Issuu on Google+

One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy featuring the Patricia Kluge collection

royal-athena galleries new york

london


No. 88 - 1000 Years of Greek Vases II - September 2010 We are pleased to issue this catalog celebrating our 68th anniversary of dealing in classical numismatics and our 56th year of dealing in ancient art. It illustrates in full color 195 selected vases priced from $1,750 to $285,000. This publication is one of a continuing series primarily illustrating new acquisitions featured in our New York and London galleries, where over two thousand fine works of art are on permanent display. All of the antiquities in this catalog are displayed at our New York gallery, the largest and most extensive collection of the ancient arts ever exhibited for sale. In addition to the many masterworks of ancient art, there is a wide variety of fine items on display priced from $100 to $1,000 and up, including Greek and Roman coins, Old Master prints and drawings, and antique Egyptian prints and photographs, perfect for the beginning collector or for that very special gift. A few of the pieces illustrated may not be available since they were sold while the catalog was in preparation, but a number of other newly acquired objects will be on display in our New York gallery and on our website: www.royalathena.com, updated weekly.

We unconditionally guarantee the authenticity of every work of art sold by Royal-Athena Galleries. ©2010 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Inc. Composed and printed in the United States of America.

Every object purchased by our galleries has been legally acquired. If imported by us into the United States, we have done so in compliance with all federal regulations and have given full consideration to all international treaties governing objects of cultural importance. Antiquities priced at $5,000 or more are now checked and registered with the Art Loss Registry in London. All of our objects are clearly labeled with complete descriptions and prices. Condition reports on all the objects are available upon request. We encourage browsing and are happy to assist and advise both the amateur and the serious collector. We urge our prospective clients to ‘shop around’, for we are proud of our quality, expertise, and competitive pricing. Appointments may be arranged outside of regular gallery hours for clients desiring privacy. Updated price lists for our catalogs are available upon request. For terms and conditions of sale see the inside back cover. COVER PHOTOS: Apulian large red-figure volute krater by the Baltimore Painter (detail of neck) Ca. 340 BC. H. 44 1/4 in. (112.4 cm.) No. 126.

Back cover: Attic black-figure amphora of the Leagros Group Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 17 in. (43.2 cm.) No. 41.

Text and catalog design by Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., and F. Williamson Price Photographs by Brent M. Ridge

We will be exhibiting at BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 4-10, 2010 TEFAF, The European Fine Arts Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 18-27, 2011 The New York Spring Show, New York, NY, April 24-May 4, 2011 BAAF Brussels, The Brussels Ancient Art Fair, Brussels, Belgium, June 8-12, 2011 BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 4-10, 2011 (Check our website to confirm the dates)

royal-athena galleries established 1942 153 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022 Tel.: (212) 355-2034 Fax.: (212) 688-0412 ancientart@aol.com Monday-Saturday, 10 - 6

Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D. Director

VISIT OUR WEBSITE, updated weekly with our latest acquisitions:

www.royalathena.com

Royal-Athena at Seaby 14 Old Bond Street London W1S 4PP UK By appointment Tel.: (44) 780-225-8000 Fax.: (44) 18-833-4772


One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy featuring the Patricia Kluge Collection

An ongoing exhibition Table of Contents MAINLAND GREECE Minoan & Mycenaean Vases Geometric Vases Corinthian Vases Attic Black-figure Vases Amphorae Hydriai Column kraters and kalpides Cups & kyathoi Lekythoi Oinohoai & olpai Attic Red-figure Vases Amphorae Hydriai and kalpides Bell kraters Column kraters Calyx kraters Pelikes and lekythoi Skyphoi Stamnoi

1

2 4 6 12 22 26 28 32 34 37 40 41 43 49 50 54 55

SOUTHERN ITALY Apulian Vases Campanian Vases Lucanian Vases Paestan Vases Sicilian Vases

56 69 72 73 75

ETRUSCAN VASES

76

SECONDARY VIEWS

86

COLLECTING ANCIENT ART

94

ROYAL-ATHENA GALLERIES 94 Expertise and Ethics 95 Royal-Athena Galleries Catalogs Inside back cover

Photo above: Attic red-figure column krater by the Meleager Painter (detail) Earlier 4th Century BC. H. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.) No. 102


Introduction We are delighted to announce our acquisition of the prestigious Patricia Kluge collection of ancient vases, nearly all of which are published in this catalog. This outstanding assemblage of 48 Greek, Etruscan, and South Italian vases was acquired exclusively from Royal-Athena Galleries by Mrs. Kluge from 1988 to 1995 and also includes several pieces from the collection that she had formed with her former husband John W. Kluge from 1979 through the early 1980s, all also acquired from Royal-Athena. This catalog, our 88th publication devoted to antiquities, covers our first major gallery exhibition of ancient vases since our groundbreaking exhibition of 186 vases - ‘One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases’ - held in 1990. The present exhibition showcasing 197 vases includes seventeen examples from the Kluge collection that were in the 1990 show, now reoffered to the public for the first time after twenty years. Many of the other vases in this catalog were originally purchased from Royal-Athena over the past several decades and we are pleased to offer them again to a new generation of enthusiasts. It is a rare occurrence in view of the ever-diminishing supply of antiquities to offer for sale such a large group of important vases. It is unlikely to happen again. Dr. Eisenberg sold a Corinthian skyphos – his first ancient vase – in 1954 (for $125!). Our first group of Attic vases was published in our Art of the Ancient World, vol. I (catalog no. 44), in 1965. In the past 25 years alone we have sold over 200 Corinthian vases, 700 Attic vases, and some 800 South Italian vases. For well over half a century we have sold over 40,000 carefully attributed antiquities with particular attention to their provenance. This diligence has resulted in an astonishingly low percentage of claims against legal ownership – less than 0.0006%, or one out of every 2000 objects! In view of the increasing legislation being passed in several countries to restrict the trade in illegally exported antiquities (which we applaud), we may assure our clients that we continue to proudly conduct a very ethical business and take all of the proper steps to insure that our inventory is free of any possible claims.

Minoan & Mycenaean Pottery

1 LATE MINOAN CUP, the exterior decorated with four double-axes and wavy lines in purplish-brown slip; the vessel with a single handle and pedestal foot. Later 15th Century BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.); Diam. 4 in. (10.1 cm.) The double-axe, known as a labyrs, was an important cult object to the Minoans. Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 67. Cf. K. Demakopoulou, The Mycenaean World, Athens, 1988, p. 105, no. 36, for a similar cup and decoration.

2


2 MYCENAEAN PYRIFORM JAR decorated in brownish slip with a scale design on the shoulder and banding encircling the body; three small arching handles are attached to the shoulder. Late Helladic IIB-III, ca. 1450-1230 BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex Koutoulakis, Paris. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, part 2, 1991, no. 59. 3 MYCENAEN AMPHORISKOS WITH TWO HANDLES attached at the neck and the shoulder of the globular body. Palmettes on shoulder; body ringed. Late Helladic IIIB, ca. 1250-1150 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.2 cm.) Ex Albert F. Pagnon collection (1847-1909), Luxor. 4 MYCENAEAN LARGE STIRRUP JAR, the body with a band of zig-zags with four arcs at each right angle; the top with dotted lines. In unusually fine condition for a vase of this size. Late Helladic III, ca. 1350-1230 BC. H. 11 1/2 in. (29.3 cm.) Ex Austrian collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 151. Cf. R. Higgins, Minoan and Mycenaean Art, London, 1981, no. 127. 5 MYCENAEAN LARGE STIRRUP JAR decorated in brownish slip with four spikey spirals on the shoulder and banding encircling the globular body. Late Helladic III, ca. 1350-1230 BC. H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 70.

3


Geometric 6 GREEK GEOMETRIC PYXIS of tapering silhouette with stylized birds and linear designs in brown slip; lacking lid. 8th Century BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm); Diam. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) Ex private collection, San Jose, California, acquired at auction in Beverly Hills, June 1993. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 78. 7 GREEK GEOMETRIC PYXIS with banding and chevrons; lacking lid. Early 8th Century BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.); Diam. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex collection of Louis-Gabriel Bellon (1819-1899), SaintNicolas-les-Arras, France; thence by descent. Bellon founded a museum in Saint-Nicolasles-Arras. Sadly, most of the collection was destroyed during the bombardment of the town at the outset of World War I. 8 GREEK GEOMETRIC LIDDED PYXIS with overall banding and central row of dots; lid with pointed knob handle. 8th-7th Century BC. Diam. 5 3/4 in. (14.7 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired in the 1950s. 9 GREEK GEOMETRIC FLAT PYXIS WITH COVER Pairs of geese; star pattern on the bottom. Ca. 750-735 BC. Diam. 3 1/8 in. (7.9 cm.); H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) Ex English collection dispersed at Sotheby’s, London, December, 1984.

4


10 GREEK GEOMETRIC KANTHAROS with two raised loop handles, the shoulder decorated with geometric motifs in black slip. 8th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.); W. 5 1/4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex private French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 109. 11 GREEK GEOMETRIC TANKARD with arching striated handle, the body with overall banding, flanking a central frieze of water fowl. Geometric IB-IIA, 750-725 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex private North German collection. Published: W. Hornbostel, Kunst der Antike, Sch채tze aus Norddeutschen Privatbesitz, 1977, p. 241, no. 226; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 81. 12 GREEK GEOMETRIC TANKARD of tapered cylindrical form, flaring mouth, bulbous foot, arching handle. In brown slip: central panel of grazing stag, zig-zags, banding, etc. Ca. 750 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex A. Trampitsch (1893-1970) collection, Paris; New York private collection, acquired in 1992. 13 EARLY PROTOCORINTHIAN MINIATURE OINOCHOE Ca. 700-675 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex Dr. Jean Lauffenburger collection, Geneva. Published: J. Chamay, Ceramiques Corinthiennes, 1984, p. 14-15.

