Page 1

Annual Report

2014 - 2015


Design and layout: Leisa Quinn. | Contributors: Louise Douglas and Tammy Ven Dange. | Edited and reviewed by: Debbie Hartley. Photographs taken by: Leisa Quinn | Statistics: Jane Gregor.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 04 08 13

FROM THE PRESIDENT

KEY NUMBERS

OUR SUPPORTERS

06 10 15

CEO REPORT

STATISTICS

FINANCIAL REPORT


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

FROM THE PRESIDENT Following great change in the previous year, Council agreed 2014-15 had to be a transitional year of stabilisation and consolidation – while keeping an eye on the future. This meant a focus on internal arrangements and processes, while steadily enhancing RSPCA ACT’s public profile to ensure community support continued to build. The key mechanism for implementing this strategy was a wide-ranging set of recommendations arising from a comprehensive organisational review undertaken by the CEO and endorsed by Council in July 2014. These recommendations affected governance, our operating model, people, finances, back up functions, events and marketing, and facilities – and were progressively implemented throughout the year.

4

Arising from the recommendations relating to governance, Council initiated a thorough review of its governance framework including the constitution. With a view to modernising and updating governance policies, processes and documentation, significant time was devoted to drafting a new constitution and developing a governance policy ‘toolkit’ detailing the processes and policies which underpin the roles and responsibilities of both Council and the Chief Executive Officer. Key changes proposed for the constitution were discussed at two quarterly Members’ Information Sessions during the year including the appointment of three Directors (in addition to six elected Directors).

Members accepted that this change enabled Council to ensure it had sufficient expertise in critical areas such as finance, risk management and business planning. A draft of the proposed constitution was finalised by the end of June 2015 with a view to putting it to members in July. [Members accepted the proposed constitution on 28 July 2015.] Council members participated in a number of important strategic discussions and forums during the year including two planning sessions to address medium and long term strategic challenges facing RSPCA ACT. These discussions later informed successful negotiations with the ACT Government which ensured the


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

fees received for 2015-16 were slightly increased and more closely matched the cost of the services that RSPCA ACT provided as an outsource provider of some legislated services. Attendance at a national forum also contributed to Council’s understanding of common strategic issues facing RSPCA societies around the country. Three longstanding Council members either did not stand for re-election in 2014 or departed during the year (Susan Black, Amanda Cattermole, Kasy Chambers) and I thank them for their contribution. In January 2015, Council welcomed a well-known member of the ACT legal fraternity, Michael Sassella.

On behalf of Council, I thank Tammy Ven Dange and her dedicated staff for an outstanding year. Staff have adapted to changing circumstances with great flexibility and fortitude – making it possible for RSPCA ACT to achieve a surplus of $288,576 (in comparison to a deficit of $551,000 in the previous year). Council also wishes to acknowledge the difficult and demanding work undertaken by staff in the Inspectorate who had to deal with a range of appalling cases of neglectful and cruel human behaviour resulting in harm to animals. Our dedicated army of volunteers made the achievements of 2014-15 possible, and special thanks should go to those who supported the extensive fund-raising events program, and those who work in the shelter.

Many supporters, sponsors and donors contributed to our work this year, and on behalf of Council, I thank them all and look forward to their continued involvement with us. While there are still challenges ahead, as a result of the changes put in place this year, RSPCA ACT is in a very strong position to face the future.

Louise Douglas President

5


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

FROM THE CEO When I look back at 2014-15, a quote from the Charles Dickens’ book, A Tale of Two Cities seems to be most appropriate, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” Let’s start with the worst. There were a lot of sleepless nights for the management team at RSPCA ACT. The organisation had operated at a loss for so many years, and the reserves were practically depleted. Therefore, in order for us to stay solvent, we needed to complete the transformation program we started towards the end of the previous financial year and finish with a surplus. This program resulted in about a 50% turn-over of staff – some by choice and others through redundancies. For a while, it seemed like we had goodbye teas for at least one staff member a week, and unfortunately it always took longer to replace a departing employee than it did 6

for them to leave which meant double duty for those that remained. While these challenges seemed daunting at the time, they also brought the RSPCA staff (new and remaining) and our volunteers together in a good way. As a result, not only did we finish the financial year above budget and with a surplus greater than any single bequest, we also had one of our best years for animal welfare too. One of the key changes was to refocus our services back towards our core mission: the prevention of cruelty to animals. By reducing staff at the management level we were able to redirect vital budget towards our front line with a larger veterinarian and inspector team. While the budget was now there, it actually required a massive recruitment effort to fill these roles, with the inspector jobs still proving to be the most difficult to fill out of all of them.

The public would have also noticed this shift of focus as the media shared one animal cruelty story after another. We ended the year with 979 animals that were either seized or surrendered to our inspectors as compared to just 34 the previous year. We also had nine out of nine successful prosecutions with another 28 cases pending. These were remarkable achievements by our small team, and I am very proud of their work. I was also proud of the other animal welfare outcomes we achieved this year despite so many organisational changes that could have reasonably disrupted operations. We had the lowest euthanasia rates for both adult dogs and cats on record. We also broke our kitten adoption record for a second year in a row. This was only possible because of the passion and dedication of all of our amazing staff and volunteers.


