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Founded i n 1949

The Newspaper of Imperial College Union

44

In a poll held by Consoc this term 50-60% of those asked whether they were satisfied with the performances of these people as sabbaticals answered "Don't Know". The full results are on page six. Incidentally, they are (left to right) Rae Snee, ICU DP, Liz Lindsay, ICU Hon Sec, and John Passmore, ICU President.

Junk Food

"Steady my

contact

on lens

Chaps, has

fallen

out!'

LAST TUESDAY afternoon a computing first year undergraduate found a piece of metal in his Sherfield Refectory meal. H e h a d been e a t i n g q u i c h e , chips a n d sweetcorn, w h e n he discovered a c h u n k of m e t a l i n his m o u t h . H i s friend, w h o was also e a t i n g the same food, f o u n d a piece of m e t a l i n his m e a l as well. T h e person c o n c e r n e d took the pieces to M r M o o n e y , C a t e r i n g M a n a g e r , w h o asked w h a t the students h a d been h a v i n g to eat. O n h e a r i n g sweetcorn m e n t i o n e d , he went to the can-opener i n the k i t chens to inspect it. H e said that the blade was o l d a n d h a d to be replaced. Continued

No. 578

on page 3.

Mines have retained the Bottle in an easy 9-4 victory over old rivals, Camborne. Article on Camborne weekend - see Sports Page.

Friday. February 27,1981

Hockey win league F O L L O W I N G an excellent a l l r o u n d performance this season, I C 1st X I finished top of their S a t u r d a y league — M i d d l e s e x D i v i s i o n 2 — c o l l e c t i n g sixteen points from a possible eighteen points a n d were unbeaten in the league a l l season. T h i s ensures a return to top class hockey for the side w h i c h w i l l r e m a i n v i r t u a l l y u n c h a n g e d a n d hopeful of success amongst some of the b i g guns of hockey. L a s t W e d n e s d a y saw further success for the side in w i n n i n g the U L U D i v i s i o n 1 titles at their first attempt. I n sweeping aside a l l other colleges on their w a y to this title the team d r o p p e d only two points a l l season — a n a r r o w last m i n u t e defeat by o l d r i v a l s C i t y & G u i l d s , w h o look set to finish the season i n second place.

Free!


Letters to the Editor

•MSk

Dear Sir (letter unreadable -

Ed.) Tours sincerely A n n e Evans xxx Aero 3

Dear Mr Marshall T h e remarks w h i c h y o u m a d e i n y o u r F E L I X E d i t o r i a l last week about H R H Princess A n n e are u t t e r l y despicable. E v e n if y o u h o l d these views i n p r i v a t e it is c o m p l e t e l y d i s l o y a l to p u b l i s h t h e m . A s for c r i t i c i s i n g Princess A n n e for h e r h o b b y (at w h i c h she was v e r y good) it smacks of the l o w e r m i d d l e class intolerance that we have c o m e to expect from F E L I X this year. Princess A n n e does a good d e a l of c h a r i t y work (e.g. N a t i o n a l Society for the P r e v e n t i o n of C r u e l t y to C h i l d r e n ) f o r w h i c h she r e c e i v e s i n a d e q u a t e credit f r o m gutter press e d i t o r s l i k e y o u r s e l f . In closing I w o u l d suggest that you a p o l o g i s e a n d t h e n do the honourable thing. lours very sincerely Frank James Humanities P G Sir W i t h reference to y o u r c o m ments of Princess A n n e , y o u S i r are o b v i o u s l y e x c l u d e d f r o m the 23,000 students " w i t h b r a i n s " . F o r one who c a n express h i m s e l f i n such a c h i l d i s h a n d i n s u l t i n g m a n n e r s h o u l d never h a v e b e e n e l e c t e d to e d i t the C o l l e g e or a n y other m a g a zine, a n d as r e g u l a r readers of F E L I X , m y colleagues a n d I are disgusted by y o u r o b n o x i o u s inference to the Princess (sic). J M a t h e r a n d telephonists: H L o r i b o n d , J Skech, K Franks, A Mitchell, P Croad, P Chandler, D Walters, P Rule, J Longdon, and W Jacks.

Page 2

Sir W e feel m u c h a s h a m e d to be members of a C o l l e g e whose " n e w s p a p e r " publicises such m a l i c i o u s insults as c o n t a i n e d in y o u r last e d i t o r i a l . F r o m y o u r d e s c r i p t i o n H R H Princess A n n e seems to be a m u c h m o r e c h a r i table person t h a n yourself. W h a t e v e r y o u m a y t h i n k of o u r n e w C h a n c e l l o r it was very w r o n g o f y o u to m a l i g n o n e m e m b e r of o u r R o y a l F a m i l y as this is also a direct insult u p o n o t h e r m e m b e r s for w h o m we h a v e reason to have m u c h respect and regard. W e f i n d it h a r d to corrtprehend t h a t y o u r e d i t o r i a l is a t r u e t h e r m o m e t e r of the feelings of the I C U E x e c a n d even less of the vast m a j o r i t y of students at I C . W e t h i n k that the E x e c w o u l d be w e l l advised to remove y o u as e d i t o r of F E L I X before y o u cause a n y m o r e m u d to be splattered over us a l l . Yours regretfully David Pinnegar & 48 others _ „. Physics 2 Dear Sir Y o u m a y h o l d the o p i n i o n that Princess A n n e is not suitable for the C h a n c e l l o r s h i p of this U n i v e r s i t y , but there is not cause to be d o w n r i g h t abusive. Yours John Mornement Civ Eng 1 Dear Sir O n e of the golden rules of good j o u r n a l i s m is t h a t i n d i v i d u a l m e m b e r s of the R o y a l F a m i l y are not ' f a i r game'. O n e of the h a l l m a r k s of b a d j o u r n a l i s m is sensationalism. It is the last resort of the u n i n s p i r e d a n d tir ed. Yours faithfully M a r k Clegg Mech Eng 3 Dear Sir N o t content w i t h repetitively a t t a c k i n g M r M o o n e y to the p o i n t of u t t e r t e d i u m a n d p r i n t i n g racist and generally i n s u l t i n g cartoons, y o u have now l o w e r e d y o u r s t a n d a r d s of j o u r n a l i s m even further with y o u r pathetic a n d puerile attack o n Princess A n n e i n y o u r e d i t o r i a l last week. W h a t e v e r y o u r views of our new C h a n c e l l o r (my o w n are h a r d l y c o m p l i m e n t a r y ) , there c a n be no defence against y o u r using F E L I X to a i r such vehement abuse against any i n d i v i d u a l w i t h o u t the slightest attempt at providing justification. Your c h e a p attack on such an easy t a r g e t was n e i t h e r c l e v e r n o r a m u s i n g , a n d I must presume that y o u d i d not consider the h a r m that w o u l d be done if a representative of the mass m e d i a , s e a r c h i n g for student reaction to the c h o i c e of C h a n c e l l o r , were to seize u p o n y o u r remarks as being r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the student b o d y at I C . T h e p u b l i c w o u l d

FEUX,

s u r e l y c o n c l u d e t h a t it is us, rather t h a n Princess A n n e , w h o possess the 'intellect of a c a b bage'. O r perhaps you were encouraged by such thoughts, since y o u a p p e a r to enjoy cheap publicity. If you manage to complete y o u r t e r m as F E L I X E d i t o r , I hope y o u w i l l c o n t i n u e to express y o u r opinions, but please refrain from using unjustified a n d h i g h l y personal abuse. Yours faithfully Andy Tye Civ Eng 3 Sir W i t h reference to the article entitled Operatic Diversion D i v e r s i o n , I note w i t h more t h a n a little t r e p i d a t i o n that the dates g i v e n for this o p e r a clash w i t h the d a t e s a l r e a d y b o o k e d for t h e H A M D R A M 81 ( H o m e C o u n ties A m a t e u r D r a m a t i c Festival) F i n a l s . A s this is the first time such a prestigious festival has been hosted by I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e it w o u l d be t r a g i c i f it w e r e m a r r e d by a bookings oversight. Is there some mistake? W e w o u l d hate to d i s a p p o i n t those w h o have a l r e a d y pu r c h as ed tickets for H A M D R A M 81 (available f r o m the B o o k s h op or I C D r a m s o c m e m b e r s ) a n d h o p e t h a t last week's article was incorrect. Geoffrey B a r b e r H A M D R A M 81 L i a i s o n Officer Ed's Comment: D r a m s o c h a v e assured me the s i t u a t i o n is totally under control. Sir I w r i t e i n response to D V M o l e s w o r t h ' s foolish d i s p l a y of i g n o r a n c e i n his letter of F e b r u a r y 6 for F E L I X . L e t me q u o t e two of his sentences: " I a m not so naive that I believe there is no injustice in the R e p u b l i c " . T o b l i n d D V M o l e s w o r t h , the obvious injustice is not so i m p o r t a n t to be c o n d e m n e d . ". . . these firms especially some of t h e m . . .are p r o b a b l y l e a d i n g t h e w a y to n a r r o w i n g the gaps between ' b l a c k s ' a n d 'whites' s t a n d a r d of l i v i n g " . If D V M o l e s w o r t h is a w a r e of the different l i v i n g standards based on c olou r, then he ought to be aware of the injustice in the system he admires so m u c h . P e r h a p s , we w i l l forgive D V M o l e s w o r t h for b e i n g so naive to realise that b e i n g w h i t e i n S o u t h A f r i c a , he was i n such a p r i v i laged p o s i t i o n — h i g h wages, lots of incentives, etc. — as to pay n o a t t e n t i o n to t h e i n j u s t i c e m e t e d o n o t h e r s . H e is n o w b e i n g used (from the tone of his last p a r a g r a p h ) to a u g m e n t the white p o p u l a t i o n a n d m a t c h the p o p u l a t i o n i m b a l a n c e if not white m a j o r i t y . W h a t he s h o u l d bear in m i n d is: S o u t h A f r i c a c a n

February

27, 1981

never be another A u s t r a l i a or North America. H a s D V M o l e s w o r t h been a b l a c k S o u t h A f r i c a n a n d seen his wife for o n ly two days i n a m o n t h a n d h a d seen h i s l i t t l e s i s t e r g u n n e d d o w n over a protest i n the S o w e i t o - c l a s h , he w o n ' t believe that as justice. M a y b e D V Molesworth will be h a p p y to hear of Botha's latest p r o m i s e d to i m p r o v e the position of B l a c k s b y a l l o w i n g a f e w B l a c k s ' black-representatives i n P a r l i a m e n t . I r e p h r a s e his s t a t e m e n t as t h e c r e a t i n g o f M u z o r e w a ' s (Black puppets) to u n d e r m i n e the l i b e r a t i o n m o v e ments. I assure h i m a n d B o t h a that the l i b e r a t i o n w a r continues u n a b a t e d a n d that p a y i n g a l i p service to d e m o c r a c y does not w e a k e n the efforts. If he wants to be a disciple a n d a propagandist of a n A p a r t h e i d regime then he s h o u l d be p r e p a r e d to c l a i m r e s p o n s i b i l i t y fo r t h e v e r y difficult times yet to come. L e t us be frank, D V M o l e s w o r t h is not b e c o m i n g a n t i - A n t i A p a t t h e i d as he claims. H e is for the A p a r t h e i d regime. T o be a n a n t i - A n t i - A p a r t h e i d is to be p r o A p a r t h e i d , there is no m i d d l e t e r m . H e t r i e s to h i d e h i s boldlessness by a l o n g phraseology. R e a d i n g his letter, I c a n n o w u n d e r s t a n d h o w the holocaust of the J e w s , the genocide of A m e r i n d i a n s , the s l a v e r y a n d t h e d o m i n a t e d e c o n o m y of the blacks, etc., have been possible. Yours truly F Amandle N Yaw Civ Eng Dear Steve T h e a r t i c l e of M r P a u l S i m o n s o n guide to f a r t i n g ( F E L I X 577) leads me to believe that he seems to t h i n k that he has fired the last s h o t as f a r as u n d e r s t a n d i n g f a r t i n g is c o n c e r n e d . W h i l e I a p p r e c i a t e his attempt to scientifically analyse this socially stigmatised phenomenon, I s h o u l d like to point out that a m o r e d e t a i l e d analysis t h a n his has been i n existence for nearly a c e n t u r y . I refer to The Art of Farting or the Sly Artilleryman'.i Manual by C o u n t T r u m p e t , D o c t o r of the Brass H o r s e . T h i s f a s c i n a t i n g piece of research, w h i c h bears no date, seem to have a p p e a r e d i n the n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y i n F r a n c e . A n d thanks to S a l v a d o r D a l i , w h o r e p r o d u c e d it as a n a p p e n d i x t o h i s a u t o b i o g r a p h y , a greater n u m b e r of people w i l l be able to u n d e r s t a n d a n d a p p r e c i a t e this noble art now (see, S a l v a d o r D a l i , Diary of a Genius - An Autobiography, App e n d i x 1, p p 217-251, P i c a d o r , L o n d o n 1976). C o u n t T r u m p e t begins the p r e l u d e to his w o r k by saying: " I I Continued

on page 4.


from front page. M r M o o n e y t o l d F E L I X that the m e t a l c o u l d have come from s a u c e p a n s o r c a n s . W h e n he found out that the m e a l h a d i n c l u d e d c a n n e d sweetcorn, he w e n t to the c a n - o p e n e r . T h e p i e r c i n g n a i l o n it was b l u n t , a n d it r a n u p a r i m on the c a n . A s soon as he knew about it, he h a d the n a i l c h a n g e d straightaway. T h e r e was a s i m i l a r i n c i d e n t earlier i n the week, but no one had brought it to his a t t e n t i o n . H e h a d apologised to the student concerned, but as he h a d m a d e such a 'song a n d d a n c e " about it he w o u l d not get a refund. O n the subject of C o l l e g e food generally, M r M o o n e y said that he w o u l d have to take people's w o r d for it if they thought the f o o d w a s g e t t i n g b e t t e r , as a suggestion w h i c h F E L I X put to h i m . A s k e d a b o u t the better chips this t e r m from the U n i o n Refectory, he said that the supply h a d been c h a n g e d , a n d as this w a s f o u n d a c c e p t a b l e it w a s decided to c o n t i n u e it.