5


Corinthian Pottery 14 PROTOCORINTHIAN ROUNDMOUTHED OINOCHOE with a central band of animals. Ca. 640-630 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.1 cm.) Ex German collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1983; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. This is a rare and important vase, a masterwork of potting and painting produced in Corinth in the time of transition from the Late Protocorinthian to the Corinthian styles. In the frieze around the middle of the body are eight animals: two goats, two leopards (?), a lion, a boar, a bull, and a ram. Seven of the beasts walk to the left. The ram, however, walks to the right and comes head to head with the bull; both lower their heads as though determined to contest the right of way. This parade of beasts is executed with far more feeling and precision than would ever again be found in the developed Corinthian style. Parts of each animal are highlighted by the use of added red. The shape is East Greek but the decoration is pure Corinthian. Only one other example is known which also has an animal frieze: Munich 228; see H. Payne, Necrocorinthia, Oxford, 1931, p. 272, no. 149. Cf. A. Lane, Greek Pottery, New York, 1949, pl. 24A; F. Villard, CVA Louvre 13, pl. 47, 1-2; and H. Bloesch, ed., Greek Vases from the Hirschmann Collection, Zurich, 1982, 18-19 and 94, no. 6.

6


15 CORINTHIAN FLAT BOTTOMED OINOCHOE BY THE PAINTER OF BOSTON F471 Between bands, a central frieze of animals including a panther, an ibex, a small bird, and a siren; tongues on the shoulder and rays beneath the frieze; with dipinto (painted inscription). Ca. 580 BC. H. 8 in. (20.5 cm.) Acquired in Basel, Switzerland, June 2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 169. Cf. D.A. Amyx, Corinthian Vase-painting of the Archaic Period, 1988, 221, pl. 91.

16 CORINTHIAN OINOCHOE with two registers of decoration heightened with incision and crimson on a buff ground, the upper with a frieze consisting of a siren with outstretched wings, flanked by two geese, the lower frieze with a confronting bull and lion, a siren and adorned lions; with rosettes and dots in the field. Ca. 580-570 BC. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex private collection, California, acquired at auction at Butterfield's, San Francisco, about 1992. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 134.

7


17 CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON BY THE POPULONIA PAINTER A siren, with a bird's body and a woman's head, surmounted by a polos, her hair in archaic tiers down her back; pear-shaped form with disk rim and pierced handle; rosettes in the field. Ca. 610-590 BC. H. 9 5/8 in. (24.4 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired prior to 1950. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 84. 18 CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON A siren with outstretched wings; the ground ornamented with rosettes and lotus motifs. Ca. 600 BC. H. 6 3⁄4 in. (17 cm.) Ex Christie’s London, November, 1980; private collection, Los Angeles; private collection,UK. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 91. 19 CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON depicting a winged panther; rosettes in the field. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (16.4 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1960s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 101.

20 CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON BY THE COCK PAINTER depicting two confronting cockerels; rosettes in the field. Ca. 610-590 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Hugo Munsterberg (1916-1995), New Paltz, New York, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 113.

8


21 CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON depicting a winged Potnia Theron, “Mistress of the Animals”, grasping a goose by the neck with each hand; rosettes in the field. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.6 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1960s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 100. 22 CORINTHIAN EXALEIPTRON depicting, between three spool-form handles, panels of birds; rosettes in the field. Scarce type. Early 6th Century BC. Diam. 6 1/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex Elie Borowski (1913-2003) collection, Basel, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 166.

23 CORINTHIAN ARYBALLOS depicting a siren, her wings spread, and two birds; rosettes in the field. Ca. 600 BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.6 cm.) Ex private collection. Munich, Germany. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 90. 24 CORINTHIAN ARYBALLOS BY THE BAYRAKLI PAINTER depicting sirens flanking a winged Potnia Theron, “Mistress of the Animals”, holding geese. 7th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9 cm.) Formerly attributed to the Potnia Painter. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 83.

9


25 CORINTHIAN SKYPHOS Thinly potted, the body with a panther and a swan moving right and a goat moving left, its head lowered; rosettes in the field; with rays above the foot, vertical lines in the handle zones, details in added red. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.); Diam. 4 3/8 in. (11 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Jean Lauffenburger, Geneva, 1970s; Royal-Athena, 1987; William Suddaby, Key West, Florida, acquired in 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 110. 26 CORINTHIAN LARGE SKYPHOS depicting a lion facing a ram on either side; rosettes in the field; with rays above the foot, vertical lines in the handle zones, details in added red. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 5 5/8 in.(14.5 cm.); Diam. 7 3/4 in. (20 cm.) Ex Swiss collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 170. 27 CORINTHIAN LARGE PYXIS with a frieze of animals, including a siren, a wild goat, and a lioness; rosettes in the field; two applied handles at the rim. Ca. 600-575 BC. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm); Mouth diam. 8 in. (20.4 cm.) Ex Swiss collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IX, 1999, no. 86.

10


28 CORINTHIAN POTTERY PYXIS of carinated form, the shoulder with three felines walking to right. Ca. 585-575 BC. Diam. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex Chandon de Briailles collection, France. For a similar example, see J. Chamay and J-L. Maier, CĂŠramiques Corinthiennes, Lauffenburger Collection, 1984, pp. 160-161.

29 CORINTHIAN LIDDED PYXIS, the body and cover with banding and maeanders flanking a key maeander. Mid-6th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex Sybille Kroeber collection, Berlin, ca. 1964. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 84.

30 CORINTHIAN PYXIS of unusual form, nearly cylindrical, faintly waisted, with rounded shoulder and broad mouth. Decorated with a central frieze of three dolphins amid rosettes, bordered by a checkerboard band. Above, a band of rosettes and a band with trios of vertical zigzags; two applied canted handles at the shoulder. Later Middle Corinthian, ca. 575 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex German collection, acquired ca. 1980. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 112. For the shape, cf. T.J. Dunbabin, Perachora II, Oxford, 1962, pl. 88: 1742. The filling is reminiscent of the work of the Gela Floral Kotylai; cf. C. W. Neeft: Addenda et Corrigenda to D. A. Amyx, Corinthian Vase-Painting in the Archaic Period, pp. 54-55. Attributed by Dr. Cees Neeft, Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam.

11


31 EUBOEAN BLACK-FIGURE OVOID NECK AMPHORA Three bearded men wearing red himations approach an enthroned female, a large sphinx behind her. Reverse: Two confronting panthers. Ca. 560-550 BC. H. 12 5/8 in. (32.1 cm.) Ex Elie Borowski (1913-2003) collection, Basel, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 172.

Attic Black-figure 32 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE TYRRHENIAN NECK AMPHORA BY THE POINTED-NOSE PAINTER with three seated sphinxes, the two at right confronted. Reverse: A seated sphinx flanked by standing felines. Ca. 560-550 BC. H. 12 5/8 in. (32.1 cm.) Ex New York private collection, acquired in the 1970s. Published: M端nzen und Medaillen, Antike Kunst, Basel, 1983, no. 19, pl. 7; Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 80. 33 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE PANEL AMPHORA BY A CONTEMPORARY OF LYDOS Probably a departure scene, depicting a warrior wearing a Corinthian helmet and holding a round shield facing left, flanked by four men. The reverse is similiar except that the inner pair are semi-nude youths. Ca. 565-535 BC. H. 10 5/8 in. (27.2 cm.) Ex collection of Albert Pilot (1922- 2002), France, acquired circa 1940. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 110.

12


T h e re v e r s e s o f many of the vases may be found on 34 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE PANEL AMPHORA Two armed nude warriors attack each other with spears. Reverse: Hermes, with raised kerykeion, wears a chiton and cloak, a petasos on his head. On either side, a bearded man dressed in a chiton and cloak, holding a spear; nonsense inscriptions on both sides. Ca. 560-550 BC. H. 13 1/2 in. (34.4 cm.) Ex private collection, Hamburg, acquired in 1993.

Numerous details correspond to the Painter of Berlin 1686: ears, faces, and petasoi (Cf. Naples Stg 116: AhlbergCornell - 1984, 112 III 2 B) and the nonsense inscriptions (e.g. on an amphora in Paris, Cabinet des MĂŠdailles 207: Attic Black-figure Vase-painters 296, 6; Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum Bibl. Nat. (1) pl., 34, 3-5; Lissarague - 1999, 8586, ills. 66-67; or the amphora in Urbana-Champaign 70-9-3: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (CVA) University of Illinois (1) pl. 9), which, however do not conform to the standard formula.

13


35 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE GROUP E PANEL AMPHORA Gigantomachy. In the middle Poseidon kills Polybotes by dropping the island of Nisyros on him. At left Athena runs toward him pursued by an armored giant, and at right Ares fells another armored giant. Reverse: An armed warrior, seated upon an altar, receives tribute from a man and woman at left; behind the warrior are two other males. Ca. 540 BC. H. 19 5/8 in. (50 cm.) Ex private collection, Dusseldorf, acquired from Herbert Cahn, Basel, Switzerland, in 1988. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 98. Group E refers to a number of vases from the same workshop where Exekias developed his style.