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

The year wasn’t just about animal welfare achievements though. We did achieve a number of other milestones. From an events perspective, we were the Charity Partner for Floriade in 2014 for the first time. This opened up the door for a month long engagement with our supporters, the revealing of our Pet Memorial Tree and the inaugural “Dogs Day Out” where visitors were allowed to bring their canine companions on a designated day to Commonwealth Park to enjoy the tulips too. During Floriade, we also raised about $30,000. Furthermore, we set a new World Record at the 2015 Million Paws Walk for the “Most Dogs Wearing Bandanas.” This pre-event prior to the traditional walk increased registrations by about 1000 participants from the previous year.

In 2014-15, we also tested a few new fundraising events to close the budget gaps: some that worked and others that didn’t. Two that worked well included “Canberra’s Next Top Pet” and “In the Dog House.” Both fundraisers generated thousands of dollars of additional revenue with minimal cost and resources. These events additionally proved useful for media content. Between cruelty case prosecutions, animal welfare stories, events and other related topics, Meltwater Media Monitoring reported 1183 media hits in 2014-15 compared to just 287 in 2013-14. That’s more than a 300% increase in media exposure (mostly positive) in a 12 month period in print and online news sources alone.

While the transformation is not complete yet, I can say that the major elements are now in place so that a more sustainable foundation can be built in 2015-16. On behalf of the 6096 animals we helped in 2014-15, I would like to express our gratitude to all of our supporters, sponsors, event participants, donors, volunteers, Council, members and staff. The prevention of cruelty to animals in the ACT is truly a team effort.

Tammy Ven Dange Chief Executive Officer

7


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

KEY NUMBERS ANIMALS REUNITED

84%OF CATS REHOMED & REUNITED

825

HIGHEST NUMBER OF ALL OTHER* INCOMING DOMESTIC ANIMALS EVER RECORDED

91.4% DOGS REHOMED & REUNITED

HIGHEST NUMBER OF KITTEN ADOPTIONS EVER RECORDED

ADOPTIONS INCREASED BY 22.7%

*Other domestic animlas include: Birds, Ferrets, Fowl, Guinea Pig, Livestock, Rabbits, Rodents, Crab, Fish and Reptiles.

9

SUCCESSFUL PROSECUTIONS

0

ANIMALS EUTHANASED FOR SPACE

LIVE ANIMALS BROUGHT IN BY INSPECTORS 2013/14

2014/15

LOWEST NUMBER OF ADULT CATS AND DOGS EUTHANASED EVER RECORDED


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

OVER 12,000 FACEBOOK FOLLOWERS

OVER 3,000 TWITTER FOLLOWERS

MILLION PAWS WALK REGISTRANTS

421

OVER 300 DEDICATED VOLUNTEERS

CUPCAKE COOKS

2235 COMPLAINTS INVESTIGATED

ANIMALS DESEXED 555 CANINES

131 RABBITS

7 FERRETS

1,299 FELINES

9


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

STATISTICS Canines

Dogs

Puppies

Outcomes

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

Reclaimed

671

923

626

847

45

82

Rehomed

388

403

191

195

197

208

In stock

54

71

42

42

12

29

Transferred**

168

138

168

138

-

-

Euthanased

88

104

72

80

16

24

Other#

8

6

2

1

6

5

Total

1377

1645

1101

1303

276

336

Domestic euthanasia reasons Medical

39

54

30

45

9

10

Behavioural

44

42

41

35

3

7

Infectious

4

8

-

-

4

7

Owner Requested Via Inspectors

1

-

1

-

-

-

Total

88

104

72

80

16

24

**Transferred: RSPCA works collaboratively with Domestic Animal Services to maximise positive outcomes for dogs. RSPCA also received dogs from DAS and this figure is included in the total above. #Other: includes dead on arrival, stolen, escaped, unassisted death.

Domestic Felines

Domestic Cats

Domestic Kittens

Outcomes

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

Reclaimed

165

184

150

170

15

14

Rehomed

1376

1328

464

492

912

836

In stock

134

70

76

39

58

31

Domestic euthanased

259

279

150

166

109

113

Feral euthanased

348

361

219

229

129

132

Other#

32

28

4

4

28

24

Total

2314

2250

1063

1100

1251

1150

Domestic euthanasia reasons Medical

287

325

188

243

99

82

Behavioural

41

44

35

33

6

11

Infectious

109

123

47

58

62

65

Organisational*

3

-

-

-

3

-

Total

259

279

150

166

109

113

#Other: Includes dead on arrival, stolen, escaped, unassisted death *Organisational: Infantile kitten with no available foster carers

10


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

Rabbits Outcomes

This year

Other (Rodents, ferrets, fish, reptiles, amphibians)

Guinea Pigs Last year

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

Reclaimed

13

4

3

2

8

16

Rehomed

183

118

100

72

235

85

In stock

16

21

4

4

4

54

Euthanased

34

43

11

12

13

19

Other#

25

7

4

4

11

16

Total

271

193

122

94

288

190

Euthanasia reasons Medical

17

26

11

8

5

5

Behavioural

15

15

-

-

11

10

Infectious

2

2

-

4

14

4

Total

34

43

11

12

30

19

#Other: Includes dead on arrival, stolen, escaped, unassisted death.

