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Club W E R U N T H E N AT I O N !

Get Ready for RUN @ WORK DAY Sept. 18th

Spring/Summer 2009

Kara Goucher and Ryan Hall have been selected as RRCA’s 2008 Road Runners of the Year

RRCA: Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going Reviews of New & Updated Shoes

ROAD RUNNERS CLUB OF AMERICA

Permit #351 Bolingbrook, IL

PA I D U.S. Postage

NON PROFIT ORG

www.Photorun.NET; (Inset) Bob Burgess

RRCA National Event Championships


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Club

Spring/Summer 2009

Matt Mendelsohn

W E R U N T H E N AT I O N !

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Executive Director’s Letter

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Health & Safety Spotlight Road Rage Management

10 RRCA Program

Spotlight

Kids Run the Nation Run@Work Day

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FEATURE:

RRCA Past and Future ROAD RUNNERS CLUB OF AMERICA

18 RRCA Championship

Spotlight

Napa Valley Marathon Presidio 10 Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile Plus Upcoming Events

22 Reviews of New &

Updated Shoes

26 National Award Winners

Spotlight

Open & Masters Road Runners of the Year Hall of Fame Inductees Beginning Running Program

30 Potluck Recipe Mom’s Taco Salad

4 Club

• Spring/Summer 2009

CONTENTS


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Executive Director’s Note

Matt Mendelsohn

New Beginnings Life always seems to present us with new beginnings. At the Road Runners Club of America, new beginnings have kept the organization relevant to the running community for over 50 years. In 1958, the year we were founded, the RRCA launched a new beginning for the running community: the national infrastructure that supports the development of running clubs and events at the local level. As you read our history on page 12, you will learn about other new beginnings in running that the RRCA was instrumental in launching. Jean Knaack Today, we kick off the next 50 years of the RRCA by partnering with the Running Network LLC and their advertisers to bring our members this complimentary publication, Club Running. Club Running signifies another exciting new beginning for the RRCA and the running community. You, our readers, share a common bond: the love of running as a sport and healthy exercise. You may be a life-long runner with a long-term relationship with your local club. You may be someone who has been a club member since the beginning (1958), and are beginning a transition from running to walking. You may be a returning runner engaged in a new beginning as you find time to incorporate running back into your life after a break. You may be new to running or walking or to your local running club and endeavoring to change your life through regular physical activity and the social, supportive outlet a club offers. Or perhaps your new beginning is changing your training routine to achieve a PR or distance goal. Club Running is designed to embrace and celebrate everyone in our membership and to shine a national spotlight on the rich diversity of running around the United States. The RRCA uses the term “running” to encompass competitive running, jogging, fitness walking, race walking, and wheelchair fitness on roads, trails, and tracks. Your contributions of photographs, running club and event spotlights, training articles, outstanding volunteer spotlights, and more will help ensure that Club Running is a success. Why Are You Receiving This New Magazine? Welcome to the inaugural issue of Club Running magazine. This complimentary publication is made possible by our advertisers and is created through a partnership between the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) and Running Network LLC. You’re a member of your local running club and your local running club is, in turn, a member of the RRCA. That makes you a member of the RRCA and explains why you’re receiving this magazine.

ClubRunning Club Running is produced by Shooting Star Media, Inc. for publisher Running Network LLC, P.O. Box 801, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. All ad materials and insertion orders should be sent to Running Network LLC, at the above address. Shooting Star Media, Inc. and Running Network LLC assume no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Publisher expects that all claims by advertisers can be substantiated and that all guarantees will be honored. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright © 2009 by Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) unless otherwise noted. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the Publisher.

We recommend, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instituting any changes in your fitness program.

Let Us Hear From You!

Club Running welcomes your suggestions, comments, and questions. Direct them to share@rrca.org.

Address Changes/Missing Issues

Please email us at shootingstarmediacirc@gmail.com about address changes, duplicate mailings, or missing issues. Please include both old and new addresses.

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ClubRunning Spring/Summer 2009 ROAD RUNNERS CLUB OF AMERICA (RRCA) Executive Director Jean Knaack RRCA President Brent Ayer SHOOTING STAR MEDIA, INC. Group & Coordinating Editor Christine Johnson, christinej.ssm@gmail.com Designer Alex Larsen Photographers Victor Sailer www.PhotoRun.net www.Brightroom.com Bob Burgess Dennis Steinauer www.WhenItClicks.com Matt Mendelsohn Proofreader Red Ink Editorial Services, Madison, WI Pre-Press/Printer W. D. Hoard & Sons Co., Fort Atkinson, WI

RUNNING NETWORK LLC Advertising Larry Eder President phone: 608.239.3785; fax: 920.563.7298 larry.eder@gmail.com Advertising Production Manager Alex Larsen Counsel Philip J. Bradbury Melli Law, S.C. Madison, WI w w w. r r c a . o r g w w w. r u n n i n g n e t w o r k . c o m w w w. s h o o t i n g s t a r m e d i a i n c . c o m

