-Jul

This Year

S outh Island Weekly Cattle Kill

k 03-Jun 10-Aug

5.0

Last Year

10k40 30

5.5

200

100 50k

5k20 10

North Island 300kg bull price

300

100k

15k60 50

5yr Ave

Last Year 5.86 5.88 5.90 5.91 2.85 5.73 5.73 5.73 5.73 2.75

150k

10 k 0 10-Aug 3-Jun

5.5

2 Wks A go 7.06 7.08 7.10 7.11 4.25 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 4.30

200k

50

40 20k30

6.5

4.5 14-Jul

Thousand head

7.5

40k60

14-S ep

n/c n/c n/c n/c +5 n/c n/c n/c n/c n/c

Last Week 7.06 7.08 7.10 7.11 4.30 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 4.30

North eekly lamb N ort hIsland Islandw Weekly Lambkill Kill

250k 400

North N ort hIsland IslandWeekly Weekly Cattle Cattle Kill Kill

Change

Slaughter Thousand head

5.5 4.5 14-Jul

P 2 Steer - 300kg

Thousand head

$/kg

7.5

North Island 17kg M lamb price

SI

c/kgCWT NI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 17.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1 - 21kg SI Lamb YM - 13.5kg P M - 16.0kg P X - 19.0kg P H - 22.0kg M utto n M X1- 21kg

Thousand head

c /kgCWT

S o u th Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 7 .0 8

UKp/kg

No rth Is lan d C h an g e L as t c /kg We e k n/c 7 .0 8

% Returned NI

+0 .5

2Wks A go 73.8

% Returned SI

+1.0

72.8

Change

85 80%

3 Wks A go 73.3

Last Year 70.2

71.8

66.7

5yr A ve 70.4 68.1

Procurement P rocu rementindicator Indicator-- North North Island I.

% of export returns

Me at

LAMB MARKET TRENDS

BEEF MARKET TRENDS

75 70% 65 60%

Last Year

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 14-Jul 11-Sep 11-Oct 14-S ep11-Nov 11-Dec 14-Nov11-Jan 11-Feb 14-Jan 75 80%

% of export returns

MARKET SNAPSHOT

Procurement indicator - South Island P rocu rement Indicator - South I.

70% 65 60% Last Y ear

This Year

50% 55 11-Aug 14-Jul 11-Sep 11-Oct 14-S ep11-Nov 11-Dec 14-Nov11-Jan 11-Feb 14-Jan 5yr ave Last Ye ar This Ye ar

Venison Prices NI Stag - 60kg

n/c

Last Week 9.70

SI Stag - 60kg

+10

10.05

Change

Beef & venison prices are reported as gross (before normal levies & charges are deducted). Lamb & mutton prices are reported nett (after levies & charges are deducted).

We know your weekends are workdays too.

2 Wks A go 9.70

Last Year 8.70

9.95

8.90

5yr A ve 7.88 8.25


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

MARKETS & TRENDS 25 PRICE WATCH

beef market continues to prove unpredictable, with demand and prices not following expected seasonal patterns. US production continues to be high, however we have yet to see prices ease as a result. Ongoing strong retail demand for fresh lean grinding beef is

WOOL PRICE WATCH Indicato rs in NZc/kg

12-Oct

05-Oct

Last Year

12-Oct

05-Oct

Last Year

301

298

454

Co arse Xbred

-3

219

222

327

310

-

555

Ewe - 35 micro n

-

226

-

400

Ewe - 37 micro n

-5

295

300

555

Ewe - 37 micro n

-8

215

223

400

2nd Shear 37M

+2 0

265

245

475

2nd Shear 37M

+11

193

182

342

Wool trends Woindicator ol Indicator Trends

850 600

Second shear - 37 micron

600 CXI

750 500

FXI LI

650 400

500

400

550 300

300

450 200 13-O ct 42166 13-Jan 13-A pr42320 13-Jul WeekNo 42110 42124 42138 42152 42180 42194 42208 42222 42236 42250 42264 42278 42292 42306 42334 42348 42376 42390 42404 42418 42432 42446 42459 CXI FXI LI

200 13-Jul

650700 600 600 500 550400

e - 37 micron C o arseEw Xbred Indicator Last Year

This Year

13-Jan

Ew e - 35 micron

500 400 300

45020013-Jul Oct Dec 5yr ave

100%

13-Nov This Ye ar

600

500300

The Rabobank difference

13-S ep Last Ye ar

700

13-S Feb ep Apr 13-Nov Jun Last Ye ar

Aug 13-Jan This Ye ar

AgriHQ is the leading source of independent agri market analysis and advice that farmers can bank on. For the latest market reports visit agrihq.co.nz/farmer or call 0800 85 25 80.

200 13-Jul

13-S ep 5yr ave

13-Nov

Last Ye ar

13-Jan This Ye ar

agriHQ.co.nz

The average time our Rural Managers have worked with us

94%

of our customers believe we are committed to their business for the long-term Kantar TNS New Zealand independent research, August 2016

of deposits fund New Zealand agribusiness

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

12630

Change

-

OUR INSIGHT. YOUR EDGE.

years of global agricultural history

Indicato rs in USc/kg

+3

c/kg

in the sheep processing space. Spot prices were around $4.20-$4.50/kg in both islands, but it is the contracts that are grabbing our attention. $4.80/ kg is on offer for much of November, and is it widely expected the spot price will match this. Demand from China for New Year Celebrations is the driver. The other driver for the ewe market is an upcoming supply gap for lambs. The last of the old seasons will be largely tidied up in the next 10 days, and new seasons are slow to finish this season. The first stirrings of the new season store lamb trade are occurring. It is hard to pin a price on the handful of new season stores trading in the paddock. Generally good lambs were making $105-$110 in the yards, while lighter types are more like $90-$105. Reports from exporters indicate overseas demand for our frozen production is firm.

Change

Ewe - 35 micro n

Co arse Xbred

SHEEP: Ewes are the headline story

Overseas Wool Price Indicators

c/kg

INTERNATIONAL BEEF: The US

reported as being one of the key drivers. Rain in Australia has halted the cattle slaughter there. Export data shows that NZ exported 430,000 tonnes of beef in 2016/17, down by 36,000t on the previous season.

c/kg

BEEF: Cattle slaughter prices remain Largely. Supply remains the biggest driver, with many cattle still behind normal finishing times. There has been an increase in bull and prime numbers, however cow numbers have dropped right back as on-farm conditions improve. Many processors have just opened up more processing capacity. Supply is, however, a long way off from matching this capacity, and is likely to remain so until December. The number of store other cattle to sell is reportedly a bit thinner, as many farmers are opting to sit on them for the time being. There are, however, several cattle fairs scheduled in the next couple of weeks that look to have significant numbers on offer. 100kg calves continue to be in good demand, particularly through the paddock. Paddock sales were around $520-$550 in the North Island and $460$480 in the South Island.

c/kg

NEWS

100,000

farmers to connect with worldwide

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

COUNTRIES


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

26 AGRIBUSINESS

Challenging future facing livestock farming

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THE DISRUPTIVE forces facing New Zealand agriculture could mean a tough future for livestock farming, says the new president of the New Zealand Institute of Primary Industry Management (NZIPIM). Farm consultant Craig Osborne, from Oxford, North Canterbury, has been named to replace Guy Blundell, heading the institute for the next twoyear term. Osborne says that

and it paints a picture that shows livestock farming in NZ probably has a tough future. That’s easy to say; what replaces it becomes a lot harder,” Osborne says. “Do we have a place in the alternative protein market? Should we be producing the plants that provide those proteins?” he asks. “That’s a possibility. Can we go very premium and very niche so we’re selling what we make for a whole lot more? “The reality is that the

where NZ farming is heading is the “milliondollar question” and a tough one to answer because of all the competing forces gaining momentum globally. “Alternative synthetic proteins are a disruptive force,” he told Rural News. “You’ve got climate change and [few] tools to mitigate the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from ruminants; and NZ’s own social pressures on the impact of livestock on the environment. “Put all those together

in

NIGEL MALTHUS

The New Zealand Institute of Primary Industry Management (NZIPIM) has appointed Craig Osborne as its new president. RURAL NEWS

best NZ can do, at the moment, is get ourselves ready, place a lot of bets, investigate a lot of things, so that as the market develops we have the ability to tailor what we head towards,” he said. Osborne says NZIPIM is an organisation for those people “who drive up farm driveways advising farmers”. “We’ve got a challenge to help make sure our members are thinking about these future scenarios so the advice they’re providing for their clients is good. “At the same time, the other part of our role is making sure we are helping them personally prepare for what their own businesses will look like in the future.” A member of the NZIPIM for about 10 years, Osborne said a priority as president will be finding ways to deliver more to its members.

