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Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, & Near Eastern Antiquities

Celebrating our 72nd Anniversary

Volume XXV - 2014

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No. 92 - Art of the Ancient World - Vol. XXV - January 2014 We are pleased to issue this catalog celebrating our 72nd anniversary of dealing in classical numismatics and our 60th year of dealing in ancient art. It illustrates in full color 220 selected antiquities priced from $1,250 to over $600,000. This publication is one of a continuing series primarily illustrating new acquisitions featured in our New York galleries, where over two thousand fine works of art are on permanent display. All of the antiquities in this catalog are displayed at our New York gallery, the largest and most extensive collection of the ancient arts ever exhibited for sale. In addition to the many masterworks of ancient art, there is a wide variety of fine items on display priced from $100 to $1,000 and up, including Greek and Roman coins and Old Master prints and drawings, perfect for the beginning collector or for that very special gift. A few of the pieces illustrated may not be available since they were sold while the catalog was in preparation, but a number of other newly acquired objects will be on display in our New York gallery and on our website: www.royalathena.com, updated weekly.

We unconditionally guarantee the authenticity of every work of art sold by Royal-Athena Galleries. ©2013 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Inc. Composed and printed in the United States of America.

Every object purchased by our galleries has been legally acquired. If imported by us into the United States, we have done so in compliance with all federal regulations and have given full consideration to all international treaties governing objects of cultural importance. Antiquities priced at $10,000 or more are now checked and registered with the Art Loss Registry in London. All of our objects are clearly labeled with complete descriptions and prices. Condition reports on all the objects are available upon request. We encourage browsing and are happy to assist and advise both the amateur and the serious collector. We urge our prospective clients to ‘shop around’, for we are proud of our quality, expertise, and competitive pricing. Appointments may be arranged outside of regular gallery hours for clients desiring privacy. Updated price lists for our catalogs are available upon request. For terms and conditions of sale see the inside back cover. COVER PHOTOS: no. 171 Egyptian large limestone deep bust of Tuthmosis III, reigned 1504-1450 BC. H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm.); Back cover: no. 170 Large Egyptian Middle Kingdom limestone relief of Senusret, XIIth Dynasty, ca. 1991-1778 BC. H. 32 5/8 in. (83 cm.)

Text and catalog design by Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., and F. Williamson Price Photography by Ramon Perez

We will be exhibiting at BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 8-13, 2013 TEFAF, The European Fine Arts Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 14-23, 2014 BAAF Brussels, The Brussels Ancient Art Fair, Brussels, Belgium, June 4-8, 2014 BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 7-12, 2014 (Check our website to confirm the dates)

royal-athena galleries established 1942 153 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022 Tel.: (212) 355-2034 Fax.: (212) 688-0412 ancientart@aol.com Monday-Saturday, 10 - 6

Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D. Director

VISIT OUR WEBSITE, updated weekly with our latest acquisitions:

www.royalathena.com

Royal-Athena at Seaby 14 Old Bond Street London W1S 4PP UK By appointment Tel.: (44) 780-225-8000 Fax.: (44) 18-8334-4772


Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, Near Eastern, & Prehistoric Antiquities

Volume XXV - 2014 Table of Contents CLASSICAL ART Greek Marble Sculptures Roman Marble Sculptures Roman Mosaics Greek Bronze Sculptures Etruscan Bronze Sculptures Roman Bronze Sculptures, etc. Ancient Terracottas Early Greek Vases Attic Black-figure Vases Attic Red-figure Vases South Italian Vases Etruscan Vases Roman Pottery & Lamps Ancient Glass Ancient Jewelry

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3 6 15 17 20 21 36 38 40 48 51 62 65 66 67

ANCIENT VARIA BYZANTINE ART

68 72

EGYPTIAN ART Egyptian Stone Sculptures and Reliefs Egyptian Bronze Sculptures Egyptian Ushabtis Egyptian Wood Objects Faiyum Potrait Egyptian Varia

74 76 80 82 85 86

NEAR EASTERN ART

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COLLECTING ANCIENT ART 94 ROYAL-ATHENA GALLERIES 94 Expertise and Ethics 95 Royal-Athena Galleries Catalogs Inside back cover

Photo above: Apulian monumental red-figure hydria by the White Saccos Painter ; detail. Ca, 320-310 BC. H. 37 1/4 in. (94.6 cm.) P. 53, no. 114.


Introduction As we enter our 60th year of dealing in ancient art and our 72nd year in Classical numismatics we are pleased to present in our 92nd publication an outstanding selection of antiquities assembled primarily from old collections in the United States and Europe. A large number of these objects were originally purchased from us over the past several decades and we are delighted to offer them again to a new generation of enthusiasts. We are pleased to offer in this catalog a good number of antiquities that have been purchased from us over the past several decades including a superb limestone bust of Tuthmosis III, the famous Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty, acquired from us by the late Maestro Giuseppe Sinopoli in 1996. Also reacquired by us from the Dr. E. collection of North Carolina are an exceptional Roman marble sculpture of the Aphrodite Kallipygos, a fine Roman marble portrait bust of a lady, and a rare Paestan red-figure bell krater depicting the blind Thracian bard Thamyris and Kadmos, the founder of Thebes. We have devoted over half a century to selling carefully attributed works of art with particular attention to their provenance. This diligence has resulted in an astonishingly low percentage of claims against legal ownership – less than 0.0006% or one out of every 2000 objects! In view of the increasing legislation being passed in several countries to restrict the trade in illegally exported antiquities (which we applaud), we may assure our clients that we continue to proudly conduct a very ethical business and take all of the proper steps to insure that our inventory is free of any possible claims. It is with great pride and delight that we celebrate our 72nd year! Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph. D.

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Greek Marble Sculptures 1 IMPORTANT CYCLADIC MARBLE IDOL OF A RECLINING FEMALE OF THE EARLY SPEDOS TYPE An elegant stylized nude figure, her arms are folded beneath her breasts, her slender lyre-shaped head with wedge-shaped nose and long oval neck;incised details, with traces of red pigment and strong root marks. Early Bronze Age II, ca. 2600-2500 BC. H. 9 11/16 in. (24.6 cm.) Ex collection of Vivian ands David Campbell, Toronto, acquired in the mid-1980s; Sotheby’s New York, 7 December 2005, lot 43; private collection, Amsterdam. Published: E. Merrin, Masterpieces of Cycladic Art, New York, 1989, no. 14.

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2 HELLENISTIC MARBLE STATUE OF SEATED CYBELE The Great Mother goddess enthroned, wearing a himation and polos, holding a patera, a small lion resting on her lap. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 10 in. (25.4 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, acquired ca. 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 3. Cf. G. Richter, Catalogue of Greek Sculptures in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1954, no. 127, pp. 75-76; G. Hanfmann & N. Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis, 1978, no. 259, pp. 169-170, fig. 447. Originally a Phrygian goddess, she is the deification of the Earth Mother, goddess of fertile earth, caverns and mountains, walls and fortresses, nature and wild animals. 3

LATE HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF ISIS turned to her right, her wavy hair parted in the center, bound in a diadem, and falling in a broad plait over the nape of the neck and in a thick tress behind each ear, a hole on top of the head for insertion of the missing crown. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Hermasn S. Gundersheimer (19032004), Philadelphia, acquired in Europe in the 1950s; thence by descent to a New England collector.

4 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF APHRODITE, Her head turned to her right, her wavy hair centrally-parted and swept back into a chignon at the nape of her neck, held with a diadem around her head, her oval face with soft almond-shaped eyes and full pouting lips. Ca. 1st Century BC. H. 5 in. (12.7 cm.) Ex Belgian private collection, acquired in 1971. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXII, 2011 no. 3.

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Visit our website, updated weekly, to view more of the nearly 100 marble sculptures in our current inventory as well as our latest acquisitions. www.royalathena.com

5 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS, PROBABLY APHRODITE, her centrally parted hair pulled back and up into a topknot. 2nd – 1st Century BC. H. 5 1/4 in. (13.3 cm) Ex collection of Eduardo Alonso, Switzerland (Barcelona, Catalunia, Spain), 1960’s. 6 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS, depicted with her head turned and tilted left, the wavy hair parted at the center, bound in a band, the sides rolled back and tied in a chignon. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 5 1⁄4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex Frederico Castelluccio collection, assembled in the 1950s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 4.

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Roman Marble Sculptures 7 ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF APHRODITE KALLIPYGOS The goddess of erotic love with her left hand raised over her head, lifting her garment to expose her nude posterior. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 36 5/8 in. (93.2 cm.) Ex Emmanuele Segredakis (1890-1948), Paris, ca.1940; G.M. collection, Paris; Jean-Loup Despras, Paris; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2000. Published: K. Parlasca, Aphrodite Kallipygos, Scriptorum, 2007, fig. 6. Cf. for the type: Naples Museum, no. 288, published: S. Reinach, Repertoire de la Statuaire Grecque et Romaine, vol. I, p. 328, fig. 611, 1916. The Naples example is heavily restored. To the best of our knowledge, this sensual sculpture is one of only five known marble examples of which three are just fragments. Our ‘Aphrodite of the beautiful buttocks’ is by far the most complete example known.

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8 ROMAN MARBLE HECATEION depicting the triple-aspected Hecate Dadhouchos as protector of the home and guardian of the soul, holding torches surmounted by a crescent moon and bust of Sol Invictus. Ca. 3rd Century AD. H. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm.) Ex English collection sold at Sotheby’s, London, July 17, 1985, lot 311; W. H. collection, Westport, Connecticut; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from RoyalAthena in 2004. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 26. A rare inclusion of Sol Invictus and crescent at the top. Often erected at crossroads, this meta-form votive, representing a turning point, well demonstrates her role over choices. 9 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE BEARDED HERCULES A typical representation of the demi-god and hero with short curly hair and beard. Ca. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (29.6 cm.) Ex collection of J-P. Mariaud de Serres, Paris, France, acquired before 2000.

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10 ROMAN ROSSO ANTICO MARBLE HERM BUST OF HERMES (MERCURY), the herald and messenger of the gods, god of both mortal and divine travellers, bassed upon a Hellenistic type, ultimately derived from the sculpture of Alkamenes, ca. 400 BC. Very fine style. Later 2nd Century AD. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.7 cm.) Ex Jean-David Cahn, auction no. 2, 2000, no. 316; Struhe collection, Berlin. As religious sculpture, herms were often carved in an archaizing style in order to give them an air of ancient sanctity. During Roman times, herms lost their religious significance and became a popular garden and courtyard ornament. 11 ROMAN SMALL MARBLE HEAD OF ASKLEPIOS, the god of healing, with flowing hair centrally parted and bound by a diadem. 2nd Century AD. H. 2 1/2 in . (6.3 cm.) Ex French private collection, purchased from the Drouot, Paris, circa 1972.

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12 ROMAN MARBLE BUST OF THE EMPEROR DOMITIAN , AD 81-96 An idealized bust of Titus Flavius Caesar Domitianus, wearing the corona triumphalis and a cuirass, the buckles of which remain on the shoulders. Ca. AD 81-96. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex English private collection acquired in 1980. Published: Summa Galleries, catalogue 1, 1976, no. 46. The third and last emperor of the Flavian dynasty, he was an enlightned despot whose various programs led the way to the peace of the second century.


13 ROMAN MARBLE LIFE-SIZE PORTRAIT BUST OF A PATRICIAN in imago clipeato, sensitively carved with luxuriant hair framing his powerful, expressive face that combines the vigor of young manhood with thoughtful maturity. He wears a chiton and toga. Ca. AD 130-140. H. 24 7/8in. (63 cm.) Ex Abraham Ahdout collection, Israel, acquired in 1982 11 from his father Soly Ahdout who acquired it in Paris in the 1950s.


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14 ROMAN IMPERIAL MARBLE PORTRAIT BUST OF A LADY turned to her left and wearing a stola and palla, her face with thoughtful expression, high cheek-bones, her imperial coiffure parted and drawn behind the ears and up into a tiered turban of braids, small incised curls escaping at the temples. Early Hadrianic, ca. AD. 120-125. H. 25 in. (63.5 cm.) Ex Stora Sundby Castle, Eskilstuna, Sweden, collected in the 18th Century; Swedish private collection, acquired in 1912; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2002.