Member of


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Health & Safety Spotlight

Road Rage Management By Jean Knaack, RRCA Executive Director On Nov. 5, 2008, my name led off a story in the Health section of The New York Times. The article, written by Christopher Percy Collier, raised an important runner issue: road rage. As a result, I received numerous emails from people outlining their own horror stories about hostile encounters with motorists and how momentary lapses in judgment escalated their encounters. One thread these stories share is that there are important lessons to be learned from these experiences. As part of the pre-article interview with the Times story, I shared my story and also outlined some important lessons learned from my own momentary lapse of judgment. So here is “the memo” outlining what you can do when faced with an angry motorist. First, follow the RRCA Safety Tips found on our website at www.rrca.org/programs/education/. Then, go the extra mile by ensuring you make eye contact with motorists before you cross an intersection or parking lot exit. Keep in mind that even this isn’t a failsafe method, as I learned after landing on the hood of a car whose driver definitely made eye contact with me. There’s no harm done to your workout if you take a few seconds to stop and give a car the right of way, even if it’s not theirs to take. This could be the difference between a good workout and a trip to the emergency room. Think of these stops and starts as good interval training! All runners value their personal safety while out on a run, and nothing can put the rage meter in the red like a near-miss or a brush with an automobile. For the most part, we have all experienced the person who turns right without looking; the person who speeds up through an intersection to get through before they have to stop for you; the person who honks at you and cuts it close while you’re running down the road. No matter how angry you are, don’t give motorists the universal signal of communication (you know, “the finger”) or let loose a string

of obscenities at them. And no matter how frustrated you are, don’t bang on car hoods or windows if you catch up with an offending motorist at an intersection, driveway, or parking lot. This behavior can get you in legal hot water if you damage the offending car or, even worse, damage the driver’s face. Keep in mind, this behavior also gives runners a bad reputation and further degrades the runner–motorist relationship. Not to mention that you never know how the person in the car will react to your outburst. Consider this: perhaps the person is having a medical emergency or perhaps the person is just downright crazy and won’t think twice about running you down or worse. Keeping yourself in control can be the difference between a good workout, a trip to the slammer, or even worse, the morgue. These close encounters are eternally frustrating, I know. But there are things you can do to keep your cool under pressure. First, cuss all you want in your mind if it makes you feel better, but the most important thing is to keep it to yourself. Kick a curb or signpost if you feel you must absolutely make contact with something to manage your anger, but don’t blame me if you injure yourself. Don’t create an environment that antagonizes drivers, like running down the middle of the road and not moving when a line of cars is driving 5 miles an hour behind you, especially if your city has invested in sidewalks or trails for your express use. Carry your cell phone and have the local police or 911 on your speed dial. If you’re in danger or provoked by a motorist, a quick call to the cops could send the driver quickly on their way. Learn to memorize license plates so

=SYVHEMP]YTHEXIWSRXLIPEXIWXMRXVEGO JMIPH GVSWWGSYRXV]VSEHVEGMRKERHQEVEXLSRVYRRMRK 7MKRYTEX[[[VYRFPSKVYRGSQERHKIX]SYVEXLPIXMGW JM\EXPIEWXHE]WE]IEV ,I][IRIIHEFVIEO SRGIMRE[LMPIXSS

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you can report incidents such as hit-and-runs. Here are some more proactive steps to improve runners’ safety on the roads: • Work with your local law enforcement on pedestrian safety campaigns. This can include papering cars parked at the grocery store with pedestrian awareness fact sheets. • Running clubs can volunteer to monitor dangerous intersections and provide written reports about pedestrian and motorist interactions to local law enforcement. • Work with local law enforcement to enforce local traffic laws designed to protect pedestrians. Running clubs responsible for leading group runs should be extra mindful to follow traffic signals. • Write letters to your local paper about particularly dangerous intersections and give a call to action to the citizen drivers to be more mindful. As runners, we have a shared responsibility with motorists to keep our roads safe. To foster better community support, runners need to rise above the rage and be better people than the average motorist. Keep your cool, keep your mouth shut (no matter how hard that can be), keep your hands to yourself, and run safely. There’s nothing more important than making it home from your run alive and in one piece.

To read the original New York Times article visit (www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/-health/nutrition/06fitness.html?ref=health)


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October 10, 2009

LOOK HOW EASY IT IS TO RUN HARTFORD…. Easy to Get Here… minutes from airport, train station and highways. Easy to Stay Here… Hotels that fit your budget, all within two blocks of race start and finish. Easy to Play Here… Walk to everything, from the Expo to the Pasta Supper, from race start to great spectator spots. Easy to Run Here… Start and finish in same location, beautiful course lined with over 50 bands, best post race food in North America. Named the GREENEST MARATHON IN AMERICA by The Council for Responsible Sport, 2009

www.inghartfordmarathon.com

THE ING HARTFORD MARATHON Simply a great race.


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RRCA Program Spotlight

Kids Run the Nation

Penny Photography

In 1986, in response to the growing national concern for children’s health status in the U.S., the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) launched its children’s running program. Developed by a team of experts including Olympic marathoner Don Kardong, the program included a 60-page TEACHER’S AND COACH’S CURRICULUM GUIDE and a 20-page booklet about running designed for children and parents. These materials were reprinted in 1994 and continue to be sought-after resources. The RRCA’s vision is to see a locally managed youth running program in every grade

Kidstock 1-Mile Fun Run/Walk In Anniston, AL

school in America. To achieve this lofty goal, in 2008, the RRCA introduced the revised kids’ running materials as part of the RRCA: Kids Run the Nation® program. The Kids Run the Nation program is a multi-week, gender neutral, youth running program designed to be implemented locally and engage children in kindergarten through sixth grade. The program emphasizes participation and developing a healthy lifestyle rather than the competitive aspects of running. The KIDS RUN THE NATION PROGRAM GUIDE is a full-color, 40-page educational curriculum divided into eight lesson plans, with a bonus ninth lesson on competitive running. Each lesson can be taught during a one-hour class period over an 8-week time frame. The materials also include the KIDS RUN THE NATION: A RUNNING GUIDE FOR KIDS booklet. This 5x7-inch booklet contains 12 pages of information designed as a take-home item for children to share their running knowledge with their family. While this booklet is designed as a Kids Run the Nation program companion, anyone can purchase a copy and any running

4th Annual National Run@Work Day

This free poster can help publicize your event.