In mythology, the Gigantes were a tribe of one hundred Giants born of Gaia, the Earth. At her instigation they made war on the gods but, with the help of Herakles, were destroyed in the ensuing battle. This conflict symbolized the struggle between the cosmic order of the Olympians led by Zeus and the forces of chaos led by the giant Alcyoneus. Interestingly, it was only successful because of the participation of a man born of a mortal woman, Herakles, as prophecized by Hera.

14


36 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE PANEL AMPHORA BY THE BATEMAN PAINTER Herakles stands in the center, locked in combat with the Nemean lion, an invulnerable beast that terrorized the vicinity near Nemea in the N. W. Peloponnese. Iolaos, Herakles’ nephew and companion, stands at left holding Herakles’ club and gesturing excitedly. At right stand Athena and Hermes. Reverse: The red-bearded Dionysos stands in profile holding a kantharos; at right dance two nude satyrs. Behind him, at left, dance a third satyr and a whiteskinned maenad. Ca. 530-520 BC. H. 19 in. (48.3 cm.) Ex collection of Patricia Kluge, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: Summa, Ancient Art, Beverly Hills, California, 1976, no. 9.

Only five other vases are known by this painter, an artist Sir John Beazley placed among the followers of the Lysippides Painter (the name vase in the Cleveland Museum, two in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, one in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the other in a private American collection). The goddess Athena was a frequent companion of Herakles and was his patron among the gods. Hermes was also present during several of his Twelve Labors.

15


37 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA. THE CLASS OF THE CABINET DES MÉDAILLES 218, NIKOSTHENIC SUBGROUP On either side a nude satyr clasps a fleeing maenad. On the neck, on either side, a running maenad. Ca. 525-515 BC. H. 8 1/8 in. (20.6 cm.) Ex English collection; acquired in London in 2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 184. 38 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA BY THE EUPHILETOS PAINTER A warrior mounts a quadriga; a female and two other warriors in attendance. Reverse: Two Scythian archers holding spears on horseback. Ca. 520 BC. H. 19 1/2 in. (49.5 cm.) Ex collection of Morris J. Pinto (1925-2009), New York. An unevenly diluted brown slip is intentionally applied in horizontal brushstrokes across the entire vase, creating a subtly variegated background; graffito on base. The Euphiletos Painter was known for his capacity of detail, his Panathenaic vases, and his chariot scenes.

16


Visit our website, updated weekly, to view many of the over 300 ancient vases in our current inventory as well as our latest acquisitions: www.royalathena.com

39 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA On both sides, a Gigantomachy: Athena attacks to the right, plunging the spear in her upraised right hand into the giant who kneels in front of her, probably Enkelados. Reverse: Similar, but Athena fights without a shield. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. with lid 20 1/2 in. (52 cm.) Ex collection of Patricia Kluge, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. In mythology, the Gigantes were a tribe of one hundred giants born of Gaia, the Earth. At her instigation they made war on the Olympian gods but, with the help of Herakles, were destroyed in the ensuing conflict. The battle between the gods and the giants had a long history in art and literature, being mentioned by Homer (Odyssey 7.59) and described by Hesiod (Theogeny 185).

17


40 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA FROM THE GROUP OF TORONTO 305 In a battle between Greeks and Amazons (Amazonomachy), a four-horse chariot (quadriga) is wheeling to the left. The horses have already turned, but the chariot itself still faces frontally, with the wheels foreshortened. The charioteer is not visible, but we see the Theban shield he wears on his back, with its red rim and characteristic indented sides. Of the warrior riding beside the charioteer, we see only his high-crested Corinthian helmet, his scabbard, his two long spears, and his round Argive shield. An air of equine ferocity is reinforced by the open mouths and white teeth. At the left is an Amazon carrying a spear and shield. She falls to the left; at first glance, the horses seem to be trampling her, but in fact she is behind them. Her attacker is probably the warrior at the far right, who strides to the left behind the chariot, his face hidden by the shield of the charioteer.

18

Reverse: In the center, Dionysos stands holding a rhyton in his left hand and a grapevine in his right. He wears an ivy wreath. Like the two satyrs in the scene, the god has a long red beard. One satyr stands empty-handed at the far right; the other stands behind Dionysos holding a jug, ready to fill the god’s rhyton when summoned. Behind this satyr, at the far left, is a maenad wearing a deerskin (nebris) over a chiton decorated with stars and rosettes. A second woman, probably Dionysos’ consort, Ariadne, stands before the god, in a chiton and red-striped himation, her right hand gesturing toward him. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 17 1/8 in. (43.5 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 30. The painters in this group were followers of the Antimenes Painter and worked in a comparable style.


41 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA FROM THE LEAGROS GROUP Herakles holds the Erymanthian boar upside down on his left shoulder, scaring the daylights out of Eurystheus, who hides in a sunken storage jar (pithos), gesturing excitedly. Athena, on the right, looks on. Iolaos, Herakles’ companion, stands behind him at the far left. Reverse: Dionysos holding a kantharos. Flanking him are two maenads, both dancing away from the god but looking back and gesturing at him. Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 17 in. (43.2 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 29.

19

The goddess Hera hated Herakles because he was the son of her husband Zeus and the mortal woman Alkmene. When it was fated that Herakles and Eurystheus would be born on the same day, and that the first-born would have dominion over the other and be king of Argos, Hera intervened to have Eurystheus born prematurely. Eurystheus was a spiteful weakling and envious of Herakles. It was he who set Herakles the Twelve Labors, one of which was to capture the vicious boar of Erymanthos. When the hero returned to Argos with the beast, Eurystheus was so terrified that he hid in a pithos. Herakles was a favorite subject of the Leagros Group. The heroic proportions and features are typical and, as usual, there is little wasted space.


42 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA FROM THE LEAGROS GROUP depicting Ajax in full armor holding a sword and attempting to seize Kassandra as she seeks refuge at a statue of Athena Promachos, the goddess’s shield emblazoned with a dolphin. The other side is decorated with a figure of Dionysos flanked by a maenad and a satyr, a dotted vine in the background. As usual, rays above the foot, linked lotus buds below the scenes, palmettes linked by tendrils in the handle zones, linked double palmettes on the neck, the details in added red and white; graffito under the foot. Ca. 520-500 BC. H. 11 3/4 in (29.8 cm.) From a New York private collection, acquired in the 1960’s; Antiquarium, Ltd., New York, 1990; Florida private collection; Dr. R.B. collection, St. Louis, Missouri.

The subject of Ajax and Kassandra is not common; two examples by the Painter of Munich 1519, a Leagran artist, are Vatican G 22 and London B 242. In Greek mythology, Kassandra ("she who entangles men") was a daughter of King Priam of Troy who captured the eye of Apollo and so was given the ability to see the future. However, when she did not return his love, he placed a curse on her so that no one would ever believe her predictions. Thus Kassandra foresees the destruction of Troy (she warns the Trojans about the Trojan Horse, the death of Agamemnon, and her own demise), but is unable to do anything about it.

20


43 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA A warrior battles an Amazon; possibly Herakles and Andromache; a draped youth holding a spear at either side. Reverse: A draped female between two warriors; possibly the capture of Helen. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex French collection. The thighs of the Amazon and the central body of the draped male at right are restored. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 100. 44 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA IN THE MANNER OF THE THREE LINE PAINTER Herakles wrestling the Nemean lion; at right, Athena seated upon a folding stool evidently goading Herakles on; at left a draped male citizen. Reverse: Athena seated between two nude males. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 99. 45 ATTIC SMALL BLACK-FIGURE PSEUDOPANATHENAIC AMPHORA Athena Promachos. Reverse: Two nude athletes with javelins, a discus, etc. Late 6th-early 5th Century BC. H. 9 5/8 in. (24.4 cm.) Ex E.K. collection, Canton, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1989-2005. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 96.

21


46 ATTIC LARGE BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA A goddess mounts a quadriga with three deities watching; below, a stag flanked by two lions; on the shoulder are two nude boxers observed by two draped males, one on either side. Ca. 540-525 BC. H. 19 3/4 in. (50 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 112A. 47 ATTIC LARGE BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE SWING PAINTER A warrior prepares to depart in a chariot. The charioteer stands in the box, the reins in one hand and the goad in the other. His hair and beard are red, like those of the man standing in the background conversing with the warrior (his son?). At either end of the chariot, stand two males mantled in red-striped himations; the one at the left is bearded. In the foreground, a woman stands by the chariot box, apparently conversing with the driver. On the shoulder, a hoplite is among four enemy horsemen, who have surrounded him for the kill. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 18 1/4 in. (46.4 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 33. Of the Swing Painter, Sir John Beazley said he was perhaps a pupil of the Princeton Painter, and clearly also influenced by Exekias. Some thirteen hydriae are known by his hand, all with chariot scenes on the body, but only one other with a fight scene on the shoulder: British private collection; J. Beazley, 22 Paralipomena, Oxford, 1971, 135, 98.


23


48 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE READY PAINTER A nude youth puts on greaves, before him a woman who holds his shield and spear. On either side of them is a draped youth and a nude youth with spear. On the shoulder are two grazing roe deer, between them a panther. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (30.7 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Jacques Denier (1926-1992), La Tour du Pin, France, acquired from Spinks, London. Published: J. Beazley, Paralipomena, Oxford, 1971, p. 54.

24


49 ATTIC LARGE BLACK-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE EUPHILETOS PAINTER Dionysos and Ariadne in a quadriga; behind, Apollo, a goddess, and Hermes. On the shoulder: Dionysos reclining, satyrs and maenads in attendance. Ca. 520-500 BC. H. 20 in. (50.1 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, part I, 1992, no. 264.