Domestic Birds

Poultry

Livestock

Outcomes

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

This year

Last year

Reclaimed

13

13

2

1

-

2

Rehomed

217

112

231

110

8

3

In stock

79

2

43

1

-

1

Euthanased

9

3

39

22

1

-

Other#

7

9

4

2

-

1

Total

325

149

319

136

9

7

Euthanasia reasons Medical

9

3

33

18

1

-

Behavioural

-

-

6

4

-

-

Infectious

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

9

3

39

22

1

-

#Other: Includes dead on arrival, stolen, escaped, unassisted death.

11


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

STATISTICS Inspectorate Investigation Type of animal

Number of complaints

Number of prosecutions

Number of animals involved

Complaints investigated

2235

Dogs

605

7

993

Complaints revisited

-

Cats

122

2

429

Prosecutions finalised

9

Cattle

-

-

-

Number of charges laid

31

Sheep

8

-

>100

Number of people charged

9

Horses

23

-

>1300

Number of successful prosecutions (charges found and proven)

9

Poultry/Birds

71

-

83

Number of convictions recorded

-

Rabbits

22

-

83

Cases examined (trials / hearings)

-

Guinea Pigs

6

-

11

Cases pending (trials / hearings)

28

Other

49

-

>200

Wildlife Report Animals in

This year

Last year

Animals released

This year

Last year

Mammals

15

62

Mammals

6

11

Marsupials

151

283

Marsupials

29

102

Monotremes

5

4

Monotremes

2

4

Native amphibians

2

6

Native Amphibians

1

2

Native birds

1040

1835

Native Birds

187

445

Native reptiles

76

124

Native Reptiles

31

46

Total

1289

2314

Total

256

610

Euthanasia

691

1246

Other Outcomesâ€

398

525

†Other Outcomes: Includes transferred out, escaped, unassisted death

12


. RSPCA ACT ANNUAL REPORT 14/15 .

OUR SUPPORTERS SHELTER PARTNERS

SHELTER SPONSORS

coateshire.com.au 13 15 52

13


SHELTER SUPPORTERS

MAJOR DONORS We rely on the community to help us continue our vital work with animals in need. A big thank you to all who have supported and continue to support RSPCA ACT. Every single dollar counts. Although we would love to list all of you who donated, we simply do not have the space. We would like to thank the following people who have donated significant amounts to our mission in the 2014-15 financial year. Mr Ian Albrey . Mr John Alcock . Ms Monica Allami . Miss Elizabeth Allen . Ms Jane Allen . Ms Margaret Anderson . Mr Jim Aravanis . Miss Margaret Atkinson . Mrs Judith Avery . Mr & Mrs Geoff & Pauline Bairnsfather . Mr T Baker . Mr Donald Balfour . Mr Bruce Barnes . Ms Pam Behncke . Mr John Bellinger . Mr Daryl Blaxland . Ms Margaret Blumer . Mrs Natalie Bobbin . Mrs Marjorie Boorman . Mrs Heather Boyd . Mr John Brain . Ms Jillian Brankin .Mr Frank Breglec . Mr Michael Brown . Miss Lyn Brown . Ms Shirley Brown . Mrs Sylvia Budynek . Ms Noela Buntine . Mrs & Mr Mariko & Leszek Buszynski Mrs Emily Canning . Ms Sue Carpenter . Mrs Barbara Cattell . Mr Hugh Chalmers . Mr Prin Chegwanich . Mrs Jan & Geoff Clark . Mrs Jennifer Cleary . Ms Alison Clifton . Mr Bruce Collins . Ms Victoria Cotton . Miss Sarah Crichton . Mr Robert Cuttell . Mr John Davenport . Miss Emma Davey . Ms Katharine Devitt . Dr Ian Doherty . Mr Kieran Donaghue . Ms Louise Douglas . Mr Ian Douglas . Miss Susan Doyle . Ms Kathy Dunn . Mrs B Edward . Ms Margaret Enfield . Mrs Robyn Fetter . Ms Patrica Flynn . Miss Vickie Forsyth . Mr Matthew Frawley . Mr Peter Fricker . Mr Ryan Genero . Ms Maria Grainger . Mr Wayne Grant . Mrs Betty Grant . Ms Marion Gras . Dr Matthew Gray . Manjuni Gregory . Mrs Elizabeth Gunn . Ms Rosemary Halloran . Mr Tom Halstead Mrs Barbara Hamburger . Ms Anita Hancock . Ms Tricia Hardy . Mrs J Harmsworth . Ms Lexie Harper . Ms Elisabeth Hartinger . Mr Colin Hauff . Mr David Heim . Mr Kevin Heindl . Ms Rachael Henson . Mr Aaron Hess . Mr Mike Hillman . Mrs Celia Hodgson . Mrs June Howard . Ms K Hueppauff . Ms Judith Hurlstone . Ms Margaret Jones . Ms Kelli Jones . Mr Neil Jones . Mr Peter Kesby . Mrs Dilys Ketley . Mrs Teresa Keung . Ms Christine Keur . Miss Gina Kikos . Ms Christine King . Ms Leanne Kossatz . Ms Jennifer Kruse . Mr John Kung . Mrs Wendy Kupkee . Mr Scott Lambeth . Ms Debbye Lang .Miss Sandra Lauer . Mr William Laurie . Mrs E Law-Smith . Ms Victoria Leaver . Miss Anke Lebang . Ms Michele Leslie . Dr Ray Lindsay . Mrs Shirley Llorens . Ms Rachel Love . Miss Esther Macdonald . Ms Janet Marshall . Ms Margot McCarthy . Ms Peta McGhee . Mr Robert McHugh . Ms Rosemary McKenzie . Ms Margaret McMillan . Dr Susan Meek . Mr Ken Meikle . L Meredith . Dr Margaret R. Middleton . Mr John Miller . Mrs Jill Mitchell . Mrs Peta Mitterfellner . Mr Frederick Monk . Ms Christa Moore . Mrs Pearl Moyseyenko . Mrs Elizabeth Munro-Ashman . Mr Michael Musson . Mrs Kathryn Nelson Ms Michael Newman . Mr Hans Oberg . Mr Graham O’Brien . Ms Melanie O’flynn . Dr Lindl Orthia . Ms Lee Otto . Ms Joanne Palmer . Ms Janet Patterson Mrs Deborah Perrin . Ms Margaret Pfanner . Mrs Gayle Philip . Miss Kate Prior . Mr John Prytz . Ms Kannika Rangsayapan . Ms Miranda Rawlinson . Ms Shannon Read . Ms Pauline Reynolds . Ms Betty Richardson . Ms Patricia Richardson . Ms J Richardson . Mrs Pam Robbins . Ms Felicity Roberts . Ms Sheridan Roberts . Ms Susan Robertson . Mr David Rolfe . Mrs Simone Rowell . Mr Richard Rye . Mr Mark Sampson . Mr Saul Schneider . Mrs Patricia Schuberth . Mr John Simpson . Mr Bruce Sinclair . Ms Ruth Smith . Mrs Marcia Smith . Mr Tuck Soo . Professor Raymond Spear . Mrs Joan Styles . Mrs Eleanor Sulinski . Ms Suzanne Swensson . Lady Elizabeth Synnot . Mr Robert Taylor . Ms Claudia Thame . Ms Ann Thompson . Ms Elizabeth Toledo Mrs Loris Trainor . Mrs Morna Vellacott . Ms Marg Vidler . Mrs G Walker . Mrs C Walker . Ms Laura Ward . Ms Carol Wattam . Miss Tracy Webb . Ms Alexandra Wedutenko . Ms Pauline West . Ms Marjorie Wheeler . Miss Joan White . Ms Wendy Whitham . Ms Sarah Whitty . Mrs A Whyte . Mrs Alison Wishart . Ms Georgina Withers . Ms Jan Wryell .


Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated

(Incorporated in the Australian Capital Territory under the Associations Incorporation Act 1991) ABN 35 730 738 037

General Purpose (Reduced Disclosure Requirements) Financial Report for the year ended 30 June 2015


Table of Contents Council Report ................................................................................. 1 Statement of Comprehensive Income ................................................ 3 Statement of Financial Position ........................................................ 4 Statement of Cash Flows .................................................................. 5 Statement of Changes in Equity ........................................................ 6 Notes to the Financial Statements .................................................... 7


Council Report The Council presents this report on the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated “the Association” for the financial year ended 30 June 2015. Council Membership The Council is responsible for the management of the Association. The Council members in office during the financial year are: President Ms Louise Douglas Secretary Ms Paula Shinerock Treasurer Ms Kasy Chambers Other Members: Ms Amanda Cattermole Mr Andrew Lander Mr Michael Sassella Mr Jeff Butler Principal Activities The principal activities of the Association during the financial year were those of advocacy, sheltering and veterinary services for and on behalf of, all animals within Australia with emphasis on the ACT. The Association is actively involved in:  operating an animal cruelty inspectorate;  operating an animal shelter;  providing a veterinarian service for injured or orphaned native wild animals;  operating a public and shelter veterinary clinic for domestic animals;  delivery of a public dog and puppy training school;  operating a public cat boarding facility;  providing educational programs for kids during school holidays; and  operating a retail shop. Significant Changes The transformational changes that began in 2013-14 to reduce operational costs and increase revenue continued into 2014-15. It was clear from our financial outcomes that the cost reductions made a substantial impact to the bottom line while revenue figures remained steady compared to the previous year. The organisation would have more than likely achieved total revenue targets too had we not been required to close the veterinarian clinic to the public for four months due to staff shortages. All of those veterinarian roles were filled by the beginning of the 2015 calendar year, and commercial revenue from this source has resumed to past levels.

1|Page


Financial Result The net surplus of the Association for the financial year ended 30 June 2015 was $288,576 (2014: deficit $551,484). After the Balance Date Events No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year that significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the Association, the results of those operations, or state of affairs of the Association in future financial years. This report is provided in accordance with a resolution of the Council and is signed for and on behalf of the members of the Council by the President, Louise Douglas. Likely Developments and Expected Results The future operation of the Association involves the continued pursuit of its principal activities and financial sustainability Employees The Association employed 47 employees as at 30 June 2015 (2014: 47 employees).