On Sept. 18, 2009, the Road Runners Club of America will mark the 4th Annual National Run@Work Day® to promote physical activity and healthy living through running or walking. The goal of Run@Work Day is to raise awareness about the importance of daily physical activity for adults and to help combat the national inactivity crisis gripping our nation. Running clubs, company-based wellness programs, human resources departments, and individuals nationwide are encouraged to plan fun runs and/or walks with their employers throughout the U.S. Stay-at-home parents and telecommuters can participate, too. Simply get out with a friend, co-worker, or family member on that day and run or walk for 35 minutes. Run@Work day activities are community-based events that provide an opportunity for individuals to incorporate at least 35 minutes of exercise into their daily routine either before work, during lunch, or immediately following work, spreading the message that incorporating exercise into one’s daily routine can markedly improve a person’s overall physical health and help alleviate healthrelated medical costs associated with the overweight and obesity crisis. If adults lead by example, if companies encourage healthy living, then together we can combat the national inactivity and obesity crisis facing our nation and our children.

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program leader can purchase multiple copies to be given away. To support development of youth running programs around the country, the RRCA also launched the Kids Run the Nation Fund. This fund raises money on a national level and

then provides small grants to youth running programs around the nation. For more information about the Kids Run the Nation program, Kids Run the Nation grants and grantees, and how you can support this program, visit www.RRCA.org/programs/kids.

How You Can Make a Positive Impact on National Run@Work Day Sign the FREE pledge to run or walk for at least 35 minutes on Sept. 18, 2009. Hosted by Active.com, you can find the pledge at www.RRCA.org/programs/runatwork. Plan and promote a Run@Work Day event in your community. To assist you, the RRCA has developed a planning kit that can be found on our website (www.rrca.org/programs/runatwork). In it, you’ll find a sample press release for announcing local events, ideas for planning and promoting the event, plus information on nutrition and running that can be shared with event participants. You can use the Run@Work logo, royalty free, to promote your local Run@Work Day event, or get creative and create your own Run@Work Day logo to be used locally. A copy of the logo can be found at www.rrca.org/services/branding. Hang Run@Work Day posters around the office or around town to promote your event. The RRCA has created a general Run@Work Day promotional poster (see right). To obtain a free copy, send a self-addressed, postage paid ($0.65), 9x12 envelope to 1501 Lee Hwy., Ste. 140, Arlington, VA 22209. To order multiple copies of the Run@Work Day posters, visit the RRCA Publication Store online at www.RRCA.org/shop. Post your Run@Work Day event for FREE on the RRCA Calendar at www.RRCA.org/calendars. Event organizers can use the special event code, Run@Work Event, when posting their event.


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oad Runners Club of America By Gar Williams

1958-2009

WE RUN THE NATION!

THE EARLY DAYS In the late 1950s, jogging for heath and fitness was practically unheard of. Competitive long-distance running was an official Olympic sport but with the exception of a few races in New England, there were very few distance racing events in the United States. In those days, the LONG DISTANCE LOG was the chief means of communication with distance runners, primarily cross-country athletes. The publication had a circulation of 126 readers. In its August 1957 issue, an editorial by Olympian Browning Ross proposed the development of an organization for American distance runners. The concept was modeled after the Road Runners Club of the UK founded in 1952. He suggested that member-

Road Runners) was established with 29 members. At the 1960 annual meeting, legendary distance runner Ted Corbitt was elected president of the RRCA. “Those were tough days of survival [for the RRCA],” Corbitt wrote. “Instead of recognizing the good work the RRCA was doing to promote distance running, the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) refused to admit the RRCA as a member club and took the position that the RRCA was illegal.” In those days, the AAU was the ruling body of the sport; they advised the RRCA to function solely as a social or fraternal group, and not conduct races. By 1963, the RRCA was challenging the AAU by advocating the removal of age requirements for racing imposed by the AAU and removing the AAU medical requirements for race participants. Under Corbitt’s leadership, the RRCA began work on a booklet about accurately measuring road running courses. The

Courtesy of RRCA

On February 22, 1958 the Road Runners Club of America was born.

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booklet was officially published by the RRCA in 1964. The RRCA Standards Committee began to certify courses that had been accurately measured, and the RRCA awarded certificates to runners who achieved certain times on the certified courses. While the program was slow to catch on, it formed the basis for modern-day course certification. Today, the USATF certifies courses for road running, though the original process was developed and implemented by the RRCA. In tandem with its efforts to enhance competition through course certification, the RRCA established the first events for recreational Ted Corbitt at the ceremony joggers. The events were dedicating a plaque at the called Run-For-Your-Life Paramount Hotel where the and came to be comRRCA was founded. monly known as fun runs. These events didn’t fall under the jurisdiction of the AAU and this was great news for women, since the AAU didn’t permit women to run distances over 1.5 miles. Women and girls of any

Courtesy Corbitt family

Browning Ross

ship include not only runners but officials, race sponsors, coaches, and more. Ross envisioned the group would encourage running, meet regularly, raise funds, coordinate schedules, recruit sponsors, and promote competition in long-distance races such as the one-hour track run. Response to the concept was positive and meetings were held in December 1957. On February 22, 1958, the Road Runners Club of America was born. Meeting at the Paramount Hotel in New York City, Ross and nine others discussed the general direction for the organization and developed the basic operating structure. Ross was named acting provisional president. The first RRCA National Championship races were awarded, including a one-hour run, a 12mile run, a 15-mile road race, a 5-mile junior championship road race, and a 10-mile track relay. The events were held in Chicago, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. One of the oldest distance running traditions, the RRCA Championship continues today. Interest in the RRCA began to grow and by April 1958, the New York Road Runners Club (now the New York


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age could participate in the RRCA-hosted fun runs, which were typically 2-mile events. In the fall of 1965, the RRCA held its first National Women’s Cross Country Championship at 2.5 miles, despite significant objection by the AAU. By the end of the RRCA’s third year, our members had hosted over 600 races around the country, compared to the handful of races that were previously on the national calendar.