25


50 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE BUCCI PAINTER Two charioteers in a quadriga, an eagle flying above. Reverse: Three youths with a horse. Ca. 530 BC. H. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm.); W. 13 in. (33 cm.); Diam. 10 1/2 in. (26.6 cm.) Ex German collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1989, no. 35. 51 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURED WHITEGROUND KALPIS BY THE PAINTER OF THE HALF-PALMETTES The panel on the body with a bearded ithyphallic satyr walking to the right and looking back, holding a thyrsos in his left hand, followed by two galloping horses from a biga, a dog below, vines in the field. Ca. 490-470 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex collection of Frank H. Sommer III (d. 2006), former head of the Winterthur Library, Winterthur, Delaware, acquired in 1968.

26


52 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE KALPIS In a panel on the shoulder: A bearded charioteer in a quadriga. The horses are at rest, but seem to snort and stamp the ground, as though restless for the race to commence. Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 14 in. (35.5 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 34. A kalpis is a type of hydria with a continuous, curving profile from mouth to foot and a vertical handle connecting the shoulder and neck. In the more standard type of black-figure hydria, the neck and body are offset, the shoulder sharply angled, and the vertical handle runs from shoulder to rim. Kalpides were invented late in the 6th century and became the standard red-figure hydria. Black-figure examples are not common.

27

A close parallel to this vase in shape, subject, and height is a kalpis once in a British private collection: Catalogue of the Collection of Ancient Greek Pottery, the Property of the Rt. Hon. Lord Revelstoke. London, Puttick & Simpson, April 5, 1935, no. 70. The only difference is that the Revelstoke vase had a band of palmettes between the handles.


53 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BAND CUP WITH EROTIC SCENE On either side, a nude couple copulate, as from both sides a nude male runs to join them, while at the far left and right a draped male stands. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 5 in. (12.7 cm.); W. 11 1/8 in (28.3 cm.); Diam. 8 1/4 (21 cm.) Ex Sybille Kroeber Collection, Berlin, ca. 1964. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 91. 54 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BAND CUP NEAR THE OAKESHOTT PAINTER On either side, an erotic grouping of two ithyphallic satyrs flanking a nude female who balances on her left leg; by either handle, a kneeling satyr. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.); W. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm.); Diam. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. R. Vadaszy. Published: Mテシnzen und Medaillen, Antike Kunst, Basel, June 1987, no. 436; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 77. Cf. J. Beazley, Paralipomena, Oxford, 1971, no. 78. 55 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BAND CUP IN THE MANNER OF THE RUNNERS PAINTER On either side, a rider on a white horse is flanked by two nude runners and two draped males. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm.); W. 11 7/8 in. (30.1 cm.); Diam. 8 7/8 in. (27.5 cm.) Ex Sybille Kroeber collection, Berlin, ca. 1964. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 90. The name Runners Painter was proposed by Dr. Herman Brijder in his article 窶連ttic Black Figure Cups in Amsterdam and an Exchange with Heidelberg', BABesch 50, 1975, 157-177. See also his additional notes on this painter in CVA Amsterdam 2, 86ff., pls. 102.4, 112.1.

28


56 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE EYE CUP Between apotropaic eyes, a Gorgon running to right; a mounted warrior riding right, a bird in flight above; a leaping winged dolphin below each handle. Ca. 530-520 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (13.3 cm.); W. 14 1/2 in. (36.8 cm.); Diam. 11 1/4 in. (28.2 cm.) Ex J. L.Theodor collection, Brussels. Published: A. Pollino, Guerriers et Cavaliers dans le Monde Grec, 1988, pp. 182-183; J.A. Jordan, Attic Black-figured Eye-Cups, Ann Arbor, 1989, no. C198; P. Heesen, The J.L. Theodor Collection of Attic Black-Figure Vases, Amsterdam, 1996, no. 48; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 113. 57 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE EYE CUP A centaur between apotropaic eyes on either side; hoplites flanking the handles; in the tondo, a siren. Later 6th Century BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.); W. 11 1/8 in. (28.2 cm.); Diam. 8 1/2 in. (20.5 cm.) Ex French collection of Pierre P., purchased in Paris in 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 141.

29


58 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE EYE CUP with a gorgoneion in the tondo; each side centered by a dancing maenad between apotropaic eyes, flanked by gesticulating nude youths; a dolphin below each handle. Late 6th Century BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.2 cm.); W. 11 3/8 in. (28.9 cm.); Diam. 8 3/4 in (22.2 cm.). Ex A. Paulsem collection, acquired in 1985. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 140. 59 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE CUP-SKYPHOS FROM THE WORKSHOP OF THE HAIMON PAINTER On either side, Herakles fighting the Nemean lion; flanking palmettes. Ca. 500 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.); W. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm.); Diam. 7 1/2 in. (19.3 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, acquired ca. 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 142.

60 EUBOEAN BLACK-FIGURE PLATE FEATURING A COCKEREL with grooved lip, a ridge defining the floor on the exterior and a ring-base. The decoration, which makes lavish use of crimson and white, shows a strutting cockerel with, above him, a palmette and, to the right, a spiral supporting a lotus flower on a long stem. The rim is pierced for suspension. The composition is encircled by broad bands - black, crimson, and black - and the underside is filled with similar bands in black only. Rare. Ca. 600-550 BC. Diam 5. 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) Ex English collection.

30


61 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND KYATHOS, GROUP OF VATICAN G57 Between apotropaic eyes, Herakles battles a crouching warrior, perhaps Kyknos, grasping his shield blazoned with a tripod. On either side of the handle is a nude crouching warrior, one with a shield blazon of a bearded snake, the other a satyr mask. Ca. 515-505 BC. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.); Diam. of mouth 4 1/8 in.(10.5 cm.) Ex collection of the Marquess of Northampton, Castle Ashby; William Suddaby, Key West, Florida. Published: J. Boardman and M. Robertson, Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain, Castle Ashby, Northampton, Oxford, 1979, pl. 24, nos. 7-9; A.J. Paul, Exhibition catalogue, “A View into Antiquity: Pottery from the Collection of William Suddaby and David Meier,” Tampa, 2001, no. 16; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 121. The tripod shield blazon would suit the location of Delphi, where Kyknos robbed and killed supplicants on their way to the oracular shrine. 62 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE KYATHOS NEAR THE PAINTER OF VATICAN G7 Between apotropaic eyes are two dancing maenads amid vines. Ca. 510 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.); Diam. of mouth 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex Hr. B. collection, Switzerland, acquired between 1960 and 1980. Cf. M. Eismann, Attic Kyathos Painters, 1971, 282ff, no. 65, pl. 24. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 99. 63 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE KYATHOS NEAR THE PAINTER OF VATICAN G7 Between apotropaic eyes, the bearded Dionysos wears a chlamys and rides an aroused prancing mule. The base of the handle is flanked by seated sphinxes, their front legs raised and their heads turned back; vines surround the central figure. Graffiti beneath the foot: ANEIA (in retrograde). Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 5 in. (12.8 cm.); Diam. of mouth 4 in.(10.3 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection, acquired in the late 1960's. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 81. .

31


64 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS BY A FOLLOWER OF THE TALEIDES PAINTER, with a nude boxer flanked by two judges on either side; on the shoulder, two judges flank a palmette. Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 8 5/8 in (21.9 cm.) Ex German private collection, acquired in the 1980s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 136. 65 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Between apotropaic eyes, two women draped capite velato in black stand with their hands extended in the attitude of mourning. Ca. 500 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (30 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 102. 66 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE SMALL LEKYTHOS OF THE COCK GROUP Two lions attacking a bull; on the shoulder: a cock between leaves. Ca. 500 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14.2 cm.) Ex K. F. collection, Garden City, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1985. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1996-2003; George Mason University, 2003-07. Cf. H. Bloesch, Greek Vases from the Hirschmann Collection, 1982, no. 27.

32


67 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS “The Concert of Apollo� with the god of music playing a lyre instead of his usual kithara.The goddesses standing on either side of him are probably his sister Artemis (behind him) and his mother Leto. Each holds a flower. At the far left, behind Artemis, stands Dionysos holding a rhyton. At the far right, behind Leto, is the nude Hermes holding his kerykeion. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 63. The large diameter and tall, nearly conical shoulder place this among the earliest of the cylindrical lekythoi that came into fashion in the last quarter of the 6th century and which became the standard red-figure type throughout most of the 5th century BC. 68 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND LEKYTHOS NEAR THE HAIMON PAINTER Herakles and Apollo scuffle over the Delphic tripod; Athena, at the right, watching. Ca. 490 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.3 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 116. 69 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND LEKYTHOS NEAR THE HAIMON PAINTER Herakles finding the cattle of Geryon, one of the Twelve Labors; Eurytion at the left, Athena in the midst. Ca. 490 BC. H. 6 1/2 in.(16.5) A rare subject. Ex M. Hubmann collection, Zurich, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 206. According to Evander, Herakles stopped to pasture the cattle he had stolen from Geryon near the cave where lived Cacus, the son of Vulcan. As Herakles slept, Cacus took a liking to the cattle and slyly stole eight of them by dragging them by their tails, so as to leave no trail. When Herakles awoke and started to leave, the remaining herd made plaintive noises towards the cave; Herakles then found the cattle and killed Cacus.

33


70 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Athena battles a giant; flanked by Amazons on horseback, each helmeted and wrapped in a cloak. Ca. 500 BC. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex Austrian collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 197. 71 ATTIC TREFOIL ‘COOK CLASS’ OINOCHOE: HEAD OF A FEMALE wearing a black saccos. Ca. 490-480 BC. H. 7 1/16 in. (17.9. cm) Ex Dutch private collection, Maastricht; H.J. collection, Sun City, Arizona. Exhibited at Kresge Art Museum, Michigan State University, 1985-2009. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 82; vol. XXI, 2010, no. 197. 72 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE depicting a warrior arming, helped by a draped woman who stands before him holding his spear and shield, and a youth who stands behind him. Ca. 530 BC. H. 7 3/8 in. (18.7 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 81.