This report is provided in accordance with a resolution of the Council and is signed for and on behalf of the members of the Council by:

President: Louise Douglas (President) Dated: 27 October 2015

2|Page


Statement of Comprehensive Income

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015

Revenue

Note

3

Costs of Goods Sold

2015

2014

$

$

3,903,390

3,879,188

(309,511)

(335,603) (115,956)

Depreciation expense

4a

(60,246)

Salary and employee benefits expenses

4b

(2,287,419)

Other expenses

4c

(957,638)

(1,266,511)

288,576

(551,484)

−

−

288,576

(551,484)

(7,242)

85,579

(7,242)

85,579

281,334

(465,905)

Net surplus/(deficit) before income tax expense Income tax expense Net surplus/(deficit) after income tax expense Other comprehensive income Unrealised (loss)/gain on available-for-sale investments Total other comprehensive income for the period

Total comprehensive surplus/(deficit) attributable to members of the Association

2l

(2,712,602)

3|Page


Statement of Financial Position

2015

2014

$

$

305,006 104,324 48,504 21,155

122,794 93,705 54,760 18,710

478,989

289,969

445,991 165,661

453,233 173,477

611,652

626,710

1,090,641

916,680

286,468 121,307

345,777 138,362

407,775

484,139

-

31,011

-

31,011

TOTAL LIABILITIES

407,775

515,150

NET ASSETS

682,865

401,531

209,384 473,481

216,626 184,905

682,865

401,531

AS AT 30 JUNE 2015

CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Inventory Prepayments

Note

5 6

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Available-for-sale investments Property, plant and equipment

7 8

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables Provisions

9 10

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions

10

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

EQUITY Equity attributable to members of the Association Net unrealised gain reserve Accumulated surplus TOTAL EQUITY

11

4|Page


Statement of Cash Flows

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015

Note

CASH FLOWS FROM/(USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from customers, government and others Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received Dividends received

NET CASH FLOWS FROM/(USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES

5 (b)

CASH FLOWS FROM/(USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from disposal of available-for-sale investments Payments for property, plant and equipment

2015

2014

$

$

3,978,895 (3,781,161) 3,515 33,392

3,613,455 (4,114,747) 2,214 57,036

234,641

(442,042)

-

568,888

(52,430)

(49,833)

NET CASH FLOWS (USED IN)/FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

(52,430)

519,055

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF THE YEAR

182,210 122,795

77,013 45,782

305,006

122,795

5 (a)

5|Page


Statement of Changes in Equity

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 Accumulated Surplus

$

Net Unrealised Gain Reserve (Note 11) $

Total Equity

$

736,389

417,931

1,154,320

− _ (551,484) (551,484)

(286,885) 85,579 − (201,306)

(286,885) 85,579 (551,484) (752,790)

AT 30 JUNE 2014

184,905

216,625

401,530

Unrealised (loss)/gain on available-for-sale investments Surplus for the year Total comprehensive income for the period AT 30 JUNE 2015

− 288,576 288,576 473,481

(7,242) − -7,242 209,384

(7,242) 288,576 281,334 682,865

AT 30 JUNE 2013

Transfer of realised gains to the statement of comprehensive income on disposal of available-for-sale investments Unrealised (loss)/gain on available-for-sale investments Deficit for the year Total comprehensive loss for the period

6|Page


Notes to the Financial Statements For the year ended 30 June 2015

NOTE 1 – CORPORATE INFORMATION The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated (“the Association”) is domiciled in Australia and is a not-for-profit organisation. The Association is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 1991 and is an incorporated Association. The financial report of the Association for the year ended 30 June 2015 was authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the members on 24 November 2015. The nature of the operations and principal activities of the Association are described in the Constitution.

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (a)

Basis of preparation

The general-purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance the Association Incorporation Act 1991, Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and other mandatory professional reporting requirements. The financial report has also been prepared on a historical cost basis, except for available-for-sale investments, which have been measured at fair value. The financial report is presented in Australian dollars. (b)

New Accounting Standards and Interpretations

Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standard requirements Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued or amended that are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a financial impact in the financial statements or performance of the Association, and are not expected to have a future financial impact on the Association. Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations that have recently been issued or amended but are not yet effective have not been adopted by the Association for the annual reporting period ended 30 June 2015. It is anticipated that the new requirements will have no material financial impact on future reporting periods. (c)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents in the statement of financial position comprise cash at bank and in hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents consists of cash and cash equivalents as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts.

7|Page


NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued) (d)

Trade and other receivables

(e)

Investments and other financial assets

(f)

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

Trade receivables, which generally have 30-day terms, are recognised and carried at original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectable amounts. An allowance for doubtful debts is made when there is objective evidence that the Association will not be able to collect the debts. Bad debts are written off when identified.

Financial assets in the scope of AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement are classified as either financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, loans and receivables, held-tomaturity investments, or available-for-sale investments, as appropriate. When financial assets are recognised initially, they are measured at fair value, plus, in the case of investments not at fair value through profit or loss, directly attributable transactions costs. The Association determines the classification of its financial assets after initial recognition and when allowed and appropriate, reevaluates this designation at each financial year-end.