THE RUNNING ROOM The late ’70s and early ’80s are commonly referred to within the running community as the first Running Boom. During this period, running went from a sport of a handful of aficionados to an activity that attracted thousands of health-conscious people. Under the leadership of Gar Williams, the 1970s began a tremendous surge in growth for the RRCA. In 1978, the RRCA membership included 142 clubs representing over 33,000 individuals. During this time, the organization developed its Hall of Fame, followed by other award categories to honor the dedication of individuals involved in the sport.

youth sports organization. Twenty years after the founding of the RRCA, one major challenge remained: women’s access to participation in running events was still limited. Before 1970, there were several high-profile attempts by women to enter marathons, but these were met with intense opposition. In 1970, the RRCA hosted the first marathon championship for women. Bostonian Sara Mae Berman won the race with a remarkable time of 3:07:10. In a 1978 SPORTS ILLUSTRATED article by Kenny Moore titled “Ready to Run a Long Way,” Aldo Scandurra, former RRCA president and advocate for women’s participation in distance running, pointed out that to get justice, women had to wait for social change on an international scale. At that point in time, many in the sport felt that women running in distance events was tantamount

In 1970, the RRCA hosted the first marathon championship for women. In 1978, RRCA president Jeff Darman helped lobby Congress for the passage of the Amateur Sports Act. The Act changed the nature of amateur sports in the U.S., essentially disbanding the AAU and ending its virtual monopoly governing Olympic sports in this country. The breakup of the AAU resulted in the formation of The Athletics Congress/USA (TAC/USA). From 1980 to 1992, TAC/USA served as the official governing body for the sport of running. In 1992, TAC/USA changed its name to USA Track & Field (USATF) to increase recognition for the organization and the sport. USATF continues to serve as the governing body for the sport of running. The AAU continues today primarily as a

to blasphemy and that it would ruin women’s femininity. While the international governing bodies for distance running were doing everything possible to limit running distances for women, the RRCA embraced women in its membership and events. In 1979, the RRCA started the Women’s Distance Festival in response to the lack of distance running events that were women-friendly and to protest the lack of women’s distance running events in the

Courtesy of Footnotes/RRCA

Courtesy of RRCA

A dream came true on July 26, 1980 as 70 RRCA clubs staged women’s races around the U.S.—like the Women's Distance Festival 5K in Lexington, KY shown here—to publicize the fact that women weren’t allowed to run in Olympic distances more than 1500 meters.

Frank Shorter

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At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, Joan Benoit Samuelson (inset) won the inaugural women's Olympic marathon. Deena (Drossin) Kastor, a 1997 RRCA Roads Scholar, continued the U.S. women’s Olympic marathon medal tradition by winning Bronze in the 2004 Athens Olympics.

Olympic Games. The first Women’s Distance Festival events were held on July 13, 1980, the date of the men’s marathon at the Moscow Olympics. It would be four more years—at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles—before women would have an Olympic Marathon to call their own. In 1983 as the second running boom swept the nation, the RRCA’s membership roster included 400 clubs, fueled mostly by the growing numbers of female recreational runners. In 1986, in response to the growing national concern for children’s health status in the United States, the RRCA launched its children’s running program. Developed by a team of experts, including Olympic marathoner Don Kardong, the program included a 60-page Teacher’s and Coach’s Curriculum Guide and a 20-page booklet about running designed for children and parents. The materials were reprinted in 1994 through a grant from the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and continued to be sought-after resources for over two decades. The ’90s brought additional new beginnings for the RRCA beyond membership growth. In 1996, the organization developed and launched the RRCA Certified Coaching Program under the direction of Roy Benson, and later Patti Finke. To date, the organization has trained and certified over 700 distance running coaches around the country. While participation in running boomed in the ’90s, elite American distance runners virtually disappeared as a factor in major U.S. and international road races. This decline was due, in part, to the lack of financial support for the athletes and the disappearance of running coverage on television. To raise awareness of the need to invest money in elite athlete development, the RRCA founded its Roads Scholar program in 1996, to provide grants directly to athletes for their training needs. In its second year, a young distance runner by the name of Deena (Drossin) Kastor, was named a Roads Scholar. Deena went on to win the Bronze medal in the marathon at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. The Roads Scholar program continues to invest in promising elite athletes.

Courtesy of Nike

PhotoRun.net

Continued on page 16

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Continued from page 14 In 2001, after 6 years of board service and 10 years of service as the RRCA’s first executive director, Henley Gabeau, retired from the organization. Within a year of Gabeau’s departure, leadership challenges emerged, and it was evident that the RRCA was in the throes of an organizational mid-life crisis. Over the next 4 years, the RRCA would experience turnover in staffing followed by downsizing in an effort to improve its financial position, which at one time reached negative net assets over $200,000. Despite the challenges it faced, the RRCA stayed true to its mission and a dedicated group of volunteers vowed to bring the organization back to prominence. In August 2005, the RRCA board of directors hired its third executive director since Gabeau’s departure in 2001. Jean Knaack, an experienced nonprofit professional dedicated to the sport, accepted the challenge of rebuilding the organization and, by the end of that year, the RRCA had significant, positive net assets for the first time in three years. The Board of Directors established an operating reserve fund to ensure long-term financial stability for the RRCA and, for the first time, developed financial management safeguards.

In 2006, the RRCA launched the Kids Run the Nation Fund for which it accepts restricted contributions and then, through an application and selection process, awards small grants to multi-week, youth running programs around the country. On the membership front, the RRCA rolls included more than 775 clubs and events. In 2008, the RRCA celebrated the 50th anniversary of its founding and our rich history in the successful development of running in the United States. At the conclusion of 2008, the RRCA boasted an all-time membership high of over 988 clubs and events. Nearly 200,000 people in the United States, from new runners to world recordholders, are members of an RRCA running club and millions of people run in its events nationwide. Our sport has come a long way in 50 years. As we enter our 51st year, the RRCA’s impact on the sport of running continues to be written.