34


73 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE BY THE ATHENA PAINTER The bearded Dionysos between dancing maenads; grapevines in the field. Ca. 500-480 BC. H. 7 in. (17.8 cm.) Ex collection of F. Pruslin, New York; J.L., Bay City, Texas, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 55; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 115. 74 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND TREFOIL OINOCHOE, perhaps by the Painter of Vatican G49. Dionysos holding a kantharos with a maenad to the right, a goat between. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 in. (22.7 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1984; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 72. 75 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE OINOCHOE CLASS OF LONDON B495 Herakles fighting the Nemean lion. Ca. 500 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010.

35


76 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE OLPE BY THE PAINTER OF VATICAN G49 Artemis holding a flower; behind her, a deer. Ca. 500 BC. H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 57. 77 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE OLPE An Amazon holding spears and standing behind a horse. Ca. 510 BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex Münzen und Medaillen, Antike Kunst, Basel, 1983; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1983; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 78 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND MASTOID CUP with satyrs, maenads, a draped youth on mule-back, a prancing goat, and two seated figures of Dionysos looking back, one holding the thyrsos; dotted vines in the field. Ca. 500-490 BC. H. 3 5/16 in. (8.5 cm.) Ex collection of Charles-René de Paul de SaintMarceaux (1845-1915), Paris, thence by descent. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 85. 79 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND LIDDED PYXIS of concave cylindrical form with a frieze of cavorting satyrs and maenads; on the lid, a youth and five lions. Ca. 520 BC. H. 5 in. (13 cm.); Diam. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) 36 Ex German collection.


37

80 ATTIC RED-FIGURE AMPHORA WITH TWISTED HANDLES BY THE HARROW PAINTER The music lesson: A youth is seated to the left on a rectangular block. He is covered from chin to ankle Attic Red-figure with a himation which he draws taut with his covered right hand. Va s e s In his left hand he holds a lyre, the tortoise-shell soundboard of which is not visible. He looks straight ahead, not meeting the eyes of the bearded man who stands before him, leaning on his knotty staff, his left leg drawn back. Reverse: A youth stands to the left, wrapped in a himation. Ca. 480-470 BC. H. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 64. He was strongly influenced by the Berlin Painter, though not from the same workshop. Another neck-amphora with twisted handles has a nearly identical scene and is in the collection of the Vatican, no. 17889, in J. Beazley, Attic Red-figure Vase-painters (ARV), Oxford, 1963, no. 272,5. For other vases by this painter see nos. 85 and 100.


81 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY THE NIKON PAINTER A flying Nike holding a fillet in both hands. Reverse: A draped youth with arm outstretched. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm.) Published: G. Puhze, Kunst der Antike, Freiburg im Breisgau, 1998; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII, 2002, no. 86. 82 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY HERMONAX A nude frontal Dionysos, wearing a laurel wreath and cloak draped over his arms from behind, standing, holding a thyrsos, looking to the right. Reverse: A nude satyr holding an oinochoe, wineskin, and a thyrsos, strides to the left. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.4 cm.) Ex North German private collection. Hermonax was a pupil of the Berlin Painter. Cf. The neck amphorae: Louvre G376 (ARV2 488,68: Dionysos); Altenburg, Lindenau Museum, 289 (ARV2 487,62: Satyr); Moscow, Pushkin Museum, 601 and 1071 (ARV2 488,75-76: Satyr). Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 103. 83 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA with a youth at the right being handed a lyre with a tortoise-shell soundboard by his instructor. Reverse: A striding youth with a walking stick. Ca. 450 BC. H. 12 3/4 in. (32.5 cm.) Ex private French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 89.

38


Our collection of ancient vases, numbering over 300 museum quality examples, is arguably the finest and most comprehensive available for sale anywhere. For an overview, consult our recent catalogs, visit the New York gallery, or go to

www.royalathena.com.

39

84 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY THE ETHIOP PAINTER A young warrior standing, wearing a belted chiton, a chlamys draped over his right arm, a shield over his left shoulder and a spear in his right hand, takes leave of an older bearded man to the left; an inscription in added red in between: KONI. Reverse : A standing bearded man, wrapped in a himation and leaning upon his staff. Ca. 460 BC H. 11 7/8 in. (30.2 cm.) Ex Japanese private collection, acquired in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 143.


85 ATTIC RED-FIGURE KALPIS BY THE HARROW PAINTER A courting scene: flanked by two bearded males leaning upon knotty staffs, a woman, probably a hetaira, sits holding a mirror; a dog behind her, a kalathos at her feet. Often shown spinning, it is believed that these paid companions did so to pass the time between customers or to emulate the domesticity of respectable women to titillate suitors. Ca. 470 BC. H. 12 3/4 in. (32.4 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, vol. XII, no. 212. 86 ATTIC SMALL RED-FIGURE KALPIS Eos and Kephalos. The goddess of the dawn, in pursuit with outstretched arms, the young hunter Kephalos running ahead, holding a pair of spears. Ca. 420 BC. H. 6 3/4 in. (17.8 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. X, 1999, no. 107; vol. XVII, 2006, no. 105.

40


87 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE CHRISTIE PAINTER A komos procession led by a draped female playing a flute followed by two nude youths, the first holding a barbiton. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 450-440 BC. H. 10 3/4 in (27.3 cm.); W. 13 1/2 in. (34.2 cm.); Diam. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired from Mythes & LĂŠgendes, Paris, in 1971. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 126. 88 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Herakles offers a kantharos to Nike; at the left the Dioscuroi holding torches or spears, at the right another nude laureate male watching. Reverse: Three draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 13 1/8 in. (33.5 cm.); W. and Diam. 13 in. (33 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 153.

41


89 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER by the same hand as Liverpool 5037. A symposion with four young men reclining on two couches; a female flute player walking in front and a nude youth holding a tympanon kneeling on the couch at the left. Reverse: Three draped youths, one holding a strigil. 4th Century BC. H. 15 1/8 in. (38.5 cm.); W. and Diam. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.) Ex European private collection assembled in the 1970s and 80s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 111.

90 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Four nude maenads and a satyr cavort around a laver in their midst, in which a nude, winged Eros alights. Reverse: Three draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.); Diam. 16 in. (40.6 cm.); W. 17 in. (43.2 cm.) Ex Belgium private collection, acquired in the 1980s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 112.

42


91 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE ALKIMACHOS PAINTER Two galloping horsemen holding spears, one dressed in an ornate cloak called a zeira. This boldly patterned garment was favored by the Thracian cavalry, famed for their horsemanship. The rider’s cap is of animal skin; it too is Thracian and is called an alopekis. Reverse: A mantled youth is accosted by two youths with sticks, also wearing himations. The pillar separating them is probably one of the starting posts in the palaestra, the public exercise ground, a common trysting place. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 13 3/4 in. (35 cm.); W. 14 1/8 in.(35.8 cm.); Diam. 12 in. (30.4 cm.). Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Greek Vases, 1990, no. 72. This Early Classical painter is especially known for his column kraters and neck amphorae.

43


92 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF THE LOUVRE CENTAUROMACHY The capture of Helen. Theseus, carrying a spear, a large round shield with a serpent blazon, and wearing a crested helmet runs toward Helen, at the left. Another draped female, possibly Clytemnestra, her sister, flees to the right toward a bearded figure, probably Tyndareus, father of Helen. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 17 in. (43.2 cm.); W. 16 1/4 in. (41.2 cm.); Diam. 14 in. (35.5 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired in 1971. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 121. Cf. a similar scene on a krater by the Christie Painter in Naples, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, 81570 [H 2301].

In one legend, Theseus, the founder-king of Athens, abducted the young Helen, daughter of Zeus and Leda, intending to marry her when she reached the proper age, but she was rescued by the Dioskouri.

93 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE BOREAS PAINTER Theseus abducting Helen, the hero lunging forward, a spear in his raised right hand. She flees toward an older man, possibly Tyndareus, standing right. Reverse: Winged Nike with two males. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 18 1/2 in. (47 cm.); W. 17 in. (43.2 cm.); Diam. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.) Ex Japanese collection, acquired in the 1970s-80s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 103.

44


94 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF THE LOUVRE CENTAUROMACHY The capture of Helen. Theseus on horseback, carrying a spear, pursues Helen and her sister Clytemnestra who both flee to the right. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 16 3/4 in. (42.5 cm.); W. 17 1/8 in. (43.5 cm.); Diam. 14 1/2 in. (36.8 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 104. For the abduction of Helen on Attic vases see H. Kahil, LIMC, vol. IV, nos. 48-52. It is interesting to compare the two dramatically different treatments of the myth by this painter: nos. 92 and 94.

95 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE NAPLES PAINTER Orpheus, seated upon a rocky outcrop, plays his lyre, flanked by two Thracian warriors; at the right a third warrior holds his horse’s bridle. Reverse: Two draped youths flank a draped female. Ca. 450-430 BC. H. 17 in. (43.2 cm.); W. 16 1/4 in. (41.2 cm.) Ex M.D. collection, Antwerp, Belgium, acquired in the 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 144.