UC Sit-in

Carnival L A S T F R I D A Y ' S Links Carniv a l , was a t t e n d e d by about 600 people. M o s t semed to have been there to see O t w a y a n d B a r r e t t the h e a d l i n e act, since m a n y left at m i d n i g h t , before the f i n a l b a n d . W h e n e v e r y t h i n g is sorted out the event is expected to " j u s t about break e v e n " . U n f o r t u n a t e l y t h e r e was n o p r o f i t to donate to N i g h t l i n e . A n d y D i x o n G u i l d s P u b l i c i t y O f f i c e r said " A g o o d t i m e was h a d by a l l w h o w e n t , it was a s h a m e th ere weren't m o r e " .

Guilds Trip t o 'Tomfoolery' Criterion

T h e a t r e ,

Piccadilly

Thursday, March 5 Ticket s

£3

(normally

N a m e s

o n

notice

G u i l d s

office

on Overseas

b y

£5.50)

b o a r d

in

T u e s d a y

Fees

S T U D E N T S at U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e L o n d o n started a n o c c u p a t i o n of their College's a d m i n i s t r a t i v e block, i n a n attempt to persuade their college not to increase fees to overseas students. A n emergency U G M m o t i o n three weeks ago noted inter a l i a " d i s c r i m i n a t i o n reached i n t o l e r a b l e p r o p o r t i o n s w i t h the i n t r o d u c t i o n of so-called ' f u l l cost' fees for overseas students of ,£2,000 for A r t s courses, a n d £3,000 for Science courses . . . served o n l y to further enhance the elitist a n d racist nature of h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n i n B r i t a i n . T h e G o v e r n m e n t h a d to give colleges a special e x e m p t i o n f r o m the R a c e R e l a t i o n s A c t 1977 before they c o u l d i m p l e m e n t these increases". T h e m o t i o n went o n to instruct the E x e c u t i v e to o b t a i n a n assurance from C o l l e g e not to increase fees next year. T h e college d i d not give such a guarantee, but d i d agree not to impose a p r e v i o u s l y d e c i d e d e x t r a 10%. A n emergency U G M m o t i o n a week later noted, inter a l i a " t h e full c o s t fees a r e d r i v i n g o v e r s e a s a w a y . T h e r e is n o f i n a n c i a l a r g u m e n t i n favour of full cost fees, a n d college c an n ot therefore c l a i m that it is u n d e r financial o b l i g a t i o n to charge these fees". A m o t i o n on t h e m c a l l e d for " A total boycott of lectures o n F e b r u r y 24, pickets of a l l e n t r a n c e s / m a i n d e p a r t m e n t s " . T h i s was d e c l a r e d " t h e b e g i n n i n g a n d not the e n d " . A n d emergency U G M m o t i o n a week later resolved, inter a l i a " t o go into i m m e d i a t e o c c u p a t i o n of college u n t i l college take a stand against full-cost fees. T o support the N U S N a t i o n a l L o b b y of P a r l i a m e n t o n M a r c h 1 1 " . I n a statement issued by the U n i o n , students were urged to support the boycott. A f t e r o u t l i n i n g w h y it was thought the increase in fees was d i s c r i m i n a t o r y a n d incorrect is said " o n l y il we say b o l d l y a n d clearly that these fes are w r o n g , w r o n g , w r o n g , w i l l there be any change. A n o c c u p a t i o n is the o n l y w a y o p e n to us n o w to make that message clear. O t h e r colleges w i l l follow if we take a s t a n d . S u p p o r t the occupation". Last T u e s d a y , students o c c u p p i e d the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n section at I C a n d this was c o n i n u i n g o n W e d n e s d a y . U C students visited I C on W e d n e s d a y afternoon to ask for support for their c a m p a i g n , the a i m being a c t i o n a l l over L o n d o n against the " d i s c r i m i n a t o r y lee increase a n d the general attack on e d u c a t i o n " . A l l unions are b e i n g asked to " t a k e a c t i o n " if college authorities intend to i m p l e m e n t the fee increase, organise a one day lecture boycott, a n d , as a last resort, o c u p y C o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . I C U staged a w e e k - l o n g sit-in i n the Sherfield S e n i o r D i n i n g R o o m last year, this was once a g a i n o n teh overseas students differential lees issue. T h i s protest, a l t h o u g h led by the E x e c , d i d not achieve its aims, w h i c h were to get assurances f r o m the P r i m e M i n i s t e r , a n d Secretary ol State for E d u c a t i o n a s k i n g for a review of the G o v e r n m e n t ' s E d u c a t i o n p o l i c y , w i t h p a r t i c u l a r regard to overseas students. T h o se people w h o p a r t i c i p a t e d i n last year's sit-in d i d not feel it was totally i n v a i n .

T H E I N T E R N A T I O N A L P A R T Y , the culmination of International W e e k , w a s highly s u c c e s s f u l . T h e e v e n i n g i n c l u d e d D i n n e r , w i t h Indian, C h i n e s e , S r i L a n k a n , a n d G r e e k foods. Afterwards there were stage performances in the J C R . T h i s included G r e e k , Latin A m e r i c a n and classical Indian dances, a karate demonstration by a group including eight black belts. B h a n g r a dances were performed by a student group w h o have only been practicing for a few months. T h e R e c t o r and 600 other people attended the event, w h i c h most regarded as the best international party so far, and the most popular event in the J C R this year.

Field Cup T H E A N N U A L Guilds Field C u p C o m p e t i t i o n was h e l d on W e d n e s d a y evening. A b o u t sixty people g r o u p e d i n twelve teams took par t. T h e w i n n e r s were B a r r y ' s Bashers, a n d they w i l l be presented w i t h the magnificent t r o p h y at the elections U G M . D u r i n g the c o m p e t i t i o n , two p a r t i c i p a n t s were arrested a n d charged w i t h theft. T h e purpose of the c o m p e t i t i o n is to visit ten specified pubs, a n d g a i n points by d r i n k i n g a n d finding treasure on the way.

Council Report I C C C o u n c i l met on M o n d a y evening. T h e D e p u t y President's proposals regulating finance, n a m e l y , to restrict the grounds on w h i c h clubs c o u l d c l a i m extra money, were defeated. It w a s d e c i d e d t h a t J o h n Passmore should become R e t u r n i n g O f f i c e r for the c o m i n g s a b b a t i c a l e l e c t i o n s as it w a s alleged that L i z L i n d s a y ' s friendship w i t h one c a n d i d a t e m i g h t m a k e her a p r i m e target for attacks i n F E L I X . T h e m o t i o n a l l o w i n g the H a n d b o o k E d i t o r six weeks i n F l a i l over the s u m m e r v a c a t i o n , p a i d for by I C U , was passed. II anyone else really wants to k n o w any more, then it w i l l be p u b l i s h e d next week.

FELIX, February 27,1981

Hustings Shocker A t yesterday's R C S U H u s t i n g s Meeting Christine Thompson one of two candidates for H J T (Honorary J u n i o r Treasurer) w i t h d r e w at t h e e n d o f h e r hustings speech. She said that if she'd w o n it w o u l d have been because she was a w o m a n , a n d that she thought C h a r l e s F u l l e r w o u l d do a better job t h a n she w o u l d have done. C h a r l e s F u l l e r was thus ratified for the " K a m i k a z e " post. T o m O w e n was ratified as A c a d e m i c Affairs Officer despite o n objection by G a r y T u r n e r , o n the grounds that he was an idiot. H e went o n to say " I f I ' d have k n o w n T o m O w e n was s t a n d i n g , I ' d have stood m y s e l f . A s k e d if he wished to c o m m e n t on the meeting, P a u l J o h n s o n , R C S V P , said " n o t p a r t i c u l a r l y " .

Sexy Sarah Romps Home N E X T Y E A R ' S London Student E d i t o r is to be S a r a h L e w t h w a i t e , c u r r e n t l y features e d i t o r o n the p a p e r . She was elected by eighteen votes to seven at the L o n d o n Student C o u n c i l M e e t i n g last T u e s d a y e v e n i n g , her r i v a l b e i n g D a v e Bennett, news editor. S a r a h is also C h a i r m a n of the London Student Journalists G r o u p , a n d her motto is " I ' l l do it i f n o b o d y else w i l l " . T h e m e e t i n g also decided to raise the s u b s c r i p t i o n for London Student by ' / p to 3p per copy. 2

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Letters to the Editor

more definitive guide to the art of f a r t i n g t h a n his. F o r those, w h o even i n this day a n d age, persist i n their prejudice against f a r t i n g , there is a c h a p t e r o n Ways of Disguising a Fart (chapter 12). T h i s w o r k of art is sheer pleasure to r e ad. A s the a u t h o r points out. " I t is indeed more important than people n o r m a l l y i m a g i n e , to k n o w h o w to fart i n the right w a y at the right time. A fart that tries v a i n l y to come out, A n d then turns back i n fury to send the flanks, O f t e n causes d e a t h . F o r the life o f a constipated m o r t a l t h r o u g h the d a r k p o r t a l entering, B y a F A R T let out i n t i m e m i g h t w e l l have been s a v e d . "

Continued from page 2. is a s h a m e f u l m a t t e r , dear reader, that in spite of your long experience o f f a r t i n g y o u still d o not k n o w h o w y o u fart, o r h o w y o u ought to fart. It is c o m m o n l y thought that farts differ o n ly i n size a n d that b a s i c a l l y they are a l l o f the same type. A gross e r r o r " ( D a l i , o p c i t , p217). T h e analysis o f M r S i m o n s is faulted by the same error. A s the l e a r n e d scholar points out, farts c a n be d i v i d e d into vocals, a n d mutes or silent c r e e p e r s . V o c a l f a r t s m a y be f u r t h e r d i v i d e d i n t o : (i) T h e P l e u r i - V o c a l o r B i g F a r t (further sub-divided into simple and dipthong or double-barrelled farts), a n d (ii) t h e S e m i - V o c a l or L i t t l e F a r t (further s u b - d i v i d e d into C l e a r , M e d i u m a n d Aspirated). " M u t e farts, v u l g a r l y k n o w n as silent creepers, h a v e n o s o u n d and comprise a small amount of very d a m p w i n d . I n L a t i n they are c a l l e d V i s i a , f r o m the v e r b visire; i n G e r m a n Fiesters; a n d i n E n g i s h , fitch or v e t c h " ( D a l i , op c i t , p234). T h e y m a y be either d r y o r s u n n y. T h e C o u n t further classifies a c c o r d i n g to the social status of people (followers of M a x W e b e r o u g h t to be p l e a s e d ) , g o i n g largely b y the subtle differences i n s m e l l . T h e categories he lists are: P r o v i n c i a l F a r t s , H o u s e h o l d Farts, M a i d e n ' s Farts, Fencing Masters' Farts, Y o u n g Ladies F a r t s , M a r r i e d W o m e n ' s Farts, Bourgeois W o m e n ' s F a r t s , P e a sant W o m e n ' s F a r t s , S h e p h e r desses' F a r t s , O l d W o m e n ' s Farts, Bakers' Farts, Clay Potters' F a r t s , W h o r e s ' F a r t s , C u c k o l d s ' Farts, Clerks' Farts, A c t o r s ' a n d Actresses' F a r t s a n d f i n a l l y , L e a r n e d M e n ' s Farts. I a m sure even M r S i m o n s w o u l d agree that this is definitely a