This article was adapted from the official RRCA History by Gar Williams.

RRCA’S STRATEGIC DIRECTION Responsible Growth

10-Point Strategy For The Next 10 Years

The RRCA is a grassroots organization. But what does this mean? In reality, it means different things to different people, as there is no legal definition for the term grassroots as it relates to nonprofit organizations. However, academia has attempted to provide some framework for the term grassroots. According to Dr. Jo Anne Schneider, “Grassroots generally refers to local people working together or organizing to find solutions to problems in their communities. Grassroots organizations are often contrasted with organizations founded by outsiders.” Based on the general term grassroots, the RRCA is a grassroots organization. The RRCA is a national association of clubs and events, and our national office does not organize these entities locally. Organization of running clubs and events is the responsibility of local people. The RRCA in turn provides services, benefits, and programs to support the grassroots (locally organized) clubs and events. We do not dictate management or operations to our members, but we do provide guidelines and guidance on best practices. This is what makes the RRCA a grassroots organization. In support of our vision as a grassroots organization, the RRCA outlines the following strategies for responsible growth:

1. To be the leading authority on the organization of running clubs and training programs, and to be the largest association of grassroots running organizations in the United States that serves the needs of individual runners and makes their safety a top priority.

• The RRCA will engage in responsible growth which we define as growth that is beneficial to our members and the running community at large.

5. To be a leading force in ensuring that participation in running remains constant or grows over the next decade through community support of event hosting, longterm sustainability of local clubs, and maintenance and promotion of running as the most affordable form of regular exercise.

• The RRCA does not have a numerical growth goal for the number of running clubs, training programs, or event memberships to reach by 2018, because the RRCA is not directly responsible for the organization of these entities. We believe that for these entities to be successful, they must be organized by individuals in their communities with a vested interest in the success of the running club, training program, or event. • The RRCA’s growth goals are service-oriented as opposed to being financially or numerically motivated. The RRCA seeks to maintain and develop programs and services that current and potential members across our constituent base find valuable. We believe this investment in service delivery will maintain and continue to expand the existing membership base of the RRCA in the coming decade. • The RRCA will seek to minimize growth or the unintended consequences of growth that are detrimental to the overall well-being of the organization and its members as a whole. For example, the RRCA will develop and improve a baseline criteria checklist for new running clubs, training programs, and events to ensure these organizations are meeting minimum standards of safe operation. • The RRCA will continue to monitor the evolution of the delivery of long distance running in the U.S., and we will adapt to meet the needs of our members in order to sustain our membership base.

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2. To have sufficient financial support from members, sponsors, and individuals and to have leaders actively engaged in the solicitation of financial support to ensure organizational stability so the RRCA can be outward-focused in the promotion and support of running in the United States. 3. To be the leading authority and resource for the establishment of new grassroots running organizations and training and education programs for runners, running coaches, race directors, and other special interests that emerge as priorities as the sport evolves. 4. To have a major public profile and major name recognition as the leading voice of running in the United States, with increased use of “cutting edge” means of communication to reach out to the public.

6. To engage in best practices in organizational governance and management with the ability to adapt positively to a changing world along with generational leadership changes. 7. To continually invest in and improve existing programs/services, develop new programs and services that are beneficial to the members, and to seek maximum participation in our programs and services by our members. 8. To be a major, collaborative partner with health organizations and other running-related organizations as long as the partnerships enable the RRCA to achieve our strategic goals as an organization and for the sport of running. 9. To integrate elite American runners into the RRCA’s promotion of running in the United States in order to provide good role models for American youth runners. 10. To encourage all RRCA members to actively engage the next generation of runners to participate in running club activities.


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RRCA Championship Spotlight

RRCA National Marathon Championships Reported by Mark Winitz March 1, 2009

Peter Gilmore

WhenItClicks.com

Mary Coordt

WhenItClicks.com

The Kaiser Permanente Napa Valley Marathon in Napa, CA served as the RRCA National Marathon Championship. The marathon boasts one of the most beautiful courses in the world. Despite the rainy, but otherwise temperate conditions, a remarkable 1,822 runners (out of 1,895 starters) finished the 26.2-mile race that runs the length of the beautiful Napa Valley. Beginning in Calistoga, famous for its geysers and curative waters, the race winds south along the historic Silverado Trail to finish in Napa. It was the all-time highest finisher count for the race for the second year in a row. Californians Peter Gilmore, age 31, of San Mateo, and Mary Coordt, age 39, of Elk Grove, were named RRCA National Marathon Champions. Both runners registered clear-cut wins, finishing well ahead of their competition. Gilmore’s winning time was 2:23:05, the second-fastest men’s time at this race in the past 15 years. Coordt topped the women’s race with a finishing time of 2:48:54 and claimed her third RRCA National Marathon Champion title. Johannes Rudolph, age 43, of Boulder, CO, captured the RRCA Masters men’s title in 2:33:41, while Cinthya Vielma, age 42, of San Jose, CA, garnered the Masters women’s title with her time of 3:06:15. Visit www.napavalleymarathon.org for more information.