15 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF APHRODITE, the goddess of erotic love, her head turned slightly to her left, her hair swept back, arranged in a chignon and top knot and bound with a diadem. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 11 3/8 in. (29 cm.) Ex collection of Michel Gaud, Saint Tropez, France, acquired in the early 1980s. 16 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A SEVERAN MATRON, the lady with almond-shaped eyes and high cheekbones, her hair with a middle parting, wavy at the side and pulled to a wide bun. Below is a protuberant wreath of her own hair framing the face. 3rd Century AD. H. 9 1/2 in. (24 cm.) Ex Bavarian private collection, acquired in 1990. 17 ROMAN MARBLE RELIEF FRAGMENT: DEEP BUST OF A SOLDIER Probably from a battle sarcophagus, depicting a soldier turning to his left, wearing a helmet with chin strap, and a cuirass with a pleated tunic underneath. 2nd Century AD. H. 6 3/4 in (17 cm.) Ex Joseph Klein collection, formed in New York between 1941 and 1980; thence by descent. 18 ROMAN MARBLE STELE SECTION DEPICTING A WARRIOR mounted on horseback, wearing a tunic and carrying a double-headed ax. This could be a representation of Hercules. 4th Century AD. H. 13 3/8 in.(34 cm.); W. 11 7/8 in. (30 cm.) Ex Morkramer collection, acquired in the 1960s.

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Roman Mosaics 19 ROMAN POLYCHROME MOSAIC OF A FEMALE BUST, probably of a goddess or a representation of a Season. Ex Brussels art market, May 1989; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. V, pt. 1, 1988, no. 10.

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20 ROMAN POLYCHROME MOSAIC ROUNDEL: WINGED HEAD OF MEDUSA with entwined serpents. Ca. 1st Century AD. D. 22 1/2 in. (57.2 cm.) Unusually colorful tesserae. Ex collections of Dr. Jacob Hirsch; Morton D. May, St. Louis (from Royal-Athena in 1965); Dr. J. R. Little, Salisbury, North Carolina (from Royal-Athena in 1968); James Alsdorf, Chicago, Illinois (acquired from Royal-Athena in 1982); M.P. (1925-2013), La Jolla, California (acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987. 19th Century restoration on wings and in field. 21 ROMAN POLYCHROME MARBLE AND CALCITE MOSAIC: BUST OF A YOUNG MAN with long hair on a red background within a frame of gray diamond lozenges on black, bordered by white. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. & W. 23 1/4 in. (59 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired in Beirut in the 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 31.

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Greek Bronze Scu lpt ures 22 EAST GREEK BRONZE GRIFFIN PROTOME joined to two converging sections of a rod tripod. 6th Century BC. H. 4 1â „4 in. (10.8 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Catalogue of the Greek, Bronzes in the Collection of John Kluge, 1992, no. 88-60; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 27. Exhibited: From Olympus to the Underworld, Ancient Bronzes from the Kluge Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1996. Published: This griffin protome is thought to join a fragment in the collection of the French School of Classical Studies in Athens, no. 135, pl. 45 in Rolley. 23 GREEK BRONZE NUDE KOUROS The youth has long hair falling to the neck, his left leg advancing; his left arm bent at the elbow and raised slightly. Late 6th Century BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) Ex English collection. From the northern Peloponnese, perhaps Olympia.

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24 GREEK BRONZE KORE wearing a mantle, the left hand holding garment, the right arm outstretched. Magna Graecia, ca. 500 BC. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.) Ex Satel collection; collection of F. M., West Bloomfield, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987.


25 HELLENISTIC BRONZE NUDE APOLLO after a Greek original of the 4th century BC, in Polykleitan style. Ca. 1st Century BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.8 cm.) Ex E.K. collection, Canton, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1987-2005. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 33. 26 HELLENISTIC BRONZE NUDE POSEIDON (NEPTUNE), his right leg raised upon a rocky outcrop, his left arm raised to hold a staff or trident. Based upon the Isthmian Poseidon by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor Lysippos. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.3 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2001, no. 47. Cf. D. Mitten/S. Doeringer, Master Bronzes from the Classical World, 1968, no 128, pl 129.

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27 HELLENISTIC BRONZE ATHENA wearing a horned helmet and a long peplos tied under her breasts, her raised left hand once supporting a scepter or spear and in her right hand is a phiale. Inlaid silver eyes. Extremely fine style. Variegated green and reddish-brown patina. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.5 cm.) Ex private Swiss collection, acquired in the 1970s. Cf. The terracotta from Pella in the exhibition The Search for Alexander, 1980, no. 150.

Our stock of ancient bronzes numbers over 300 museum quality examples. For an overview consult our recent catalogues, visit our New York gallery, or go to:

www.royalathena.com

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E tru scan B ronze Scu lptu res 28 ETRUSCAN BRONZE NUDE HERAKLES wearing a lion skin and and wielding a club made separately from a twisted strip of bronze. Probably Vulci, ca. 500-490 BC. H. 5 3/8 in. (13.5 cm.) Ex French collection; Swiss private collection; R.G. collection, Calodyne, Mauritius, acquired 1977-85. Published & exhibited: I. Jucker, Italy of the Etruscans, Israel Museum, 1991, no. 135. Fine dark olive-green patina. 29 ETRUSCAN BRONZE FEMALE VOTARY wearing a long peplos with incised folds, which she grasps with her left hand. Her right hand is slightly extended to her right, palm forward and stiffly opened thumb upward. Ca. 6th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex Prof. Hugo Munsterberg (1916-1995) collection, New Paltz, New York, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1972. 30 ETRUSCAN BRONZE FIGURES OF HERMES AND PENELOPEIA She was one of the Dryad nymphs of Mount Kyllene in Arkadia, the beautiful goddesses of the oaks and pines, poplar and ash, apple and laurel. She bore a son, Pan, to Hermes. Probably from the top of a candelabrum. Ca. 400 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm) Ex South German private collection, acquired 1970s. Cf M. Cristofani (Ed.), CiviltĂ  degli 20 etruschi, 1985, Cat.156, no. 6.26.3.


Roman Bronze Scu lpt ures 31 ROMAN BRONZE ENTHRONED ZEUS SERAPIS wearing a modius atop the masses of wavy hair and a himation around the long tunic; his raised left hand once held a staff. The throne and footstool have engraved embellishments. At his right foot sits Cerberus, the threeheaded dog who guards the underworld. In three sections. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm.) Ex private English collection since the mid 1980s. Based upon a 3rd Century BC original by Bryaxis. 32 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE HERMES (MERCURY) WITH BABY DIONYSOS, wearing a laurel wreath on his winged head. In his right hand he holds a caduceus and with his left hand supported by a column, he holds the infant; a cloak is draped from his shoulder over his left forearm. Very rare type, in very fine style. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex German collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 46.

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33 ROMANO-CELTIC BRONZE NUDE ZEUS (JUPITER) HOLDING A THUNDERBOLT, a cloak over his left shoulder. Ca. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 5/8 in. (6.7 cm.) Ex Bandy collection, Rochester, Michigan. Exhibited: University of Miami, Lowe Museum of Art, 1987-95; Ball State University Art Museum, 1995-2002. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, 2003, no. 44. 34 ROMAN BRONZE MERCURY (HERMES) wearing a plumed and winged helmet, baldric, a chlamys over his right shoulder. In his left hand he supports a cornucopia and in his right hand is a bag of money. At his right foot a miniature ram. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.5 cm.) Ex German private collection. 35 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE MERCURY (HERMES) The messenger of the gods wears a petasos and chlamys, and holds a purse in his right hand; he holds a fragmented kerykeion in his left hand; a ram is at his feet. On an ancient drum-shaped plinth. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired in the 1980s.

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36 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF DIONYSOS RECLINING ON A PANTHER SKIN in languid pose, his himation covering only the lower portion of his body. His right arm is raised and resting on his laurelcrowned head. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 4 3/8 in. (11 cm.) Ex German private collection. 37 ROMAN BRONZE WINGED NUDE EROS (CUPID) Love’s messenger stands in a relaxed pose, his face framed by long curls. He holds a goat’s head rhyton in his raised right hand; on a circular stepped base. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 9 1/8 in. (23.2 cm.) Ex private French collection; acquired in Paris, March 2001. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 47. 38 ROMAN BRONZE PANTHEISTIC EROS The winged god depicted nude, standing with his weight on the right leg, the left leg crossed in front, wearing a winged helmet, a cape draped around his shoulders, his left arm resting on a column, the right raised to reach the quiver on his back. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 3 1/4 in . (8.3 cm.) Ex English private collection, acquired on the New York art market in the 1990s.

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39 ROMAN BRONZE MITHRAS The Eastern sun god wears a tall peaked cap with lappets, an orientalstyled short tunic, a long himation, and leggings; holding a patera. 1st Century BC/1st Century AD. H. 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm.) Ex E.K. collection, Canton, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1987. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1987-1996; Ball State University Art Museum, Muncie, Indiana, 1996-2005. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 48. 40 GALLO-ROMAN SILVER-COVERED BRONZE APPLIQUE BUST OF APOLLO, his long locks falling over his shoulders and chest, and tied in a bow atop his head. 2nd Century AD. L. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex collection of Jerome Soubriez, Paris, France. Said to have been found in Normandy, the metal below is most probably a potin alloy of copper, tin, and lead that was most often used by the Gallic tribes. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 64.

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41 ROMAN BRONZE GROUP: HERCULES WRESTLING ANTAEUS, the hero standing with his knee bent, his left leg flexed, his head tilted to his left and angled downward, with thick curly beard and wavy locks, lifting the earth Antaeus up in the air, depriving him of his strength. Hercules gripping his opponent to his right with both arms around his waist, his hands clasped at his navel, Antaeus struggling to be freed, his left leg kicking back, his hands clasping Hercules’ arms. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.6 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, London, July 13, 1970, lot 163; J. Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals, 2006, no. 62. 42 ROMAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM IN THE FORM OF A HERM OF HERCULES, wearing the lion’s skin draped around his shoulders, his head surmounted by a fillet with floret remaining on one side, eyes inlaid with silver. Very fine style. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.); H.with handle 8 3/8 in. (21.2 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, New York, May 20, 1982, no. 135.

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43 EARLY IMPERIAL ROMAN BRONZE NUDE ODYSSEUS RUNNING The hero is depicted lunging forward on his left leg, the right extending back, his muscular torso twisted, his arms bent, the right held forth, the left pulled back at the shoulder, his head turned sharply to his right, wearing a pilos helmet high on his head, with a full beard and thick curls framing his face. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 5 in. (12.7 cm.) Very fine style. A rare depiction. Ex C. Newhall collection, Owings Mills, MD. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, part II, 1995, no. 37. Odysseus' stance recalls his position on the massive sculptural group of the Blinding of Polyphemus from Sperlonga. See fig. 10 in D. Buitron, et al., The Odyssey and Ancient Art (1992). 44 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE RULER OR PRINCE in the guise of the youthful, nude Hercules, wearing a band diadem; nipples once inlaid. Ca. AD 170-190. H. 6 1/4 in. (15.87 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. X, 1999, no. 48.

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45 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APOLLO standing with his weight on his right leg; his right arm raised atop his head, the left arm leaning upon a kithara, which is standing upon an altar. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.) Ex private collection, Beverly Hills, CA. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 83. 46 ROMAN BRONZE SEATED MUSICIAN PLAYING THE DOUBLE PHRYGIAN TIBIA wearing a short chiton and boots. This instrument uses a reed for generating a warm and buzzy sound and is a forerunner of the oboe. A very rare representation, possibly unique in bronze. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 61. 47 ROMAN BRONZE THRAEX GLADIATOR wearing a loin cloth with protective waist-belt, and armored guards for his shins, sword arm, and shoulder; with crested helmet and rectangular shield; sword lacking. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired in the 1980s. 48 ROMAN LARGE BRONZE HIGH RELIEF RADIATE BUST OF HELIOS The sun god is depicted in high relief on a square fitting from a boat or chariot. Late 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.); W. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.) Ex Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, 1984; acquired at Sotheby’s, London, July 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 148.

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49 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE ISISAPHRODITE wearing a headdress centering a plumed lunar disk between Hathor horns; flanked by grain ears atop a uraeus circlet, all upon the back of a vulture. In her left hand she holds an apple and in her right she holds a bird. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 9 1/2 in. (24 cm.) Ex private collection, Japan, ca.1960s; Gallery Sakae, Nagoya, Japan.

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50 ROMAN BRONZE ATHENA (MINERVA) wearing a long chiton, aegis, and a Corinthian helmet surmounted by a sphinx. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods and Mortals, 1989, no. 105. Ex E.K. collection, Canton, Michigan, acquired from the Royal-Athena Galleries in 1990. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1990-2005.

51 ROMAN BRONZE HEAD OF ATHENA wearing a Corinthian helmet. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.8 cm.) Ex collection of Lord McAlpine of West Green, England; J.M.E. collection, New York. acquired from Lord McAlpine in July 1988. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 144.