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( E m p h a s i s as i n t h e o r i g i n a l , D a l i , o p c i t , p p 217-8). Tours Sincerely Bharat Bhushan DSES P G Dear Sir Obviously M r Simons, author of last week's " D e f i n i t i v e G u i d e to F a r t i n g " is not a true devotee of the art o f f a r t i n g . I a m fully i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h his observations pathetic on the sometimes attempts of amateurs to " p i t c h " or " t e a s e " a fart, b u t I must strongly object to his a d v o c a t i n g r e b a s i n g a n S B D . . a n d then disclaiming it!! A s a founder m e m b e r of the F l a t u l e n c e is A r t f u l , R e l a x i n g a n d T r a n s c e n d e n t a l Soc. I a m therefore d r a f t i n g this short note to p o i n t o u t to y o u r readership that f a r t i n g s h o u l d be looked o n w i t h P R I D E , a n d not d e n i e d as a shy perversion. E x t e n s i v e field research has s h o w n that 9 9 . 9 % of the p o p u l a t i o n f a r t , so D O N O T B E A F R A I D ! Ignore M r Simons h e r e t i c a l a d v i c e a n d break forth. T h e w o r l d lies at y o u r feet (note: T h i s c o u l d also be d u e to the ' I r i s h M i s t ' , a strange c o n c o c t i o n p r o d u c e d as a result o f a peanut bu tte r a n d c h i l i sauce diet. It is often a c c o m p a n i e d b y severe blistering). Tours sincerely C o l i n Devey G e o l o g y II Dear Sir A l t h o u g h r e l u c t a n t to j o i n the ranks o f letters page c o n t r i b u t o r s I feel m o v e d to c o m m e n t o n the ' D e f i n i t i v e G u i d e to F a r t i n g ' p u b l i s h e d i n last week's F E L I X . It was e n c o u r a g i n g to f i n d some a t t e n t i o n b e i n g g i v e n to this m u c h m a l i g n e d pastime, b u t M r S i m o n ' s a r t i c l e p u t f o r w a r d only one of the facets of a r e w a r d i n g , though misunderstood hobby. While having compiled an excellent treatise o n the a u d i t o r y v a r i a t i o n s M r S i m o n s has p a i d

scant a t t e n t i o n to the olfactory nuances i n h e r a n t i n the raison d'etre o f the fart. A c e r t a i n i n d i v i d u a l i t y is a l w a y s i m p a r t e d to the bouquet by the p a r t i c u l a r gut flora of the performer. T h i s enables afficianadoes to p i n p o i n t the o r i g i n of a virtuoso rendition when modesty or unconsciousness prevents the o w n e r c l a i m i n g it. There are however several substances w h i ch will lend distinctive r e p r o d u c i b l e flavours to one's emissions. M a n y t r a d i t i o n a l beers have t h e i r o w n recognisable odours for instance, Wadworths O l d Timer, known as O l d F a r t b y regulars, w h i c h c a n be i d e n t i f i e d i n m i n u t e concentrations two hundred yards d o w n w i n d of m a n y W i l t shire pubs not to m e n t i o n the Anglesea A r m s . T h e c o m b i n a tion o f the c a l c i u m sulphate a n d yeast content of Bass found i n m a n y outlets p r o d u c e a n e m e n a tion c o m m o n to m a n y I C students. I a m surprised that the ' h i g h ' q u a l i t y of food i n the C o l l e g e refectories does not cause more motions to be passed at UGMs. W e l l k n o w n aromas (not necessarily a t t r i b u t a b l e to the substance after w h i c h they are named) i n c l u d e : The eggy one: this varety linger longer t h a n M u r r a y mints. The cabbagey one: savage! A r e a l swine. A i r w i c k s the o n l y answer. The beany one: binds c o v a l e n t l y to the nasal mucosa. really l o w , The yeasty one: L D banned by Porton D o w n . The butter curry: c o m b i n e d w i t h the b u r n t r i n g s y n d r o m e a n d the d e a d rat — c h a r c o a l u n d e r p a n t s a must for this one. 5 0

T h e S B D fart m a y e m b o d y a n y one of these b u t extensive research has p r o v e d the most vile farts to be those that are h e a r d as a soft p o p followed b y a hiss. A final comforting thought a t t r i b u t e d b y some to D r S a m u e l J o h n s o n : N o m a n c an n ot stand his o w n farts (or s o m e t h i n g like that). Tours fartfully P I Morris R e a l A l e Soc P u b l i c i t y Officer Sir A s residents of L i n s t e a d new block, we were most surprised to see y o u r front page article i n F E L I X 557 " I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e D o n accused o f b e i n g a n u r d ! " A l t h o u g h we are i n the h a b i t of d i s p l a y i n g messages, the one i n y o u r p h o t o g r a p h has never appeared o n o u r windows. Most of the p r i n t e d a r t i c l e is fabricated a n d has m i s l e d m a n y F E L I X readers. W e w o u l d like to stress a g a i n that the p h o t o g r a p h is a forgery a n d we d e m a n d a p r i n t e d apology.

FEUX, February 27,1981

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Tours R F i s h e r , et a l .

Dear Ed W e went r i g i d w h e n we saw the photo; it was like a bolt from the blue. W e d i d n ' t realise that the message h a d ever existed. H o w ever, we k n o w it must have a p p e a r e d as F E L I X is such a t r u t h f u l , honest, u p s t a n d i n g o r g a n o f the press, a n d w o u l d not p r i n t a pack o f filthy lies. A l t h o u g h we agree y o u have the intellect of a c a u l i f l o w e r a n d the a b i l i t y o f a m o l l u s c , a short glans at y o u r articles reveals a depth hitherto unknown in C o l l e g e (except i n the c a t e r i n g field). H o p e you're well The Dicks C l u b PS: W e c l a i m more readers t h a n FELIX. Dear Sir W e are w r i t i n g against W I S T b e i n g a l l o w e d to p u t o n their picket on Imperial College ground. Both men a n d women a t t e n d this College a n d both s h o u l d be a l l o w e d the same rights a n d status. P r e s e n t i n g w o m e n as mere pickets is both d e g r a d i n g a n d i n s u l t i n g to t h e n o r m a l w o m e n at this C o l l e g e (the ones w h o don't look like bus-conductors). M i n e s p o i n t e d out last year. T h e y also p o i n t e d o u t that a m a l e stripper was ridiculed i n the event, w h i c h w o u l d thus not be v i e w e d as sexist. H o w e v e r , f r o m a n R S M survey previous to the event, we f o u n d out that the w o m e n i n the audience v i e w e d the female stripper as a b i t of a joke a n d f o u n d the m a l e stripper's c h o p p e r t a n t a l i s i n g . W e are w e l l a w a r e t h a t the m e n to w o m e n ratio is r a t h e r large (as are most of the w o m e n ) b u t w o u l d like to point o u t that this problem will diminish if I C doesn't c o n t i n u e to offer services w h i c h e n h a n c e the image of women. W o m e n w h o cannot cope w i t h the p r o b l e m ought to j o i n W I S T a n d go p i c k e t i n g at M i n e s events a n d o n field trips to Y o r k s h i r e . W e agree that m e n s h o u l d not a c t u a l l y have to p a y to see a w o m a n n a k e d ; it s h o u l d be free. If anyone feels strongly against the picket they a r e w e l c o m e to (at) the M i n e s review o n F e b r u ar y 27 at 7:30pm. Signed Keith Maynard Crispin Dobson R o b Pascoe RSMU PS: W e w o u l d l i k e to t h a n k W I S T , to w h o m wc a r c e te r n al ly i n d e b t e d for their sincere cllbrts in p u b l i c i s i n g the M i n e s R e v i e w so effectively. Sir A s a n R S M U n i o n Officer, I s h o u l d like to d i s o w n myself from the letter b e i n g proffered lor your pages u n d e r the n a m e of R S M


E x e c . I feel the 'views' expressed i n the aforementioned letter do not represent the views of the m a j o r i t y of the members of R S M U n i o n , b u t m e r e l y those of a select few, a n d therefore s h o u l d most definitely not be signed i n the n a m e of the u n i o n . A f t e r a l l , w o u l d it not be better to defend the M i n e s R e v i e w for w h a t it is? T h a t is, a u n i o n event, designed to generate funds for the U n i o n , w h i c h w i l l be s u p p o r t e d because the m a j o r i t y of R S M students w i l l want to go. So w h y a l l this needless slander a n d back b i t i n g by our exec? J o h n Eagleson R S M Newsletter E d i t o r

Small Ads •Ford Escort van, 1300, M reg, year's MOT, good condition, £625ono. •Morris 1100 automatic, F regs. must sell £150ono. Ring 581 3165 after 6:00. •Fountain dancing can be funl •Central Stores require the assistance of twelve persons on Wednesday afternoon, March 11 for 2-3 hours. £2 per hour cash. Give your name to Stores Superintendent, int 2700. •Wanted: Swimmers to represent C&G in the Intercollegiate Gala (Monday, March 9). Contact Dave Roberts, ME3. •Can you play darts? I f you can, sign on for the Fremlin's (singles) or Scottish and Newcastle (doubles) tournaments. Details behind the Union Bar. Entries close February 28. •Nothing to do on Friday nights? Help desperately needed on Soup Run. See ICCAG article in this FELIX. •AMERICA: Want to work and travel in the US and Cartada next summer? For details of job schemes and woek visas contact BUNAC, Green Comm Room 3rd floor, Union B u i l d i n g, on Friday lunchtimes. •The Photosoc requet the pleasure of some customers. Old Darkroom, Beit Quad, 12:30-1:00pm. •Kirsten Pratt: Would you support her? If so meet her in Southside Upper Lounge, 12:30pm, TODAY! •Please is anyone willing to lend or hire an upright piano to Metallurgy and Materials Science Society for their magnificent evening of entertainment/annual dinner on March 12? Con tact Chris Ward, Metallurgy 3, Mines letter-rack. AND if you'd like to partici pate or just eat, drink and beastounded, tickets will be£3.50 (including meal and real ale, wine, cider,softdrinks)andwi be on sale soon!! Send your orders in NOW. •Ski Boots, size 6. Henke, 5 clips, £20 Contact Jo, 874-2470 after 7:00pm. •Three seater bike for sale or hire Contact Martin Taylor, DoC PG for details. Internal 4179. •Mike — I can't think of asmall ad to put in this week, so I won't bother — Andy

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2nd Robert Pryor Memorial Lecture British Steel in the80's and Beyond M r

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C h a i r m a n , M o n d a y , 6 : 3 0 p m

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Voyager scientist at IC D R G A R Y H U N T , the o n l y B r i t i s h scientist c u r r e n t l y i n v o l v e d i n the V o y a g e r space project, gave a lecture last week at I C o n his w o r k i n this field. T h e purpose of the V o y a g e r space craft is to investigate a n d c o m p a r e the two giants of the solar system, J u p i t e r a n d S a t u r n , a n d their satellites, i n p a r t i c u l a r T i t a n . D r H u n t o u t l i n e d the p a t h of the V o y a g e r II spacecraft by the use of some t r u l y r e m a r k a b l e slides taken by the V o y a g e r crafts. T h e d a t a o b t a i n e d by the spacecraft has given a w e a l t h of i n f o r m a t i o n o n the geophysical nature of J u p i t e r a n d S a t u r n . D r H u n t was p a r t i c u l a r l y excited by d a t a o b t a i n e d f r o m T i t a n , a satalite of S a t u r n . V o y a g e r II has shown that T i t a n has a p l a n e t a r y a t m o s p h e r e s i m i l a r to t h a t o f p r i m e v i l a r t h , a n d p e r h a p s m o r e i m p o r t a n t , simple h y d r o c a r b o n s have been detected i n d i c a t i n g the possibility of life. D r H u n t said that space h a d to be developed a n d that the returns were o n l y j u s t b e g i n n i n g to t r i c k l e i n . A d v a n c e s have been m a d e i n i n s t r u m e n t a t i o n a l l o w i n g satellites to be used more efficiently i n meterology. D r H u n t p r e d i c t e d that very soon, by means of the space shuttle, zero g r a v i t y space laboratories c o u l d be used to b u i l d things such as perfect crystals w h i c h w o u l d be useful i n microelectronics. D r H u n t then a d d e d that he w o u l d be p r e p a r e d to justify space on p u r e l y a c a d e m i c grounds. " W e must go out there a n d explore. W e are the C o l u m b u s e s a n d M a g e l l a n s of today a n d we must m a i n t a i n o u r pioneering spirit". W h e n questioned on w h a t w o u l d h a p p e n next D r H u n t said that V o y a g e r w o u l d a r r i v e at N e p t u n e i n 1989 b u t t h a t a l l f u t u r e p r o g r a m m e s , such as the G a l l i l e o D a p i t e r probe, w o u l d have to be reviewed i n the light of the recent R e a g a n s p e n d i n g cuts.