Feedback suggested that for many members, local branchlevel events such as onfarm meetings with a couple of speakers, a barbecue and networking, is a big part of the value of the organisation. He says the local branches are working well in Canterbury and Waikato and there is a

What’s NZIPIM? Formed in 1969, NZIPIM now has at least 1000 members from agriculture-related occupations. This includes farmers, farm consultancies, education providers, fertiliser companies, agri-scientists, property management, veterinary services, rural valuation, finance, accountancy and banking. NZIPIM also has 300 student members in agriculture-related tertiary courses.

growing branch in Otago. “We’re not consistently strong across all of NZ, so part of what

I’m keen to do is look at how to get more strong branches in the key agricultural regions.”

BACKGROUND IN AGRICULTURE OSBORNE WAS raised as one of four brothers on an 80ha sheep beef and horticulture farm near Ashhurst, Manawatu. He’s had a 25-year career in corporate agribusiness, having held senior roles at Fonterra and PGG Wrightson. He established his own consulting practice, CarmeAg, about four years ago, with clients now including Ngāi Tahu Farming and mid-Canterbury’s MHV Water (recently formed by the merger of Mayfield Hinds Irrigation and Valetta Irrigation).

He is also a member of the steering committee of Crops for Future Foods. Osborne was involved from 1993 in the re-organisation of the dairy industry, which eventually led to Fonterra. He now describes himself as a “strategy management generalist”. “It’s anything from helping agribusinesses formulate their strategic plans through to working on specific projects and business analysis and undertaking specific pieces of research.”


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

AGRIBUSINESS 27

Mapping the shift to digital farming AGRESEARCH SAYS it is starting a big programme to prepare New Zealand for the new era of digital agriculture. It will identify the barriers to taking up new digital technologies on and off the farm, and will develop a technology ‘roadmap’ to support the industry’s transition. AgResearch research director Greg Murison says many farmers are already using technologies such as sensors on their farms connected to their mobile phones or devices. However, he believes there is enormous potential for uptake of other new tools, and digital platforms that can bring together and analyse large amounts of data from different sources onfarm to guide decisionmaking. “There are huge gains on offer from digital agriculture in terms of productivity, the envi-

ronments we farm in and pressures on farmers,” Murison says. “It’s crucial that NZ, as an agricultural nation and exporter, stays ahead of the game. We want to support the industries as best we can. “We believe our programme will be among the first of its kind where a system-wide analysis of digital agriculture has been done in NZ. There are a lot of smart people and companies developing these new digital tools for farmers.” Murison says AgResearch’s role is looking at the big picture of adoption across NZ and how best to measure and interpret the data essential to the operation of these tools. “We are already collecting data from our Tokanui research farm, where for example we are digitally tracking the movements and behav-

SAFELY MANAGING HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES FROM PAGE 30

others from the dangers of hazardous substances. Workers need to be informed of the risks and have the training, supervision and equipment to do their work safely. “For example, if you send someone out to spray diazinon, you need to make them aware of the health risks of exposure as well as providing the necessary personal protective equipment,” Handforth explains. Some substances may need to be secured and only handled by people with the appropriate training. Approved handlers become certified handlers under the new regulations. There will be fewer substances that require a certified handler, but a greater emphasis on making sure all workers handling hazardous substances can do so safely. “And don’t forget, even the most safety-conscious farmer can have an accident. Make sure you have an emergency plan in place, including who to contact and who is responsible for what.” What to do now As well as looking at what is changing on December 1, it’s important to remember there are already rules in place. Now is a great time to review your hazardous substances management and make sure you are complying with your duty to protect people from harm in your workplace.

iour of cows,” he explains. “We are also testing and trialling new technologies that become available to see how they can be integrated into NZ farming systems, and what value they can bring for our farmers.” AgResearch has recently worked with Aus-

AgResearch’s Greg Murison believes there’s huge gains on offer from digital agriculture in terms of productivity.

tralian firm Agersens to trial its new virtual fencing technology in NZ. This uses collars on livestock that enable farmers to restrict, move and monitor stock from anywhere and anytime via an app. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

28 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Talk is cheap WITH THE new Labour/NZ First/Greens government now in power, what changes can the rural sector expect? In essence there will be change, but just how much is open to question. The new Minister of Agriculture, Damien O’Connor, is well respected in the sector, but he seems something of a lone voice in the heavily urban-centric cabinet with little or no understanding of the primary sector. Country-of-origin labelling is likely, but that was coming anyway. The splitting off of biosecurity and possibly the food safety functions from MPI seems clear. But with the coalition agreement signalling the setting up of new forestry and fishery services, it’s possible these functions could remain under the MPI umbrella – but with greater independence, more funding and more staff, i.e. communications, HR and IT consultants. A review of the PGP grants is likely and Crown support for irrigation is gone, although current schemes will keep their funding. It’s possible this may be revised in time, but the Greens want dairying scaled down and a move to other forms of farming. There will be a strong focus on cleaning up rivers and this is likely to be based on a new national policy statement (NPS). Expect to see fast-tracking of plans for improving rivers to swimmable standards and fencing intensively stocked land near waterways, including setbacks for riparian planting to filter and absorb silt and nutrients. However, much of this work has already been done, so those expecting quick results on this front will be disappointed. The infamous idea of a water tax is gone, but agriculture will now be included in the emissions trading scheme. How this will work and at what cost is still rather sketchy. Of course, we will now have a climate change commission – to go along with the committees on tax, child poverty and agriculture to name a few – which will publish numerous reports, employ friends and supporters of the new government, but probably achieve bugger-all. There’s promise of a strong emphasis on regional development, with an annual $1 billion budget which hopefully will benefit rural communities and not just be a slush fund for re-electing certain politicians. Thankfully, Labour’s anti-free trade election rhetoric seems to have been just that, and the ban it plans to impose on sales of houses and farms to foreigners will not trip up current or future FTAs, which are the lifeblood of our trading nation’s future. Ok, the talk is over. Go do it!

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“Quick! Quick! – present the trophy! – before Winston claims it was won by a coalition of three other horses!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Clean sweep

Wait for it

Gassed

Tickled Pink

THE HOUND sees that former Feds spin doctor and Winston Peters’ chief of staff for the past six years, David Broome, no longer has a job. It appears Broome’s consistent brownnosing of Peters and carrying his man-bag while in opposition didn’t mean much when it came to Government: he was dumped quicker than one of NZ First’s election bottom lines. There’s not too much sympathy for Broome with much of the parliamentary media pack unhappy with his behaviour during the coalition negotiations – by instructing parliamentary security to cut off media access to the new deputy PM during the talks. Meanwhile, your old mate hears that the chance of Broome getting back with the Feds is less than zero: a number of insiders say the best thing that happened to the farming lobby was when he left to go work for Winny. Ouch!

YOUR CANINE crusader reckons it is only fair to give the new government a chance. However, many in the rural sector are understandably nervous about what Socialist Cindy’s new regime may visit on them and the wider country. Let’s hope the social engineering that lefties are so fond of does not include emulating a recent proposal in California. The Hound reads that California’s Governor Jerry Brown recently signed in a new law that makes the state the first in the US to officially recognise a ‘third gender’. Apparently now California residents who identify as transgender or nonbinary (whatever that means) will be able to select the letter X on stateissued documents rather than M or F! Your old mate reckons it won’t be long before NZ does the same. You read it here first.

THIS OLD mutt hears that – like the proverbial bad penny – his good mate and former chairman of failed meat industry ginger group, MIE, John McCarthy was used by Winston Peters as his ‘agriculture advisor’ during the Dutch auction held between Labour and National last month. Mind you, the Hound is not surprised as Peters and McCarthy were tight as the proverbial fish’s behind in their failed attempt to try to de-rail the Shanghai Maling/Silver Fern Farm merger a couple of years back. Meanwhile, one of Winston’s new lackey list MPs is none other than another former failed MIE member, South Otago farmer Mark Patterson. So farmers can thank McCarthy and Patterson for selling out the agricultural sector to Labour and getting it stuck in the ETS. Talk about gassing your mates!