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52 ROMAN BRONZE ISIS-FORTUNA, the pantheistic Romano-Egyptian goddess of fortune and destiny. 2nd Century AD. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.2 cm.) Ex M. de Clercq collection, France, late 1800s; ex N.K. collection, Geneva, Switzerland. Published: A. de Ridder, 'Collection de Clercq', vol. III, Les Bronzes, Paris, 1905, p. 215, no. 308. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, 60. 53 ROMAN BRONZE DIANA (ARTEMIS) WITH ROEBUCK AND HOUND She wearing a short chiton and boots, her hair pulled back into a bun on top of her head; the animals leaping. All on a hexagonal spool-shaped plinth. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 3 1/2 in. (8.8 cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired 1980s. Diana was the moon goddess and virgin huntress.

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54 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APHRODITE (VENUS) wearing a diadem, a breast band (strophion) wrapped around her upper torso, a cloak over her left shoulder and right thigh. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 56. 55 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE BUST OF A FEMALE WEARING A DIADEM, possibly a Ptolemaic queen as Isis. 1st Century BC/AD. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 36. Cf. K. Parlasca, Trauernde Isis, Euthenia oder “Aegyptus capta?, Antike Welt, 34, 2003, pp. 161164. See also J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2000, no. 54.

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56 ROMAN BRONZE STANDING GIRL wearing a long belted peplos. The right arm is bent, the left one is lowered. Both hands probably once held ritual objects. This is likely a representation of one of the arktoi (little bears), who performed the bear dance in the Artemision at Brauron in Attica. Appealing green patina. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex German collection acquired in the early 1980s. Cf. C. Vermeule and A. Brauer, Stone Sculptures, Harvard, 1990, no. 27; M. True and A. Herrmann, A Passion for Antiquities: The Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman Collection, no. 50. Bronze filled with lead; arms worked separately and reattached; 57 ROMAN BRONZE HEAD OF SERAPIS After the original by Bryaxis, sculpted for the great temple of Serapis on the Hill of Rhacotis in Alexandria in 280 BC. Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.8 cm.) Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 19852003. Ex Skupa collection, New Baltimore, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 39.

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58 ROMAN BRONZE INCENSE BURNER decorated with a marine theme, the body of cylindrical form, with incised bands and attached to the long handle by scrolling motifs, surmounted by a figural group, probably of Europa and the bull. The female figure's right hand resting between the bull's horns, her left on its shoulder, the end of the handle forming the tail of a sea centaur, his right arm raised and left hand on his hip, the forelegs arching, the hooves on an integral rectangular base. A very rare type. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 11 3/4 in. (29.8 cm.) Ex German private collection, Munich, formed in the 1980s; UK private collection, acquired in 1997.

59 ROMANO-BRITISH BRONZE VESSEL MOUNT: FOREPART OF PEGASUS emerging from a burst of foliage. This has been published by M. Henig in the Antiquaries Journal (1983), p. 361, f, pl.L; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, IV, 1985, no. 319. Ex Mildenhall, Suffolk, England; R.K. collection, Drayton Plains, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1985. Exhibited: Kresge Art Museum, MSU, 1985-1994; Ball State University Museum 1994-2005; Fitchburg Art Museum 2010-2013. 60 ROMAN BRONZE BULL, STRIDING, his head slightly turned to the right. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 3/4 in. (8 cm.); L. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.) Ex German private collection.

61 ROMAN BRONZE OPENWORK FITTING DEPICTING A HUNT Within the rectangular frame a deer is attacked by a panther; below, two dogs hunt rabbits.; copper inlays accentuate the eyes of the animals and the dots of the panther´s skin. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 5 1/8 in. (13.2 cm); H.. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex Munich private collection, acquired in the 1980s.

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62 ROMAN BRONZE OVER LIFE-SIZE RIGHT FOREARM in a relaxed pose, from a monumental statue of a woman, the fingers adorned in the casting with rings. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 16 1/8 in. (41 cm.) Ex English private collection acquired in 1981. 63 ROMAN BRONZE RAISED LEFT ARM According to its posture it once belonged to an enthroned or standing figure of Zeus or Poseidon holding the scepter or trident with the left hand. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex American private collection acquired in 1980. Cf. Greek, Etruscan and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, p. 115, no. 122, p. 116, no. 123; Sammlung Loeb, Poseidon Loeb, p. 82 f, no. 33.

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64 ARCHAIC GREEK TERRACOTTA STANDING GODDESS Wearing a polos and a long chiton, her hair falling on the shoulders of her mantle; her hands are open and pressed against her abdomen. Ca. 6th Century BC. H. 7 1/2 in. (19.5 cm.) Acquired at the Dorotheum in Vienna, February 2001. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 68. 65 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA SEATED WOMAN HOLDING AN INFANT, her hair combed into a melon coiffure pulled into a bun at the back; traces of original pigments. 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17 cm.) Ex collection of Mme. Sautereau, Paris, acquired from Mythes & Legendes, Paris, in the 1980s. 66 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA WOMAN OF FASHION wearing a diadem, standing in a relaxed pose, wrapped in a himation; traces of white paint remaining. 3rd Century BC. H. 7 in. (18 cm.) Ex French collection. 67 GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A FEMALE with three rows of short, curly hair. Traces of red and white pigment still extant. Magna Graecia, mid 5th Century BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16 cm.) Ex German private collection.

Ancient Terracottas

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68 HELLENISTIC LARGE TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A WOMAN, her hair combed into a melon coiffure partially hidden by a saccos; wearing disc earrings. 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex collection of Maria Zechner, France & Austria. 69 ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA FEMALE VOTIVE HEAD, the youthful features framed by hair falling in curls, secured at the top with a fillet, a himation drawn over the back of the head. 4th-2nd Century BC. H. 6 in. (15 cm.) Ex collection of Jay Ward, Los Angeles, acquired before 1950. An old collection label on the bottom inscribed in ink. 70 ROMAN TERRACOTTA LAMP IN THE FORM OF A HIPPOCAMP A rare type in extremely fine style. Ca. 1st Century AD. L. 4 7/8 in (12.1 cm.); H. 4 1/2 in (11.4 cm.) Ex collection of Jean-André Perichon-Bey, 1860-1929?, Rodah, Egypt, and Paris, France, acquired before 1903. 71 ROMAN TERRACOTTA SQUATTING BAUBO with legs drawn up and partially draped, hands raised up palms forward; wearing jewelry and an elaborate coiffure. Alexandria, ca. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) Ex English collection sold at Christie’s, London, December 1993. Very fine style.

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72 MYCENAEAN LARGE POTTERY STIRRUP JAR, decorated in brownish slip with four spikey spirals on the shoulder and banding encircling the globular body. Late Helladic III, ca. 1350-1250 BC. H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 70.

Early Greek Vases

73 MYCENAEAN LARGE POTTERY STIRRUP JAR, the body with a band of zig-zags with four arcs at each right angle; the top with dotted lines. In unusually fine condition for a vase of this size. Late Helladic III, ca. 1350-1250 BC H. 11 1/2 in. (29.3 cm.) Acquired at the Dorotheum, Vienna, June 2000. Cf. R. Higgins, Minoan and Mycenaean Art, London, 1981, no. 127. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 197. 74 MYCENAEAN POTTERY PIRIFORM JAR Decorated in orangish slip with a scale design on the shoulder and banding encircling the body; three small arching handles are attached to the shoulder. Ca. 1350-1250 BC. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm.) Ex English collection, acquired at Christies, 12/7/72, no. 91. 75 BOEOTIAN MIDDLE GEOMETRIC POTTERY CHOUS with rounded body, cylindrical neck with rim turned outwards slightly, and tall handle. Dots and dotted lozenges, stripes. Rare type. Early 8th Century BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8.1 cm. ) Ex private collection, Switzerland. Cf. J. N. Coldstream, Greek Geometric Pottery: A Survey of Ten Local Styles and Their Chronology, London, 1968, pl. 42, h-j. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 68.

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76 ATTIC GEOMETRIC POTTERY HIGH-RIMMED BOWL with two spotted serpentine handles, a spotted band around the lip, and filled sawtooth band around waist. Late Geometric II, ca. 8th Century BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.); W. 6 5/8 in. (17 cm.) Cf: K. Schauenberg, et al, Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, HeidelbergUniversit채t, Munich, 1954, vol. 3, fig. 8. 77 LATE CORINTHIAN POTTERY ARYBALLOS BY THE HERZEGOVINA PAINTER A siren with outspread wings; rosettes in the field. Ca. 580-560 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) Ex New York private collection, acquired at the Drouot, Paris. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 71. 78 CORINTHIAN POTTERY ARYBALLOS BY THE FALDETTA PAINTER, spherical in form, with two dancing komasts; rosettes in the field. Ca. 600-590 BC. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.3 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1970s; J.M.E. collection, New York. acquired in Munich, December 2004. For a similar one in the British Museum, see A. Seeberg, Corinthian Komos Vases, 1971, pl. X. 79 CORINTHIAN POTTERY RING ARYBALLOS BY THE BLARICUM PAINTER Frieze of two horses and a snake. Middle Corinthian, ca. 600-575 BC. Diam. 2 in. (5 cm.) Ex French collection; New York private collection, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, June 1992. 80 CORINTHIAN LARGE POTTERY SKYPHOS depicting a lion facing a goat on either side; rosettes in the field; with rays above the foot, vertical lines in the handle zones, details in added red. Middle Corinthian, ca. 600-575 BC. H. 5 5/8 in.(14.5 cm.); Diam. 7 3/4 in. (20 cm.) Ex Swiss collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 170.

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81 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE KYLIX BY THE CAYLUS PAINTER A departure scene: Seated father, two warriors and two seated attendants on either side. Tondo: Running satyr. Dolphins beneath handles. Ca. 500 BC. H. 3 14 in. (8.3 cm.); Diam. 8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm.); W. 10 7/8 in. (27.6 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, London, May 1987; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988.

Attic Black-figure Vases

82 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BELLY AMPHORA Two helmeted warriors attacking a third warrior. Reverese: Maenad flanked by two satyrs. Ca. 525-500 BC. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex Brussels art market, July 1988; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988.

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83 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA FROM THE LEAGROS GROUP depicting Ajax in full armor holding a sword and attempting to seize Kassandra as she seeks refuge at a statue of Athena Promachos, the goddess’s shield emblazoned with a dolphin. The other side is decorated with a figure of Dionysos flanked by a maenad and a satyr, a dotted vine in the background. As usual, rays above the foot, linked lotus buds below the scenes, palmettes linked by tendrils in the handle zones, linked double palmettes on the neck, the details in added red and white; graffito under the foot. Ca. 520-500 BC. H. 11 3/4 in (29.8 cm.) From a New York private collection, acquired in the 1960’s; Antiquarium, Ltd., New York, 1990; Florida private collection; Dr. R.B. collection, St. Louis, Missouri. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Greek Vases, 2010, no. 42. 84 ATTIC SMALL BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND NECK AMPHORA, Light-Make Class. Two satyrs and a maenad dancing before a reclining Dionysos. Reverse: Two helmeted warriors in combat. Ca. 500-480 BC. H. 6 15/16 in. (17.7 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s New York, March 1985; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 49.

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85 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA A warrior battles an Amazon; possibly Herakles and Andromache; a draped youth holding a spear at either side. Reverse: A draped female between two warriors; possibly the capture of Helen. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex French collection. The thighs of the Amazon and the central body of the draped male at right are restored. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 100. 86 ATTIC MINIATURE BLACK-FIGURE PANEL AMPHORA On either side: three cavorting nude male dancers. Ca. 530-520 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in London June 1995. These youths are komasts, descendents of the padded dancers that originally entered Athenian iconography from Corinth. We can interpret the figures here as young men in high spirits after a drinking party. For another small (3 3/8 in.) vase of the period decorated with similar dancers, see Metropolitan Museum of Art: 56.171.37


87 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER Three hunters on horseback, moving to the right, each holding a spear in one hand, the reins in the other, the figure at the center looking back, a hound and a hare below. Reverse: a panther attacking a deer, an owl below; bearded busts on the handle-plates, swans below the handles. Ca. 560 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex Galerie Puhze, Frieburg,1987; collection of Frank H. Pearl, Washington, DC, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988.

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88 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE READY PAINTER A nude youth puts on greaves, before him a woman who holds his shield and spear. On either side of them is a draped youth and a nude youth with spear. On the shoulder are two grazing roe deer, between them a panther. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (30.7 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Jacques Denier (1926-1992), La Tour du Pin, France, acquired from Spinks, London. Published: J. Beazley, Paralipomena, Oxford, 1971, p. 54; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 118.

89 ATTIC MINIATURE BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA with frontal panel scene depicting Nike on one knee, wings outstretched, flanked on either side by a male in a long robe; on shoulder, a ram. Ca. 550-500 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.9 cm.) Possibly, Euboean. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s, London, October 2000.