Raymond Baxter at IC

Pedalling for 24 hours L A S T W E E K E N D , thirty G u i l d s people went to B r i s t o l for the annual 24-hour Pedal C a r Race. T h e new car " S n o t g o b b l e r " was b u i l t at great speed, b u t , u n for tu n ately, c o u l d not c o n t i n u e i n the race for m o r e t h a n the first four laps. T h e men's t e a m c a m e fifth a n d the ladies t e a m c a m e in eighteenth o v e r a l l , a n d were the top ladies t e a m . T h e j o u r n e y to Bristol d i d not prove u n e v e n t f u l , as one d r i v e r fell asleep w h i l s t c r u i s i n g a l o n g the m o t o r w a y , however, no accidents o c c u r r e d . T o n y Heales, Pedal C a r C l u b C a p t a i n , expressed his thanks to a l l those w h o r a c e d , cooked, a n d h e l p e d , p a r t i c u l a r l y the d e p a r t m e n t of M e c h E n g .

Giles Shaw speaks Former Northern Ireland J u n i o r M i n i s t e r G i l e s S h a w , M P visited the C o l l e g e last T u e s d a y at the i n v i t a t i o n of the C o n s e r v a t i v e Society to give a talk o n ' T h e Last Eighteen M o n t h s in Northern Ireland'. M r Shaw, who became a j u n i o r E n v i r o n ment M i n i s t e r i n M r s T h a t c h e r ' s recent reshuffle, began by o u t l i n i n g the b a c k g r o u n d to the present s i t u a t i o n , and then proceeded to c o m m e n t o n the security a n d p o l i t i c a l issues i n the last eighteen months.

Raymond Baxter, ex-RAF pilot and BBC TV presenter was guest speaker at the Aeronautical Society Dinner last Friday. The Dinner was well attended and Mr Baxter's speech much appreciated.

C O N S O C SUPER SPECIAL

Meet THE Cabinet Come and hear Rt Hon Mark Carlisle, MP Secretary of State for Education on T U E S D A Y , M A R C H 3 at 1:00pm in Huxley 213. FELIX, February 27,1981

H e s a i d t h a t the l e v e l of t e r r o r i s t a c t i v i t y o v e r a l l was steadily d e c l i n i n g , w i t h terrorism confined to l i m i t e d areas. T h e police force was g r a d u a l l y t a k i n g o v e r s e c u r i t y d u t i e s f r o m the a r m y , w i t h the e v e n t u a l aims of restoring n o r m a l p o l i c i n g a n d the rule of l a w to the p r o v i n c e . MoreNorth/Southcooperation is c o m i n g about on security, a n d M r S h a w said he believed there was a greater u n d e r s t a n d i n g b y the R e p u b l i c of the N o r t h ' s problems a n d a willingness to w o r k together to defeat t e r r o r i s m . O n the p o l i t c a l front, M r S h a w said it was almost impossible to distinguisharoute toacompromise s o l u t i o n of N o r t h e r n Ireland's c o m p l e x problems, but that governments must continue a l o n g the ' t h o r n y r o a d ' i n a n effort to find a solution because the troubles are not g o i n g to go a w a y . T h e audience of a b o u t fifty was t h e n g i v e n a c h a n c e to question M r S h a w .

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The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is a showcase for original productions, and this year IC Dramsoc is to be on display. If you wish us to consider one of your works then contact us on internal 2854 or in the storeroom (Union East Staircase) by March 11. The plays must be for a small cast (up to eight) preferably in one scene with a minimum of props (we have to get it Edinburgh)! It would help if costumes are cheap (e.g. modem dress). The meeting where the plays will be chosen will be in the Lower Refectory on Tuesday, March 17. Good Luck. Graham Brand President, Dramsoc

UROP summer jobs The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme is beginning to attract sponsorship from outside organisations and, firms. This will take the form of contributing towards the cost of a student working on his UROP project during the summer vacation. To qualify for support a student must have 'joined up' under the UROP scheme during the academic year and, together with his supervisor, make a proposal for a summer research programme. If it is accepted UROP will pay for a shared room in a Student House for up to ten weeks, plus pocket money at a level negotiated by the student with UROP and his supervisor. So far we have offers of funding from four different organisations, in some cases for a particular range of projects. Offers will be posted on the UROP noticeboard on level two walkway outside the JCR. For further details contact: Professor J C Anderson, Electrical Engineering.

Consoc Opinion Poll Between January 28 and February 11, members of C o n s o c have been asking residents of Falmouth and Tizard Halls their opinion on matters both inside and outside College. We visited 101 people (consisting 65 first years, 28 second and third years and 8 PGs) and asked them 17 questions divided into 5 sections. Section 1: Sabbatical Officers' Popularity The most remarkable feature of this section was that nearly half those questioned were unable to give an opinion on John Passmore's performance, and nearly two-thirds on Rae Snee and Liz Lindsay. Of those expressing a view, people were more or less evenly divided on Passmore and Snee, and strongly in favour of Lindsay. Ignorance certainly wasn't a problem with Steve Marshall, with only one sixth of the people not giving an opinion. The remainder approved of K E Y : S-Satisfied,

his performance by a majority of a little under 2 to 1. It is worth remembering that the poll was predominated by first years who have no standard of comparison by which to judge the sabbaticals' performances. Thus further analysis of the results (ignoring don't knows) shows first years slightly, in favour of Passmore and seconds and thirds slightly against. Firsts were slightly against Snee, and second and thirds about even. With Lindsay both groups approved of her performance, the second and thirds to a much stronger extent. Both sections approved of Marshall, the first years more strongly so. Section 2: Performance of Marshall This section aimed to find out whether people approved of Marshall printing the controversial 'New Years Honours Shock' in FELIX, January 9. As expected, most people had read the article,

D—Dissatisfied, DK—Don't Know, Y-Yes, N-No, T-Total

1.1 Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with John Passmore as President? 1.2 Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with Rae Snee as DP? 1.3 Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with Liz Lindsay as Hon Sec? 1.4 Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with Steve Marshall as FELIX Editor? 2.1 Did you read the article about Mooney in FELIX called"New Years Honours Shock"? 2.2 (If Yes) Do you think Marshall was right to print the article whether it was humourously intended or not? on 2.3 Was Pub Board too harsh, too lenient or correct, in asking Marshall apologise publicly and privately to Mooney.

S

D

26 19 30

26 22 9

49 60 62

DK

101 101 101

T

55

29

17

101

Y

N

DK

T

90

11

101

56

26

8

90

TH 31

C 43

TL 4

DK 6

Y

N

DK

T

3.1 Do you believe in principle that there should be re-apps in IC Halls and Houses? 3.2 Do you think students should have the main say in who the re-apps are? 3.3 Should the wardens have the power of veto on re-apps?

77

19

5

101

63 59

25 32

13 10

101 101

4.1 Are you aware of proposals that maintenace grants might be replaced by a part loan, part grant system in 1982? 4.2 (If Yes) Do you know what that might entail? 4.3 (If Yes) Are you in favour of such a system in principle?

81 56 10

20 25 43

— 3

101 81 56

60

28

13

101

21

70

10

101

46

35

17

101

49

35

17

101

5.1 In your opinion, would Britains national security be threatened by undertaking unilateral disarmament? 5.1 and would such a course of action encourage other countries to discard nuclear weapons? 5.3 Should Britain allow American Cruise missiles to be stationed here? 5.4 and should Britain go ahead with building Trident submarines as her own nuclear deterrent? Page 6

FELIX, February 27,1981

Bookshop News Penguin New Titles • February 1981 Social History The History of Myddle

Publication date 26

Richard Gough £2.50

Fiction Schultz — JP Donleavy £1.50 Burger's Daughter — Nadine Gordimer £1.95 Grendel — John Gardner £1.25 Malcolm — James Purdy £1.95 Tales from the Little World of Don Camillo — Giovanni Guareschi £1.25 Pelican You and Your Heart — Paul Kezdi £1.75 Statistics Without Tears — Derek Rowntree £1.95 Betrayal of Innocence — Forwardd & Buck £1.95 Reference Penguin Dictionary of Microprocessors — Anthony Chandor £2.25 Advance Information Book Sale: April 27 — May 8

and of these, nearly two-thirds approved of him printing the article, humourously intended or not. Having said that, most also thought Pub Board was correct in asking Marshall apologise publicly, and privately to Mr Mooney. A substantial minority (one third) felt, however, that Pub Board was too harsh to do this. Section 3: ReappKcants in IC Halls and Houses Here, we wanted to find out what students feel about the problem of whether or not some people should get second years in residence, and it produced some of the clearest response of the poll. (It is worth remembering that the respondents were Hall residents, and the results should be interpreted with that in mind). Over three-quarters felt there should be reapps in residence. Lesser, but still clear-cut majorities, felt that students should have the main say in who the reapps are and that the wardens should have the power of veto on reapps. Section 4: Student Loans This part was designed to assess (i) the level of ignorance about the possibility of student loans being introduced in the next couple of years and (ii) what people thought of the idea. We discovered that 20 of the 101 hadn't heard of the proposals, and a further 25 didn't know what that could entail. The remaining 56 split roughly 4 to 1 against the idea. Section 5: Nuclear Weapons Here, Consoc wanted to know what students felt about various aspects of this controversial subject. Firstly, excluding don't knows, more than two-thirds felt Britain's national security would be threatened if we undertook unilateral nuclear disarmament, and over three-quarters thought that such a course of action wouldn't encourage other countries to discard nuclear weapons. Again, after getting rid of don't knows, small majorities approved both of Cruise missiles being here and of Britain building Trident submarines. The poll obviously has limitations, namely that the respondents were mainly first years, and all were in Hall. However, going round Halls means you get to see a random sample of students, that you don't do the same person twice, and that usually you see the student individually, so that you get a single person's view rather than a group's view, which you might get going round the JCR at lunchtime. say. This article aims merely to present the results, not to interpret them, and interested people and groups can draw their own conclusions about them. Thanks are due to John Webley, Ian Stockdale, John Patterson, Mark Clegg, William Cortazzi and Geoff Knox for giving up their spare time to help. Tim Lawes Maths 3


Campaign Coffee W H E N Y O U B U Y a jar of instant coffee, only about 37% of what you pay will get back to the country from which the coffee beans came. About 10% will go to the retailer, and the rest will go to Nestles, General Foods, or Brooke B o n d Liebig if you buy a "brand name", or to J Lyons or C o c a C o l a L t d if you buy a supermarket "own label". It is in processing the coffee that the profits lie. S o , i n t h e o r y , if t h e p r o d u c i n g c o u n t r i e s processed their coffee themselves, they would make more money. In practice, however, they run into problems with the multinational corporations ( M N C s ) , who may object to "unfair" c o m p e t i t i o n . W h e n B r a z i l i a n s olu ble coffee companies captured 15% of the American instant coffee market, General Foods complained to the U S G o v e r n m e n t w i t h t h e r e s u l t t h a t the Government threatened to cut off aid and not to renew the International Coffee Agreement (ICA). T h e s e c o m p a n i e s c a n have m o r e p o w e r i n s h a p i n g s o m e c o u n t r i e s destinies t h a n their governments — but, as in Britain, a lot of the leaders of these c o u n t r i e s have also been company directors, which is' why the M N C s never come under effective fire. Although the producing countries only receive 37% of what you pay, it makes up more than a quarter of the export earnings of eleven out of the fifty producing countries — all Third World. In Burundi, it accounted for 83% of export earnings for 1972-77. Coffee, whilst in no way essential to the survival of its consumers, nor the M N C s , is crucial to a producing nation's economy. Although various I C A s have been made to try to get a better deal for the producing countries, this non-essentiality to the consumers coupled with the fact that coffee beans r o t if s t o c k - p i l e d for t o o l o n g , means that the producing nations cannot withold the coffee until prices go up, as is done with oil (although, after oil, coffee is the most valuable commodity traded internationally). Also, as the 1977 crisis showed, most of us start questioning our "need" for coffee if shop prices rise by more than a few pence. The M N C s can weather crises like these — for example, in 1977, Brooke B o n d Liebig's profits only dropped from £49 to £41. Nestle is the s e c o n d largest f o o d c o m p a n y in the w o r l d (Unilever is the largest) with an annual turnover in 1977 of about £550m — larger than the gross international product ( G N P ) of 51 out of 53 A f r i c a n c o u n t r i e s a n d 21 times the size of Tanzania's total world sales. In 1963, soon after independence, the new Tanganyikan government decided, in conjunction with its policy of self-reliance, to reap the profits of processing the coffee itself. But, along with equipment p r o b l e m s , they have also had marketing ones. Although Nestle's were called in to provide management and marketing skills training, Nestles "assistance" has still not found adequate outlets for Tanzania's admittedly more expensive, but high quality instant coffee, nor for helping to train Tanzanians to continue the work. The cost of Nestles expertise to a country w h i c h still h a s a c l e a n water s u p p l y a n d a d i s p e n s a r y as p r i o r i t i e s f o r every village is immense; but T a n z a n i a cannot afford to do without it as it is the western nations who have the necessary technology and access to markets. Until recently Tanzanian instant coffee has only been marketed in Zambia, K e n y a and Tanzania itself as "Africafe". It is now available in Britain as "Campaign Coffee" and can be bought from Campaign Co-op, 52 Acre Lane, London, SW11. O n Friday, February 27, there will be a stall in the J C R selling the coffee during lunchtime. Also on T u e s d a y , M a r c h 3, at 6:30pm i n the G r e e n Committee Room, as speaker from "Campaign C o - O p " will be giving a lecture in the exploitation of workers in the coffee plantations and how we should stop supporting the multinationals and help the developing countries instead. The cost of the coffee will be £1 for a lOOg packet Jan Czernuszka