Financial assets classified as held for trading are included in the category “financial assets at fair value through profit or loss�. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for the purpose of selling in the near term. Derivatives are also classified as held for trading unless they are designated as effective hedging instruments. Gains or losses on investments held for trading are recognised in profit or loss. (g)

Held-to-maturity Investments

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity are classified as held-to-maturity when the Association has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. Investments intended to be held for an undefined period are not included in this classification. Investments that are intended to be held-to-maturity, such as bonds, are subsequently measured at amortised cost. This cost is computed as the amount initially recognised minus principal repayments, plus or minus the cumulative amortisation using the effective interest method of any difference between the initially recognised amount and the maturity amount. This calculation includes all fees and points paid or received between parties to the contract that are an integral part of the effective interest rate, transaction costs and all other premiums and discounts. For investments carried at amortised cost, gains and losses are recognised in profit or loss when the investments are derecognised or impaired, as well as through the amortisation process. (h)

Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables including loan notes and loans to key management personnel are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Such assets are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Gains and losses are recognised in profit or loss when the loans and receivables are derecognised or impaired. These are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after balance date, which are classified as non-current. (i)

Available-for-sale investments

Available-for-sale investments are those non-derivative financial assets that are designated as availablefor-sale or are not classified as any of the three preceding categories. After initial recognition, availablefor-sale investments are measured at fair value with gains or losses being recognised as a separate component of equity until the investment is derecognised or until the investment is determined to be impaired, at which time the cumulative gain or loss previously reported in equity is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

8|Page


NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued) The fair value of investments that are actively traded in organised financial markets is determined by reference to quoted market bid prices at the close of business at the reporting date. For investments with no active market, fair value is determined using valuation techniques. Such techniques include using recent arm’s length market transactions; reference to the current market value of another instrument that is substantially the same; discounted cash flow analysis and option pricing models. (j)

De-recognition of financial instruments

(k)

Property, plant and equipment

The de-recognition of a financial instrument takes place when the Association no longer controls the contractual rights that comprise the financial instrument, which is normally the case when the instrument is sold, or all the cash flows attributable to the instrument are passed through to an independent third party.

Cost Plant and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Depreciation Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis or diminishing value over the estimated useful life of the assets as follows: (i)

Furniture and equipment: 5 years

(ii)

Fixtures and fittings: 10 years

(iii)

Computer equipment and software: 4 years

(iv)

Motor vehicle: 5 years

(v)

Building: 40 years

The assets’ residual values, useful lives and amortisation methods are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each financial year-end. Impairment The carrying values of plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. The recoverable amount of plant and equipment is the greater of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Value in use is the depreciated replacement cost of an asset when the future economic benefits of the asset are not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate net cash inflows and where the Association would, if deprived of the asset, replace its remaining future economic benefits. Impairment losses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income. (l)

Taxes

Income Tax The Association is exempt from income tax in accordance with Section 50-40 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST except: (i)

where the GST incurred on a purchase of goods and services is not recoverable from the taxation authority, in which case the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense item as applicable; and

(ii)

receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. 9|Page


NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued) Taxes (continued) Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to the taxation authority, are classified as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to the taxation authority. (m)

Trade and other payables

(n)

Employee benefits

Trade payables and other payables are carried at amortised cost and represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Association prior to the end of the financial year, which are unpaid and arise when the Association becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services. The amounts are unsecured and usually paid within 30 days of recognition.

Provision is made for employee benefits accumulated as a result of employees rendering services up to the reporting date. These benefits include wages and salaries, annual leave and long service leave. Liabilities arising in respect of wages and salaries, annual leave and any other employee benefits expected to be settled within twelve months of the reporting date are measured at their nominal amounts based on remuneration rates that are expected to be paid when the liability is settled. All other employee benefits liabilities are measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. In determining the present value of future cash outflows, the market yields as at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity approximating the terms of the related liability, are used. Employee benefits expenses and revenues arising in respect of the following categories: (i)

wages and salaries, non-monetary benefits, annual leave, long service leave and other leave entitlements; and

(ii)

other types of employee benefits

are charged against operating results in their respective categories. The contributions made to superannuation funds are charged to the statement of comprehensive income. Superannuation Commitments Employees contribute to external superannuation funds at various percentages of their wages and salaries. Contributions by the Association of not less than 9.5% of employees’ wages and salaries are legally enforceable in Australia and were paid. (o)

Leases

(p)

Revenue Recognition

Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense in the statement of comprehensive income on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Operating lease incentives are recognised as a liability when received and subsequently reduced by allocating lease payments between rental expense and reduction of the liability.

Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the entity and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised.

10 | P a g e


NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued) Revenue Recognition (continued) Sale of goods Revenue is recognised when the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods have passed to the buyer and can be measured reliably. Risks and rewards are considered passed to the buyer at the time of delivery of the goods to the customer. Rendering of services Revenue from rendering of services is recognised when control of a right to be compensated for the services has been attained and the stage of completion of the service contract can be reliably measured. Stage of completion is measured by reference to the services performed to date as a percentage of total estimated services to be performed for each contract. If a contract outcome cannot be reliably measured, revenue is recognised only to the extent that costs have been incurred. Interest revenue Revenue is recognised as interest accrues using the effective interest method. This is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and allocating the interest income over the relevant period using the effective interest rate, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to the net carrying amount of the financial asset. Dividends Revenue is recognised when the right to receive the payment is established. Membership fees The Association charges annual fees to its RSPCA members. The fixed annual membership fee is required to be paid by member if they intend to maintain a membership. Membership fee revenue is recognised upon receipting. Fundraising Fundraising income is recognised when the RSPCA obtains control of the funds. Government grants and other contribution from community Revenue is recognised when the Association receives an asset, including the right to receive cash or other forms of asset without directly giving approximately equal value to the other party or parties to the transfer. Contributions received or receivable are recognised immediately as revenue when the Association obtains control of the contributions, it is possible that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the Association and the amount of the contribution can be measured reliably. (q)

Provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Association has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event. It is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Where the Association expects some or all of a provision to be reimbursed, the reimbursement is recognised as a separate asset but only when the reimbursement is virtually certain. The expense relating to any provision is presented in the statement of comprehensive income net of any reimbursement. If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. Where discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as a finance cost.