RRCA National 10K Championships Reported by Jean Knaack March 29, 2009

Trevor Ward

Kristi Rossi

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18 ClubRunning • S p r i n g / S u m m e r 2 0 0 9

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The Presidio 10 in San Francisco served as the RRCA National 10K Championship and was held in conjunction with the 51st Annual RRCA National Convention. Racers lined up at the starting line on the beautiful, sunny morning of race day. Shortly after the gun went off, runners were treated to a steep uphill climb to the Golden Gate Bridge. As the mass of runners crossed the bridge, they could see Jonathon Pierce already on his way back, running alone with a large gap between him and the rest of the pack. He won the RRCA National 10K Champion title with a time of 31:31. Pierce, a 2008 RRCA Roads Scholar grant recipient, is currently training with the Mammoth Track Club in Mammoth Lakes, CA. Kristi Rossi, age 40, from Hillsborough, CA was awarded both the RRCA National 10K Championship title and the RRCA Masters Champion title. She won the women’s race with a time of 41:23 and a pace of 6:39. The RRCA 10K National Male Master Champion title went to Sherwick Min, age 42, with a time

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of 40:51. The RRCA 10K National Grand Masters male and female winners were Trevor Ward from Merrimack, NH with a time of 41:50 and Mary Bihr of Petaluma, CA with a time of 53:10. Ward was in town with his wife, Leeann, who received the 2008 RRCA Out-

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standing Youth Program Director award. The Pamakid Runners were awarded the 2009 RRCA National Club Challenge Champions title at the event. Visit www.Presidio10.com for more information.

RRCA NATIONAL ULTRARUNNING CHAMPIONSHIP July 18–19, 2009 Tahoe Rim Trail Endurance Runs in Lake Tahoe, NV will serve as the 2009 National Ultra Championship. “A glimpse of heaven, a taste of hell” is how the race is described. This event is run in some of the high-elevation alpine and subalpine regions of the magnificent Sierra Nevada Mountains. The race begins and ends at Spooner Lake State Park, which sits at an altitude of 7,000 feet. The highest point on the course is just below the 9,214-foot Snow Valley Peak which, not surprisingly, also provides one of the best views of the course. The low point on the course is the bottom of the now-infamous Red House Loop (the aforementioned “taste of hell”) at approximately 6,800 feet. The race is hosted by the Tahoe Mountain Milers and the Sagebrush Stompers and is an all-volunteer–run event. Visit www.tahoemtnmilers.org/trt50/index.html for more information.

Pamakid Runners

Pamakid Runners

RRCA National 10 Mile Championships Reported by Frank McNally April 5, 2009

RRCA NATIONAL 5K CHAMPIONSHIP August 1, 2009

(l–r) Sally Meyerhoff Lineth Chepkurui

Dennis Steinauer

The Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile in Washington, DC served as the RRCA’s National 10 Mile Championship. The event is also part of the Professional Road Running Organization (PRRO) Circuit. Under ideal conditions on a mild, sunny day, Sally Meyerhoff, a 2008 RRCA Roads Scholar grant recipient, made history at the 37th annual Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile Run by setting the American record for a womenonly race. The 25-year-old Phoenix native posted a time of 54:38, breaking the old mark of 55:42, set by Turena Johnson Lane, a 2006 RRCA Roads Scholar grant recipient. Moroccan Ridouane Harroufi and Kenyan Lineth Chepkurui returned to defend their RRCA National 10 Mile Champion titles. Harroufi, age 27, broke away from a tight pack of six runners in the final 500 yards to finish with a first-place time of 45:56. He became the first competitor in a decade to break the 46-minute mark. Lineth Chepkurui, age 21, pulled away from a pack of 16 runners just after the 8-mile mark to win the women’s title with a time of 53:32. Virginians Ray Pugsley, age 40, from Reston, VA earned the RRCA 10 Mile Masters Champion title with a time of 52:08, along with Maureen

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Ackerly of Richmond, VA age 40, earning the female Masters title. RRCA 10 Mile Grand Master Champions were John Tuttle, age 50, of Villa Rica, GA, with a time of 55:42, and Beth Moras, age 50, from Ridgewood, NJ, who finished in 1:09:01. Visit www.cherryblossom.org for more information (l–r) Ridouane Harroufi, Ray Pugsley and John Tuttle

Woodstock 5K in Anniston, AL will serve as the 2009 National 5K Championship. The Woodstock 5K has been a local tradition for nearly 30 years and is an all-volunteer–managed event. In 2007, it received the RRCA Road Race of the Year award at the National RRCA Running Awards ceremony. The event has served as the RRCA Alabama State Championship as well as the RRCA Southern Region 5K Championship. Visit www.annistonrunners.com/woodstock/ for more information.

RRCA NATIONAL HALF MARATHON CHAMPIONSHIP August 22, 2009 Parkersburg News & Sentinel Half Marathon in Parkersburg, WV will serve as the 2009 National Half Marathon Championship. An all-volunteer–managed event hosted by the River City Runners Club, the race starts in downtown Parkersburg then proceeds on a rolling course that will take you out of the city and into the scenic surroundings of West Virginia before looping back into the commercial area. After running the last hill, you’ll finish the race to the cheers of spectators lining Market Street prior to the Parkersburg Homecoming Festival Parade. Visit http://newsandsentinel.com/halfmarathon for more information.

Bob Burgess

RRCA members also host championship events at the regional and state levels. You can find our complete championship calendar at www.RRCA.org/programs/championships.