THE HOUND’S editor was contacted by a Hawkes Bay sheep farmer about an item in the Oct 24 column on American singer Pink’s illogical and ignorant antiwool stance. While he didn’t entirely disagree with the sentiment expressed in said column but suggested an even better idea. Our Hawkes Bay visitor reckoned a more constructive initiative would be for Merino NZ, Fed Farmers or some other wool related body to contact Pink’s management and show her how sheep are raised in NZ, a demonstration of shearing and then present her with some nice wool-based attire. He reckons this would show her how well sheep are treated in NZ, why they are shorn as well as the environmentally friendly and fashionable apparel made from wool. A brilliant idea, but will the NZ wool industry take up the challenge.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................. Ph 09 620 7811 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

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ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 31/03/2017

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Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

OPINION 29 ILLEGAL DEER RELEASE CONDEMNED HUNTERS JOIN with other voices in condemning threats by anti-1080 activists to illegally release deer in new areas now free of game

animals. The outrageous threats to release sika deer in the Taranaki region are deplorable and the NZ

ag twits Rural News’ irreverent and hypothetical look at what’s happening in the farming world Top Bleats view all @justcallmejacinda: Hi peeps, it’s your friend and totally funky PM Jacinda here. I’m just loving all the ‘Jacindamaina’ in the media. Here’s some more: fluffy bunnies, ice cream, my cat Paddles, relentless positivity, Colgate and my hip boyfriend Clarke. #yahiampm #thankswinston @benglishexpm: Bloody Winston. Bloody Greens. Bloody ‘Jacindamaina’. How about the political phenomena known as ‘Billimia’? A political disorder characterised by binge electoral campaigning followed by a purging from voters. #bugger @winstonfirstandlast: I don’t care that 93% of the country did not vote for me. It’s absolutely right that I get to decide who our next government is behind closed doors; that is open, transparent and accountable politics a bit like the NZ First’ ‘board’. #iamgod #whoarethey @shanethejonesboy: Kia ora and haera mai to the great, political rangitara that is @ winstonfirstandlast. The Jones Boy is delighted to have $1 billion a year to spend as the great one best sees fit. Just a heads-up: I may need to use a bit of this to pay off my hotel ‘movie’ bills. #slushfund #pornfree @winstonfirstandlast: No problem @ shanethejonesboy, put it on the credit card. Meantime, I’m so concerned about the state of capitalism in NZ that I am going to spend the next three years on overseas jaunts and living in 5-star hotels. #allaboutme #baublesofoffice @damienoconnormp: So now after nine long years in the wilderness I get to be ag minister. Only problems is I hate bloody Tories and I hate bloody farmers and I really, really hate bloody Tory farmers. #paybacktime @davidparker: Actually @damienoconnormp no one hates farmers more than me. How dare they stifle my fart tax idea back in the 2000s and then slate my irrigation tax in 2017. Bastards! #revengeshallbemine #smallmanhugeego kmilnefeds: Stand for president Katie, they said. It will great, they said. The Nats will be in again and it’ll be a doddle, they said. Where the bloody hell are ‘they’ now? #myworstnightmare #threelongyears

WRITE and RURAL NEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

TELL US YOUR VIEWS AND WIN

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Want to get something off your chest? Want to inform the ill-informed? Send your letters in for a chance to win a pair of SKELLERUP WORK BOOTS EMAIL: editor@ruralnews.co.nz POSTAL: The Editor, PO Box 331100,

Takapuna, Auckland 0740

Deerstalkers’ Association condemns this act of ecoterrorism. We totally distance ourselves from anyone involved in this outrage against the environment and sound wildlife management. Apart from being illegal, further release of game in new places is totally

contrary to the protection of indigenous biodiversity. We acknowledge that wild game are already

in enough places throughout New Zealand and fully support the immediate eradication of any wild animals illegally released anywhere new, any time. Bill O’Leary National President NZ Deerstalkers’ Association

SECRECY OK – WHEN I AGREE I ALWAYS read the Hound with interest, but I reckon the one on transparency (Rural News October 24) was wide of the mark. There’s a world of difference between an international agreement such as the TPP, which will affect us all for decades and is negotiated over years, and arrangements between

domestic political parties. The latter needed to be finalised in a timely manner to form a government and is merely to cover this election cycle. Imagine if the public were to have input into those arrangements. We wouldn’t have a government before the next election in 2020. Paul Elwell-Sutton, Haast


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

30 OPINION

Safely managing hazardous substances Fuels and chemicals are widely used on farms to help improve productivity, but there can be a cost to the health of you and your workers. Randall Walker, from WorkSafe NZ, explains why it’s important to know the risks of the substances farmers are working with and what they must do to protect people from harm. The aim is to reduce the harm from workrelated activities involving hazardous substances. Petrol, diesel, pesticides,

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tivity and efficiency, but they also pose risk to the people working with and around them. “Farmers often under-

fertilisers and cleaning solutions are common examples onfarm. Used safely, these contribute to produc-

Hazardous substances are part of everyday farming.

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which is usually too late to prevent the serious, sometimes fatal, consequences,” WorkSafe chief inspector Darren Handforth says. “Exposure to agrichemicals is a major contributor to the deaths from work-related health risks in the agricultural sector. We are using a wide range of them on farms, but not necessarily managing those risks very well.” The regulations will bring greater focus to managing hazardous substances safely at work. It’s not wholesale change: the rules for the workrelated use of hazardous substances are moving from the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act to the Health and Safety at Work Act (HSWA). Many of the existing requirements continue under the new regulations, so if you are complying now, there may not be much more you have to do. However, there are key changes that will help ensure you are doing your duty to protect people from harm. Risk management The starting point for all farmers is to identify and assess the risks. Make a list of the hazardous substances on your farm, the quantities and where these are stored. Then read the safety data sheets to understand the risks they pose, how to use and store them safely and what to do if there is a spill or you are exposed to them. “From 1 December it will be mandatory to keep both an inventory of your hazardous substances and their safety data sheets, so if you haven’t already got this in place you

should act now,” Handforth says. The simplest way to prepare an inventory is to use WorkSafe’s hazardous substances calculator. It will also provide clear guidance about what you need to do to be compliant, i.e. the controls you need to have in place to protect people from harm. “Keeping an inventory of hazardous substances will help you look at what substances you have, and whether you need them or can substitute them with a safer product.” Storage A big area for improvement on farms is the storage of hazardous substances, Handforth adds. “WorkSafe inspectors still find stocks of hazardous substances dating back decades in farm sheds. This presents an unnecessary risk, given the options for disposing of old agricultural chemicals. “The best method at present is offered through AgRecovery, a charitable trust set up to dispose of unwanted chemicals and their containers. You can book a chemical collection online, and this is free or subsidised depending on the chemical. AgRecovery also provides collection sites around New Zealand for containers.” As well as reducing risk, keeping the amount of substances you hold to a minimum can save you money and time. Quantities above certain limits may trigger additional requirements, such as location compliance certificates. Keeping others safe Farmers have a duty to protect workers and BACK TO PAGE 27


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

OPINION 31

Protecting an environment includes the economy THE ROLE of the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in New Zealand is to keep the environment and people safe, whilst enhancing lifestyle – which means considering the economy as well. These aspects are taken into account in all the decision-making processes, recognising that lifestyle requires income – and that goes for NZ as a whole as well as individuals. Much of the EPA’s work involves facilitating the decision-making process for proposals from applicants for nationally significant resource management proposals under the Resource Management Act (RMA). Another role of importance for the primary sector is administering and making decisions on new applications under the Hazardous Substance and New Organisms (HSNO) Act. Hazardous substances include fireworks as well as agricultural (and industrial and domestic) chemicals. It

is the role of the EPA to examine the pros and cons associated with new chemicals coming into NZ. Regulatory Science, involving consideration of the existing research into the effectiveness of the chemical on weeds, the effect on other plants and the environment, and the effect on human health, has developed considerably in the last few decades. At the same time as assessing applications for new chemicals, the EPA evaluates new research on chemicals already in use. We examine how the research was done, the conclusions, the implications, the alternatives and the applicability to NZ. Glyphosate (Roundup) is a case in point. The EU is still debating extension of the licence for sale, reflecting public concern about links to cancer. Fears

were exacerbated by the recent media coverage of ‘glyphosate concentration in human urine increasing’. The research paper did state that the concentration found was 50 times lower than that associated with liver inflammation in rats, but it had increased over the last 30 years. Glyphosate targets photosynthesis, which occurs in plants, algae and some bacteria, not in animals (including humans). If ingested it passes through the body, and is excreted in the urine unchanged. The LD50 (lethal dose for 50% of the test animals) is about twice as much as table salt. A meta-review published by the European Food Safety Authority in September this year indicated no effect of glyphosate as an endocrine disruptor. In terms of cancer, the Interna-

tional Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) put glyphosate in Category 2a – probable cause of human cancer. The report is now the subject of an investigation, but 2a also contains red meat and frying. Category 1, definite cause of cancer, contains asbestos, tobacco, solar radiation and alcohol. IARC reports on ‘hazard’; the role of the EPA is to consider both hazard and risk. Chemicals are hazards, just like fireworks. To reduce the risks we impose restrictions such as licence to operate, reduced sales outlets, protective clothing, and regulations on where the chemicals can be applied. Banning glyphosate would increase weed competition in crops and reduce the ability to use ‘no-till’ methods of crop establishment. This would increase establishment costs, and increase greenhouse gases through increased fuel and loss of organic matter from the soil. Estimates from the UK are that yields of crops would

be reduced, and the area considered suitable would be cut back considerably (20% in wheat and 37% in the case of oilseed rape). This would create shortages, which in turn would increase food prices. An alternative to glyphosate is paraquat, which is extremely toxic; it used to be known as the widow’s choice…. The EPA is concerned about chemical use in NZ which is why it employs experts to assess and evaluate. Our people recognise that they are responsible for protecting what is a unique country, including all the people within it. They also recognise that protecting the environment takes income. Achieving the balance takes knowledge and effort; the EPA is committed to both. • Dr Jacqueline Rowarth is chief scientist at the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

32 MANAGEMENT

Northland farm project looking for t PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS KEEN to play a key part in the new Northland Extension 350 programme should raise their hands now. It will link five target farms in a cluster with mentor farmers and consultants to look at improving production, profits and environmental performance over three years. Five associate farmers will be linked to each target farmer. They will apply the target farmer’s learnings to their own farm. Eventually 10 clusters will have been formed, involving 350 Northland farms. Extension 350 chairman Ken Hames says target and mentor farmers are now sought for four clusters starting next

year. Two sheep and beef clusters will kick off, one in the Helensville to Wellsford area and another in the mid north. Two dairy clusters will also start next year, one in the Far North around Kaitaia and one in the Ruawai region. Hames and Beef + Lamb NZ northern North Island extension officer Alison Whiteford held a workshop briefing in Wellsford recently. Extension 350 is about farmers learning from farmers, says Hames. “Extension 350’s objective is to raise the onfarm productivity and profitability of Northland farming businesses,” he says. “It is also aiming to improve environmental sustainability and build those changes into farming operations.