11 | P a g e


NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued) (r)

Other Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition. (s)

Significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions

The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other various factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. Provisions for employee benefits Provisions for employee benefits payable after 12 months from the reporting date are based on future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures, and periods of service. The amount of these provisions would change should any of these factors change in the next 12 months. Valuation of investments The Association has decided to classify investments in securities as ‘available-for-sale’ financial investments and movements in fair value are recognised directly in equity.

12 | P a g e


NOTE 3 - REVENUE

Retail sales Income from Government Contract Sponsorship

2015 $ 1,111,024 605,340 111,576

2014 $ 1,086,881 590,000 61,266

Fundraising and membership fees

1,235,491

1,085,848

118,630 33,392 3,515

106,371 57,036 2,214

_

286,885

279,019 381,505 23,898

155,978 445,418 1,291

3,903,390

3,879,188

Events Dividend income Interest income Realised gain on disposal of available-forsale investments Bequest Veterinary clinic sales Other Total

NOTE 4 - EXPENSES (a) Depreciation Expense Plant and equipment Total (b) Salary and Employee Benefits Expenses Salaries and wages Superannuation expense Provision for employee benefits Total (c) Other Expenses Sheltering expense Fundraising expense and advertising Facility and equipment IT communication Professional fee Bad debts General expense Miscellaneous expense Total

2015 $ 60,246 60,246

2014 $ 115,956 115,956

1,990,546 191,753 105,119 2,287,419

2,357,747 207,168 147,687 2,712,602

236,004 166,106 221,540 83,552 16,922 13,290 220,223 957,638

311,775 144,805 225,848 94,664 70,961 19,303 398,140 1,015 1,266,511

13 | P a g e


NOTE 5 - CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS (a)

Reconciliation of cash

Cash on hand Cash at bank Total

(b) Reconciliation of net surplus/(deficit) to net cash flows from/(used in) operating activities: Net surplus/(deficit) Other non cash items Adjustments to reconcile net surplus (deficient) to net cash flows from operating activities: Depreciation Realised (gain) on disposal of available-for-sale investments Changes in assets and liabilities Trade and other receivables Prepayments Inventory Asset Held for Sale Trade and other payables Provision Deferred Income Net cash flows from/(used in) operating activities

2015 $

2014 $

1,592 303,414 305,006

1,500 121,294 122,794

2015 $ 288,576

2014 $ (551,484) 74,413

60,246 -

115,956 (286,885)

(10,619) (2,445) 6,257 (59,309) (48,065) 234,641

375,402 65,333 52,637 (76,041) 83,627 (295,000) (442,041)

14 | P a g e


NOTE 6 - TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

Current Trade receivables GST receivable/payable Other debtors Total

Ageing analysis of receivables 2015 2014

Total

0-30 days

31-60 days PDNI*

2015 $ 88,883 1,839 13,602

2014 $ 78,895 (495) 15,305

104,324

93,705

61-90 days PDNI*

+91 days PDNI*

+91 days CI**

$104,324

$42,048

$17,619

$24,672

$19,985

-

$93,705

$30,215

$16,510

$10,374

$36,606

-

* Past due not Impaired (PDNI) ** Considered Impaired (CI) Receivable past due date but not considered impaired are $77,376 (2014: 63,490).Management is satisfied that payment will be received in full. Receivables past due bur considered impaired are nil (2014: nil)

15 | P a g e


NOTE 7 - AVAILABLE-FOR-SALE INVESTMENTS

2015 $ 99,049

2014 $ 101,393

Listed shares

346,942

351,840

Total

445,991

453,233

At fair value: Fixed interest securities

Available-for-sale investments consist mainly of fixed interest securities and listed shares and therefore have no fixed maturity date or coupon rate.The fair value of the available-for-sale investments is based on market data that is observable and therefore classified as level one financial instruments. The following table provides the fair value measurement hierarchy as at 30 June 2015.

At fair value: Fixed interest securities Listed shares

Fair value measurement using Quoted prices Significant Significant in active observable unobservable markets inputs inputs (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)

Date of valuation

Total

30 June 2015 30 June 2015

$99,049 $346,942

$99,049 $346,942 -

$445,991

$445,991

-

The following table provides the fair value measurement hierarchy as at 30 June 2014.