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WE KNOW

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National Award Winners Spotlight

RRCA 2008 Road Runners of the Year

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Open Female – Kara Goucher Kara Goucher turned in a history-making American performance by finishing third in the 2008 New York City Marathon hosted by the RRCA’s oldest member, the New York Road Runners. Crossing the line in 2 hours, 25 minutes, 53 seconds, it was the fastest marathon debut ever by an American woman; it was the fastest time ever by an American at the ING New York City Marathon; and it marked the first time in 14 years that an American woman placed in the top three in New York. Goucher came out on top of a historic, three-

woman duel in the women’s 5000m at the 2008 Olympic Trials that saw American recordholder Shalane Flanagan, Jen Rhines, and Goucher scorch the track over the final three laps. With 300 meters to go, Goucher’s leg turnover increased noticeably. Off the final turn, she went full-throttle to move strongly, and permanently, into the lead, winning in 15:01.01. Goucher also made the Olympic team in the 10,000m after finishing as the runner-up in 31:37.72. —Courtesy of USATF

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Open Male – Ryan Hall Ryan Hall won the U.S. Men’s Olympic Marathon Trials in November 2007 in New York City in 2:09:02. He went on to finish a respectable 10th at the 2008 Olympic Games Marathon in Beijing with a time of 2:12:33. In February 2008, Hall competed at the 2008 USA Cross Country Championships in San Diego, finishing fifth. In April, he followed up with the fastest-ever marathon by a man born in the United States when he posted a 2:06:17 at the FLORA London Marathon. “He’s

the country’s premier marathoner and biggest star,” noted Road Runner of the Year selection panel member Jim Hage. As a youth, Hall was a standout in the junior striders program with the Big Bear Running Club, an RRCA affiliate member in his hometown of Big Bear, CA.

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Masters Female – Stephanie Herbst-Lucke In her marathon debut at the 2006 LaSalle Bank Chicago Marathon, Stephanie Herbst-Lucke was a force to be reckoned with, finishing second among the masters women in a time of 2:42:53. Her performance also made her one of the few women over the age of 40 to qualify for the 2008 Olympic Team Trials–Women’s Marathon, where she finished 59th overall and 3rd masters woman in a time of 2:45:14. She missed the U.S. master’s 10K record by only 5 seconds, finishing in third place

overall at the Boston Scientific Heart of Summer 10K in Minneapolis. The 42-year-old mother of three is a native of Chaska, MN, and was a ninetime All American distance runner at the University of Wisconsin from 1984–1988. “I am speechless,” responded Herbst-Lucke, when she learned of being named RRCA’s Masters Woman Road Runner of the Year. “This is a great honor considering the success of the members of the selection panel.”

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Masters Male – Dennis Simonaitis Dennis Simonaitis, who is from Draper, UT, won the USA national masters marathon crown in 2:27:23 at the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. He also set a U.S. 45–49 age-group record at the Carlsbad 5000 in April with his time of 14:47. Simonaitis was a two-time All American at the University of Lowell, Massachusetts two decades ago.

“Those 2:20:00s still come easy for him,” commented Road Runner of the Year selection panel member Frank Shorter.

Visit www.RRCA.org/programs/awards for the complete listing of RRCA Hall of Fame members, as well as all RRCA National Award winners.

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National Award Winners Spotlight

2009 RRCA Long Distance Running Hall of Fame Inductees Established in 1970, the RRCA Hall of Fame consists of runners who have shown long-term excellence in long-distance running and/or have made outstanding contributions to the sport. This year’s inductees are a two-time Olympian and a former world-record–setting marathoner.

Anne Marie Letko the best U.S. runner both years. In early 1996, Letko earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic marathon team when she finished third at the U.S. Marathon Trials in Columbia, SC. In 1999, she returned to the 10,000m on the track where she finished second at the U.S. National Track & Field Championships in 31:43, setting the stage for her attempt for a second Olympic team the next year. She missed a team berth in the 10,000m when she finished fourth. Her only hope of going to Sydney came down to the 5000m. She ran a personal best of 15:23 for a fifth-place finish. It turned out to be enough to secure a berth on her second Olympic team when two other 5000m qualifiers opted to compete in other events. After 2001, Letko retired from serious competition and now works as a massage and bodywork therapist with her own business, Sacred Space Massage & Bodywork, in Flemington, NJ.

PhotoRun.net

In the early ’90s Letko, who competed during some of her career by her then-married name of Lauck, signed a contract with Nike and began a professional career that lasted more than 10 years and included representing the United States in the 1996 and 2000 Olympics. Letko established herself early as one of the top U.S. 10,000-meter runners by winning the event at the 1991 World University Championships. After finishing second in the 1993 U.S. National Championships 10,000m in 32:01, she followed with a PR of 31:37 at the World Championships in Germany. That autumn, she made her marathon debut in New York City and, although she ran strong for 18 miles, she didn’t finish. She learned from that experience and returned in 1994 to finish third in 2:30:19, the best recent American finish in this race until Kara Goucher finished third in 2008. Including her other outstanding road race performances during those 2 years, Runner’s World rated her

Khalid Khannouchi in 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002. Throughout his career, Khannouchi and Chicago have proven to be a potent mix. He returned to Chicago in 1998 and ran almost as fast as he had the previous year (2:07:19) but finished second. The following year, he ran a world record 2:05:42 while winning Chicago for a second time. The year 2000 was significant in Khannouchi’s life: he became a U.S. citizen in May of that year. After running 2:08:36 in the FLORA London Marathon in the spring, he went back to Chicago as a U.S. citizen and won the Chicago Marathon for the third time in 2:07:01, a new American record. After a year plagued by injury, Khannouchi produced his most outstanding marathon performances in 2002. He lowered his world record in winning the London Marathon (2:05:38) in the spring and that fall won in Chicago for the fourth time (2:05:56), becoming the first runner to complete two sub-2:06 marathons in the same year.