“We want to strengthen farmer networks and lift farmer interactions between themselves to build a sense of community. “We are also targeting getting Maori farmers and Maori farming corporations. There is a big one in Northland in the sheep and beef cluster that shows huge potential.” The set-up phase was up to June 1 this year. They hired a project manager and consultants and put systems in place, Hames explained. One sheep and beef cluster is already underway in the Far North as are two dairy clusters, north and south of Whangarei. Planning is underway for year two, which officially starts on June 1, 2018, but preparatory work is needed for the two sheep and beef and

two dairy clusters starting. After mentor and target farmers are in place, a call for associate farmers will be made in the new year. Hames says the target farmer needs to be a ‘middle of the road’ type. The mentor farmer will help him improve his productivity and profitability. A consultant will work with both to achieve the target farmer’s goals and objectives. The five associate farmers will watch and learn from the target farmers’ journey. Hames says an extra mentor farmer may be brought in on specific issues. The model and funding is all based on five teams per cluster so they need to ensure they achieve that to maximise the funding involved. The cluster stays

GUTTERING & DOWNPIPE

Extension 350 chairman Ken Hames, centre holding paper, shows farmers what a ‘cluster’ may look like.

together for three years. The target farms for the clusters starting next year will get a wholefarm assessment early in the new year. On June 1 the clusters will formally start. Whiteford says the whole farm assessment

ROLLER DOOR

is very involved, e.g. governance and business structure, through every aspect including animal welfare, environmental, personal goals and succession planning, etc. Consultants must be certified and must meet a very high standard.

Whiteford says current funding only allows for a farm assessment of the target farms. The onfarm assessment costs $3000$4000. Hames says the project is funded through four to five different sources: MBIE is con-

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

MANAGEMENT 33

r target farmers and mentors tributing 60% of the funding, about $1.4m; Northland Inc $832,000; DairyNZ $600,000; and BLNZ $200,000. Each target farmer’s contribution averages about $2000 a year – $6000 over the three years. It is arranged to be more lightly loaded at the beginning of the project. The first year’s

contribution can be about $1000. Hames says this ensures some “buy in or commitment” by the target farmers and they might boost profits by $20,000-$30,000 or more. “Hopefully they should get 10 times the return out of that investment.”

After three months under the project ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

■■ ■■

Whole farm assessment Follow up visit to discussion recommendations Model farm in Farmax Cash Manager Rural group training day followed by one on one training Contact with other like-minded farmers Two day course on farm business training covering things such as strategic planning, setting KPIs, benchmarking, budgeting, risk analysis, apps and programmes available to help participants to the above.

The target farmer will sit down and talk about what they want to achieve; every farm will be different. “We will work with you to identify opportunities to improve profitability, productivity and environmental sustainability,” says Hames. As well as the comprehensive whole farm assessment, target farmers are paired with a mentor who will be a good farmer in the region. They also need good communications skills to transfer information. A consultant will make eight visits in the first year with advice paid for under the project. There is also farm business training involved – setting KPIs, benchmarking,

budgeting, risks, etc. The clusters also provide excellent networking opportunities. The five associate farm-

ers linked to each target farm will learn from their experience. It is expected associate farmers will lift their profitability by at least 20% of what the target farmer achieves. They will be benchmarked, but lightly. The mentor farmer’s role is a chance to give back; it is not a paid role. “One of the great things about farming is farmers are willing to give back and help other

people.” Hames has asked the farmers to get in behind the project. “I have seen it work in the dairy sector – farmers learning off farmers,” he says. He gave an example of a DairyNZ partner farm in the Far North where mature farmers had boosted annual profits by $180,000 through a similar scheme of

farmers helping farmers. “When you improve profitability and have got cash, you can take your kids on holiday, pay off debt, do more environmental stuff which is looming or make changes on farm.” • Anyone interested in being a mentor or target farmer in any of the areas should contact Luke Beehre, Extension 350 project manager, 027 544 7839.

UP AND GOING A TARGET farm in a sheep and beef cluster is already started in the Far North: • 421ha (345ha effective beef breeding and trading unit) • All cattle finished • Located at Broadwood, 45 minutes’ drive SW of Katie • Medium hill country on heavy clay soils • Winter 550-600 cattle including 210 Angus cows • Owners are two brothers. Both work off farm, one full time and the other three days a week onfarm. They employ a full time farm manager • A year ago the farm was run by their late father and previous farm manager (retired, was with the farm for 20 years). • The farm was faithfully, but conservatively farmed • Brothers and farm manager want to see the farm’s potential achieved • Extension 350 offers them the help they need to do this

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

34 MANAGEMENT

Genetic way to cut nitrogen CANTERBURY DAIRY farmer John Tanner has been working hard to improve sustainability on his Leeston farm, Dunlac Dairies Ltd, reports CRV Ambreed. The farm is located

in the Selwyn Waihora catchment and is 20km from Lake Ellesmere (Te Waihora), considered an important wetland area. On either side of the catchment are the Rakaia River and the Selwyn

River. “In Canterbury we have to lessen our nitrogen footprint on the farm,” says Tanner, who milks 730 dairy cows during the peak of the season on 260ha. “In our

catchment, we farm on environmentally sensitive land.” In recent years Lake Ellesmere has been plagued by water quality issues related to intensive farmingon the Canter-

now has an a

d

bury Plains will end up in Lake Ellesmere, so Environment Canterbury, sets nitrogen limits per farm. The Canterbury Water Management Strategy, introduced in 2012, requires that dairy farms in the catchment reduce their nitrogen limits by 30% by 2022. Tanner is making an effort to reduce Dunlac Dairies’ environment impact, improving water management and fertiliser usage. The farm was a finalist in the Dairy Business of the Year 2016. “We are trying to milk at our current numbers, but lessen our nitrogen footprint. So you are trying to do the same, but with less environmental impact,” says Tanner. When he heard about CRV Ambreed’s genetic discovery, and its LowN Sires bull team, Tanner bought 200 straws. The genetic discovery is believed able to reduce nitrogen leaching by 20% within 20 years. The company identified and selected bulls genetically superior for a new trait related to the amount of urea nitrogen in milk. Cows bred using straws of semen from CRV Ambreed’s LowN Sires, and those daughters, will have reduced concentration of milk urea nitrogen (MUN).

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“We are trying to milk at our current numbers, but lessen our nitrogen footprint. So you are trying to do the same, but with less environmental impact.” t io di

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Canterbury dairy farmer John Tanner is working to reduce nitrogen output on his farm.

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These are expected to excrete less nitrogen in their urine, so reducing the amount of nitrogen leached. from grazed pasture. “When CRV Ambreed came up with their LowN bulls, we thought ‘we’ll have a go’,” says Tanner. “If we can lessen the nitrogen from the 730 cows herd by 20%, then that makes a big dent.” Canterbury regional councillor John Sunckell also notes the CRV Ambreed programme. Sunckell farms at Leeston, in the Selwyn/ Waihora zone. He says most farmers in the region know what’s required and that change is happening, and understand the importance of reducing their environmental footprint. “CRV Ambreed scientist Phil Beatson’s work... will enable us to still farm and meet environmental regulations.” Sunckell says dairy farmers in his catchment are required to reduce their nitrogen loss by 30% “which equates to getting rid of every third cow”. “However, if LowN Sires can have an impact by reducing nitrogen by up to 20%, and with other new developments, e.g. Agricom’s Ecotain plantain, we able to reduce nitrogen in the cow’s urine patch.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH 35