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90 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BAND CUP IN THE MANNER OF THE RUNNERS PAINTER On either side, a rider on a white horse is flanked by two nude runners and two draped males. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm.); W. 11 7/8 in. (30.1 cm.); Diam. 8 7/8 in. (27.5 cm.) Ex Sybille Kroeber collection, Berlin, ca. 1964. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 90. The name Runners Painter was proposed by Dr. Herman Brijder in his article 窶連ttic Black Figure Cups in Amsterdam and an Exchange with Heidelberg', BABesch 50, 1975, 157-177. See also his additional notes on this painter in CVA Amsterdam 2, 86ff., pls. 102.4, 112.1. 91 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE KYATHOS NEAR THE PAINTER OF VATICAN G7 Between apotropaic eyes are two dancing maenads amid vines. Ca. 510 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.); Diam. of mouth 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex Hr. B. collection, Switzerland, acquired between 1960 and 1980. Cf. M. Eismann, Attic Kyathos Painters, 1971, 282ff, no. 65, pl. 24. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 99. 92 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND LEKYTHOS NEAR THE HAIMON PAINTER Herakles and Apollo scuffle over the Delphic tripod; Athena, at the right, watching. Ca. 490 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.3 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 116. 93 ATTIC SMALL BLACKFIGURE LEKYTHOS ATTRIBUTED TO THE LITTLE LION CLASS with two youths mounted on donkeys taunting two satyrs; two animals on shoulder. Ca. 520-500 BC. H. 4 in. (10.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York. Cf. a very similar example in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, ex Walter Baker: 1972.118.141.

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94 ATTIC SMALL BLACK-FIGURE OLPE Prancing goat; vines behind. Early 5th Century BC. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from P. Donati, Lugano, May 1992. 95 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE OINOCHOE, CLASS OF LONDON B 495 Three draped women with vines in the field. Ca. 520-500 BC. 9 3/8 in. (23.8 cm). Ex Paris art market, July 1988; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988. 96 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE MINIATURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE The central panel decorated with three dancing nude youths. Late 6th Century BC. H. 5 3/8 in (13.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in New York September 2001. These youths are komasts, descendents of the padded dancers that originally entered Athenian iconography from Corinth. We can interpret the figures here as young men in high spirits after a drinking party. For another small (3 3/8 in.) vase of the period decorated with similar dancers, see Metropolitan Museum of Art: 56.171.37 97 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE depicting a warrior arming, helped by a draped woman who stands before him holding his spear and shield, and a youth who stands behind him. Ca. 530 BC. H. 7 3/8 in. (18.7 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 81.

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98 ATTIC SMALL BLACK-FIGURE CUP SKYPHOS On either side a mounted figure flanked by two draped males; swan beneath each handle. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 2 5/8 in. (6.6 cm.); Diam. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm.); W. 5 3/8 in (13.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York; collection of Prof. Milton V. Anastos (1909-1997), Decmber 2000. 99 ATTIC WHITE GROUND BLACK-FIGURE SKYPHOS On either side a cockerel flanked by palmettes. Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.); Diam. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.); W. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s, London, October 2003.

100 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE SKYPHOS, CLASS ‘O’ Griffin confronting butting bull. Reverse: Feline confronting boar; palmettes flanking both scenes. Ca. 500 BC. H. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm.); D. 3 1/2 in.(8.9 cm.); W. 5 3/8 in. (13.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Joel Malter, Encino, California, in 1994.

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101 ATTIC SMALL RED-FIGURE GLAUX BY THE PAINTER OF LOUVRE CA1694, an early follower of Douris. With a running satyr on either side, one carrying a thyrsos. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (6.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York.

Attic Redfigure Vases

102 ATTIC SMALL RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS, GROUP OF LONDON E614 A leaping sphinx right; before her, a stand of tendrils. Ca. 450-425 BC. H. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) Ex collection of Dr. Wilhelm Hartwig, Weinheim, Germany; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in London, June, 2007. 103 ATTIC MINIATURE RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Herakles, wearing lionskin, holding large club, striding right. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 4 in.(10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from H. Cahn, Basel, January 1989. 104 ATTIC SMALL RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Youth holding a staff of citizenship. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex Peyrefittte collection; Jean-Marie Talleux collection, Grand Fort Philippe, France; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Paris, January 1996. 105 ATTIC PLAIN BLACK-GLAZED LEKYTHOS . Early 5th Century BC. H. 10 7/8 in. (27.7 cm.) Ex Prof. Hans Erlenmeyer collection, Basel; Sotheby’s, London, June 1987; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988.

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106 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS, MANNER OF THE AISCHINES PAINTER Seated female holding thyrsos, flanked by two columns. Ca. 470-460 BC. 6 3/4 in. (17.2 cm). Ex Sotheby’s, London, May 1983; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in July 1986. 107 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS IN THE MANNER OF THE CARLSRUHE PAINTER A youth, possibly Kephalos, draped with his cloak, carries two spears, a sun hat strung about his neck. Ca. 460 BC. H. 7 3/8 in. (18.8 cm.) Ex private collection, Solothurn, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 102. 108 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA POSSIBLY BY THE CHARMIDES PAINTER An armed youth pursues a female who flees to her right looking back at him, his scabbarded sword across his tunicclad breast. Reverse: A draped female, beckoning. Ca. 475-460 BC. H. 13 1/8 in. (33.4 cm.) Ex New York private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 99. 109 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA with a youth at right being handed a lyre by his instructor. Reverse: A striding youth with a walking stick. Ca. 460-450 BC. H. 12 3/4 in. (32.5 cm.) Ex private French collection, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, October 2003. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 89.

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110 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE CHRISTIE PAINTER A komos procession led by a draped female playing a flute followed by two nude youths, the frst holding a barbiton. Reverse: three draped youths. Ca. 450-440 BC. H. 10 3/4 in (27.3 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired from Mythes & LĂŠgendes, Paris, in 1971. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 126. 111 ATTIC RED-FIGURE PELIKE IN THE KERCH STYLE FROM GROUP G Arimasp battling two winged griffins wears an barbarian costume with leggings, a pelta beneath his knee, as he struggles to rise to his feet. Reverse: Two draped figures, a stele between. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.9 cm.) Ex Vakilli collection, Paris; C. Ede, London, December 2003. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 94. In Greek mythology, griffins lived far to the north and guarded large deposits of gold. They were in constant conflict with the Arimasps, a tribe of one-eyed people, who regularly tried to steal the gold. Although literary sources describe the Arimasps as one-eyed, visual artists did not follow this convention, instead, merely depicting them in barbarian costume. These vases were made for the Greek colony of Panticapaeum, on the Kerch Strait in the Ukraine.

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Sout h Ita lia n Va se s

112 APULIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE AMPHORA, WORKSHOP OF THE PAINTER OF COPENHAGEN 4223 In an Ionic naiskos: an armed warrior holds his shield and spear; a female at left holding a casket, and a nude male at right. Reverse: Three draped male figures. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 31 1/2 in. (80 cm.) Ex old Dutch collection. 113 APULIAN RED-FIGURE COVERED LEKANIS On cover: Young male jockey riding horse. Reverse: Winged female griffin. Fine style; rare subject. Ca. 340-330 BC. W. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, London, May 1987; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988.

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114 APULIAN MONUMENTAL RED-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER Enthroned female between two standing attendants in added white within an Ionic naiskos, each wearing a himation over a peplos with two vertical red stripes. On the separately made foot is the winged profile of Nike. Ca. 320-310 BC. H. 37 1/4 in. (94.6 cm.) Ex collection of Frank H. Pearl, Washington, DC, acquired from Bruce and Ingrid McAlpine, London, 1988. Published: A.D. Trendall and A. Cambitoglou, Red-Figured Vases of Apulia, 2nd Supplement part II, 1992, no. 29/4-3, pl. XCV,1.

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115 APULIAN RED-FIGURE KANTHAROS A seated female holding a mirror. Reverse: A running satyr holding a torch and a situla. Ca. 350 BC. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Choice. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York. 116 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE RIBBED OLPE with the polychrome head of a goddess in very fine style beneath the handle, a gold vine around the neck, and gold necklace around the shoulder. Ca. 330-300 BC. H. 11 1/2 in. (28.4 cm) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York. 117 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE SMALL VOLUTE KRATER with ribbed body and vine with berries and leaves around the neck. Ca. 4th Century BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.4 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, in December 2007. 118 CAMPANIAN BLACK-GLAZED ARYBALLOS IN THE FORM OF A BOAR seated on its haunches, with upturned snout, the curving tail rendered in relief, the profiled vessel handle arching over the boar's back, the nozzle at the top of its head. Ca. 350-290 BC. L. 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm.) Superb condition. Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1991; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in 2004.

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119 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE IXION PAINTER Greeks battling, with a scene between multiple warriors in two levels, the upper with a melee of five clad warriors; the lower with two battling pairs, nude but for their billowing cloaks, helmets, and weapons. Ca. 330-310 BC. H. 23 3/8 in. (59.4 cm.) Ex private collection, Munich, Germany, 1980early 1990s. Published: K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen Vasenmalerei, vol. XI/XII, Kiel, 2008, pl.183a-c. 120 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF B.M. F229 OF THE BRANICKI GROUP with a nude couple embracing upon a couch. Reverse: two draped females flanking a stele. Ca. 330-310 BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (37 cm.); D. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen Vasenmalerei, vol. II, Kiel, 2000, pl. 114-117, 8645/3.

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121 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE PAINTER OF LOUVRE K491 A rearing centaur about to hurl a large rock. Reverse: Draped youth; small suspended vase before him. Ca. 370 - 360 BC. H. 6 3/4 in. (17.1 cm.); W. 6 7/8 in (17.5 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Karl Ballhaus, Hamburg, Germany, acquired in the 1980s; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich in July 2006. Pub.: A.D. Trendall, The Red-Figured Vases of Lucania, Campania and Sicily , 2. Suppl. 1978, 188,28; K. Schauenburg, Unteritalische Kentaurenbilder, ÖJh 51, 1976-77, 17 f. nos. 1-3; W. Hornbostel, Kunst der Antike. Schätze aus norddeutschem Privatbesitz. Hamburg, 1977, no. 336. 122 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS A profile head of a satyr, with wild hair and pointed ear; the other side with the head of a maenad in profile, her hair bound in a saccos. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1991, no. 155.

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57 123 LUCANIAN BELL KRATER BY THE CREUSA PAINTER At left is a small fawn, below which a young satyr is seated, wearing only shoes and a dotted fillet round his head. In his right hand he holds a kantharos and with his left grasps the neck of an wine-skin. At right is seated the youthful Dionysos, the lower part of whose body is covered by a piece of drapery; round his head is a dotted fillet, and above it is a leafy crown. His left hand holds the stem of a thyrsos; his right holds out a kantharos to a maenad who stands in front of him, pouring wine into the vessel from a tall oinochoe. She wears a peplos with a star pattern; her hair is caught up in a headband; there are snake-headed bangles round both her wrists. Between these two figures a tambourine is suspended. On the reverse are three draped youths. The one to left holds out an oinochoe, decorated with a running figure in black, as if to pour a libation to the second youth, who faces him, a stick in his right hand. The third youth stands to right, completely enveloped in his himation. Ca. 400-375 BC. H. 12 7/8 in. (32.7 cm.) Ex E. Borowski collection; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2003. Published: A.D. Trendall, Redfigure Vase-painters of Lucania, Campania, and Sicily, Sup.I, 1967, 15, no. 422a, pl. V 1-2; Red-figure Vase-painters of Lucania, Campania, and Sicily, Sup III, 1983, 44, no.4C; J.R. Guy, P. Denis, N. Leipen, Glimpses of Excellence, Ontario, 1984, no. 18. Exhibited: Royal Ontario Museum, 1984-1985.


124 PAESTAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER NEAR THE DIRCE PAINTER The Thracian bard Thamyris, blinded, and the Muses. Reverse: Kadmos, founder of Thebes, slaying the dragon whose teeth became the men of Thebes. The Dirce Painter is the seminal artist for the Sicilian, Paestan, and Campanian schools of vase-painting. Ca. 400-370 BC. H 16 1/2 in. (42 cm.) Ex Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2003. Published: K. Schauenburg, Unteritalischen Vasenmalerei. vol. IV, 2001; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 93. 58


Thamyris had boasted that he could win any contest even if competing with the Muses, whereat they blinded him and caused him to forget his skill. Two very rare subjects.