ICCAG E V E R Y F R I D A Y N I G H T at about 10:30 they used to pack into Falmouth Kitchen as best they c o u l d — the w e e k l y c r o w d of e n t h u s i a s t i c souprunners. Some were old hands. Some were "socially aware". Others still were third years who'd never heard of a soup run. Some just didn't want to go to bed, while others wanted to meet different and interesting people. A n d some just came for the drive round London. But whatever their reasons, they've stopped coming, except for a small handful, who obviously can't be expected to come every week. Why don't you come? In case you don't know, people on the Soup Run go to various locations in London in a van, armed with urns of hot soup, loaves of bread, and packets of biscuits, which they distribute to those who sleep rough, perhaps chatting to them for a while as well. Normally back at College before 1:00am. It's c e r t a i n l y a n e y e - o p e n i n g a n d interesting night out. Meet in the kitchen, Falmouth Hall, Southside at about 10:30pm every Friday — at least give it a try!

Phil Lloyd Appeal Phil Lloyd was an undergraduate at Imperial College from 1969 to 1972 and a postgraduate from 1972 to 1976. To those of us who know Phil Lloyd as a student at Imperial College, the news of his accident and the resulting permanent disability came as a great shock. Phil was one of the brightest students in his year, and during his time as an undergraduate, followed by postgraduate research, made many friends at Imperial College. His individual flair was automative engineering. This expertise is not bottled up in his mind; ideas are waiting to find a way onto the drawing board as P h i l is t o t a l l y p a r a l y s e d f r o m t h e n e c k downwards. W e can help Phil by raising money to purchase a mouth-stick operated X - Y plotter (£460) plus any o t h e r c o m p u t e r a i d s f o r t h e s e v e r e l y handicapped that are available. The experience he gains in developing techniques in this new field will help others similarly handicapped. I i n t e n d to r u n i n L o n d o n ' s first P e o p l e ' s Marathon on M a r c h 29 1981 (26+ miles) from G r e e n w i c h to T h e M a l l . S p o n s o r s h i p o n a mileage-covered basis could raise the money he needs to get this project moving. If you would like to help to raise money for the Phil Lloyd Appeal I would like to hear from you. Peter Saunders M e c h Eng Dept

SF Sock IT W A S A N early afternoon in February and the clocks weren't striking at all. Fortunately, neither were the authors of the S F Soc Bulletin, which this week comes from the pen of Mark Jeffcock, the paper of Ken Mann, the subconscious of J o h n Chamberlain, and the angst of Elise Pechersky. For those of you who dislike in-jokes, that wasn't one, so hard luck. L o v e a n d kisses to A f r o - C a r i b S o c from Jonathan's stunt hairdresser. Cynicism is Naive. The committee for less sense in S F Sock bulletins has ceased control of this report due to its disgust at the rampant eroticism prevalent in K e n ' s knees. Chris Priest. Sorry about the previous sentence but I was told to mention an author. T H I S IS A L M O S T A S FEUX,

February

27,1981

DISJOINTED A S Lot of rot, my whole life has been like that. Have you ever read Flight 714 by Herge! Anyway Arthur C Clarke's just a figurehead. A FELIX L E A D ARTICLE I don't know what to write. Actually I was enjoying myself with Ken's knees, but my hands were controlled. A n d now a quote from Mark's watch 16.8938. Thank-you. Concealed deep within the heart of this bulletin lies a sentence composed by Steve Higgins the Sage of Salford. T o find it; scan all sentences with a pretentiometer. This sentence though short, has the highest reading. A n d now here are the main points again. We're showing the Rocky Horror Picture Show on March 10. We're going to the One Tun in Farringdon, for further details come to a L I B R A R Y M E E T I N G on F R I D A Y S at 12:46 in S O U T H S I D E U P P E R L O U N G E . We've also done something actually connected with S F . Y e s , two authors are coming to College. Chris Priest early next term and J O H N S L A D E K at the end of this term. Yes, J O H N S L A D E K , author of the Steam Driven Boy, Keep the Giraffe Burning, The Muller-Focker Effect, the Reproducing Machine, The New Apocrypha and Roderick. A n d now an extract from a Vladivar Vodka Ad. Well, we're coming to the end now, so we'll say goodbye. Goodbye. The Gunslinger's Osteopath John (the man without a nickname) Chamberlain K e n (the man without qualities) M a n n , and Yetta (Swordmistress of Chaos). All items in bold contain information.

Patrick Moore will speak to Astrosoc on The

Planet

M a r s

6:30pm Friday, February 27

in Physics LT1 BE

THERE!

Amnesty International E A R L I E R T H I S M O N T H , the IC A m n e s t y I n t e r n a t i o n a l G r o u p learnt that its a d o p t e d prisoner Ngimbi Mbaki was released from jail in Zaire. He was arrested in M a r c h 1980, probably for attending illegal meetings or for belonging to an illegal political party. It should be noted that opposition political parties are banned under the Zairean constitution. He was not charged nor b r o u g h t to t r i a l , a l t h o u g h de te n ti o n w i t h o u t charge or trial is supposedly restricted to five days, and Amnesty International have reason to believe that p o l i t i c a l p r i s o n e r s in Z a i r e a r e routinely ill-treated and beaten. A s he was the adopted prisoner of the College's Group, letters were written to senior government officials in Zaire requesting further information and asking them to look into the matter, and the campaign, which was carried out together with an Amnesty G r o u p in Austria, was ended when news was received of his release. Last year the G r o u p had two adopted prisoners released from Zimbabwe and Indonesia. Anyone who is interested in the Amnesty International Organisation, is welcome at the weekly meeting o n Tuesday, 5:30pm in the Green C o m m i t t e e R o o m , t o p f l o o r of t h e U n i o n Building. Page 7


Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Scheme is a programme of sparetime activities available to young people between the ages of fourteen and twenty-five, designed to encourage a spirit of voluntary service, self reliance and perseverance, a sense of responsibility to the community and the acquisition of vocational skills The Award Scheme relies upon adult help for its implemenation and promotion — adults who are not necesarily connected with schools or youth organisations. For overseas students currently in the UK wishing to learn m o r e about the A w a r d Programme overseas and for those people intending to spend some time in a country other than the UK (perhaps on teaching contracts or Voluntary Service Overseas), two training courses are being held this year near London. Monday, 13 to Wednesay 15 July: Green Park Training Centre, Aston Clinton, Aylesbury. Wednesday, 16 to Friday, 18 December: Easthampstead Park, Wokingham, Berkshire. Both courses will be residential with a nominal charge of £15.00 per person including all meals and accommodation at the course centre. If you would like to attend please write to Adrian Goodworth, Overseas Executive, Duke of Edinburgh's Award, 5 Prince of Wales Terrace, Kensington, London W8 5PG (telephone 01 937 5205) before May 31 1981.

fkjnt

IC Baha'i Society Inter-Caiary Days Celebration

in Sherfield Great Hall at 7:30pm S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 28

Mozart

Requiem From

Scratch

Join ICSO and IC Choir on Sunday, March 8 from 10:30 to 4:00 in the Great Hallf. from 10:30 to 4:00 in the Great Hall. Do join us. YouH enjoy singing with us, you'll be made very welcome.

Antimalarial Prophylaxis T h e a d v i c e o n the d o s e of M a l o p r i m ( P y r i methamine and dapsone) has been changed since the original advice which was given in October 1980. Until further notice, take one tablet of Malprim a week before gong to Kenya, Central and South America and Asia (including Asia Minor), and then take one tablet every Sunday, and continue for six weeks after you come home.

Natural

History

Society A D A Y T R I P to Virginia Water this Saturday has been organised by the Natural History Society. Virginia Water is a flooded valley which is used as a West L o n d o n reservoir. It is o n the edge of Windsor Great Park and is a managed estate c o m p r i s i n g of areas of d e c i d u o u s trees a n d c o m m o n land. T h e a r e a is of p a r t i c u l a r interest to the ornithologist and botanist. The valley gardens contain foreign plants, many of which are labelled, and there is a possibility of observing Mandarin ducks, Hawfinches and other winter migrants. A walk of about five miles is expected and walking boots or strong shoes are advised. A packed lunch may be taken or food may be obtained at the pub. W e shall meet at Virginia W a t e r S t a t i o n at 10:00am a n d later at the Wheatsheaf Hotel car park (map ref T Q 982688) at 10:30am for the start of the walk. Time of Trains BR Station Departure Waterloo 09.22 Richmond 09.37

Arrival 09.58 09.58

Cost £4.00 £1.50

S t u d e n t R a i l c a r d s halve the c o s t . R e t u r n trains from Virginia Water, ten minutes past every hour. If you have any enquiries see Nick Grattan, Life Sci 3, S J Slade, Life S c i 2.

Visits frtends

f)0dw

hi the street the last revellers were wending their various •jfays home. The public house was shut; its clientele well satisfied. Zacharee Hellebore climbed over the stile on the <ith which led dawn to the railway. The seasonal rain had made the ground treacherous and as he passed the Curious Stones he slipped and fell, covering himself from head to foot in slough. His inebriation did not allow him to register his state and his wife was thus caused to make derogatory remarks.

The railway line; Zacharee has crossed some time before and all that is left to show where he has passed are a few spots of mud on the silvery rails. Here by the Une it is quiet; a lone fox scurries down the bank to the fence and hops over the lowest rung. Just a slight sulphurous odour indicates that the train has been here. And now it has gone, Aunt Deidre too, and the village is at rest.

The very last episode Page 8

FELIX, February 27,1981


2. Distribute the diminished grant equitably among schools; thus those who have a high proportion of overseas students would be cut most e.g. S O A S . 3. C u t each school equally by about 15-20%. This is a policy of 'pernicious anaemia'. The implementation of either of these solutions would lead to a possible 15% reduction in wages and s a l a r i e s e x p e n d i t u r e . T h e c h o i c e being between fewer and smaller departments. Smaller d e p a r t m e n t s a r e u n d e s i r a b l e p r i m a r i l y for academic reasons i.e. same number of lectures for fewer students, isolation of staff, replacement of staff in specialised fields, etc.