Don’t assume FMD won’t happen here NIGEL MALTHUS

A FOOT and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in New Zealand is only a matter of time, says Dairy NZ biosecurity readiness and response manager Chris Morley. “We all hear about foot and mouth disease, and we assume it’ll never happen. I can guarantee that it will happen. It’s just a matter of time,” he told the recent Lincoln University Dairy Farm spring focus day. With the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak uppermost in dairy farmers’ minds, onfarm biosecurity was a major topic of the day’s programme. Morley says there’s an increasing number of passengers coming to NZ from increasingly higher risk places, and the dairy business is getting more complex. “Everything’s starting to stack up against us. MPI cannot stop everything at the border,” he said. “What does that mean at farm level? Do we carry on as we have done for the last 50 -100 years or do we need some changes?” An MPI assessment, from two years ago, shows that just a smallmedium FMD outbreak would take $16 billion off NZ’s GDP, with borders closed and interest rates up. “It’ll impact everyone

Biosecurity was a major discussion theme at the recent Lincoln University Dairy Farm spring focus day. Asking attendees to disinfect boots arriving and leaving has become a standard feature of DairyNZ onfarm events. RURAL NEWS GROUP

in Auckland; it’ll impact our prices; it’ll impact everybody,” he says. “That’s why it’s important to look at onfarm biosecurity. Because if it does come here, there are things we can do dayby-day to minimise the impact in terms of how far it can get before we find it and how quickly we can stop it moving around.” Both Morley and the LUDF veterinarian, Chris Norton, had worked on the big FMD outbreak in Cumbria, northern England, in 2001. Norton told the focus day he went there as part of a NZ veterinary contingent. “I wiped out hundreds of thousands of cows; I took out entire valleys.” Norton said FMD was by far the biggest threat

to NZ’s biosecurity. “It would cripple us.” Norton believes migrant workers returning to NZ from visiting relatives back home is one of the biggest risks and suggested farmers impose a stand-down period. “They’re over there for three or four weeks and they’re back on a Sunday and they’re back milking cows 3 o’clock Monday morning.” Norton says in the meantime the workers could have been through Asia. “Those places are full of bugs and exotic diseases we don’t want on our farms. Yet we let these guys back on our farms within literally hours of getting off the plane. I see that as a sig-

nificant risk to my farm.” Norton conceded it is difficult when migrants are on a roster and needed back on the job. He says when he worked on the 2001 outbreak he was culling cows in Cumbria one Monday and delivering calves in Taranaki the following Monday. But he’d soaked himself in a bathtub of Virkon disinfectant at Heathrow and again when he got to NZ. “It’s paranoia, I know, but I’d been on the front line. I’d seen the effects of an outbreak, so the last thing I wanted to do was introduce the virus into NZ.” Morley said that with the ease of travel now it was quite practical for a dairy farmer to be on a farm milking cows in

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accidentally in seed and we’ve planted it on over 200 farms, and no-one was looking for it? I find that staggering.” Velvetleaf came in with fodder beet seed grown in Italy and certified in Holland and Denmark. “The people signing the certificates didn’t know we didn’t have velvetleaf. They also didn’t know that velvetleaf was growing in Italy because they weren’t interested quite honestly because velvet leaf’s all over the place in Europe,” Morley said. “Our own seed merchants were aware there was a risk and they never flagged that. If you see risk... flag it.”

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Chile or China and be back milking cows in NZ within 24 hours. Dairy NZ imposes a stand-down on its staff if they have been working overseas: eight days, or five if they have not been in contact with animals, before they go onto a farm here. “I wouldn’t let anybody off a plane and onto a farm in NZ from South East Asia, Africa and parts of China who has come from livestock.... That’s just absolute nuts and irresponsible,” Morley said. He believes visitor management, including contractors and service workers, is the numberone biosecurity risk for farmers running a closed herd. “But if you’re buying

in dairy cows, or heifers, or bulls, then that’s right up there, because most bugs will travel with the animal. So animal movements are number-one,” Morley says. “If they’re going away grazing, or using a contract rearer doing that grazing and growing, they’re mixing. Who are they mixing with, where have they come from?” However, he says it’s not just animal diseases to be aware of, but also insect pests and pasture weeds, including velvetleaf -- “a disease I’d never heard of”. “How come there’s this supposedly worst weed in the world in fodder beet we’ve now imported into the country

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

36 ANIMAL HEALTH

Let’s get the facts, not fiction, on M.bovis

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THE MINISTRY for Primary Industries (MPI) wishes to set the record straight regarding the article titled ‘Imported semen fingered for M.bovis outbreak’ in Rural News October 24. In the article, Chris Morley, Dairy NZ biosecurity manager stated that, in his opinion, he would bet on semen as the most likely source of the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak. Of course, Mr Morley is entitled to his opinion, but the fact of that matter is that MPI does not know how or when Mycoplasma bovis entered NZ, although significant efforts are being made to find out. A full investigation is looking at six possible means of entry: live animals, imported semen, embryos, contaminated equipment, biological material (such as vaccines) and feed. While this is underway, we are not going to speculate on the origin of the disease in NZ. We are dealing with a lot of uncertainty and it is possible that despite our best efforts, we may never know the exact source or route of entry. Speculation, rumour and misinformation in situations such as this can be dangerous things when lives and livelihoods are at stake. Intensive farming systems have been one area of misinformation. Mycoplasma bovis is common internationally, regardless of the farming system (indoors or outdoors). There is no evidence internationally that indoor farming raises the risk of Mycoplasma bovis infection. But once the disease enters an indoor system, it is likely to spread more readily. To date, the animals that have tested positive for Mycoplasma bovis in NZ were farmed outdoors. Another example of fear caused by misinformation is farms in South Canterbury and North Otago having contracts cancelled with customers looking at sourcing stock from other parts of NZ. This is disappointing and is not justified based on what

we know of the current pattern of disease. We have no evidence of any means of disease-spread other than from animals in close, repeated and prolonged contact on a farm at this stage. This includes no evidence that the disease has jumped fences and infected animals on neighbouring farms. Since the start of this response in late July, we’ve carried out tens of thousands of tests of the infected, neighbouring and trace properties as well as district-wide testing in Waimate and Waitaki, and nationwide testing of bulk milk. The only positive results for the disease have been on seven infected properties, leading us to be cautiously optimistic that we are dealing with a localised area of infection around Oamaru. We are moving forward with control measures to prevent further spread of the disease, with plans being developed with farmers to cull animals from the known infected farms. What the South Canterbury and North Otago farming communities need right now is support. As much

Geoff Gwyn

as possible, business needs to continue as usual. We realise that this is a worrying situation for farmers across NZ but business decisions need to be evidence-based and grounded in fact. • Geoff Gwyn, MPI director readiness and response

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH 37 VETS BACK FIREWORKS BAN THE NEW Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) says it supports a ban on the private use of fireworks. Chief veterinary officer Helen Beattie says a ban would improve the welfare of animals. “While we understand that many people enjoy fireworks displays, it is the role of veterinarians to advocate for what is right and good for animals in

homes or paddocks and put themselves in danger’s way,” she says. “Animals also experience anxiety and stress so the psychological harm is a significant component of their compromised welfare. NZ has led the world in its Animal Welfare Act in acknowledging that animals are sentient. We have a responsibility to ensure we protect the

psychological welfare of animals.” Unfortunately, this is not an issue limited to Guy Fawkes Night, as people buy and store fireworks for use at other times. “Veterinarians see animals with fireworks-related trauma year-round. This makes it even more difficult to manage and protect our more stressed and anxious pets.”

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NEW ZEALAND recorded its lowest lamb prevalence level of sheep measles in ten years, says the project manager for Ovis Management Ltd, Dan Lynch. He says 0.59% of lambs processed in the season ending October were detected with sheep measles versus 0.64% last season. Lynch believes this low prevalence reflects continuing onfarm control being exerted by farmers across NZ. “This is a great outcome.” He says it is now rare to meet a sheep farmer not treating their dogs for sheep measles; the latest survey data shows that farmers continue moving to monthly treatments to break the life cycle of the parasite. “Over the years, we have met many people treating their dogs three-monthly for parasites and telling us they are on a sheep measles programme,” Lynch explained. “However, [given] they are on a dog health programme, their relying on three-monthly dog treatment for sheep measles control is inappropriate when they are seeking to control a parasite with a 35-day life cycle.” He said farmers are also increasing pressure on visitors, such as contractors, hunters, etc, not to bring dogs onto their farms. “Or if they do they must have evidence of treatment.” Lynch says one area being closely monitored, which has been highlighted in surveys, is the higher sheep measles prevalence seen in trading lambs compared to those bred and finished on the same farm. “This is despite those suppliers finishing the lambs having the same level of onfarm control as breeder finishers.” Meanwhile he says Ovis Management is continually looking at methods of increasing feedback to those who breed, but don’t finish, lambs; currently the feedback loop ends with the finisher. “We are looking to target back down the production chain to ensure lamb breeders who are not sending stock for processing are aware of the need to have an effective onfarm control programme in place.”