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125 PAESTAN LARGE REDFIGURE HYDRIA BY ASTEAS Argus, the nymph, Io, and Hermes. Zeus dispatched Hermes to slay Argus and set the nymph Io free. Hermes sang Argus to sleep, used his magic wand to seal Argus's eyes shut, and decapitated Argus. Io is seated upon a rocky outcrop wearing a delicate peplos with embroidered edging. Upon her head is a jewelled diadem with cow horn frontlet. Her name is inscribed above her. Beneath each handle is painted the profile bust of a female wearing a sakkos and jewels. Ca. 350-340 BC. H. 19 1/4 in. (49 cm.) Ex G. collection, Belgium.

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126 SICILIAN OR EARLY PAESTAN REDFIGURE BELL KRATER, FROM THE GROUP OF LOUVRE K 240 Two satyrs and a maenad holding a tambourine in an ecstatic thyasoi (a frenzied dance). Reverse: A draped youth and a maenad. Ca. 370 BC. H. 14 5/8 in. (37.2 cm.); W. and Diam. 15 in. (38.1 cm.); Ex collection of J-M R., Dijon, France, acquired in Paris in 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 118.

127 PAESTAN RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATERISKOS A satyr with a kithara in his left hand, a plekton in his right. Reverse: A draped youth holds a staff. Ca. 450 BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex Clark collection, Michigan. Exhibited: Detroit Institute of Art, 1983-2004. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 117.

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Etruscan & Roman Vases 128 ITALO-GEOMETRIC POTTERY CHALICE OF THE METOPE TYPE on a funnel-shaped foot. A frieze of metopes with zig-zag bands and ‘triglyphs’ with stripes below the everted lip; bands of differing width in concentric circles on rest of body and foot. Ca. 650 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.3 cm.) Ex private collection, Basel, acquired from Herbert Cahn in 1976. Cf. A. Akerström , Der geometrische Stil in Italien, 1943, 92f., pl. 25, 3. 129 ITALO-CORINTHIAN LARGE POTTERY TREFOIL OINOCHOE Rays encircling the shoulder, dotted rosettes between; the foot with cross-hatched lines between. Body with multiple bandings. Ca. 7th Century BC. H. 13 1/2 in (34.3). Ex C.F. Collection, Monte Carlo. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2000, no. 72. 130 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN POTTERY LIDDED PYXIS of waisted cylindrical form, one side of the body with a panther facing a goat, the other side with a boar between two lions, rosettes in the field; with rays above the base, concentric circles on the underside; the lid with a lotus-bud chain. Ca. 620-590 BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.); W. 3 3/8 in. (8.1 cm.) Ex private European collection; Swiss art market, early 1990s; collection of William Suddaby, Key West, Florida.

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131 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN LARGE OLPE BY THE HERCLE PAINTER Four bands of panthers, lions, stags, boars, and birds. Vulci, ca 600-575 BC. H. 15 3/4 in. (40.5 cm.) Ex C. Ede, London, May 1988; M.P. (1925-2013) collection, La Jolla, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 200. 132 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA WITH ATHLETES AND WARRIORS near the Painter of NY.MMA.2012.26. A pair of apotropaic eyes on either shoulder; various athletes flanked by attendants in the second register; the bottom register with two wolves baiting a calf, one in front and the other from behind. Reverse: Warriors fighting; the bottom register with wolves fighting over the carcass of a dead calf. Late 6th Century BC. H. 16 7/8 in. (42.8 cm.) Ex collection of Pino Donati, Molinazzo di Monteggio, Switzerland, acquired in the later 1960s. Cf. R. De Puma, Etruscan Art in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2013, pp. 129130, no. 4.110.

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133 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN SKYPHOS with lion and lioness. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (6.4 cm.); W. 6 1/2 in. (15.2 cm.); Diam. 3 3/4 in. (9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Zurich in May 1984. Exhibited: The New York International Antiquarian Fine Art Fair, New York, November 2001. 134 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN POTTERY PHIALE MESOMPHALOS with interior register of striding felines. Ca. 6th Century BC. Diam. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm.) Ex collection of Sybille Rosenbaum-Kroeber (wife of Wladimir Rosenbaum, d. 1997), Berlin, ca. 1964; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Ascona, Switzerland, in November 2001. 135 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA BY THE MICALI PAINTER On either side a woman clad in a chiton, with a heavy mantle wrapped about back and upper arms, dances. Both move to right, and look round, one with her head tilted up ecstatically; their arms raised. Ca. 525-500 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex Klaus Baumhardt collection, Bonn; Hans Tollman collection, Cologne.

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136 FALISCAN BLACK-FIGURE PHIALE FROM THE VINE-PHIALAI GROUP A mesomphalos, decorated with interlacing vine leaves and dotted grape bunches around the central omphalos. Ca. 350-300 BC. Diam. 8 1/2 in. (21.5 cm.) Ex Dutch private collection, acquired in the 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. X, 1999, no. 131. Cf. similar phiale (Oxford 1925.670), in J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, 1947, p. 181, pl. XXXI.3. 137 EARLY ROMAN GREEN GLAZED POTTERY SKYPHOS with two ring handles and a molded thumbpiece; the body has relief decorations in the form of pine cone scales; ochre glazed interior. 1st Century AD. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.); Diam. 3 7/8 in. (10 cm.); W. 6 3/8 in. (16 cm.) Ex van Driesum collection, France. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 124.

138 ROMAN BARBOTINE WARE STRAIGHT-SIDED BEAKER with grey-green glaze on both the interior and exterior, the decoration in barbotine, the exterior with five vertical bands of conical projections. France or Spain, late 1st Century AD. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.); Diam. 2 3â „4 in. (7 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 123. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 123. 139 LATE ROMAN POTTERY OIL LAMP WITH THE TRIUMPH OF ACHILLES of Pohl I type, the discus with Achilles in his biga dragging the body of Hector behind. Around the discus, animals in a chase. Rare type. 4th-5th Century AD. L. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex German collection. A rare type. 140 ROMAN POTTERY LAMP: MELEAGER HUNTING THE CALEDONIAN BOAR The hero stands at right about to spear the boar that leaps from beneath a tree at left; the discus surrounded by raised tongues; workshop stamp on the base. 2nd-3rd Century AD L. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex private collection, Rhineland, Germany. Another rare type.

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141 GREEK CORE-FORMED GLASS AMPHORISKOS with dark blue body, tall neck and everted rim, wound with opaque white trails tooled into a feather pattern around the body; with applied pale green twin handles and knob base. Some iridescence. 2nd century BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex collection of Hadassah Kaplan Musher (1912-2013), New York, acquired in Israel, 1956 -1970s.

Ancient Glass 142 ROMAN ORANGE BROWN GLASS DATE FLASK The body, realistically molded to mimic the fruit, has a short neck with a folded lip. 1st-3rd Century AD. H. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm.) Ex collection of Hadassah Kaplan Musher (1912-2013), New York, acquired in Israel, 1956 -1970s. 143 ROMAN GLASS DOUBLE SIDED HEAD FLASK of opaque green and red glass with body shaped like a head with two faces, back to back. Highly iridescent. Intact. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm.) Ex English private collection before 1975. Cf. Kunstmuseum Luzern (ed.), 3000 Jahre Glaskunst, 1981, p. 82, no. 279. 144 BYZANTINE AMBER GLASS JAR WITH MULTICOLORED IRIDESCENCE The square-sided body decorated with relief panels of a standing man raising a staff in each hand, a tree, a date-palm, and a seated and standing figure. Ca. 6th-7th Century AD. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.6 cm.) Ex English collection. Cf. Christie’s, London, Ancient Glass Formerly in the Kofler-Truniger Collection, 5 Mar. 1985, lot 11.

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145 GREEK GOLD STIRRUP-SHAPED PENDANT WITH AGATE SCARAB CARVED INTAGLIO WITH A DANCING SATYR bezel set. 4th-3rd Century BC. L. of gem: 3/4 in. (2.1 cm.); wt. 12.76 grs. Ex private collection, London, England, before 1980. 146 PAIR OF HELLENISTIC GOLD LION HEAD EARRINGS 3rd-2nd Century BC. Diam. 3/4 in. (2 cm.); wt. 4.84 grs. Ex German private collection, acquired in the early 1990s.

Ancient Jewelry 147 THRACO-CELTIC WOVEN SILVER NECKLACE AND PENDANT of curled wires to form two confronting snails, the flat mesh chain with caps and rings and one large leaf and tendril-form hook. 1st Century BC/AD. L. 20 1/4 in. (51.4 cm.) Ex private collection, acquired in the early 1990s. 148 ANGLO-SAXON GOLD FINGER RING with raised borders and centering a raised horizontal “S” with overall punched background. 8th-9th Century AD. Diam. 1 in. (2.5 cm.); wt. 5.9 grs. Ex German private collection.

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Var ia 149 NORDIC MESOLITHIC GRAYISH BLACK FLINT ADZE WITH SPECIALLY TREATED EDGE, The cutting edge is the intersection of a large broad flake scar (on the less convex face) with a series of scars flaked upward from the cutting edge on the more convex face producing a hoof shaped design. This massive specimen is one of the finest examples known. Ca. 9000-4000 BC. L. 7 in. (19 cm.) Ex Lawrence Sunde collection, Copenhagen; Christensen Fund collection; private collection, Boston, Massachusetts. 150 NORDIC MESOLITHIC THIN-BLADED STONE BATTLE AXE with sharply out curving blade ends. Their thinness and out curving forms connect these axes with the early prototypical copper axes and also to the early thin flint axes. Ca. 9000-4000 BC. L. 7 1/8 in. (18 cm.) Ex Christensen Fund collection. Cf. P.V. Glob, Dansk Oldsager-Yngre Stenalder, Gyldendalske Boghandel, Nordisk Forlag, Copenhagen, 1952, #110, p. 86; pl. 110. 151 MIDDLE EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE BRONZE LANCE HEAD with a short, narrow, ridged blade, round socket and incised chevron below the blade. Ca. 1000 BC. L. 9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin. 152 VILLANOVAN BRONZE LANCE HEAD of two-edged sheet and wide middle burr. 8th Century BC. L. 8 5/8 in. (22 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin.

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153 NEOLITHIC TERRACOTTA HEAD with triangular face, circular mouth, and slit eyes. Rare. Thessaly, Greece, 6th-4th Millennium BC. H. 1 3/8 in. (3.5 cm.) Ex Americxan collection, acquired in London in 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 197. 154 CENTRAL EUROPEAN EARLY IRON AGE BRONZE DOUBLE-SPIRAL CLOAK PIN Hallstatt, 8th-7th Century BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex American collection, acquired from the collection of Lord McAlpine of West Green in 1988. Said to have been found in Hungary. Rare. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 158.

155 GREEK DAEDALIC LIMESTONE HEAD OF A FEMALE, her centrally parted hair descends at the back in vertical strands, banded at intervals; her eyes are large and piercing, her broad face tapering to the chin. 7th Century BC. H 1 3/8 in. (3.5 cm.) Very rare. Acquired in Turkey, 1960s, by a Parisian doctor; ex J.-P. DeSerres. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 10. 156 EAST GREEK LIMESTONE DEEP BUST OF A KOUROS, the young man wrapped in a close-fitting garment. Very rare type. Ca. 540-530 BC. 5 3/8 in. (13.6 cm.) Ex Bavarian pri69 H. vate collection, acquired in 1990.


157 CYPRIOT IRON AGE BICHROME WARE POTTERY HORSE AND RIDER The rider seated sideways with an arched support behind, the horse with an applied bridle. Rare type. Ca. 850-750 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex London collection formed in the 1970s; deaccessioned at Bonhams, London, April 1999. Cf. D. Morris, The Art of Ancient Cyprus, 1985, p. 205, figs. 330-1 for related examples and pp. 205-210 for a discussion of this unusual side-saddle type. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 141. 158 CYPRIOT IRON AGE TERRACOTTA CHARIOT GROUP Two figures, one the driver, the other a warrior holding a shield, stand back to back in the car. Both wear an applied cap and disc earrings, the hair, eyes and beard colored black. Rare type. 7th-6th Century BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex London collection formed in the 1970s; deaccessioned at Bonhams, London, April 1999. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2000, no. 104. 159 HELLENISTIC AMBER NUDE SEATED BABY, his head inclined to the left. Hellenistic amber figurines are very rare. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.) Ex Drouot, Paris. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 166. 160 EAST GREEK SILVER GORGON MASK APPLIQUE The grinning countenance is worked in repoussĂŠ. Ca. 5th Century BC. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) Ex private French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 136.

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161 ROMAN PARCEL GILT SILVER RHYTON The tall conical body is fabricated from a single sheet with three registers, separated by repoussĂŠ rope designs, in high relief, with draped bearded men riding horses, Athena standing by an olive tree between them; the second with various deities standing; the base with flowering stems and leaves; hollow tube at the base with a separately cast animal-head terminus. Rare.

Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex private collection of Mr. R.J., Frankfurt, Germany, acquired in 1963. Cf. a very similar example sold at Christie’s, New York, 11 June 2003, lot 191.

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Byzantine Adornments 162 OSTROGOTHIC RADIATE-HEADED SILVER BOW FIBULA with a semi-octagonal headplate with five protruding roundel terminals incised with concentric circles, and impressed and incised zig-zags, chevrons and concentric circles on the headplate. Gepidic culture, Hungary, earlier 6th Century AD. L. 5 in. (12.7cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired in the 1990s; V.T. collection. Cf. K. Reynolds Brown et al (eds.), From Attila to Charlemagne; Arts of the Early Medieval Period in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yale, 2000, no. 17.2, 17.3 & 19.7, p. 190-1 & p. 220. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 189. 163 MEROVINGIAN PARCEL GILT SILVER RADIATE-HEADED BOW FIBULA WITH CABOCHON GARNETS incorporating a halfcircle headplate with spoked grooves and three projecting knobs, arched bow with pronounced central ridge, long pointed foot plate decorated with grooves with geometric motifs. Ca. 6th Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.5 cm.) Ex French collection. 164 PAIR OF SLAVO-BYZANTINE SILVER GILT EARRINGS, each with three spheres enhanced with beading. Ca. 900-1200 AD. Diam. 1 3/4 in. (4.5 cm.) Ex German private collection, acquired in the early 1990s. 165 PAIR OF SLAVO-BYZANTINE SILVER GILT EARRINGS, each with three open-work spheres enhanced with beading. Ca. 900-1200 AD. Diam. 1 3/4 in. (4.5 cm.) Ex German private collection, acquired in the early 1990s.

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166 BYZANTINE BRONZE COLLAR OR BELT FORMED BY NINE CROSSES decorated with concentric circles, the buckle engraved with four Greek letters: ' TOMY'. Rare. 5th-6th Century AD. L. 28 3/8 in. (72 cm.) Ex private collection, New York, acquired in the early 1970s. 167 TWO BYZANTINE GOLD SADDLE FITTINGS of open-worked sheet, one a quatrefoil with fleurs du lys at the interstices and the other a dolphin. Ca. 6th Century AD. W. 1 1/8 in. (3 cm.); dolphin L. 1 1/8 in. (3 cm.); wt. 4.85 grs. Ex German collection. Cf. L.Wamer (ed.), Die Welt von Byzanz. Europas östliches Erbe, Exhibition, Archäologischen Staatssammlung München - Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Munich, 2004, p. 351, no. 775.

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Egyptian Ston e Sculptur es & Reliefs 168 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM LIMESTONE HEAD OF AN OFFICIAL wearing a large wig with horizontal tiers of waves. XIIth-XIIIth Dynasty, ca. 1991-1750 BC. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.) Ex French collection. 169 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM MARBLE HEAD OF AN OFFICIAL Wearing striated wig with almond-shaped eyes and heavy eyelids; two dimples at the corners of the full lips. XVIII-XIX Dynasty, ca. 1550-1185 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.) Ex collection of Pierre and Claude Vérité, Paris, acquired between 1930 and 1960. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII 2007, no. 203.

170 EGYPTIAN LARGE MIDDLE KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF OF SENUSRET, standing at left, as a son, wearing a kilt and shoulder length wig, before a larger-scaled offering table from which hang the lolling head of a throttled water bird as well as the hoofed foot from a calf ’s leg. Extensive red, black, and blue paint. XIIth Dynasty, ca. 1991-1778 BC. H. 32 5/8 in. (83 cm.); W. 14 1/8 in. (36 cm.) The six hieroglyphs of his name appear above his extended right arm. Ex A.A. collection, Israel; in the U.K. since 1960’s. Reassembling of four pieces.

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171 EGYPTIAN LARGE LIMESTONE DEEP BUST OF TUTHMOSIS III wearing nemes and false beard. XVIIIth Dynasty, reigned ca. 1504-1450 BC. H. 12 5/8 in. (32 cm.) Ex Jean-Marie Talleux Collection, Grand Fort Philippe, France; the collection of the late Maestro Giuseppe Sinopoli, Rome, Italy, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1996. Exhibited: Les Cultes funeraires en Egypte et en Nubie, Calais Bethune - Dunkerque, 1988, cat. no. 1. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IX, 1997, no. 161.

Tuthmosis III ruled Egypt for nearly 54 years including the 22 years that he was co-regent to his stepmother and aunt Hatshepsut. He created Egypt’s largest empire from Syria to Nubia, conducting some 17 military campaigns.

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Egyptian Bronze Sculptures 172 EGYPTIAN BRONZE SEATED HARPOKRATES-AMON wearing the Red Crown with the tall, incised plumes of Amon, a solar disk, and wearing a broad beaded collar, braided side-lock, and the cap of Amon with plumes and sun-disk; large eyes with remains of silver overlay. XXVI-XXXth Dynasty, 664-342 BC. H. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) Ex collection of Stella Fischbach acquired in the mid-1960s, almost certainly from the Joseph Steiglitz Gallery, Tel Aviv. Cf. G. Roeder, Aegyptische Bronzefiguren, Berlin, 1956, pl. 20c. 173 EGYPTIAN BRONZE OSIRIS mummiform and wearing the atefcrown and false beard bands incised to receive inlay. XXVth-XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex D.S. collection, Warren, Michigan. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University., Hamilton, New York, 1988-2005. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 435. 174 EGYPTIAN BRONZE PTAH-OSIRIS-KHONSU wearing a solar disk with lunar crescent atop his head; sidelock of youth, close fitting cap fronted with a uraeus, and holding the crook, flail, and was-scepter; on integral square base. Late Dynastic Period, 664-332 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.) Ex collection of Charles BouchĂŠ (1928-2010), France. 175 EGYPTIAN BRONZE AMULET OF RE-HORAKTY striding, falcon-headed and wearing an ousekh-collar, tripartite wig surmounted by a solar disc with uraeus, and a kilt. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 2 5/8 in. (7 cm.) Ex French collection of Madame M., acquired in the 1960s, probably from Mariane Maspero.

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176 EGYPTIAN BRONZE PRIEST HOLDING A LARGE OSIRIS Hieroglyphic inscription around self-contained base. Late Period, ca. 712-30 BC. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.5 cm.) Ex collection of le comte de Serionne, administrator of the Suez Canal Society, said to have been acquired in Egypt before 1900. A rare type. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 186. 177 EGYPTIAN LARGE BRONZE PTAH, patron of artists, and craftsmen, wearing a cap and close-fitting cloak; holding the was-scepter. XXIst-XXVth Dynasty, ca. 1069 -712 BC. H. 7 5/8 in. (19.6 cm.) Published: C. Andrews & J. van Dijk, Objects for Eternity, Egyptian Antiquities from the W. Arnold Meijer Collection, 2006, pp. 201-203, no. 3. 20, illus. Exhibited: Musée Allard Pierson, Musée Archéologique de l'Université d'Amsterdam, 17 novembre 2006 - 25 mars 2007. 178 EGYPTIAN BRONZE CAT seated in the traditional attitude, a hieroglyphic inscription along the edge of the hm-shaped integral plinth, reading: "Bastet giver of life, Maa-kheruHor...Iun(yt), Sopdet, Lady of...may she live forever!" XXI-XXXth Dynasty, 1070-343 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex collection of a midwestern university professor, acquired between 1969 and 1972.


Egypt ian Usha btis

179 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM LIMESTONE USHABTI OF NEOU-NEB, Servant in the Place of Truth, wearing a tripartite wig, his arms across his chest holding no implements. Beneath are seven registers of hieroglyphic text. XIXth Dynasty, ca. 1292-1185 BC. H. 6 5/8 in. (17 cm.) Ex old French collection of the comte de Belmore; Charles Bouché (1928-2010), France. Probably from Deir el Medina. 180 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM TERRACOTTA USHABTI OF DJEHOUTYMES, HIGH PRIEST OF THOTH, mummiform, holding hoes and a seed bag; wig, details, and column of hieroglyphic text in black and red paint. Late New Kingdom, ca. 1200-1070 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18 cm.) Ex L.B. collection, Brussels, Belgium. Cf. J. & L. Aubert, Statuettes égyptiennes, Paris, 1974, pp. 122-123; W. M. F. Petrie, Shabtis, London 1935, pl. XXXV, no. 240. M. J. Raven, ‘A transom-window from Tuna el-Gebel’, in: Oudheidkundige Mededelingen uit het Rijksmuseum van Oudheden te Leiden 69, 1989, pp. 51-64. 181 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA REIS USHABTI wearing a tripartite wig, broad collar, and kilt with triangular apron and holding a whip in his left hand and a hoe in his right. XIX-XXIst Dynasty, ca. 1307-945 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex Collection of E.S., Northern Germany, acquired in 1951 from Dr. E. Junkelmann, Schloss Lustheim, Germany.

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182 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI OF NAKHT NES-TAWY, Ouab-Priest and Chief of the Navigators, mummiform, holding hoes and seed bag; details in black including text. XXIst Dynasty, 1080-945 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. G. Janes, Shabti -- Ancient Egyptian Funerary Statuettes in European Collections, 2002, Paris, p.111, no. 56. 183 EGYPTIAN GREEN FAIENCE USHABTI OF ANKHEF-ENSEKHMET, mummiform and holding hoes and a seed basket. With eight incised registers of hieroglyphic text setting forth his name and title as well as the ushabti spell from Chapter VI of the Book of the Dead. Late XXVIth Dynasty, 570-525 BC. H. 7 3/4 (19.8 cm.) Ex French collection. 184 EGYPTIAN GREEN FAIENCE USHABTI OF NEB-PEHETY, mummiform and holding hoes and a seed basket. With eight incised registers of hieroglyphic text setting forth his name and title as well as the ushabti spell from Chapter VI of the Book of the Dead. XXXth Dynasty, 380-342 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex Belgian collection. 185 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI OF IPETHEMES, born of Hathoremakhet, holding hoes and seed bag; a single panel of hieroglyphic text on the front. Late Dynastic Period, 664-342 BC. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.6 cm.) Ex old French collection acquired before 1980.

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E gyp tia n Woo d O bje cts 186 EGYPTIAN WOOD AND POLYCHROME STUCCO CANOPIC CHEST Each side is painted with three registers of menat and thet amulets. Vignettes of the deceased with Duamoutef and Imsety; Horus, and feathers of Maat and lotuses; the deceased faced with Hapi and Qebsentenuef; and two Osirises, a table of offerings between. Early Ptolemaic Period, late 4th/early 3rd Century BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (37 cm.) Ex Collection of R.F., Brusells, Belgium, acquired in the Belgian art market 1985-86. From the 4th century BC, this type of casket replaces the four canopic jars which one finds in the previous epochs. Cf. R. Meffre, Le crÊpuscule des pharaons, Paris, 2012, pp. 164-165, no. 80. Note: a similar chest in Sotheby’s, London, November 26, 1968, dated as XXVIth Dynasty.

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187 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM WOOD STANDING DIGNITARY, wearing a skull cap over black painted hair, and a kilt with a smooth, typical knee-length loincloth, with a triangular apron; his arms are at his sides, his right hand slightly raises the edge of the apron. He also wears a ousekh necklace painted blue. VIth Dynasty, ca. 2360-2195 BC. H. 10 1/8 in. (27.7 cm.) Ex L.B. collection, Brussels, Belgium. Cf. Ch. Ziegler, Les statues égyptiennes de l'Ancien Empire, Paris, 1997, pp. 198-200, no. 56. See also: G.Jequier, Tombeaux de particuliers contemporains de Pepi II, Cairo, 1929, p. 9, pl. 1; J-P. Lauer, ‘Découverte du Serdab du Chancelier Icheti à Saqqarah,’ in Revue d’égyptologie, 7, 1950, pp. 17-18, pl. 83 II.


188 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM WOOD STANDING HARPOKRATES, nude, hands at his sides, palms forward, and wearing the sidelock of youth. XVIIIth-XIXth Dynasty, ca. 1330-1200 BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex collection of E.S., Northern Germany, acquired in 1956 from the archaeologist Dr. Müller-Feldmann of Hamburg, Germany. 189 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME WOOD PTAH-SOKER-OSIRIS Mummiform, cloaked in a beaded net shroud, tripartite wig, and false beard, now lacking. A column of hieroglyphic text on the front: ‘Offering which the king gives to Osiris who governs the West, Ounnefer, the Great God, the Lord of Abydos, so that he grants an offertory of bread, beer, meat, and fowl and every pure thing'. Late Period, 664-30 BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (31 cm.) Ex French collection formed between 1970 and 1990. This god, principally venerated in Memphis, functions as Osiris and watches over the necropolis of Sakkarah.