OLD PREVEfiS/MS

d M B 3 o

3 Committee on Academic Organisation This Committee was set up about this time last year within the non-medical side of the university to consider and recommend in broad terms what redeployment of resources available for nonmedical studies within the University should be adopted in order to maintain academic excellence in its teaching and research, having regard to the need to make financial economics and to attempt to safeguard the future of all staff employed within the University. T h e c o m m i t t e e have r e c e n t l y p r o d u c e d a 'Discussion document' which is fairly detailed in its f i n a n c i al e s t i m a t i o n s a n d in the o p t i o n s a v a i l a b l e . It is u n f o r t u n a t e h o w e v e r that throughout the document most references and statistics are made about 'the non-medical of the University (excluding Imperial College)'. This happens because IC is funded directly from the University Grants Committee ( U G C ) while the other colleges which are funded by the U G C through the Court of the University. Thus the document would appear to have little direct relevance to IC but on reading through it, it becomes obvious that the problems that face the rest of the University are the problems that face IC also, although to a varying extent. T h e D i s c u s s i o n D o c u m e n t o u t l i n e s the financial prospects which have resulted from various Governmental decisions. The drop in U G C income to the non-medical University (excluding IC) will be 17.6% by 1982/3. T h i s will o c c u r b e c a u s e the G o v e r n m e n t is removing that part of the Treasury Grant to the U G C which has in the past kept overseas student tuition fees below the 'full cost' rate. Thus if all overseas students remained and paid the 'full economic cost' to study here the grant would not decrease. Overseas student numbers have dropped and it is assumed by the Committee that they drop by 50%. The Committee estimates that the drop in student numbers in London will be about 10% and the drop in income will be 15%. The other main threat to income is in birthrate which produces a consequent drop in numbers of eighteen year-olds, so that by 1995/6 the number of eighteen year-olds will be 69% of today's number. This fall is mainly in the lower social classes which are less likely to send students to University. Also the cash limits policy which presently applies will cause a reduction in real grant if pay i n c r e a s e s are a b o v e the p e r c e n t a g e r e c o m mended by Government. The Committee then ask if their assessment is correct and if so how are the problems to be solved. There are constraints on any action taken. F i r s t l y t h e s c h o o l s of the U n i v e r s i t y are constitutionally autonomous but the financial decisions can be taken by the C o u r t . Secondly there is the principle of 'academic tenure' i.e. when a lecturer is appointed he can remain until retirement â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is the basis of the contract and as such, reduction or redeployment of staff is difficult to say the least. Lastly there is a natural resistance to change. The possible solutions are: 1. D o nothing! This is not really viable.

The methods by which staff can be reduced are N a t u r a l W a s t a g e a n d f r e e z i n g of p o s t s , Voluntary Retirement or Redundancy. Natural wastage would take a long time to implement and mainly senior staff would be affected. This would mean that senior staff would account for less than 40% of all staff as is laid down by U G C . Voluntary retirement would cost too much. Redundancy might be least harmful. But again the q u e s t i o n of A c a d e m i c T e n u r e a r i s e s . Termination of contract may lead to court action for wrongful dismissal. A special fund would be r e q u i r e d . A l r e a d y the C V C P ( C t t e e V i c e C h a n c e l l o r s a n d P r i n c i p a l s ) has a s k e d the Government to set up a special redundancy fund for universities. H O U J it affects IC The Discussion Document itself refers to IC very little but the financial problems faced by the University are faced on a lesser scale here. A t F i n a n c e a n d E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e s staff redundancies were well discussed; one problem being that the time will come when the College does not have the money to make redundancies. That time is not far off. Overseas student numbers here have fallen to 771 (994 in 1979/80; 1,074 in 1978/9). T h e proportion of overseas students now at College is 16.9% (21.3% in 1979/80; 2 3 . 1 % in 1978/9). Numbers will continue to fall for at least a further two years by which stage the 'full cost' fees will have been implemented. In effect the lack of overseas students (and their fees) and the lack of money from Government will have a serious effect on the College and on the University. The Government does not realise the seriousness of the problem which its own policy imposes on universities. What happens in the rest of the University will not affect IC financially. Perhaps we are better off as our future is in our own hands unlike some of the smaller colleges who may face closure by the University. The discussions in IC which have been initiated bv the Swinnerton-Dver discussion document are those which would lead to independence from the University. This would remove the University administration and leave us as a University in our own right validating our own degrees, etc. For IC Union it raises the question of facilities w h i c h we s h a r e as p a r t of the U n i v e r s i t y particularly sporting facilities. It also raises the problem of the voice the Union has in student matters which has been channelled through U L U in the past. Responses to the Discussion Document must be returned by M a r c h 31. It will be discussed in College at Board of Studies and Governing Body before then. We will discuss it at External Affairs and Council with the odd O P E N Meeting for good measure on Wednesday, M a r c h 4. in the Lower Refectory at 7:00pm.

TONIGHT!!!!! Mines Revue

S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 28 Inter C C U M o n o p o l y , 10:00am, I C U Office Monday, March 2 Elections. V o t i n g in all d e p a r t m e n t s . Tuesday, March 3 Results U G M , 1:00pm, P h y s i c s L T 1 . Friday, M a r c h 6 R a g R a c e starts 2:00pm.

D U E T O the success o f the breakfast before St V a l e n t i n e ' s R a g , a n o t h e r b r e a k f a s t w i l l be provided in the R C S U Office between 9:00 and 10:00am before the M o n o p o l y for all R C S competitors Cost will be minimal and everyone will be able t o participate in the monopoly well nourished. I hope everyone who came to the Hustings U G M yesterday has decided who they are going to vote for. Voting will be on Monday and there will be a ballot box in each department. Y o u must have your unioncard in order to vote. The Swimming G a l a is coming up soon. If anyone is interested in swimming for R C S please contact Rich Archer in the R C S U Office or 388 Keogh. See you for breakfast. PJ F r i d a y , F e b r u a r y 27 P a p e r s D o w n , 5:30pm S a t u r d a y , r e b r u a r y 28 M o n o p o l y R,ig C o l l e c t i o n Sunday, March 1 E l e c t i o n B a r Night A n d Dave's H e a d Shaving Friday, March 6 J C R Party Friday, 6 to S u n d a y 8 Rag Race Saturday, M a r c h 7 E l ect io n R a g C o l l e c t i o n T u e s d a y , M a r c h 10 Election U G M

T O D A Y is your last chance if you want to stand for a n E x e c p o s t . O n e p r o p o s e r a n d t e n seconders are required; the papers are on the noticeboard next to the clock in M e c h Eng. Meet in the I C U Office at 9:30am for Monopoly Rag and 2:00pm for the Rag Race, and at 9:30 in the Guilds Office for the Election Rag Collection. Full details from Ruth. Dave's head will be shaved in the U n i o n Bar at the Election Bar Night which starts at 7:30pm. The J C R Party will start at 8:00pm and includes "Tenpole Tudor". Details and tickets (75p each) from Guilds Office. The Hustings for Exec posts will be followed by voting at the Election U G M . Be there at 12:45 in Mech Eng 220, to use your vote.

F r i d a y , F e b r u a r y 27 M i n e s Review S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 28 Monopoly Rag Collection Saturday, M a r c h 7 N o t t i n g h a m 7's Rag Trip F r i d a y , 6 t o S u n d a y 8, M a r c h Rag M a g Race Monday, March 2 Elections p a p e r s go u p . T u e s d a y , M a r c h 17 Elections Brighton T r i p

JCR 7.30p.m. BAR EXTENSION Tickets on the door ÂŁ1 FEUX, February 27,1981

Page 9


Compiled by Phil Web< V U W W U W I f W W W W W U W l / W W l f ^

Results: Hockey IC Guilds Football IC 1st IC2nd IC3rd IC6th Rugby IC 1st IC2nd Basketball IC 1st V

Wednesday,

February

18

LSE RCS

7-1 2-0

LH LH Goldsmith Westminster

3-0 6-0 0-4 f3-0

V

Thames Poly Thames Poly

14-11 9-8

V

Kingston Poly

V V

V V V V

V

78-128

Football Sixths WITH one minute of the game left the referee awarded the Sixths a penalty. The crowd was iiushed as Barton stepped up, the atmosphere was electric. Slowly Dick moved towards the

ball as the Westminster goalkeeper fidgetted nervously on his line. Then Dick struck the ball sweetly towards the corner of the net but the Westminster goalkeeper leapt to his left and palmed the ball off for a corner. However, the Sixths managed to hold on to their six goal lead until the final whistle. In fact this was the Sixths biggest win of the season. Chamberlain scored the first after the Westminister goalkeeper could only parry Martin's shot. Haberlin was the next to score with a fine header from a corner. It was following another corner that Chamberlain scored the third goal after Haberlin headed against the bar. The Sixths continued to dominate the game with Martin outstanding in mid-field. Roche added a fourth with a header f r o m c l o s e r a n g e but d e s p i t e f u r t h e r pressure the score was four-nil at half-time. In the second half, playing against the wind, the Sixths created fewer chances. After a quarter of an hour Coussens scored the fifth goal following a fine solo run. The game then stagnated for a period and all credit should be given to Higham, Haberlin, Bradley and Davies in the defence for coping admirably with Westminster's occasional breaks. The sixth goal came midway through the second half when R o c h e ' s powerful c r o s s was deflected into the net by a Westminster defender. IC continued to press forward but did not add to their score. T E A M : Hampton, Higham, Haberlin, Davies, Tinkler, Martin, Coussens, Roche, Chamberlain.

Bradley, Gartside,

Fencing O U R return match with K i n g s C o l l e g e , London, on home ground was overall, as successful as our away match had been. We fielded two foil teams of four members each — the A team and a mixed ability B team — together with one E p e e team of three members. I'm afraid that our sabre team was yet again disappointed as no opposition sabre team was available — bad luck lads. The Epee team came up against particularly tough opposition and lost 6-3, the same score as in the away match. On a more optimistic note, both foil teams won convincingly. The A team conceded only 6 out of 16 bouts, Chris Wachnicki remaining unbeaten. The whole team produced highly entertaining fights with some beautiful hits — pity we didn't bring a camera. The B team were also on good form, Johnathon Reed winning all of his bouts. Special congratulations are due to Hugh MacGillivray, who, in his first match, won three out of his four fights with some very neat blade work; well done Hugh. Thanks are due to Phil Bird who presided most ably over the B team match and did all the general dogsbody work on the evening. Foil A (10-6) Team: Bird, Crisp, Parker, Wachnicki. Foil B Team (12-4): MacGillivray, Reed, Spottiswoode, Tsui. E p e e T e a m (3-6): Collins, Perkins, Wachnicki.

Camborne Weekend L A S T weekend saw the massed heathens from a certain Mining polytechnic in Cornwall sent back west with little more than a narrow victory in one out of six events. The competitions began well on Friday evening with a resounding 5-0 victory in the squash. It's been several years since RSM came out top, and there was certainly no better way to get things back on the right track. Congratulations to the team led by Dave Molesworth and ably backed up by Ralph David, John Stocks (repeating third year for the e i g h t e e n e th time). R i c h Thompson, and Mark Patterson. No problems were had in the table tennis with Rich Fifieid (ULU number one) leading tiie way. The only criticism is that C S M won two out of ten games. The one disappointing event of the evening was the badminton held in the Great Hall. Hard luck to the six RSM players who were narrowly edged 4-5 into second place. With the tension gradually mounting, the football and hockey teams with the more dedicated R S M supporters left the Union early on Saturday morning. C S M decided, unlike previous years, to bring a hockey team with them. After a quick start by R S M and a gradual takeover of control the result was never in question after I went two up midway t h r o u g h the second half. With several players having to play out of position the final performance was quite creditable. Maybe the C S M will think twice before bringing another team up to Harlington. By one o'clock the number of supporters had grown sufficiently for there to be a cuptie atmosphere during the football. The C S M ware revoltingly noisey after a first minute goal, but were soon shut up by an overwhelming barrage on their defence. By halftime R S M were three up. Was it c o m p l a c e n c y or sympathy that allowed C S M to pull two goals back? No, it flags 10

Wham!!! Dashing heriocs on the hockey field. just made their inevitable defeat that more d i s h e a r t e n i n g . R S M , c a p t a i n e d by T o m Hanke, performed magnificently. Even though the RSM were now 4-1 up in the match results, the success of the whole weekend hinged very much on the result of the Bottle match. The tension before the game in the changing room was unbearable and the atmosphere electric. The game proved to be very hard indeed, as c a n be s e e n in the n u m b e r of injuries received. Two C S M players had to be taken off concussed and one with a broken jaw. Furthermore the C S M winger flaked out after the game; he was also concussed. Doug Mcintosh had to be led off with ten minutes to go with a twisted ankle. The only scoring in the first half was an excellent penalty goal by Keith Maynard. Keith had an excellent game and his kicking was superb and did much to inspire the team to go forward. FEUX, February 27,1981

Good defensive work in the second half saw RSM soak up a lot of pressure and gradually more into attack. Mark Daniels and Ray Parkinson were stopped just a yard short in a period of sustained R S M pressure. Eventually a line out on the C S M line led to M c i n t o s h g o i n g over for the first try, beautifully converted by Maynard. From the kick-off a certain C S M prop reverted to low flying head-butts and succeeded in breaking his jaw and s t o p p i n g the game for six minutes. The' result was never in question now and only complacency allowed C S M to score an unconverted try in the last minute Although the game was a bit scrappy at times it was hard fought with total commitment from both sides. The Dinner to follow was a rather rowdy affair with C S M proving what animals they really are. The Bottle was duly returned to the Union Bar on Sunday and now RSM can say: "Didn't we stuff Camborne".