45

For a near identical depiction on a column krater by this painter see: Hamburg 1968.79, published in J. Beazley, Paralipomena, Oxford, 1971, 450.21 ter; H. Hoffmann, Jahrbuch der Hamburger Kunstsammlungen, 14-15 (1970) “Orpheus unter den Thrakern,” 31-44, figs. 1-2; M. Padgett, "Phineus and the Boreads," Journal of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, vol. 3 (1991), 25, fig. 8.


96 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE LENINGRAD PAINTER Three nude youths, two holding lyres, and one holding a kylix in his left hand and an oinochoe in his right. Reverse: Three draped youths in conversation, one holding a skyphos. Ca. 460-450 BC. H. 16 5/8 in. (42.1 cm.); W. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm.); Diam. 14 in. (35.5 cm.) Ex G. collection, Tessin, Switzerland; J.S. collection, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 104. Cf. T. Mannack, The Late Mannerists, Oxford, 2001, pl. 10 (ARV 567.12).

97 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE AGRIGENTO PAINTER Three youths with wreaths at a komos (procession after a carousal). The first carries a barbiton (lyre) and turns towards his singing companions. The central figure holds a staff, the last one holds an amphora and swings a torch. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 460-450 BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (36.7 cm. ); W. 14 3/8 in. (36.5 cm.); Diam. 12 3/8 in. (31.4 cm.) Ex C. R. collection, NordrheinWestfahlen, Germany. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 125. The komos was a part of the symposium and a popular motif for wine vessels. For the painter see CVA, M端nchen 2, 14f. pls. 70-72.

46


98 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER Standing by her front door, a draped female with her left foot crossed over her right, gazes to the right with her right arm extended in a beckoning gesture; KALE (beauty) painted on the step. Reverse: A draped youth striding to the right, his arm extending, presumably to the female on the front, in a welcoming gesture. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 17 3/8 in. (44.2 cm.); W. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm.); Diam. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm.) Ex collection of J. R. de Bourgogne, Paris, France, acquired in 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 123.

47


99 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER, MANNER OF THE ALKIMACHOS PAINTER A nude satyr running away with a wine amphora over his shoulder. Reverse: A striding, draped female, her right arm extended. Ca. 460-450 BC. H. 10 in. (25.4 cm.); W. 9 3/4 in. (24.7 cm.); Diam. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex private collection, Ascona, Switzerland, acquired in 1994. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, 1995, no. 112; vol. XIV, 2003, no. 99. 100 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE HARROW PAINTER Two centaurs facing each other over a large pithos. Each holds a branch in one hand and with the other, presumably, dips a drinking vessel into the pithos. Reverse: A satyr with a rhyton by a pithos. Ca. 480-470 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.8 cm.); W. 12 1/8 in.(30.8 cm.); Diam. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm.) Ex Elie Borowski (1913-2003) collection, Basel, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 217. 101 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER A draped female with long curly hair extends her right arm toward a draped bearded male, probably a judge, at the left; another watches from the right. Reverse: Two draped youths facing a bearded male at the left. Ca. 460-450 BC. H. 14 in. (35.6 cm.); W. 14 in. (35.7 cm.); Diam. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm.) Ex D.F. collection, Palm Beach, Florida, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1986. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 130.

48


102 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE MELEAGER PAINTER Two nude warriors with helmets, shields, and spears, battle a cloaked man riding a rearing horse, turning and lunging at the bearded soldier, with a figure further to the left. Reverse: Three draped youths. Earlier 4th Century BC. H. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.); W. 12 5/8in. (32 cm.); Diam. 10 1/2 in. (26.6 cm.) Ex Ulla Lindner, Munich, 1960s; Dr. J. Bohler, Munich; German private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 110. The Meleager Painter takes his name from two neck-amphorae depicting the huntress Atalanta and her lover Meleager. For more on the painter and his career see J. Boardman, Athenian Red Figure Vases, The Classical Period, 1989, pp. 168-169.

103 ATTIC RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE NIOBID PAINTER depicting a departure scene. An armed warrior, holding a round shield decorated with a leather shield apron, extends a phiale toward a female holding an oinochoe; a Doric column between them. At the right is a draped male holding a staff. Reverse: A draped female extends a phiale to a young man leaning upon a staff. Ca. 440 BC. H. 10 in. (25.5 cm.); W. and Diam.: 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 148.

49


104 ATTIC RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER Dionysos rides a panther surrounded by an entourage of satyrs and maenads led by a flying Eros. Reverse: Three draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.5 cm.); Diam. 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 146. 105 ATTIC RED-FIGURE PELIKE IN THE KERCH STYLE FROM GROUP G Arimasp battling two winged griffins wears an barbarian costume with leggings, a pelta beneath his knee, as he struggles to rise to his feet. Reverse: Two draped figures, a stele between. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.9 cm.) Ex Vakilli collection, Paris. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 94. In Greek mythology, griffins lived far to the north and guarded large deposits of gold. They were in constant conflict with the Arimasps, a tribe of one-eyed people, who regularly tried to steal the gold. Although literary sources describe the Arimasps as one-eyed, visual artists did not follow this convention, instead, merely depicting them in barbarian costume. These vases were made for the Greek colony of Panticapaeum, on the Kerch Strait in the Ukraine. 50


106 ATTIC RED-FIGURE PELIKE BY THE HARROW PAINTER A hunter stands leaning upon two spears, wearing a chlamys over a short tunic; a petasos hangs behind his head. Reverse: An infirmed elderly man walking with a cane. Ca. 490-470 BC. H. 11 3/8 in. (29 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 227. For other vases by the Harrow Painter see nos. 80 and 85. 107 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS A Scythian bowman, wearing an elaborate short chiton and drawing his bow, by a tree. Ca. 460 BC. H. 11 1/4 in. (28.5 cm.) Ex collection of the late Dr. Walter Imhof, Bochum, Germany. Published: M端nzen und Medaillen, Antike Kunst, Basel, 1971, no. 28; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 223; vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 127. 108 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Two warriors walking to the right. The first is an Attic hoplite wearing a chiton and holding a large round shield and a lance. The second, wearing an oriental costume with a Phrygian cap and holding an axe, is possibly a member of the Scythian Guard in Athens. Ca. 460 BC. H. 10 in. (25.5 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 126.

51


109 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS The youthful Triptolemos with long hair, diadem, scepter, and bowl, sits in a winged car. Ca. 490-480 BC. H. 9 1/8 in. (23.1 cm.) Ex private collection, Munich, Germany. 110 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS BY THE BOWDOIN PAINTER A nude youth, presumably Troilus, son of King Priam of Troy, on horseback looking back, as though at the pursuing Achilles. Ca. 475 BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. V, part 1, 1988, no. 43. 111 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS IN THE MANNER OF THE CARLSRUHE PAINTER A youth, possibly the hunter Kephalos being pursued by Eos, goddess of the dawn, draped with his cloak, a sun hat strung about his neck, carrying two spears. Ca. 440 BC. H. 7 3/8 in. (18.8 cm.) Ex private collection, Solothurn, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 102. 112 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS FROM THE GROUP OF PALERMO 16 A running male, wrapped in a himation and his hair bound with a fillet, holding a lyre. Ca. 430-420 BC. H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 97. 113 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS A nude Eros flying to the right, his wings outstretched behind, reaches towards a tendril. Mid-5th Century BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex American private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 150.

52


114 ATTIC VERY LARGE RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS BY THE CARLSRUHE PAINTER A female holding a sash, a servant to the left, a duck between; PAIDES, written above. Ca. 440-430 BC. H. 17 1/8 in. (43.5 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1992. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, part I, 1992, no. 275. 115 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS A winged goddess running to the right, holding a torch. Ca. 440-430 BC. H. 9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) Ex Cavadini collection, Sorengo-Lugano, Switzerland, acquired in the late 1960s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 149.

53


116 ATTIC RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE MILLIN PAINTER A satyr beats a drum before a maenad wearing a peplos and holding a thyrsos. Reverse: A satyr listens to a maenad playing the double-flute. Ca. 420-400 BC. H. 3 7/8 in. (9.9 cm.); W. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.); Diam. 4 7/8 in. (12.3 cm.) Ex German private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 151. For a similar skyphos see: CVA, BM 4, fasc. 35; pl. 31.3, London, British Museum. See: A.D. Ure, ‘RedFigure Cups with Incised and Stamped Decoration.-II,’ The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. 64, 1944, pp. 67-77, for cups by the Millin Painter. 117 ATTIC RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS, CIRCLE OF THE PENELOPE PAINTER A standing bearded man holds a staff in his right hand. Reverse: A cloaked youth stands in front of a column. Ca. 450 BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.); W. 11 7/8 in. (30.1 cm.); Diam. 7 3/4 in. (19.6 cm.) Ex collection of the author H. P. Rohde. Exhibited: Odense Bys Museer, Odense, Denmark, in cooperation with Storstrøms Kunstmuseum, Maribo, Denmark. Published: Johan Rohde Ars Una, 2006, no. 135, ill. 184; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 105. 118 BOEOTIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE PAINTER OF THE DANCING PAN with a kithara player walking to the right, wearing a long elaborate dotted chiton and himation, with foliate wreath in hair. Reverse: A winged Eros seated on a rocky outcrop holding out a necklace in his extended hand, which he has taken from an open pyxis in his left arm. Late 5th Century BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.); W. 9 1/2 in. (24 cm.); Diam. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex French private collection. Published: A.Ure, “The Argos Painter and the Painter of the Dancing Pan,” American Journal of Archaeology, vol. 62, 1958, pl. 105, fig. 21; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 108.