At fair value: Fixed interest securities Listed shares

Date of valuation

Total

30 June 2015 30 June 2015

$101,393 $351,840 $453,233

Fair value measurement using Quoted prices Significant Significant in active observable unobservable markets inputs inputs (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)

$101,393 $351,840 $453,233

-

16 | P a g e


NOTE 8 - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Computer Equipment and Software - At cost Accumulated depreciation and impairment Net carrying amount

2015 $ 262,452 (257,531) 4,921

2014 $ 253,252 (250,681) 2,572

Furniture and Fitting - At cost Accumulated depreciation and impairment Net carrying amount

539,842 (479,246) 60,596

531,977 (445,386) 86,591

Building and Fixtures - At cost Accumulated depreciation and impairment Net carrying amount

1,394,963 (1,339,175) 55,788

1,359,599 (1,337,634) 21,965

Motor Vehicles - At cost Accumulated depreciation and impairment Net carrying amount

135,296 (90,940) 44,356

135,296 (72,946) 62,350

Total Property, Plant and Equipment

165,661

173,477

Reconciliations Carrying amount at beginning of the year Additions Disposals Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of the year

173,477 52,430 (60,246) 165,661

432,206 49,834 (192,607) (115,956) 173,477

17 | P a g e


NOTE 9 - TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES Current Trade creditors Accrued expenses Superannuation PAYG withholding Other payable Total Current

2015 $ 141,090 19,853 17,396 34,580 73,548 286,468

2014 $ 237,933 25,484 30,895 51,465 345,777

-

-

286,468

345,777

Non-Current Other payable Total Non-Current Total Trade and Other Payables

NOTE 10 – PROVISIONS Current Annual Leave Long service leave Non-Current Long-service leave

Total

2015 $ 85,938 35,370

2014 $ 104,418 33,944

121,307

138,362

-

31,011

-

31,011

121,307

169,372

Nature and timing of provisions (h) Annual leave and long service leave Refer to note 2(n) for the relevant accounting policy and a discussion of the significant estimations and assumptions applied in the measurement of this provision.

18 | P a g e


NOTE 11 –NET UNREALISED GAIN RESERVE (a) Movements in the Net Unrealised Gain Reserve was as follows:

At 1 July 2014 Transfer of realised gains to the statement of comprehensive income on disposal of available-for-sale investments Unrealised (loss)/gain on available-for-sale investments At 30 June 2014 Unrealised (loss)/gain on available-for-sale investments At 30 June 2015

$ 417,931 (286,885) 85,579 216,626 (7,242) 209,384

(b) Nature and purpose of the Net Unrealised Gain Reserve This reserve records movements in the fair value of available-for-sale investments.

NOTE 12 – EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING DATE There have been no significant events that have occurred subsequent to 30 June 2015

19 | P a g e


NOTE 13 – RELATED PARTY AND KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL DISCLOSURES

(a) Members of the Council in office during the year are disclosed in the Council’s report that accompanies these financial statements. Key management personnel include the Chief Executive Officer, Director of Animal Welfare and Director of Support Services. (b) Key Management Personnel Compensation The aggregate remuneration paid to key management personnel during the financial year is as follows:

Short term benefits Cash Salary Superannuation Allowances Total

(c)

2015 $ 214,652 28,899 243,551

2014 $ 618,834 41,033 28,531 688,398

The association has no dealings with any other related parties.

NOTE 14 – REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

Amounts due to the auditors of the Association for:

2015 $

2014 $

Audit of the financial report Financial report preparation assistance

7,500 -

7,500 3,500

Total

7,500

11,000

20 | P a g e


Ernst & Young 680 George Street Sydney NSW 2000 Australia GPO Box 2646 Sydney NSW 2001

Tel: +61 2 9248 5555 Fax: +61 2 9248 5959 ey.com/au

Auditor’s Independence Declaration to the members of Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated In relation to our audit of the financial report of Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated for the financial year ended 30 June 2015, and in accordance with the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and Subdivision 60-C of the Australian Charities and Not-for profits Commission Act 2012, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and the Australian Charities and Not-for profits Commission Act 2012 or any applicable code of professional conduct.

Ernst & Young

Meredith Scott Partner Sydney 29 October 2015

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


Ernst & Young 680 George Street Sydney NSW 2000 Australia GPO Box 2646 Sydney NSW 2001

Tel: +61 2 9248 5555 Fax: +61 2 9248 5959 ey.com/au

Independent auditor’s report to the members of Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated We have audited the accompanying financial report of Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated (the “Association”), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2015, and the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year ended on that date, a summary of significant accounting policies, other explanatory notes and the Statement by Members of the Council.

Council Members Responsibility for the Financial Report The Council members of the Association are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission Act 2012, the Associations Incorporation Act 1991 (ACT), the Association’s Constitution and By-Laws and for such internal controls as the Council members determine are necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatements, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal controls relevant to the Association’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Association’s internal controls. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Council members, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Independence In conducting our audit we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian professional accounting bodies and the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission Act 2012.

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


Opinion In our opinion the financial report presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ACT) Incorporated as of 30 June 2015, and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission Act 2012 and Associations Incorporation Act 1991 (ACT).

Ernst & Young

Meredith Scott Partner Sydney 29 October 2015

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


RSPCA ACT A - 12 Kirkpatrick Street Weston ACT 2611 W - rspca-act.org.au P - 02 6287 8100 E - rspca@rspca-act.org.au

RSPCA ACT Annual report 14 / 15  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you