Results: Saturday, February Hockey IC 1st V Thames Valley IC2nd V Harrow IC 3rd V British Airways Football IClst V LSE V IC2nd LSE IC3rd V Kings V IC4th Kings Rugby IC'A' V Old Kingsburians

21 3-1 2-1 0-0 2-3 2-1 1-1 4-3 9-42

Football Seconds IC's impressive first half performance was e n o u g h to give them both points and a hundred per cent record at home this season. The afternoon had not started well when o n l y nine p l a y e r s arrived in the U n i o n Lounge. The goalkeeper problem was solved however when Al Betts, who had returned to IC for the previous night's Aerosoc dinner, walked in and accepted the offer for a game. Inside the first ten minutes of the match, IC were in front after Veenman had forced the ball across the area and Hartland rifled his shot, on the run, past the helpless keeper. Further pressure again paid dividends when Beer volleyed his shot against the keeper with such force that it rebounded and allowed him a few more attempts before finally squeezing the ball home. LSE however, are a good footballing side and were not going to give up easily. The impressive Betts was forced to make two fine saves when faced with a rapidly advancing forwards. In the second half L S E increased the p r e s s u r e to little effect, whilst IC squandered the chances which coud have made the game safe. L S E eventually scored with fifteen minutes to go when a shot from outside the box hit a post and rebounded kindly to the feet of an L S E forward. The last quarter produced some frantic stuff, although the tenacity of every member of the side was enough to give IC the win that they thoroughly deserved. T E A M : Betts, Dunhill, Beer, Armstrong, Lakin, Griffiths, Wiggins, Lay, Veenman, Hartland, Saunders. Jim Beer

Football Fourths IC took the field with three changes from their regular team for the top of the table clash. The Fourths started well, gaining control of the midfield and should have taken the lead cheering this spell of pressure. Twenty minutes into the game Hawa gave IC the lead when a break led to him scoring from just inside the box. This led to more good play from the league leaders. Then disaster struck, Buckley in the right back position, with time and space to play the ball anywhere passed straight to their centre forward w h o hit a first time shot past Hampton. The match then became scrappy and rough play resulted with Burns, Hawa and Graves all' involved in fights with the opposition. After half-time IC looked the better team, and McNicholas gave them the lead when after a long ball from defence he scrambled the ball into the net. King's defence were again caught square and Burns lobbed the advancing keeper to give the Fourths a 3-1 lead. Lack of concentration in defence allowed Kings to reduce the deficit before the best goal of the match. Buckley beat two men and ran thirty yards before curling a shot just inside the post. Again King's scored quickly

but IC's defence managed to hold out and enabled IC to gain the two points. T E A M : Hampton, Clegg, Gohill, Maddy, Chown, Buckley, Graves, Dolan, McNicholas, Burns, Hawa.

Castaways Cup THIS is one of the most important and prestigious events in the U L S C calendar. All the London colleges and City University are invited to enter a three boat team and IC presented two teams to defend the title again this year. The racing took place over last weekend and the first race was timed for just after 9:30 on Saturday. However the Harp was frozen and by the time racing started (almost an hour late) the efforts of the rescue boat zigzagging up and down the lake and of the few happy souls who had taken a boat out had made d e p r e s s i n g l y little impact on the surface. IC 2 were due to sail the first race and using the tactic of sailing in ice free channels were winning easily until the first mark. Here the almost unbroken ice brought all the team to a halt, unable to tack, and in danger of giving penalties if they t o u c h e d . However newf o u n d s k i l l and s o m e luck got them unscathed out of the situation and they went on to gain first, second and third positions. As the day proceeded the ice cleared and some good team racing was seen. IC 2 were beating most people on the water, but giving penalty points to anyone who cared to ask, in one race giving three "greens" (6 / points) on the start line before the race. They finally lost to both UL teams, Q M C and IC 1 but beat City on a resail. This gave them six wins and fifth p l a c e in the c o m p e t i t i o n . A g o o d weekend's sailing c o n s i d e r i n g the team consisted entirely of first years. IC 1 however owned the competition. They began showing little potential, winning race but only by narrow margins but as Saturday's racing continued a combination of g o o d i n d i v i d u a l s , p e o p l e with team r a c i n g experience and fast sailing ability, began to show as one after another the teams fell to their superior force. By Saturday evening, as the teams retired to hot food, the bar and barn dancing, arranged by Castaways, IC 1 was the only unbeaten team having shown its versatility and consistancy through changing winds and weather conditions. 9:30 Sunday morning again saw the team on the water for a resail against UC2, this was a farce, since although IC managed to put hastily rigged boats on the water for the resail UC2 had requested, U C couldn't manage to present a team and IC1 merely sailed the c o u r s e a l o n e . T h i s did however give a measure of the again vastly different weather conditions. In contrast to Saturday it was blowing quite hard and it eventually became necessary to reef the sails. T h e l e a g u e t a b l e s h o u l d have b e e n concluded with a match between IC1 and UC1 but by the appointed time it was clear that it was these two teams that were to meet in the final and with Wembley S C putting more and more boats on the water it was decided to go straight into the final, best of two races. In the first race Lewis moved immediately into first place and Baker, covering the opposition stayed just ahead of Murray and two U C boats in second, with first and second position, a winning combination the two leaders sailed for the finish. U C needing the best placings possible should have pushed Murray back to sixth, but rounding the last bouy with only yards to go they let him through into third place. IC retained their unbeaten record and needed only one boat in the first three to win the competition. In the second race Lewis again got a good start and sailed away from the fleet in first 3

4

FEUX,

February

27,1981

place with Murray and Baxter loosly covering the opposition up. The beats they retained third and fifth places, despite some desparate manoeuvres by UL during which a green was given. The final result was IC1 retained their unbeaten record over the weekend beating UC1 in the final by 15V points to 26 (first, second, third, first, third and fifth) and retainino the Cup. A word is due here to thank Cestaways for organising an event which went jff smoothly and was enjoyable both on and off the water. 2

Snooker T H E B T E A M with a new line-up managed to crush a Q M C team who lacked talent and a sporting attitude. Mr P Holt kept up his good form by w i n n i n g c o n v i n c i n g l y . B e n n e t managed to lose in a dull frame where talent and inspiration were in short supply. The battle of the two top league teams took place last week when our very own A team took on our C team. The result shocked most of the people concerned when the A team won by five frames to nil. The C team were taken by surprise when their veteran players lost frame after frame to an A team riddled with young upstarts. This year's A G M will be held on March 11. Papers for next year's committee posts are up in the Snooker Lounge.

Water Polo LAST Saturday, Bristol University came to London to give us a match, in return for our visit last month. Both sides were hoping to improve on the 4-4 score last time. imperial started very well, and scored three g o a l s in the f i r s t q u a r t e r , w h i l e o n l y c o n c e e d i n g one. Last, H e f f e m a n and M c C a r t n e y took turns in our g o a l , each playing well. The end result was a pleasing 8-3 win for Imperial. Goals came from Barry, Nick, Mike and Richard.

Ten Pin Bowling ON Sunday, February 22 four enthusiastic members of the Bowling Club set off to bowl in t h e P o m p e y Q u a d s T o u r n a m e n t at Portsmouth. When we left London at 9:30am the weather was cold but the roads were clear, however, on reaching Hindhead, half way to P o r t s m o u t h , the w e a t h e r was appalling with compacted snow on the roads. O n l y s k i l l f u l d r i v i n g o n J K n i g h t ' s part prevented an accident. We arrived unscathed and after s a m p l i n g the l o c a l brew we c o m m e n c e d b o w l i n g . T h e b o w l i n g was divided into two sets of doubles and the c o m b i n e d q u a d s c o m p e t i t i o n and after disappointing bowling by all players in our team we lost the Quads Trophy that Imperial held last year. However, individual trophies were won by McMullan and Cook. For the highest handicap doubles series. Finally thanks must go to Knight for providing transport.

Hyde Park Relay DID you know that Imperial College is the host of one of the country's top athletics events? Out very own Hyde Park Relay starts at 2:00pm on Saturday, February 28 on the south side of the Serpentine. Helpers and anyone who can put safety pins in envelopes should meet in the morning in the Union Building. Spectators are welcome. You may see some well known athletes (Seb Coe?). Look out for confirmation of these details beside the Union Staircase.

Page 11


Camborne Congratulations to M i n e s on retaining the Bottle. T a k e note of front page photo, and lengthy article. Please send M i n e s H a l f - C o l o u r s in plain b r o w n wrapper forthwith. Consoc Opinion Poll T h e C o n s o c opinion poll, while not necessarily r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of I C as a w h o l e c e r t a i n l y contains some very interesting results. By far the most interesting result is that a substantial majority "don't k n o w " when asked about J o h n P a s s m o r e , L i z Lindsay, a n d Rachel Snee. T h e main way they are likely to get " k n o w n " is through the pages of F E L I X and unless they do something to alleviate the stagnant state of I C U soon, they are liable to be forgotten completely. It amazes me that it is just these type of people who are awarded pots and U G A s at the end of the year for "their unfailing devotion to the U n i o n " . I think S c a r a m o u c h e is gradually taking over the back page. Aaarrrgh!!!!!!

s Friday, February

27

• S o c i a l i s t S o c i e t y B o o k s t a l l , lunchtime, J C R .

Saturday,

February

28

• F r o e b e l S t u d e n t s ' U n i o n R a g B a l l , with E d d i e a n d the H o t R o d s , 8:00pm, Montefiore Hall, F r o e b e l Institute. • F o r u m on 'Singapore's D e v e l o p m e n t

— a model

for

Malaysia?", 7:00pm, U L U , Malet St.

Sunday, March

1

• W a r g a m e s C l u b M e e t i n g , 1:00pm, S C R .

Monday,

March

2

• S o c i a l i s t S o c i e t y ' Y o u r L o c a l C a n d i d a t e s for the G L C Elections', 6:30pm, U n i o n U p p e r L o u n g e .

Tuesday, March

3

• I C H o c k e y C l u b A G M , 1:00pm • M a r k C a r l i s l e , Secretary of State for E d u c a t i o n ,

1:15,

H u x l e y 213. • C h r i s P r i c e s , M P o n 'The T o r y Education Cuts',

1:00,

M a t h s 341. F r e e . • R a i l s o c : 'Swiss a n d A u s t r i a n M o u n t a i n Railways',

Now the volume elements are rectl angular with length x.— and width 2 2 M o r e p r o b l e m s for P r i m e l i a C o l l e g e O r c h e s t r a . T h e y have been planning an informal musical evening for the week after their c o n c e r t , but apart f r o m a general consensus that it should consist of five pieces, the third being for oboe a n d piano, everyone has a different opinion over what music should be played. Nevertheless, after m u c h discussion, the following has been agreed o n . T h e r e must be a piece for clarinet a n d piano immediately before a piece by B e e t h o v e n . Something by M o z a r t should immediately follow a piano trio. There must be a string quartet, which cannot be played next to the piano trio, but must go next to a w o r k by B r a h m s . A n d there must be a piece by S c h u m a n n , and a piece for h o r n next to, but o n opposite sides of, a piece by Saint-Saens. N o w t h e r e m u s t be a w a y t o everyone. B u t how?

please

Solutions, comments, criticisms to me c/o FELIX Office. There is a prize of £5 (donated by Mend-a-Bike) and two tickets to the IC Orchestra concert for the correct entry randomly selected at 1:00pm next Tuesday. Last Week's J_ 4 ,

Solution I 4 ,

J_ 2_ 2 " 3n ,

2/(r

- x ) . So the volume required is V = 21 JJj x,r. | . 2. / ( r

2

2

- x ) dx x ) * dx 2

11 r , 2 2,2 [- ^Cr - x ) 1

,r ]

•Gerry Bennett Committee

from C a m p a i g n C o - o p , 6:30,

2

Green

Room.

•Photosoc

L e c t u r e : Northern

Italy, 7:30,

with A G M

at 6:30pm.

Wednesday,

March

4

• I n d s o c T r i p to C E G B Power Station at D u n g e n e s s , meet 12:00, Beit A r c h . F o r further details contact M a r k Skeates, DOC1. • W a r g a m e s C l u b M e e t i n g , 1:00pm, S C R .

Thursday,

0

•United Nations Society, o 3*.

5:40,

M a t h s 340.

2

March

5

1:00pm, U n i o n S C R . Wit h

' S t u d y in the S h a d o w of the G u n ' , a talk by two Palestinian _ students f r o m Bir Zeit University. • L u n c h h o u r c o n c e r t , the M u s i c R o o m , 53 P r i n c e s G a t e .