190 EGYPTIAN GILDED WOOD PLAQUE OF A STRIDING GOD, wearing a Maat feather atop his tripartite wig, his right hand raised in blessing. He also wears a kilt. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex collection of Edouard Louis Joseph, Baron Empain (1852-1929). Baron Empain was a wealthy Belgian engineer, entrepreneur, financier, and industrialist, as well as an amateur Egyptologist.

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191 EGYPTIAN FAIYUM PORTRAIT OF A YOUTH ON LINEN He wears a simple white tunic with two vertical red stripes. In his left hand he holds a bunch of grapes and in his right a wreath of pink rose petals. Bandoliers are sewn at several places for attachment to the mummy. Faiyum portraits on linen are rare. 3rd quarter of the 4th Century AD. H. 16 7/8 in. (43 cm.); W. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.) Ex collection of Nicolas Koutoulakis, acquired in the 1960s. A conservation report is available. Cf. K. Parlasca, Ritratti di mumie - Repertorio D’Art Dell’Egitto Greco-Romano, Series B, vol. IV, 2003, p.62, no. 766, pl. 171. A similar portrait in the 85 Brooklyn Museum, is publiahed, loc.cit. pl. 171.6.


Egyptian Varia 192 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM BANDED ALABASTER OVOID BOWL with a thin short vertical lip. Ca. 2613-2161 BC. Diam. 2 1/2 in. (6.6 cm.); H. 2 1/2 in. 6.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in London, December 1990. 193 EGYPTIAN ORANGE AND WHITE MARBLE KOHL JAR Early XVIIIth Dynasty, ca. 1567-1450 BC. H. 1 3/4� (4.5 cm) Ex French private collection; American private collection.

194 EGYPTIAN LARGE ALABASTER SITULA with remains of bronze fittings on the ears. Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 - 664 BC. H. 11 3/8 in. (29 cm.) Ex collection of Terence Eva, London, formed between 1970-1980. Situlae in stone and of this size are very rare.

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195 EGYPTIAN GREEN NOBLE SERPENTINE FIGURE OF A LION-HEADED GODDESS striding, wearing a scarab between her ears. Very rare. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC.H. 4 in. (10 cm.) Ex Old European collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, 2002, vol. XIII, no. 149. 196 ROMANO-EGYPTIAN SILVER HARPOKRATES The nude child with his fore-finger to his mouth and leaning against a staff. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 2 1/2 in (6.4 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 180. 197 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM PAIR OF BONE CLAPPERS in the form of forearms and hands, one inscribed with rows of dotted circles; handles lacking. Ca. 1550-1070 BC. L. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex collection of D.S., Germany, acquired in 1978. 198 LATE ROMAN/COPTIC WOOD PULL-TOY OF A RIDER ON TWO HORSES The horses doweled through the legs to attach the wheels; traces of original pigment remaining; heavy salt accretions. Extremely rare, especially in so complete a condition. 5th-7th Century AD. L. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Brussels, June 2001. Cf. W.M.F. Petrie, Objects of Daily Use, 1927, p. 62, ‘Toys’, pl. LV, nos. 587, 590.

O u r I n t e r ne t N e w sl e t t e r We are now issuing an online newsletter every month or two with a selection of our latest acquisitions to supplement this catalog and our website. If you are not receiving it please send a request with your email address to ancientart@aol.com

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Near E astern An tiqu ities 199 SUMERIAN CREAM STONE AMULET IN THE FORM OF A RECLINING BULL with red inclusions, its tail curving up along its back. Late Uruk-Jamdat Nasr Period, ca. 3300-2900 BC. L. 1 5/8 in. (3.5 cm.) Published: Erlenmeyer Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Stamp Seals and Amulets, Christie’s, London, 6 June 1989, lot 257. Ex C.L. collection, Boston, Massachusetts. 200 SUMERIAN STONE HEMISPHEROID SEAL: GOAT IN PROFILE, Cream in color, the underside with a goat in profile to the right, some drillings in the field. Late Uruk-Jamdat Nasr Period, ca. 3300-2900 BC. Diam. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.) Published: Erlenmeyer Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Stamp Seals and Amulets, Christie’s, London, 6 June 1989, lot 232 (part). Ex C.L. collection, Boston, Massachusetts. 201 SUMERIAN RED STONE AMULET perhaps in the form of a canine, the eyes drilled, the back perforated for suspension. Late Uruk-Jamdat Nasr Period, ca. 3300-2900 BC. L. 1 3/8 in. (3.4 cm.) Published: Erlenmeyer Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Stamp Seals and Amulets, Christie’s, London, 6 June 1989, lot 253. Ex C.L. collection, Boston, Massachusetts. 202 SUMERIAN CYLINDRICAL SHELL BEAD of elongated cylindrical form tapering at each end, the surface embellished with incised bands. Late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium BC. L. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) Published: Erlenmeyer Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Stamp Seals and Amulets, Christie’s, London, 6 June 1989, lot 300 part. Ex C.L. collection, Boston, Massachusetts. 203 SUMERIAN CYLINDRICAL SHELL BEAD of elongated cylindrical form tapering at each end, the surface embellished with incised bands. Late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium BC. L. 4 7/8 in. (12.1 cm.) Published: Erlenmeyer Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Stamp Seals and Amulets, Christie’s, London, 6 June 1989, lot 300 part. Ex C.L. collection, Boston, Massachusetts.

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204 UGARITIC BRONZE STYLIZED NUDE FEMALE wearing a garland-like headpiece and holding a large shallow bowl; grooved for the possible application of another metal. Said to have been found 11 km. N. of Latakia, N.W. Syria. 16th-13th Century BC. H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm.) Very rare. Ex private collection; Geneva, Switzerland, acquired in 1990. For other statuettes see: H. Weiss, K. Kohlmeyer, F. M. Cross, et al., Ebla to Damascus, 1985, p. nos. 132-136. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World,, vol.. XVIII, 2007, no 249.

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205 MESOPOTAMIAN VERY LARGE MARBLE EYE IDOL of basic bell form with two eyes atop a short neck. Syria, 4th Millennium BC. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. G. Zahlhaas, Orient and Occident - Cultural roots of Alteuropas, Munich, 1995. 206 ANATOLIAN MARBLE FLATTENED STYLIZED IDOL Kusura-Beycesultan type. With oval head with braided sidelock and violin-shaped body. Bronze Age II, ca. 2700-2300 BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.). Ex German collection. Cf. J. Thimme, Kunst der Kykladen, Karlsruhe, 1976, 387 -553, catalog no. 517. 207 ANATOLIAN MARBLE FLATTENED STYLIZED IDOL Kusura-Beycesultan type. With oval head with braided vertical, sidelock and violin-shaped body. Bronze Age II, ca. 2700-2300 BC. H. 3 7/8 in. (10.1 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf. J. Thimme, Kunst der Kykladen, Karlsruhe, 1976, 387 -553, catalog no. 514. 208 WESTERN ANATOLIAN MARBLE FLATTENED STYLIZED IDOL OF KUSURA TYPE with flat spade-shaped body, long neck, and a disc-shaped head. Bronze Age II, ca. 2700-2300 BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.8 cm.) Ex collection of Hadassah Kaplan Musher (1912-2013), New York, acquired in Israel, 1956 -1970s.

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209 SYRIAN ROCK CRYSTAL EYE IDOL OF THE TELL-BRAK TYPE Spherical with two ‘eye’ mounds on top, drilled through. 2nd half of the 4th Millennium BC. A rare type. H. 1 5/8 in. (4.2 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired in 1969. 210 NORTH SYRIAN SILVER IDOL Escutcheon shaped with a hammered up face on the upper section; the entire form bordered by hammered up dots. Ca. 2000 BC. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.8 cm.); wt 5 gr. Very rare type. Ex South German private collection acquired in the 1970s. 211 PAIR OF SCYTHIAN BRONZE HARNESS ATTACHMENTS OF RECUMBENT CARIBOU with their distinctive long antlers and blunt muzzels. Reticulated; green and red patina. Black Sea region, ca. 4th Century BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.); L. 3.5 in. (8.8 cm.) Ex German collection. 212 PAIR OF EURASIAN GILT BRONZE RECTANGULAR PLAQUES each depicting two beaked ungulates (equine-like beasts) separated by two serpents. 2nd -1st Century BC. L. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.); H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII 2006, no. 230. Cf. C E. Bunker, Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes, 2002, p.107, no.76E.

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213 PHOENICIAN POTTERY FUNERARY MODEL BOAT, canoe-shaped with undulating gunwales, a rising stern, a bow seat, and six thwarts. In the midst is the remains of a seated figure? With extensive marine accretions overall. 5th-4th Century BC. L. 18 in. (45.7 cm.) Ex Selim Haddad, Beirut, ca. 1970s. 214 SYRO-PHOENICIAN POTTERY GROUP: BIRTHING SCENE Three women. The mother stands supported by another from behind. The third sits in front of the mother holding the newly born infant. 5th-4th Century BC. H 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm.); L. 7 in, (17.8 cm.) Ex Selim Haddad, Beirut, ca. 1970s. Cf. K. Katz, P.P. Kahane, M. Broshi 'From The Beginning, Archaeology and Art in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem', 1968, pg. 93, no. 80. See a near identical group in J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. X, 2009, no. 212. 215 PAIR OF LURISTAN BRONZE CHEEKPIECES, each a feline-form monster walking forward on an integral ground line. 9th-7th Century BC. H. 4 1⁄2 in. (11.4 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, London, July 17-18, 1985, lot. 135. Published: J.M. Eisenberg and R.S. Bianchi, Catalogue of the Egyptian and Near Eastern Bronzes in the Collection of John Kluge, New York, 1992, no. 88-37 and 88-37.

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216 SASANIAN ROCK CRYSTAL POLYHEDRON SEAL Each large facet engraved, one with the head of a bull, one with the head of an ibex with splayed horns, one with the head of a griffin, and one with the head of a feline. Ca. 4th-5th Century AD. W. 9/16 in. (1.4 cm.) Ex Joseph Handy collection, Massachusetts, 1967; C.L. collection, Boston, 1989. 217 GRAECO-PERSIAN CALCIFIED BROWN CHALCEDONY SCARABOID engraved with a lion walking in profile, his mouth open, the tail raised and coiled, on a groundline. Ca. 4th Century BC W. 1 1/16 in. (2.6 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s, London, February 10, 1972, lot 82 (part); C.L. collection, Boston. 218 WESTERN ASIATIC ALABASTER CHALICE,the tall cylindrical stem splaying at the base, the spoolshaped bowl with a flanged flat rim. Probably from Bactria, late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium BC. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) Ex French collection. 219 BACTRIAN MARBLE STYLIZED BIRD-FORM IDOL, wings depicted as if open on either side of the body; the head introduced as humanoid, the beak becoming a nose. Late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (9.1 cm.) Ex French collection. Four related figures from the collection of George Ortiz were on view at the Musée Guimet, Paris, in the exhibition Afghanistan, une Histoire Millénaire, 1 March - 27 May 2002. 220 WESTERN ASIATIC ALABASTER CHALICE, the tall cylindrical stem splaying at the base, the coneshaped bowl with a flanged flat rim. Probably from Bactria, late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium BC. H. 6 in. (15.5 cm.) Ex French collection.

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his objects of art, rather than depositing them in a vault or holding receipts. Also, art is not as volatile as stocks and bonds, the coin, gem, and collectibles markets, and especially the gold and silver markets. Sylvia Porter in her New Money Book recommends classical antiquities as one of the best types of art for rapid growth. Dr Eisenberg was first quoted on the investment value of ancient art in the February 9, 1966 issue of Newsday - over 45 years ago! - and most recently in Business Week.

Why Collect Ancient Art? There are several reasons for collecting fine works of ancient art: • The excitement of owning a beautiful work of art that has survived for perhaps some 2,000 years or more. • The decoration of one's home or office with unique objects whose beauty and desirability have withstood the test of time. • The creative satisfaction, enjoyment, and pride in forming a truly fine collection. • The probable appreciation in value.