PhotoRun.net

Although Khalid Khannouchi has not retired from running—as evidenced by his fourthplace finish in the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon—he has been selected for induction into the RRCA Hall of Fame based on his outstanding long distance performances during the first 37 years of his life. Khannouchi was born in Meknes, Morocco on Jan. 1, 1971 and moved to the United States in 1992 after being refused training assistance by Morocco’s track & field federation. While living with friends, he found a job in Brooklyn as a dishwasher and was able to begin serious training. By 1993, Khannouchi’s name began to appear among the top 20 road racers in America. But it wasn’t until 1997, when he won the LaSalle Bank Chicago Marathon in 2:07:10—the fastest marathon debut in history—that his name became one of the most recognized in running circles. That win, along with other outstanding road race performances, earned Khannouchi the top ranking by Runner’s World in 1997, an honor he also would attain

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National Award Winners Spotlight

RRCA National Awards The success of the RRCA and its clubs and events is firmly rooted in volunteerism. RRCA members have relied on the spirit of volunteers to carry out programs, find sponsors, distribute water, work finish lines, plus many other necessary and important tasks. It is in recognition of these volunteers that the RRCA developed the national running awards to acknowledge the service and commitment of outstanding volunteers to the running community. The national running awards include the RRCA Long Distance Running Hall of Fame; the Male and Female Runners of the Year and Masters Runners of the Year; the Outstanding RRCA Club Pres-

ident of the Year; the RRCA Outstanding Club Volunteer Award; the RRCA Journalism Awards for Outstanding Club Newsletter(s); Outstanding Club Writer; Journalism Excellence; the Outstanding Children’s Program Director Award; the Browning Ross Spirit of the RRCA Award; the Outstanding Beginning Running Program Award; the Outstanding State Representative of the Year; and the RRCA Road Race of the Year. Each award winner is chosen annually by a volunteer selection panel from the nominations submitted. For more information or to nominate a deserving individual, visit us online at www.RRCA.org/services/awards.

National Award-Winning Beginning Running Program In Maryland, the Howard County Striders (HCS) women’s running programs include Females in Training (FIT) and Getting Inspired to Run for Life (GIRL). Each spring, more than 100 women are exposed to a lifestyle of running through FIT. And each fall, through GIRL, over 50 women continue their spring commitment to a running lifestyle. Throughout the combined 25 weeks, volunteer coaches, many of whom are RRCA-certified, assist runners of all levels, encourage athletes to move beyond their starting points, teach race-day techniques, and promote club membership for a lifetime. FIT caters to beginning runners of all levels. Head coaches Bev Byron and Melissa (Missy) Burger strive to provide individual attention to all members. The women involved with FIT are split into three groups—walkers,

walk/runners, runners—designed to help the participants meet their goals, whether it’s running around the track once without stopping or finishing a 5K. The program also continually graduates beginning runners into the Next Step 5K training program, as well as the Next Step Half Marathon/Marathon training program. Aside from the large number of new participants year after year, what is most impressive about the HCS women’s program is how it engages women to become active members of Howard County Striders. Many club leaders have emerged from this program to volunteer in other areas of the club. From water stop volunteers to FIT/GIRL assistant coaches to board members of the club, FIT/GIRL has promoted a sense of club ownership among its participants. Courtesy of Howard County Striders

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Potluck Recipe Everything we do is geared towards helping you love RUNNING more.

Taco Salad According to a recent survey conducted by the RRCA, one of the top three reasons a person joins a local running club is for the social atmosphere. A great way for club members to socialize and keep costs low is to host potluck events. And since deciding what to bring to a potluck can sometimes be a bit of a challenge, Club Running offers one of our favorites to give you a headstart with a delicious recipe to bring to your next club social.

Mom’s Taco Salad In a saute pan, brown 1 lb. ground turkey breast. Drain off the fat and mix in 1/2 package of taco seasoning mix. Set aside to cool for a few minutes. While the meat is cooling, mix together the following ingredients in a large bowl:

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1 head of lettuce, washed, cored, and torn (or use a mix of romaine and iceberg or your favorite prepackaged salad mix) 2–3 large tomatoes, chopped 1/2 red onion, chopped (optional) 1 15 oz. can of black beans, drained and rinsed 1 15 oz. can of red beans, drained and rinsed 1 cup frozen cut corn, thawed 1 cup of shredded cheese (taco blend cheese mix) Mix in the cooled seasoned taco meat, followed by 1/2 cup of Thousand Island dressing using more or less as desired. The salad should be lightly coated, but not swimming in the dressing. Refrigerate in a covered serving bowl until your event. Once you arrive at your potluck event, mix in small, round tortilla chips or place the bag next to the serving bowl. If you mix the chips with the salad before you arrive at the event, they will get soggy. To submit your favorite original potluck recipe to share in Club Running, email us at share@rrca.org.

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Race Dir ector s’ Director ectors’ Meeting &T Trrade Show November 5-7, 2009 riott Hollyw ood Beac h Marriott Hollywood Beach Mar Hollyw ood, FL Hollywood, lude: or ‘09 Inc Include: Topics ffor Š Š Š Š Š Š

Maintaining Good Sponsor Relations Revitalizing Race Committees Greening Your Event Part II Maximizing Merchandise Sales Contingency Planning Adapting to Troubled Economic Times

FOR MORE INFO: www.rrm.com

RRM Race Director's Meeting 110 East State St., Suite 15 Kennett Square, PA 19348 610-925-1976 jdarman@kennett.net

Who Is the W or ld Wor orld ld’’s Best Race Dir ector? Director? Make Your Nomination Today! The annual Marathon Foto/Road Race Management Race Director of the Year Award, presented by Running Network, is the most prestigious award for directors of running events. Nominees are judged on several factors including overall ability, reputation of race, services provided, sponsor relations, creativity, and organizational ability. Š Honor a deserving race director Š Finalists and winner announced before an audience of their peers at the Road Race Management Race Š Directors’ Meeting, November 5 in Hollywood Beach, FL Š Don’t Delay. Nominations close Sept. 15 Marathon Foto/RRM For nomination forms, Race Director of the Year Jeff Darman visit www.rrm.com 110 East State St., Suite 15 or send an SASE to: Kennett Square, PA 19348 (610) 925-1976

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Inaugural Issue Club Running  

Inaugural Issue of Club Running

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