Since the volume of the whole can is 2 2 Tir I , the last student's share is -r— 1 2 ^ and so the third student gets ^ - -JJJT h e winner is A S h i e k h . There can't be many students at IC who don't have A-level maths, and so I had no qualms about setting a puzzle which needs calculus even if it did cause several people to pour coffee over their lecture notes last Friday. This week's puzzle, in case y o u haven't guessed, is a plug for IC S y m p h o n y O r c h e s tra's concert on M a r c h 6, not to mention their informal musical evening o n M a r c h 12. N e x t week's puzzle is a plug for IC C h o i r . M e n d - a B i k e are still offering d i s c o u n t s to F E L I X readers. A n d I feel more like an advertising agency every week.

• H a n g G l i d i n g C l u b , 1:00pm, above Stan's B a r . • S T O I C t r a n s m i s s i o n , 1:00 a n d 6:00pm, J C R a n d Halls. • G l i d i n g C l u b M e e t i n g , 5:30pm, A e r o 254. • I C H o c k e y C l u b D i n n e r , 7:00 for 7:30pm, Southside SCR/SDR. • R e a l A l e S o c i e t y M e e t i n g , 7:30pm, C r u s h B a r , s e c o n d floor, U n i o n Building. B e e r s : T i d s b u r y bitter, K i n g a n d B a r n e s mild a n d R i n g w o r m bitter. • U L U G a y s o c M e e t i n g , 8:00pm, R o o m 2 D , U L U , Malet Street.

Don't miss the ELECTION BARNIGHT Starting at 7:30 pm T h i s Sunday in the Union Bar. All the usual fun PLUS Find out who the candidates are AND SEE DAVE GAYER'S HEAD BEING SHAVED! GUILDS

2_ 3TT

.

Imagine the c a n divided into two identical cylinders, a n d consider the top cylinder. After t h e f i r st p o u r i n g , t h e e m p t y p a r t of t h i s cylinder is the same size and shape as the part w h i c h contains beer. T h u s the first student gets a quarter of the beer. A n identical argument applied to the whole c a n shows that half the beer remains after the s e c o n d pouring. S o the s e c o n d student gets a quarter of the beer. N o w to calculate the fourth (and thence the third) student's share, I'm afraid y o u do have to use calculus, but there's one easy a p p r o a c h and several h a r d ones. T h e easy way is to take volume elements parallel to the axis of the c y l i n d e r . T h e F E L I X t y p e s e t t e r w o n ' t domathematical symbols, so we'll have to change typeface here. FELIX is published by the Editor for and on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board, and is printed by the Union Print Unit, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BB. (589 Sill ext. 1048/int. 2881) Copyright FELIX 1981. Editor: S.J Marshall. Advertising Manager: MA. Smith. Registered at the GPO as a newspaper


Study in the Shadow of the Gun Bir Zeit University is a Palestinian institution in the Israeli-occuppied territory of the West Bank. M o re than 1,500 students are currently taking degree courses in both the Arts and Sciences. Israel regards Bir Zeit as a "hotbed of nationalism", often c o n f l i c t i v e with its o w n ambitions for the West Bank, and a voice to be silenced. The students, faced with the continuing denial of their political rights, on occasion go out onto the streets to demonstrate. The resulting clashes with the Israeli military authority add to the cycle of tension. The Y o u t h Council of the United Nations Association is hosting a s p e a k i n g t o u r of t w o s t u d e n t representatives from Bir Zeit. They are c o m i n g t o t h i s C o l l e g e o n Thursday, M a r c h 5 to give a talk in the Union Senior C o m m o n Room starting at 1:00pm. This is a unique opportunity of hearing first-hand about the s i t u a t i o n facing fellow s t u d e n t s s t u d y i n g u n d e r military occupation. Don't miss this opportunity: all are welcome. T h e f o l l o w i n g is a v e r y b r i e f b a c k g r o u n d to the P a l e s t i n i a n jrobiem. The early history of Palestine In very early times, Palestine was inhabited by Semitic peoples, the earliest being the Canaanites. When the Tribes of Israel came to Palestine after their captivity in Egypt, they vere united into one kingdom by King David in 1000BC. This kingdom reached its greatest heights under King David's son, Solomon, who built the first Temple of Jerusalem. However, after Solomon's death, the history of the People of Israel (or rather of the two kingdoms of Israel and Judah) is a record of civil wars and struggles with alien tribes. 720 B C : Assyrians destroyed the Kingdom of Israel and carried its inhabitants away as captives. uOOBC: The Babylonian king, N e b u c h a d e n e z z a r , a t t a c k e d the Kingdom of Judah. Âť67BC: Jerusalem and Solomon's ' emple were destroyed by Nebuchadenezzar. Most of the inhabitants were taken captive. 5 1 7 B C : Jews were able to return to Palestine. 332BC: Domination by the Maced o n i a n s , w h o t r e a t e d the J e w s harshly. Following the Macedonian rale was a period of certain independence. C ' J B C : Roman conquest Fompey.

under

i ' A D : Emperor Hadrian prohibited the Jews from entering Jerusalem. F r o m this period dates the dispersion of the Jews throughout the world. Since then, until the establishn e n t of the State of Israel in 1948, no Jewish Government has existed in Palestine. Although some Jews I ^ve always lived in Palestine, their numbers have fluctuated depending on the tolerance of the successive rulers. 7 0 A D : Titus destroyed Jerusalem. 4 0 0 A D : T h e p a r t i t i o n i n g of the R o m a n E m p i r e . Palestine under Byzantium's rule until:-

6 3 7 A D : Arab conquest. After the interlude of the Crusades, the A r a b ruler invited the Jews to return to Palestine. 1 5 1 7 A D : T u r k s c o n q u e r e d the country and ruled it until the end of the First W o r l d War (forming part of the Ottoman Empire). Therefore it can be seen that, e x c e p t for the C r u s a d e r i n t e r r e g n u m , P a l e s t i n e was r u l e d by Arabs and then by Turks for over 1,300 years following the Byzantine era. The recent history of Palestine: "The Palestine Question" The defeat of the Turkish armies during the First World War, with the a s s i s t a n c e of the A r a b u p r i s i n g (some A r a b leaders at the time were seeking independence from Ottoman rule) resulted in the break-up of the Ottoman Empire. The administration of Palestine was then handed to the British Government. H o w e v e r , two c o n t r a d i c t o r y promises had been made during the campaign to defeat the Turks. One was to assure ultimate independence for the A r a b peoples of the region, in return for assistance in defeating the Turkish army. The other was the Balfour Declaration of 1917 which g r a n t e d the w i s h of the Z i o n i s t leadership in Europe to establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. In the following decades, Jewish immigration came into direct conflict with the livelihoods of the Palestinian peasantry. Tracts of land were sold by absentee A r a b landlords to the Jewish National Fund, which in turn led to the dispossession of the Arab tenants as the Jewish settlements were e s t a b l i s h e d . T h r o u g h the twenties and thirties, frequent clashes between the communities took place sometimes resulting in many deaths. A t the end of the Second World W a r , the British Government came under increasing pressure to allow large numbers of Jewish refugees from Europe to settle in Palestine, and faced with an impossible situation they decided to hand the problem over to the United Nations. The U N decided upon a partition plan to divide Palestine into two areas, one with a predominantly J e w i s h p o p u l a t i o n , the other predominantly Arab. Whilst acceptable to the Zionist leadership, albeit a compromise with their wishes, the A r a b states refused to agree with partition, such that with the ending of the British mandate in 1948, war b r o k e o u t b e t w e e n the n e w l y c r e a t e d Isr aeli state a n d the neighbouring A r a b states. A s a result of the war, and the conflict leading up to it, most of the A r a b population of Palestine fled, while the West Bank carne under the c o n t r o l of the J o r d a n i a n a r m y . Jordan formally annexed the West Bank in 1950. In 1967, yet another war ravaoed the region leaving the West Bank and G a z a Strip, the Golan Heights a n d S i n a i i n t h e h a n d s of a n occupying Israeli army. Since 1967, administration of the West Bank and the other occuppied territories has rested with a military government. It is directly answerable

to the Israeli Ministry of Defence and has a b s o l u t e a u t h o r i t y o v e r the Palestinian population. The Palestinian people now number approximately four million. About half a million of the Palestinians live in Israel. Another 1,200,000 live in the occuppied territories of the West Bank and G a z a . The remainder are in exile, many still in refugee camps, many as foreigners in other countries. The majority of those in exile still hope to return to their own country. Professor A r n o l d Toynbee wrote in 1968: "The tragedy in Palestine is not just a local one: it is a tragedy for the W o r l d , because it is an injustice that isa menacetothe World'speace". The Recent Situation The recent violent street battles in the W e s t B a n k in w h i c h Israeli troops shot at and wounded unarmed Palestinian student demonstrators received considerable a t t e n t i o n in the W o r l d ' s P r e s s . Higher Education has now emerged as the f o c u s for the c o n t i n u i n g struggle between Jews and Arabs in the West Bank. Bir Zeit University is an independent Palestinian institution, located about twelvemilesnorthof Jerusalem. It teaches to B A and B S c level in Arts and Sciences, and its degrees are now r e c o g n i s e d t h r o u g h o u t the World. One of the major objectives of the University is to encourage students to stay in the West Bank and work with their community, rather than to seek more lucrative employment in the Gulf or the West. Therefore each student must complete a p r o g r a m m e of c o m m u n i t y w o r k each year, which is then counted t o w a r d s the final d e g r e e , the purpose being to encourage greater awareness and critical discussion by the students of the problems facing the community. The 1,500 students in the University have to spend at least 120 extra-curricular hours on a community work programme. D r M u h a m m e d H a l l a j , D e a n of the F a c u l t y of A r t s , s a y s t h a t the students "must be actively involved i n t h e d a i l y life of t h e i r l o c a l communities; higher education must not serve as a form of escapism". Trouble started at the University early in 1980 when the native A r a b West bankers demonstrated their full opposition to the C a m p David "autonomy" plan about which they had not been consulted, and which numerous U N bodies had cond e m n e d as b e a r i n g little r e s e m blance to P a l e s t i n i a n self-determination. The growth of a sizeable student body in the West Bank vigorously opposing the Israeli occupation and any attempt to impose the C a m p David agreements clearly alarms the Israelis, as shown by the recent harsh action against student demonstrators. The recent moves against the universities (Bir Zeit and the three other Palestinian universities) are only the latest of a series of p r o b l e m s e x p e r i e n c e d by the universities as a result of operating under occupation. The problems include the 'invasion' of c a m p u s e s by t h e m i l i t a r y , closures (Bir Zeit was closed down

for months in 1979), the refusal of the military authorities to allow the entry of certain Arabic books and periodicals, despite the fact that they are available to s t u d e n t s at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and difficulties over obtaining work p e r m i t s for foreign m e m b e r s of faculty. Although these problems created h e a d a c h e s for U n i v e r s i t y a d m i n istrators, they did not affect the University's basic freedom. Order N o 854 issued by the West Bank Military Governor in July of 1980 was thus particularly ominous, as it was aimed at curbing that freedom and enabling the occupation author ities to interfere to an unprecedented extent. It stipulated that universities must be licensed, implying that the licence could be withdrawn. This is seen as p l a c i n g the U n i v e r s i t i e s under permanent threat of closure. It also said that the names of all faculty members and students must be a p p r o v e d by the o c c u p a t i o n authorities, in order to 'weed out' those who had been committed for s e c u r i t y o f f e n c e s or h e l d for questioning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and almost every Palestinian West Bank family has members who fall into this category. A l l courses of study are subject to the approval of the military governor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; again, an entirely new kind of restriction. University students say that in recent weeks their notebooks have been seized and scrutinised by the occupation authorities. The universities have refused to comply with the new decree, which aims to 'undermine the University's status, its independence, its legitimate functions and its academic freedom," as a statment issued by Bir Zeit said. The statement pointed out that the decree, by amending the Jordanian Law of Education and Culture of 1964, contravened the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 which stipulates that an occupying power does not have the right to introduce changes in the laws of the country under occupation. The content of education is also a source of growing dissatisfaction. A s D r Ibrahim Abulughod who headed the P a l e s t i n e O p e n U n i v e r s i t y feasibility study team says: "The P a l e s t i n i a n s in higher e d u c a t i o n have been educated in accordance with a c u r r i c u l u m over which P a l e s t i n i a n s have a b s o l u t e l y no control. Since these curricula have b e e n d e s i g n e d by the n a t i o n a l authorities of various countries, they were designed, if they were designed at all, in the light of the needs of those societies. The curricula in all these countries have nothing to do with the identity of the Palestinian, with his heritage, with his future aspirations. They are not designed to s e r v e the n e e d s of P a l e s t i n i a n society, they are not informed by Palestinian heritage and culture". Bir Zeit University is frequently seen as a threat to Israeli authority in the West Bank. C o m e and hear two students from this University on Thursday, M a r c h 5 at 1:00pm in the Union Senior C o m m o n Room. Nick Bedding IC United Nations Society


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