54


119 ATTIC RED-FIGURE STAMNOS AND LID BY THE TYSZKIEWICZ PAINTER A boy stands at the center, facing to the left. He holds a tortoise-shell lyre in his left hand and with his right hand gestures at the taller youth at left. The latter leans on his knotty walking stick and rests his right hand on his hip. At the right, a bearded man assumes a similar posture, but without a stick and with his back turned toward us. The boy with the lyre, perhaps on his way home from a music lesson, is being accosted by the man and the older youth, who may wish anything from a few casual words to a sexual liaison. The boy is distinguished from his waylayers both by his smaller stature and by the cut of his hair, with long side-locks and four rolls on the nape. Reverse: Three nude youths are cleaning up after exercising in the palaestra. The youth at the left holds out a round oil flask (aryballos) with a red leather cord around its neck. He has poured oil into his left hand and is now rubbing it on the right arm of his friend at center. The latter scrapes oil and dirt from his right thigh with a bronze strigil; a stream of oil pours from the strigil’s tip. With his left hand, he reaches back to touch the rump of a third youth, who walks away to the right. This youth, wearing a cloak over his shoulders and holding a strigil in his left hand, looks back to see who is taking such liberties with him. On all three figures, the abdominal muscles are drawn with brown, diluted glaze.

55

Ca. 480 BC. H. with lid: 19 1/2 in. (49.5 cm.); Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 91. The incised graffito on the bottom of the foot is Type Fii in A.W. Johnston, Trademarks on Greek Vases, Warmington, 1979, p. 155; the shape of the vase is that of the Class of the Siren Painter’s stamnoi; see B. Philippaki, The Attic Stamnos, Oxford, 1967, pp. 98-100.


South Italian Red-figure Va s e s 120 APULIAN RED-FIGURE AMPHORA BY THE SAMARCANDE PAINTER In an Ionic naiskos, a female bust 3/4 to the left. Reverse: A female head to the right. Ca. 340 BC. H. 21 in. (53.3 cm.) Ex Belgian collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, no. 27/57g, pl. 81.5; J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 92. 121 APULIAN RED-FIGURE AMPHORA BY THE GROUP OF BOLOGNA 572 A woman holding a situla and fan before a seated figure of Eros with a phiale and rosette-chain, a sash and floral garland in the field; an encircling maeander below the scenes, a white-painted wreath around the mouth. Reverse: Two draped youths. Ca. 340 BC. H. 20 7/8 in. (53 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired in London in 1974. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, vol. II, Oxford, 1982, p. 751, 23/217, 20/326; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 117. 122 APULIAN PAIR OF RED-FIGURE HYDRIAI FROM THE WORKSHOP OF THE DARIUS PAINTER Both scenes show a pair of women bringing offerings to a tomb in the form of a naiskos. These appear frequently on Apulian funerary vessels and have the appearance of a columned porch with a triangular pediment. The palmettes at the peak and corners of the roof are called acroteria. Naiskoi are usually painted white in imitation of the sculptural decoration of the tombs. These examples are unusual, however, as the naiskos on vase two has a large flowering plant inside it, and the one on vase one contains a loutrophoros, a type of tall, slender amphora with nuptial and funerary associations. This loutrophoros has figure decoration in white and perhaps represents a gold vessel with silver inlays. Ca. 320 BC. Hts. 18 1/4" in. (46.4 cm.) Ex private collection, Geneva, Switzerland; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, p. 156, no. 18/196BC, pl. XL, 1-2. 56


57


123 APULIAN LARGE REDFIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER A seated Apollo with a thyrsos and a lyre; a female with a situla, and a nude satyr with a torch and a situla. Reverse: A large winged head of a goddess. Ca. 320-310 BC. H. 18 1/8 in. (46 cm.); Diam. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1990. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, no. 29/8c, pl. XCVI, 3-4; J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 103.

124 APULIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF BOSTON 00.342: THE RECOGNITION SCENE FROM EURIPIDES' IPHIGENEIA IN TAURUS This is a remarkable and important vase, for the scene on the obverse is based on a stage production of Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Tauris, first performed in Athens in 414 BC. The scene is set in Tauris, on the shores of the Black Sea. At the left, Iphigeneia stands before a rustic temple of Artemis, its doorway decked with laurel branches. The small wooden cult statue (xoanon) of Artemis holding a bow is visible in the doorway. Iphigeneia wears a belted, diaphanous chiton with two black stripes, and a cloak that hangs over her arms. A veil hangs from the circular polos (open-topped crown) on her head, which along with the temple key in her left hand identifies her as a priestess. The polos is decorated with palmettes and maeanders. In her right hand is a letter, which she hands to the youth standing before her. He is Pylades, the companion of Iphigeneia’s brother Orestes, who sits below at center. Both youths are dressed as travelers: Pylades wears a chlamys, petasos, and boots; Orestes sports a chlamys and pilos (pointed felt cap). Both carry spears. Sitting with Orestes is a dog, which looks up alertly, apparently at a biga drawn by leopards. Artemis in the biga wears a diadem, gown, and belted deerskin, and holds a goad in her right hand. Below her, at the lower right, is a curious and unexplained group: a nude youth holding a cat over a marble louterion (a washbasin). Reverse: The young Dionysos reclines on an embroidered pillow. In his left arm he cradles a thyrsos and with his right forefinger he twirls a kylix for the game of kottabos, in which wine dregs are tossed toward a target, usually a plate balanced on a metal pole. At his feet is a three-legged stool, to the right of which sits a satyr. The satyr gestures to the left, probably telling the nude boy at the lower left to hurry up with the wine. The boy dips a jug into a calyx krater decorated with a black figure of a dancing man. While the god plays his game, his kantharos is held by a second satyr at the upper right. The latter holds a thyrsos in his other hand and is draped with an animal skin. At the upper left sits a maenad dressed in a chiton and himation and beating a tambourine. She looks toward Dionysos; hanging between them is a female theatrical mask. Dionysos was the patron god of the theater. His appearance on the reverse of this vase is further proof that the scene on the obverse was taken from the theater, a point made explicit by the presence of the mask. Ca. 360 BC. H. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm.); W. and Diam. 14 3/4 in. (37.4 cm.) Ex American private collection, New York; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, no. 10/48a. One of the few works attributed to this talented artist.

58


59


125 APULIAN VERY LARGE RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF TARANTO 7013. Two nude youths in an Ionic naiskos surrounded by attendants. On the neck: An Amazon on horseback pursuing a deer. Reverse: Two females on either side of a stele. Medusa masks and winged figures on volutes. Ca. 320 BC. H. 41 1/2 (105.4 cm.); maximum width: 19 in. (48.2 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1995. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, 528, 28/39b; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, 1995, no. 119. 60


126 APULIAN VERY LARGE RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATER BY THE BALTIMORE PAINTER, close to Toledo 77.45. Seated in an Ionic naiskos a bearded male clasps the hand of a standing youth, a cuirass between; a helmeted horseman at right. On the neck, the head of an elderly bearded male. Reverse: A youth seated within an Ionic naiskos flanked by attendants. Medusa masks on volutes. Ca. 340 BC. H. 44 1/4 in. (112.4 cm.); maximum width: 24 in. (60.9 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1995. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of 61 Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, 521, 27/13d; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, 1995, no. 118.


127 APULIAN RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATER, WORKSHOP OF THE BALTIMORE PAINTER In an Ionic naiskos a female seated upon a capital holds a casket. On the neck a female head emerges from a flowering plant; on each shoulder are two swan-heads. Medusa masks on volutes. Reverse: Two seated females on either side of a stele. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 26 in. (66 cm.); W. at handles 14 7/8 in. (38 cm) Ex old French collection (Jacques Marcou). Published: K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen Vasenmalerei vol. XI-XII, 2008, pl 106; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 139. 128 APULIAN RED-FIGURE SITULA BY THE PATERA PAINTER A satyr walks to the right holding a calyx krater with both hands; at the left a thyrsos on which hangs a panther skin. Reverse: A maenad seated upon a rocky outcrop holds a thyrsos and a patera; a tambor in the field. On the arching handle is a laurel wreath; at one end a lion’s head in raised relief and at the other end a maenad’s face. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection, acquired in the 1930s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 157.

62


129 APULIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE DIJON PAINTER A warrior is taking his leave of two women. He stands in the center, facing left, wearing a tunic, cloak, and Attic helmet. In his left arm he holds a pair of spears and a round shield. In his extended right hand he holds a kantharos which the woman at the left is filling from a jug. The wreath brought by the woman at the right is an omen of victory and is also appropriate to wear when making offerings. The cakes can be understood both as additional offerings at the ceremony of departure and an allusion to the offerings brought to the tombs, a reminder that the young warrior may be going to his death. Such double meanings are common in Apulian vase-paintings, which are frequently on vessels made specifically for funerary use. The situla which the woman holds probably contains water. Reverse: Two youths converse at the left, as a third youth gestures toward them from the right. All three wear himations, and the one at center holds a walking stick. The square ‘window’ and the libation bowl (phiale) in the background are common ornaments. The low pillar below the ‘window’, however, and the pair of jumping-weights at the upper left, identify the setting as the palaestra, the public exercise ground. The streaks on the pillar resemble the dried blood on altars, and we may wonder if a double-meaning is intended. Jumping-weights (halteres) were used by broad-jumpers to try to increase the length of their jump; with one in each hand the jumper flung his arms forward during the leap, so that the momentum of the weights would pull him forward. Ca. 370-360 BC. H. 20 1/2 in. (52 cm.); W. 19 1/8 in. (48.5 cm.); Diam. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, p. 33, no. 6/166a.