Royal-Athena Galleries Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., the founder and director of Royal-Athena Galleries, is usually at the New York gallery and visits the London gallery several times each year. He is available by appointment for consultation, expertise, and appraisals; or for a telephone conference. At no obligation he will arrange a private viewing with guidance on a sophisticated long term program of collecting and investing in the fine arts. He also is in attendance at all the fairs in which we exhibit. Over the past 59 years we have sold more than 800 works of ancient art to many of the country's leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Sackler Art Museum at Harvard University, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Walters Art Gallery, the Detroit lnstitute of Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Milwaukee Public Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. In addition to the British Museum and the Louvre, we have sold ancient works of art to the Benaki Museum (Athens), the Egyptian Museum (Barcelona), the Musée du Cinquantenaire (Brussels), the Museum of Fine Arts (Budapest), the Römisch-Germanisches Museum (Cologne), the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (Leiden), the Museo Archeológico Nacional (Madrid), the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto), the Papyrus Museum (Vienna), and a number of other museums in Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Germany, Japan, and Switzerland. The new Mougins Museum of Classical Art in Mougins, France, has acquired nearly 200 antiquities from us. The catalogs of classical marble sculptures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and from the J. Paul Getty Museum illustrate no less than 39 pieces acquired from our galleries. In addition, over one thousand objects purchased from us have been donated to many other museums, including the Freer Gallery of Art, the Sackler Gallery (The Smithsonian Institution), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Dr. Eisenberg travels overseas several times annually to visit collectors, museums, clients, and many of the nearly 150 private sources, agents, dealers, and auction houses with whom he is in frequent contact. Since 1954 he has made over 250 overseas

How to Collect Ancient Art Sylvia Porter lists ten sound rules as a guide in art collecting: 1. Study the field which interests you as much as possible. 2. Buy cautiously at first. 3. Make sure that your work of art has quality. 4. Deal with a top gallery or art dealer. “Some dealers and major galleries will guarantee the authenticity of the art works they sell, so check this point as well." (Not only have we been guaranteeing our ancient art for over fifty years, but to the best of our knowledge our two-day auction sale conducted by Parke-Bernet Galleries (now Sotheby's) in 1964 was the first auction sale by several years in which every piece was guaranteed - but by us!) 5. Have an understanding with your dealer or gallery about trading up - so he’ll repurchase or resell your works as you have more money to invest in high quality art. (We normally allow full credit for the exchange or upgrading of objects purchased from us.) 6. Do not buy art works just because they are a current rage. 7. Ask the advice of museum directors or curators whenever possible. 8. Decide upon your investing limit before you buy. If you fall in love with a more expensive object try to arrange for a time payment. (We certainly encourage this and offer flexible time payments!) 9. Spread your financial risks by buying a variety of art unless you are an expert in a particular field. 10. “Buy the best examples you can afford in any category.” We would add two other important rules: 11. Ask for the provenance of any potential acquisitions. 12. Do not buy objects that have been significantly restored. Beware of overly restored faces in both vase painting and sculpture.

Ancient Art as an lnvestment Historically, ancient art investments have yielded excellent long-term capital appreciation, usually 8% to 10% annually. Any investment in tangibles, especially works of art, should be projected for at least five to ten vears. Normally one should not hold more than 10% of their investment portfolio in art. Collecting fine art is a pleasurable way of hedging against inflation because the investor can enjoy

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trips, purchasing over forty thousand antiquities for many tens of millions of dollars. This aggressive purchasing policy, perhaps without parallel in the field, enables us to offer an extraordinary number of choice objects at very reasonable prices. Our willingness to buy in volume and to purchase our inventory outright, rather than to take it on consignment, results in extremely competitive pricing, often considerably below that of other galleries. Furthermore, exchanges and purchases are frequently made from many past and present clients who may be upgrading their collections or liquidating some of their holdings in order to collect in other areas. Exchanges or purchases are sometimes carried out with museums both in the United States and in Europe for their duplicate accessions or for objects not in their recent or current fields of specialization.

Expertise and Ethics Ancient art has been the specialty of our director for some 59 years, and numismatics for 72 years. His many publications on ancient art and numismatics span over five decades. He published his first antiquities catalog, A Catalog of Egyptian Antiquities, in 1959. The first volume of Art of the Ancient World by Dr. Eisenberg was published in 1965. Since 1968 Dr. Eisenberg has concentrated on expertise in the ancient arts, having lectured on this subject at New York University and presented several scholarly papers at the annual meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America, most recently on the ‘Roman’ Rubens Vase. His wide range of expertise is further revealed through other recent papers: on Egyptian bronzes at a Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists, on Etruscan bronze forgeries at an International Bronze Congress, on the ‘Greek’ Boston and Ludovisi thrones at the Magna Graecia Symposium in Venice, on Roman bronze forgeries at the 1999 International Bronze Congress, and on the Portland Vase as a Renaissance work of art at the 2003 International Congress of Classical Archaeology. He chaired a conference in London on the Phaistos Disk in 2008. In 1996 he was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology of the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society in 1952; a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1960 (and a Life Member in 1988); a Patron of the American Numismatic Society in 1955 (and a Life Associate in 1998); a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1966; and most recently, a Benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an Honorary Fellow of the Egyptian Museum in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Eisenberg has appeared as an Expert in the Courts of several states and has conducted appraisals for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Customs Service, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as many other prominent institutions. He was elected a Qualified Appraiser by the

Appraisers Association of America in 1964 and has participated in several episodes of the Antiques Road Show. He served on the vetting committee of the European Fine Art Fair at Maastricht from 1993 to 2001 and was the Chairman and co-organizer of the New York Antiquarian International Fine Art Fair held in November 2001. Dr. Eisenberg has been a leader for many years in the promotion of the ethical acquisition of antiquities by museums and collectors and has delivered papers on this subject at the Archaeology Section of the U.K. Institute for Conservation in 1993 and at the 1998 International Congress of Classical Archaeologists. He gave an address by invitation on the international trade in antiquities at the UNIDROIT Convention in Rome in 1993. He organized two symposia in New York in 1994 on public policy and the movement of antiquities and in 1998 on the acquisition of antiquities by museums for the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art, of which he is a founding member and was a member of the executive board from 1993 to 2002. In 1999 he presented testimony to the United States Cultural Properties Committee on the legal and illegal trade in ancient art in Italy. In 2003 he was a featured speaker and panel participant in the U.S. Government Conference on Stolen Mideast Antiquities in Washington, D.C. Also in 2003 he featured on the European TV channel Arte and on BBC Radio’s File on Four in indepth interviews on the antiquities trade. He appeared on television on CBS News, Dateline NBC, PBS Jim Lehrer News Hour, and CBC Television (Canada), and was interviewed on the BBC and PBR Radio, and in print in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, The Times, and a dozen other publications. In 2004 he was featured on a Discovery Channel program and on Fox News on the antiquities trade. Also in 2004 he presented a paper on ‘The Mesopotamian Antiquities Trade and the Looting of the Iraq Museum’ to the American Bar Association. In 2005 he was interviewed on the antiquities market and the collecting of antiquities on National Public Radio in the US and in 2006 on National Public Television in Athens, Greece. In 2007 he delivered a paper on ‘Perspectives on the Antiquities Trade and the Collector: Past, Present, and Future’ at the symposium ‘The Future of the Global Past’ at Yale University. He was interviewed in depth for his expertise on Greek television in 2008 and on Artfinding in 2009. In June 2012 Dr. Eisenberg was awarded the title of officiale in the Order of the Star of Italy by the President of the Republic of Italy for having provided a meaningful contribution to the prestige of Italy in his many publications on Etruscan and Roman art.

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Ancient Coins We carry a fine stock of select Greek silver and bronze coins from $100 and Roman silver and bronze coins from $75. We began our business as ‘Royal Coin Company’ in January 1942, 72 years ago, and Dr Eisenberg, co-founder of the firm, has specialized in ancient coins, as sole proprietor, since 1952.

Acknowledgements Dr. Eisenberg wishes to express his gratitude to F. Williamson Price who has again diligently prepared and co-authored the catalog, to Ramon Perez who did nearly all of the photography, to the scholars who attributed and reattributed some of the sculptures and vases, especially Kees Neeft and the late Konrad Schauenburg, and to the several others who prefer to remain anonymous.

Wanted to Purchase: Fine Antiquities of All Periods We are prepared to travel world-wide to acquire select works of legally acquired ancient art for our continually expanding clientele. We will purchase collections of any size, act as your agent to sell your objects on commission, or exchange them for other select pieces from our extensive inventory. Send photographs and full details with your letter or e-mail.

International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art

Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art

Art and Antique Dealers League

Appraisers Association of America

In the newly opened Mougins Museum of Classical Art, in the French Riviera, a few kilometers away from Cannes, among the four floors of works of Classical and Egyptian art there are nearly 200 antiquities acquired from Royal-Athena including many marble statues and heads, bronze helmets, and other ancient treasures. They have an excellent website and a superb catalog has been issued. See www.mouginsmusee.com.

MINERVA Minerva, the bi-monthly, international review of ancient art, archaeology, and numismatics, published in England, was established by Dr Eisenberg, its publisher and editor-in-chief from 1990 to 2009. It features the most extensive and timely coverage by any magazine of worldwide excavations, auctions and exhibitions emphasizing Greece, Etruria, the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the Near East. The book reviews are concise and objective. It also includes the most extensive annotated listings of international museum exhibitions, meetings, and symposia in ancient art and archaeology. Sample copies: $8 or £6 postpaid. www.minervamagazine.com editorial@minervamagazine.com Subscription (6 issues per year):

U.S.A., Canada, and rest of world:

U.K.: 1 year £30 Europe: 1 year £33

Surface: 1 year £38

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Recent Royal-Athena Catalogs: • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XV, 2004) illustrates in full color 190 objects. (72 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (2004, illustrates in full color 80 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare (2004, illustrates in full color 100 objects, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVI, 2005, illustrates in full color 192 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Mythologies of the Classical World & Ancient Egypt (2006, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVII, 2006, illustrates in full color 233 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVIII, 2007, illustrates in full color 259 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIX, 2008, illustrates in full color 222 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XX, 2009, illustrates in full color 217 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXI, 2010, illustrates in full color 252 objects, 96 pages, $5) • 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 2010, illustrates in full color 195 vases, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXII, 2011, illustrates in full color 207 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIII, 2012, illustrates in full color 251 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIV, 2013, illustrates in full color 246 objects, 96 pages, $5) • All 14 of the above catalogs (total list price $65), with price lists: $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.)

Other Royal-Athena Catalogs Available • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IV, 1985) illustrates in full color over 600 works of art. 208 pages, 192 color plates: $15 • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (1989) illustrates in full color 180 objects. (52 pages, $5) • One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy (1990) illustrates in full color 186 vases. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. VIII, 1995) illustrates in full color 244 objects. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IX, 1997) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. X, 1999) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5)

• Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XI, 2000) illustrates in full color 167 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XII, 2001) illustrates in full color 410 objects; 30 pages of glossaries and mythologies. (161 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIII, 2002) illustrates in full color 203 objects. (80 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIV, 2003) illustrates in full color 225 objects. (80 pages, $5) • A number of the objects in the last several catalogs are still available. Price lists will be included. • All 10 of the above catalogs, 1985 through 2003 (total list price $65), only $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.) Orders for our catalogs may be charged to your credit card.

Trade lnquiries We cordially invite inquiries from fellow art dealers, art consultants, architects, interior designers, and institutional collectors and investors.

Special Presentations, Condition Reports, and Color Photographs of Objects We can supply special presentations with further information, such as condition reports, and 4 x 6 in. (10x15 cm.) or 8 x 10 in. (20x25 cm.) color photographs, often with other views or close-ups, on any of the objects illustrated in this catalog upon request.

Conservation and Mounting Services A professional conservator working on our premises in New York does expert conservation and restoration of ancient art and antiques. Small metal and wood mountings and bases are custom made but due to insurance restrictions this work is usually limited to objects purchased from us. We are pleased to accept trade accounts.

Terms and Conditions of Sale All items are offered subject to prior sale. All prices are subject to change without notice, otherwise, the current price list is valid through 2014. The following credit cards are honored: American Express,Visa, Mastercard. A deferred payment plan is also available. New York residents must add the appropriate sales taxes (currently 8 7/8%). No cash refunds may be made after 10 days of receipt; however, full credit is allowed on all objects purchased from our galleries with the exception of a few consigned items. All shipping and insurance charges will be billed to the purchaser. Title remains with Royal-Athena Galleries until payment is made in full.

royal-athena galleries established 1942 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., Director

F. Williamson Price, Associate Director

New York Richard M. Novakovich Betty W. Eisenberg Suzanne George

Associate Director & Manager Comptroller Office Manager

Andrew England Alan J. Eisenberg Ramon Perez

Assistant Director & Webmaster Newsletter Editor Photographer

London (Seaby Antiquities) Anthony Law

Administrator

Peter Clayton

Consultant


royal-athena galleries new york

london


Royal-Athena Galleries, Art of the Ancient World, Vol. XXV - 2014