NZ. Animal welfare must always come first, and in this instance, despite human enjoyment, fireworks do not bring a welfare benefit to animals.” Beattie says that every year veterinary clinics see injured and traumatised animals as a result of fireworks. “Veterinarians see animals that, as a result of their fear and panic, have escaped from their

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38 CANTERBURY A&P SHOW

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and as friendly as a house cat – rolling over for a tummy rub. “I like the Tamworth because FRIENDLY RIVALRY between it’s a bit slower growing and it is groups of young farmers – with as better eating and you get the stockmuch eye on witty animal names and iness from the Berkshire -- from snappy dressing as the quality of the his mother,” he explains. “But his livestock – has transformed the pig mother was as mad as hell. I section of the Canterbury don’t actually have her anyA&P Show. “I like the Tamworth because more, for good reason. A group of mates from “But I thought I’ll keep the Glenmark rugby club, it’s a bit slower growing and him and put him in the North Canterbury, has set it is better eating and you show.” the pace, calling themselves However, Davidson conthe Bhuja Boar Breeders get the stockiness from the cedes Pablo lacks a bit of Association and turning out Berkshire – from his mother. length and the big hams the in bespoke matching blazers But his mother was as mad as judges will be looking for in and maroon ties. the commercial class. Now “out to beat the hell. I don’t actually have her “I’m not too confident Bhuja boys” is the Selwyn anymore, for good reason.” about him to be honest. Swine Syndicate, first-time He’s a bloody good charentrants who have hit the acter more than anything; ground running with three Pig entries for the show are up to friendly and will trot around anyboars and two sows entered. Syndicate member James David- 44 – numbers not seen in a decade. where. But they’re looking for ham. son, a Darfield contract milker, says There were no pig entries in 2010 So he’s probably not our best hope.” Davidson has never before both groups have Facebook pages and only one or two each year entered the show, but has raised pigs and “a good bit of banter” flies through to 2014. Davidson believes the new good- as a hobby and to provide meat. between them. With three boars now in the syn“We’re first time entries, but natured rivalry of the young syndithey’ve been in it the past couple cates may have tempted traditional dicate he is unsure of Pablo’s future. “I’m pretty keen to hang onto of years so we’re trying to see if we breeders back into the ring. The upsurge has prompted the him. He’s a pretty nice-natured can stick it to them. It’s a good bit of friendly competition,” he told Rural introduction of a new commercial boar. He just doesn’t quite have the class looking for “the perfect eating length and the big arse that some of News. the other ones do,” he says. “I guess our local watering hole pig” regardless of breed. “He’s got a bit of character to Davidson proudly shows off his would be the Darfield pub. That’s where a lot of the talk has originated own animal, Pablo Escoboar, a gin- him. And I don’t think there’ll be and plenty of our meetings. It’s all a ger-spotted cross between a Berk- too many ginger-spotted pigs at the shire mother and a Tamworth father, show.” good bit of fun -- but serious fun.” Davidson is joined in his syndicate by Tim McMae and Scott Carnochan. Together they have entered three boars, Pablo Escoboar, Frank Lucus, and Notorious P.I.G. and two sows – Amy Swinehouse and Beth Heke.


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

CANTERBURY A&P SHOW 39

WEDNESDAY 15 TO FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2017 Canterbury Agricultural Park www.theshow.co.nz

Show entries boom for dairy and pigs NIGEL MALTHUS

A COUPLE of weeks from the opening of the country’s biggest annual A&P show, Canterbury show president Peter Gilbert is dealing with a minor problem he doesn’t mind having. Dairy entries have risen so much, he is having to sort out an extension to the already partially built dairy pavilion. These are up about 50%, to 78 inmilk cows, versus 54 last year, along with 38 yearling heifers and about 30 calves. As a dairy man himself, Gilbert doesn’t mind a bit. “It is a Royal event for the dairy section this year so that was really pleasing to me,” he told Rural News. However, the real explosion in numbers is in pigs – boosted by a good-natured rivalry between syndicates of young farmers for whom creative names and sartorial elegance is as much a part of the game as the quality of the livestock. From only one entry a few years ago and 10 last year, pig entries have hit 44 this year. The Canterbury A&P Association is honouring the increase by putting a pig on the cover of its show

Peter Gilbert, president of the 155th Canterbury A&P Show, is pictured in the framework of the dairy pavilion at the Canterbury Agricultural Park show site, where he was busy finalising plans to extend the pavilion to cater for increased entries in the dairy section. RURAL NEWS GROUP.

catalogue for possibly the first time. Overall, entry numbers are similar to previous years, even in sheep which the association feared would fall away with the change in farming practice in Canterbury. “Overall it’s pretty good,” says Gilbert. New for this year is a fashion parade being put on by the wool section, on

the Thursday and Friday of the threeday event. Also back, for the first time in many years, is polo. There will be two matches on the Thursday and Friday afternoons in the main arena. Because it’s a smaller ground than a standard polo pitch the teams will play just three-a-side instead of four. Gilbert says the “real crowd

Preparations for the 155th Canterbury A&P Show are picking up pace at the Canterbury Agricultural Park, where Downer contractors Daniel Gray, left and Keith Reid are busy hooking up a trailer-mounted portable cell tower for Spark, to handle the many thousands of phone calls, texts, selfies and data uploads expected of the more than 100,000 people likely to attend the three-day event. The telecopic tower will take the antenna cluster to about 10m high. RURAL NEWS GROUP.

pleaser” of endurocross motorcycle racing on a short dirt course full of spectacular jumps will also be back. Gilbert says his time as president has proved to be less difficult than he expected, “thanks to the team in here and all their hard work, I think”. For show manager Geoff Bone, the annual show is the climax of a yearlong effort.

“We spend all year putting data into our computer software,” he says. “We’ve developed a customer relationship management system that manages the whole show -- a big investment. Because the show’s so much bigger than other shows you can’t do it manually just before the show; it’s not physically possible.” A few weeks out, one of the main tasks is digging and recommissioning the underground power grid, which lies unused under the rugby league and other sports fields that occupy the show site the rest of the year. “When they finish we’ve got to dig down, pull our power out, turn it on and test it,” Bone explains. “With 550 trade sites going up throughout the showgrounds we’re basically powering up a small city. We light it up for three days then we shut it down.” He says with at least 500 volunteers to help run the show, 3000 animal entries and 100,000 visitors expected, organising the event is a huge task. “Our reality is that regardless of whether or not we’re organised, 3000 animals and 100,000 people are going to turn up. So we’d better be organised.”

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

40 CANTERBURY A&P SHOW

WEDNESDAY 15 TO FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2017 Canterbury Agricultural Park www.theshow.co.nz

Livestock and equestrian judges from across the globe will descend on Christchurch in mid-November as New Zealand’s largest A&P show turns 155 years old.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

CANTERBURY A&P SHOW 41

WEDNESDAY 15 TO FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2017 Canterbury Agricultural Park www.theshow.co.nz

North Canterbury winery takes top awards WAIPARA HILLS was the big winner at the New Zealand Aromatic Wine Competition and Canterbury Wine Competition judging weekend in Christchurch recently. Nearly 300 wines were judged over two days by a blind panel of international and national wine judges. Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Riesling 2016 was judged the Supreme Champion Wine in Show and Supreme Champion Canterbury Wine in Show, as part of the new Canterbury Wine Competition. The judges’ tasting notes paint a glowing review of the riesling: “Concentrated with tons of ripe ginger marmalade richness; a riesling that has stacks of everything including finesse and a beautiful acid line. For anyone that ever doubted the power and

finesse of riesling, here is the perfect opportunity to reassess that view.” Waipara Hills winemaker Andrew Brown was delighted with the awards he and his team picked up. “To be awarded Supreme Champion Wine in Show is a great achievement for the whole Waipara Hills team, where our winemaking starts in the vineyard.” Lead judge Jim Harre said the judges were impressed with the overall standard of wine in both competitions. “As always, we assembled a group of high calibre judges and they were impressed with the high quality of wines on offer in both competitions, award-

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ing 24 golds, 59 silvers and 141 bronzes. It was fantastic to see

the wines that are known for their high quality coming through well in the blind judging process.” Also judged on October 7 was the NZ Winemaker of the Year. Michael Wood from Obsidian Vineyard on Waiheke Island was the overall winner after he impressed the judges with good

consistency across three wines. Wood was delighted with the win. “It’s fantastic and most importantly it recognises the hard work that goes into all the wine we make. It starts in the vineyard and ends up at the winery for the final step.”

Eight trophies were awarded in the NZ Aromatic Wine Competition: Beck & Caul Supreme Champion Wine in Show: Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Riesling 2016 Champion Riesling: Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Riesling 2016 Champion Sauvignon Blanc: Villa Maria Reserve Wairau Valley Sauvignon Blanc 2017 Champion Gewürztraminer: Saint Clair Pioneer Block 12 Lone Gum Gewürztraminer 2016 Champion Other Aromatic: Left Field Gisborne Albarino 2016 Champion Pinot Gris: Summerhouse Pinot Gris 2017; Champion Rosé: Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Pinot Noir Rosé 2017 Champion Swee: Tohu Raiha Reserve Noble Riesling 2015. Three trophies were awarded in the Canterbury Wine Competition: Macvine Supreme Champion Wine in Show: Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Riesling 2016 Canterbury Champion Riesling: Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Riesling 2016 Canterbury Champion Rosé : Waipara Hills Waipara Valley Pinot Noir Rosé 2017.

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

42 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Is engine re-mapping worth the risk? MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE START of the harvest season brings thoughts such as ‘there aren’t enough hours in the day’ and for farmers and contractors alike the dream of more engine power. Several companies in New Zealand claim to have the answer -- by re-mapping the tractor’s engine control unit (ECU) to deliver more power, while amazingly reducing fuel consumption. Immediately the old adages ‘all that glistens isn’t gold’ or ‘it seems too good to be true’ spring to mind and indeed are probably true. If you are considering a re-map of a tractor’s ECU it would be prudent to ask yourself many questions. Does the re-map affect the manufacturer’s warranty? Could it overload engine or transmission components, causing premature wear or ultimately failure? Are there safety implications? Will the modification affect the insurance status of the tractor? Of course, the answer to each of these questions is: yes. Understand that manufacturers, particularly engine makers, have made huge strides over the last decade to meet tightening emission regulations, while in most cases reducing fuel consumption, using technologies such as DEF, EGR, DPF and DOC. In developing tractors, manufacturers strive to deliver the required power and useable torque while considering that today’s tractors must be capable of a wide range of tasks from basic transport duties to power hungry operations like hauling power cultivators or deep rippers. The simplistic approach to re-mapping ECUs does not take into account that while tractors might have common

“At a local level, dealers are being called to investigate error messages on dashboards because of this practice. Diagnosis and rectification can take many hours, falls outside the remit of warranty and generates invoices which, we suggest, should be passed to the re-mappers.” chassis components and engine blocks, internal or ancillary equipment can be model-specific, as with a cooling package. Increasing power generally means generating more heat, so if the standard cooling package is unable to dissipate this extra heat, the consequences are likely to be premature failure of cylinder head gaskets and/or EGR valves or overload of after-gas treatment systems. The practice has become such a problem that some manufacturers are asking dealers to send failed engines back to the factory to check for a standard configuration before considering claims for warranty. The proponents of this type of upgrade also take a rose-tinted-glasses approach when they talk of unlocking the power you have already paid for, the ability to do the same work at lower throttle settings to achieve fuel savings, or pulling wider machines for

Those considering a re-map of tractor’s ECU would be prudent to ask many questions first – especially if it will affect the manufacturer’s warranty.

more output. In practice, standard tractors are configured to give maximum output in circumstances that allow the tractor to cope with such increases. ‘Power boost’ in most tractors is available for operations such as PTO work or transport operations where, in the case of the latter, increased speeds reduce torque loading on the tractor drivelines, and in doing so allows the manufacturer to offer a comprehensive warranty and peace of mind. Human nature tells us that when

the pressure is on, throttling back is a pipe-dream, particularly with units driven by staff, and upsizing machines to make better use of more power is unlikely due to the large capital cost of high output implements. Tractor and Machinery Association general manager Ron Gall says apparent gains are largely overridden by the negatives re-mapping creates. “At a local level, dealers are being called to investigate error messages on dashboards because of this practice,” he told Rural News. “Diagnosis

and rectification can take many hours, falls outside the remit of warranty and generates invoices which, we suggest, should be passed to the re-mappers.” Gall says some companies are also offering to upgrade transmission controllers, which sees tractors configured for 40km/h, risking premature failure or, more worrying, the likelihood of accidents. The rule must be, buy the right tractor for the job, as the alternative, by way of a ‘cheap’ upgrade, is likely to cost more over the long term.

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MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 43

Top of the ‘Claas’ in innovation MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

CLAAS WILL be presented with one gold and four silver medals for innovation in agricultural technology at this year’s Agritechnica. Its Cemos Auto Threshing operator assistance programme will be recognised with a prestigious gold medal, and will get silver for its new Axion 900 Terra Trac tracked tractor, Cemos driver assistance system for tractors and implements, Culti Cam cultivation guidance system and Large Vehicle Alert system. Cemos Auto Threshing continuously monitors and automatically adjusts the threshing concave clearance and drum speed on Lexion combine harvesters to best suit the prevailing conditions. The

Left: The Cemos Auto Threshing system, continuously monitors and automatically adjusts the threshing concave clearance and drum speed on Lexion combine harvesters, picked up a gold award. Right: Meanwhile, the Axion 900 Terra Trac, the first German half-tracked tractor with full suspension for the entire machine, picked up a silver award.

program forms an integral part of the Cemos Automatic platform and works in harmony with the machine’s automated residual grain separation, cleaning and cruise control systems. Claas Harvest Centre group product manager tractors, Dave Knowles,

welcomed the silver medals that have direct application to the Claas range of advanced technology tractors. The Axion 900 Terra Trac becomes the first German half-tracked tractor with full suspension of the entire machine; its suspended track system-

based technology, found on Lexion combine harvesters, has been adapted to meet the specific requirements of tractors. Like its Lexion counterparts, the Terra Trac allows a safe and comfortable transport speed of up to 40km/h. The event also marks

the pending introduction of the Claas Electronic Machine Optimisation System (Cemos) across the Claas range of advanced technology tractors. The driver assistance system continuously monitors and adjusts key operating settings of the tractor and implement based on operating conditions. In operation, the system recommends the best settings via the touchscreen Cebis terminal, which the operator can accept, from where Cemos will make automatic adjustments Aimed at users seeking to circumvent increasing restrictions on the use of certain herbicides and the development of her-

speeds or heavy work rates, and the technology is equally applicable to conven-

bicide resistance means many grain growers are returning to selective cultivation, the Claas Culti Cam is a precision guidance system for mechanical cultivation in row crops which uses a highresolution 3D camera to detect crops and guide implement settings. The processing software identifies the crops and calculates precise control signals, even in windy conditions, high working

tional row cultivation, specialist crops and organic farms. The Large Vehicle Alert System transmits real-time telemetry data of enabled agricultural machinery to navigation systems and smartphone apps, so advising motorists of the position and status of farm machinery along their intended route. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

44 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

New Isobus terminal MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW CCI 1200 ISOBUS terminal provides a flexible layout for driver adaptation to the operation at hand, while also allowing simultaneous viewing of several applications and, thanks to a narrow frame, compact mounting within the cabin. The member companies, including Kuhn, together spent four years and thousands of test hours on the project. The result is the CCI 1200, a unit with two

With a 12.1” widescreen display, the CCI 1200 offers plenty of space for simultaneous viewing of multiple applications. The standard view shows two applications next to each other of the same size, for example, the camera or the map view of the section control is shown next to the UT. integrated universal terminals (UT) enabling parallel operation of two ISOBUS machines, apps for automatic section

control and variable rate control to ensure precise application. With a 12.1” widescreen display, the CCI

1200 offers plenty of space for simultaneous viewing of multiple applications. The standard view shows two applications next to each other of the same size, for example, the camera or the map view of the section control is shown next to the UT. The driver can choose freely whether he wants to use this view in portrait or landscape format, or the third option, Maxi-view, with particularly large keys. The unit has a completely new user interface offering multi-touch

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The new CCI 1200 Isobus terminal provides a flexible layout for driver adaption, while also allowing simultaneous viewing of multiple applications.

operation in combination with a new menu navigation format that provides easy operation at smartphone level. The flat design of the menus reduces the number of necessary clicks, while symbols on the keys have been adopted by the wellknown CCI 50/100/200 terminals, so that even inexperienced CCI users can quickly find their way to the new operation. All settings are summarised in a central area with setting help explaining, step by step, more complex tasks such as the choice of the correct delay time for the automatic section control. Using GPS guidance,

WORKING TOGETHER COMPETENCE CENTRE ISOBUS e.V. (CCI) is an Osnabrück-based association founded in 2009. The CCI and its members co-operate in developing innovative agricultural electronics. Apart from the development of ISOBUS terminals and software, the group works on setting up and advancing the ISOBUS standard. ISOBUS standardises communication between tractors and implements, and data transfer between mobile terminals and farm office software.

up to 254 sections can be switched on and off automatically by the CCI200 on an already worked area or a pre-drawn headland. It offers a wide range of uses -- seed drills, planters, sprayers, fertilizer spreaders, universal spreaders, liquid manure tankers, mowers and rakes. Variable application with maps in ISO-XML or shape format is even more precise with the use

of new control points. Until now, even with very large working widths, the target rate has only been taken from the application map at the current position of the tractor and transferred to the machine. For example, if a fertiliser spreader supports control points, the CCI 1200 determines a specific target rate for the left and right dosages. www.kuhn.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 45

There can only be one! With seven different series of SUVs in the Toyota range there’s something for everyone. They range from the funky C-HR and the Land Cruiser 200 to the Highlander, the latter reviewed here by machinery editor Mark Daniel. LISTED AS a mediumlarge SUV, the Highlander is longer and wider than the apparently larger Prado series, with the only negatives being a slightly lower ground clearance and lesser towing capacity. But let’s be honest, who is going to buy a Highlander for serious off-roading or towing big loads? The machine we had on test is the Limited version, which has all the bells and whistles and, on walk-up, looks a handsome beast. Built in Toyota’s plant in Indiana, it has an American

feel when you climb in – wide, supportive comfortable seats, pedal-operated park brake and Powermode setting hidden amongst the operating sub-meus. Powered by the latest 3.5L V6 petrol engine, the 2017 incarnation gets an extra 17kW power pushing output to 218Kw and, likewise, torque is pushed up by 13Nm to a maximum of 350Nm. Both combine to deliver the smoothest, quietest 6-cylinder petrol SUV in the market. Also new for the season is an 8-speed auto

box, gaining two more ratios over the previous model and again proving smooth and slick, with no perceptible evidence of ratio changes. It is also apparent when towing a boat, which is very close to the vehicle limit, that the system is well-calibrated and shows none of the signs of some eightspeeders -- they hunt between ratios, particularly at legal road speeds. For drivers looking for seven seats, the Highlander ticks all the boxes here and, unlike some smaller bodied vehicles which aspire to be a

ROTOPICK CULTIVATOR

The Highlander SUV ticks all the right boxes according to our reviewer.

seven-seater but are only a five, there’s room for two extra people. They also get their own heating/cooling controls and there’s still room for 269L of luggage at the rear. Losing the third row of seats pushes capacity to 813L and with the second row also lowered the space hits 1872L,

matching the Prado. Up front, the centre console is wide and spacious and offers a near full-width shelf for miscellaneous items; up top is an 8-inch, full colour display and the main function controls are grouped logically and with easy reach. Interestingly, whilst

KON SEMI CHISEL PLOUGHS

A true one-pass cultivator for repairing winter damaged pugged ground. Unique blade design works the soil fine without creating a pan layer combined with rear leveling bar and packer roller results in a perfectly level seed bed for replanting. Combined with an Air Seeder - do it all in one pass!

Ideal for repairing damaged pugged ground from winter grazing or after crops. Works to 350mm depth leaving a level finish ready for regrassing or new crop establishment. Auto reset spring loaded legs and rear flat bar roller available in working widths of 2.8m to 4.8m fixed and hydraulic folding models.

the information is relatively basic, one must consider if too much information is a little distracting, so for this tester the amount is about right. Ahead of the driver a smaller secondary display gives plenty of information on distance, fuel consumption and driver aids, likewise the group-

ing for the off-road functions all fall easily to hand. Out on the road, the Highlander is no rocketship a vehicle best left to its own devices. Switch on the cruise control, set it at 103km/h and it does its stuff. Throw it into bends and it will exhibit it 2030kg tare weight: the body might show a little roll but it will stay planted to the road. Whatever happens outside the cabin, the occupants will arrive safe, secure and relaxed in a vehicle that is put together to a very high standard. Looking at the range, the mid-point GXL looks to be the best buy, with equipment that makes this a capable choice. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

CRAKER SUBSOILER PLOUGH Ideal for cultivation from 350mm to 650mm deep. Used to repair and level damaged winter water logged ground and pugged soil. Drys out soil, improves future drainage and breaks up soil pans to encourage deep plant root growth resulting in larger crop yeilds. Perfect for first pass cultivation prior to planting maize.

NATIONWIDE DISTRIBUTION NETWORK KAITAIA KAITAIA TRACTORS (09) 408 0670 WHANGAREI BRYANT TRACTORS (09) 438 1319 SILVERDALE AGROWQUIP (09) 427 9137 PUKEKOHE AGROWQUIP (09) 237 0043 MORRINSVILLE PIAKO TRACTORS (07) 889 7055 HAMILTON AGROWQUIP (07) 847 0425 CAMBRIDGE AGROWQUIP (07) 827 5184 ROTORUA PIAKO TRACTORS (07) 345 8560 STRATFORD FIELD TORQUE TARANAKI (06) 765 8643 GISBORNE D.P WILLIAMS (06) 863 2612 WAIPUKURAU STEVENSON AND TAYLOR (06) 858 6041 DANNEVIRKE LANCASTER TRACTORS (06) 374 7731 PALMERSTON NORTH TRANSAG CENTRE (06) 354 7164

MASTERTON WAIRARAPA MACHINERY SERVICES (06) 377 3009 NELSON DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 543 8041 BLENHEIM DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 579 1111 KAIKOURA DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 319 7119 GREYMOUTH DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 768 5116 AMBERLEY DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 314 9055 LEESTON DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 324 3791 ASHBURTON DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 307 8027 TIMARU DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 687 4005 OAMARU DRUMMOND & ETHERIDGE (03) 437 1111 MOSGIEL JJ LIMITED (03) 489 8199 GORE JJ LIMITED (03) 203 9970 INVERCARGILL JJ LIMITED (03) 211 0013

*Normal lending criteria and special conditions apply

www.originagroup.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

46 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER ❱❱ Feeders available from 2 bales to 24m3 ❱❱ Universal stock feeders-feed all feed types

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Baler stakes raised MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

BALER AND wrapping specialist McHale has recently released a single belt version of its V660. It uses the same single belt technology as in the productive Fusion Vario combi-baler wrapper which will become standard specification for the New Zealand market. NZ distributor Power Farming Wholesale claims this allows more product to be packed into each bale and helps to reduce leaf loss by removing the abrasive effect of multiple belt layouts. Other design improvements are large side augers on the pick-up, a 40mm diameter increase in the intake rotor and a

new density control valve. The biggest benefit of the single belt system is its ease of operation: there is only one belt in contact with the crop, which eliminates the risk of the crop ending up in the wrong place due to belt slippage. Minimal crop losses and the stability of the belt makes the machine an easier drive. Overall, baled grass is said to contain less air, and this, combined with higher density, improves the silage quality of any grass type baled. To provide high outputs in all conditions, the new flex floor allows up to 20mm of downward movement, allowing lumps to pass through from the pick-up rotor. Meanwhile, the tried and tested hydraulic drop

floor system of the Fusion series remains to lower the floor if a blockage should occur. Further technical improvements include an ultrasonic bale shape indicator allowing the V660 to operate at high speeds, giving potential for increased production. A cleaning auger is now a standard feature. Fitted to the secondary drive roller, it eliminates contamination in the bale chamber by reducing build-up on the drive roller, so should be useful in heavy and sticky crops. And a new hydraulic stretch netter fitted as standard allows the net tension to be easily adjusted through the control box in the cab as crop or weather conditions change.

HUNTER BOOTS Comfortable, durable and stylish.

The heavy duty sole construction makes this a robust boot designed for climbing over rugged ground. This boot has a soft toe and is made from a thick Mad Dog Nubuck Leather, stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Soft padding for ankle support and D-Rings for your laces are an added advantage. Great fitting boots full of comfort, ideal for those long hunting and tramping trips.

FARMER BOOTS Lastrite’s Farmer boots are made

for comfort. Constructed from Reverse kip leather they are an ideal farmers, fencers and builders boot. Very sturdy and made to last this boot is robust with a heavy duty construction. It has a leather insole and midsole that is stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Update your old boots now and you will never look back.

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ULTIMATE DRIVING LIGHTS THE NEW Ultima LED 215, a threeyear project of Narva, is claimed to set a new standard in auxiliary driving lights. The new lamp has a hybrid beam pattern that gives a better spread of light suits on-road and off-road use. The new lamp has enhanced optics that use 33 x 5W XP-G2 Cree LEDs and a highly polished metallised computerdesigned reflector to generate 165W of pure white light (5,700ºK).

This results in an output combining volume for off-road 4WD users and distance for truck drivers and other road users. The technology should make

for safer driving on dark nights: it provides the right amount of light-spread for drivers to be able to see well into the distance when there is no other light source, and

gives excellent visibility directly in front of the vehicle. A clever new advanced LED Light Pipe that meets the required ADR specifications for a front position light adds a valuable road safety feature. The housing and mounting bracket are made from cast aluminium for strength and lightness. Threebolt mounting is strong and stable; a tool-free vertical adjustment knob allows easy adjustment. The light comes in 12 colour combinations. – Mark Daniel

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RURAL NEWS // NOVEMBER 7, 2017

RURAL TRADER 47 CRAIGCO SENSOR JET

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Now you can grab your farm pole shed from the same place you get building gear for your farm. Right here at your local ITM store. You can be sure you’re getting a building that’s spot on for what you want, because you have a hand in the design. Choose either the gable or lean-to design, then simply tailor that plans to suit. Maybe add another bay, some extra height, or even a lockup. Whatever you need. All delivered onsite, ready to put up. So when you’re after a building for your farm, talk to your local farm building experts at ITM. We’ll see you right.

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24/08/17 11:58 AM

Rural News 7 November 2017  

Rural News 7 November 2017

Rural News 7 November 2017  

Rural News 7 November 2017