63


130 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PELIKE BY THE HOPPIN PAINTER An enthroned Aphrodite or Hera with an attendant holding a mirror in which is reflected the face of Helen, lower left, who stands conversing with her brothers Castor and Pollux. Reverse: Helen between the Dioscuroi. Ca. 380-360 BC. H. 13 3/8 in.(34 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1992. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, 497, 5/46b; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 286.

131 APULIAN RED-FIGURE FISH-PLATE FROM THE PERRONE-PHRIXOS GROUP Around a central depression are an ombrina, a red mullet, a squid, two small fish and a mussel; a crab in the center. Ca. 340-330 BC. H. 1 3/4 in. (4.5 cm. ); Diam 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, before 1982. Published: I. McPhee and A.D. Trendall, Greek Red-figured Fish-plates, 1987, p. 125, no. 81. 132 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PLATE with Herakles seated on rocks, wearing lion-skin covering his head and tied around his shoulders, holding a club in his right hand and a raised bow in his left, flanked by foliate tendrils, wave pattern below. Ca. 380-360 BC. Diam. 8 1/8 in. (20.5 cm.) Ex G. and M. Goldfine collection, Tel Aviv, Israel.

64


133 APULIAN PAIR OF REDFIGURE OINOCHOAI NEAR THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER One with a flying nude Eros, carrying a patera and a torch, pursuing a hare; the other with a winged nude Eros capturing a swan. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 15 1/2 in (38.6 cm.); H. 15 in (38.1 cm.) European private collection, acquired before 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 113. 134 APULIAN RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS BY THE LAMPAS PAINTER A helmeted and cuirassed warrior holding a spear and shield at the left and a draped female holding a mirror at the right with a winged Eros holding a patera and candelabrum between them. Ca. 370-360 BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (28.6 cm.) Ex private collection, Ascona, Switzerland, 1985; German private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 116.

65


135 APULIAN RED-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE BY THE SNUB NOSE PAINTER A nude youth seated upon drapery and holding a patera and a grape cluster. Ca. 370 BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.6 cm.) Ex Belgian private collection acquired in the 1980s. 136 APULIAN RED-FIGURE LIDDED TYPE C PYXIS BY THE BALTIMORE PAINTER, with Eros and a female, holding a fan, seated on a folding stool; a swan behind Eros. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.); Diam. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm.) Ex English collection; acquired in London, December 1990. Published: A.D. Trendall, Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, 27/129-2. 137 APULIAN RED-FIGURE SPHERICAL PYXIS WITH COVER BY THE PAINTER OF MARBURG 788, ‘Triangular Eye’ subgroup. The head of a woman wearing a saccos facing left. On the lid, a facing female head wearing a saccos springing from a flowering plant with elaborate tendrils. Ca. 320 BC. H. 10 7/8 in. (27.6 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. I, 1983, 198, 29/838a; J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 171. 138 APULIAN RED-FIGURE EPICHYSIS FROM THE ALABASTRA GROUP A nude Eros holding a phiale, amid scrolling stems and floral motifs. Ca. 350-325 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.); W. 8 5/8 in. (22 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 96.

66


139 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PLATE The head of a female wearing a saccos. Ca. 330-320 BC. D. 9 3/4 in. (25 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen Vasenmalerei vol. IX-X, 2006, pl. 154.88. 140 APULIAN RED-FIGURE KANTHAROID SKYPHOS FROM THE LIVERPOOL GROUP A seated female holds a wreath and a patera. Reverse: A male wearing a pilos, holds a cornucopia and a patera. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 6 3/4 in. (17.1 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, Suppl. II, 1992, 195, no. 21/331b. 141 APULIAN RED-FIGURE KANTHAROS BY THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER In profile, a female head wearing a diadem, jewelry, and saccos. Reverse: A winged nude Eros flying to left carries a wedding casket and a phiale. Ca. 320 BC. H. 10 in. (25.5 cm.) Ex English collection; private collection, San Francisco. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 230; vol. XX, 2009, no. 114. 142 APULIAN RED-FIGURE LIDDED OINOCHOE, SHAPE VIIIB, FROM THE WORKSHOP OF THE BALTIMORE PAINTER The head of a winged female wearing a diadem, earrings, and necklace; her hair in a saccos; lid with female head and palmettes. Ca. 320 BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 105.

67


143 APULIAN RED-FIGURE LIDDED OINOCHOE, SHAPE VIIIB The body is decorated with a horse head emerging from scrolling tendrils; a large palmette under the knotted handle; the knobbed lid with two profile female heads between palmettes. Late 4th Century BC. H. 11 in. (28 cm.) Ex collection of an Austrian noble family, acquired 1750-1780. 144 APULIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE, SHAPE VIIIB, NEAR THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER A nude Eros flying to the right holds a fan, a situla, and a phiale. It has a knotted handle with a large palmette below, and around the neck is a wreath with berries. Ca. 320-310 BC. H. 8 1/8 in. (15.6 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Alcibiades N. Oikonomides (d.1988), Chicago (Classics professor at Loyola University), acquired in the 1970s; M.B. collection, Westlake Village, California. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 115. 145 CANOSAN YELLOWISH-WHITE GLAZED POTTERY OLPE The upper register is decorated with relief masks, the lower register with reliefs of Herakles fighting two centaurs and the Lernean hydra. 3rd Century BC. H. 11 7/8 in. (29 cm.) Rare. Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 155.

68


146 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF B.M. F229 OF THE BRANICKI GROUP with a nude couple embracing upon a couch. Reverse: Two draped females flank a stele. 4th Century BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (37 cm.); W. and Diam. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen Vasenmalerei, vol. II, Kiel, 2000, pl. 114-117. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol XXI, 2010, no. 161. 147 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE FISH PLATE BY THE THREE-STRIPE PAINTER with two bream and a torpedo around a circular depression; a wave design around the rim. Ca. 340-320 BC. Diam. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010.

69

148 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE BEAKED OINOCHOE FROM THE WHITEFACE GROUP, SHAPE VI A reclining female (Amazon?), a shield to the side. On the shoulder: a large female head and a swan. Scarce type. Ca. 360-330 BC. H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010.


149 CAMPANIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE BAILHANDLED AMPHORA BY THE BOSTON READY PAINTER A woman at her toilette with her maid above a helmeted Chalcidian warrior wearing a white chiton and a bronze belt, his right arm resting on a large circular shield, a woman walking toward him. Reverse: Two draped youths. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 24 1/4 in. (61.5 cm.) Ex Axel Guttmann (1944-2001) collection, Berlin. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 123. 150 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS CIRCLE OF THE CASSANDRA PAINTER, NEAR THE LAON PAINTER, with a prancing spotted faun. Reverse: A female head facing left. Ca. 365-350 BC. H. 5 3/8 in. (13.7 cm.); Diam.5 1/2 in. (14 cm.); W. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) Ex English collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 156. 151 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SQUAT LEKYTHOS depicting a swan feeding amid palmettes. Ca. 350-340 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex Hoffman collection, France.

70


152 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS A profile head of a satyr, with wild hair and pointed ear; the other side with the head of a maenad in profile, her hair bound in a saccos. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1991, no. 155. 153 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE CA PAINTER A draped female standing at the left, holding a fillet in her right hand, extends a patera toward a seated bare-breasted female holding a basket. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 10 7/8 in. (27.7 cm.) Ex old French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 108. 154 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE FROM THE CASSANDRA WORKSHOP A running nude satyr. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 8 3/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex private collection, Chatham, New York. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 124. 155 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE FRIGNANO PAINTER A warrior holds a large circular white shield, decorated with ochre crosses, and a spear in his right hand, a bandeau in white around his head. Reverse: A draped youth enveloped in a himation, with a white bandeau around his head. Ca. 360-330 BC. H. 6 in. (15.1 cm.) Ex Amati collection, London, acquired ca. 1975; G.G. collection, Melbourne, Australia. Exhibited: the Borchardt Library, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, 1995-2008.

71


156 LUCANIAN RED-FIGURE PELIKE BY THE AMYKOS PAINTER A nude youth holding a staff is chased by a female holding a mirror. Reverse: Two youths. Ca. 420-400 BC. H. 10 3/4 in. (27.2 cm.) Published: A.D. Trendall, Red-figured Vases of Lucania, Campania, and Sicily, Suppl. II, 1973, no. 263a. Ex Belgian collection, acquired in the 1980s. 157 LUCANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER NEAR THE MESAGNE PAINTER A Lapith with a spear fighting a centaur who is biting his arm. Reverse: Youths with a wreath over an altar and a trumpet. Ca. 400-390 BC. H. 10 in. (25.4 cm.); W. and Diam 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 70 (published as Attic). 158 LUCANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE PISTICCI PAINTER Between two nude athletes, a winged Nike awards a fillet to the one at the left who holds a strigil. Reverse: Three youths. Ca. 440-430 BC. H. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.); W. and Diam 12 1/2 in. (31.7 cm.) Ex Swedish collection. Published: A.D. Trendall, Red-Figured Vases of Lucania, Campania and Sicily, Suppl. III, 1983, p. 7, no. 43a.; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XV, 2004, no. 109. 159 LUCANIAN RED-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE PISTICCI PAINTER Two draped women, one holding a mirror, stand addressing each other over a kalathos. Ca. 440-430 BC. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 163.

72


160 PAESTAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP Two nude women washing at a laver; the girl at the right looks into the mirror in her right hand. An inscription incised above her head identifies her as Myrtipho; another inscription labels the girl at left as Emauta (refer to RVP, p. 149, where it occurs on a cup by Python). Such inscriptions are quite rare, especially on small vases like skyphoi. Reverse: A nude youth and a draped female exchanging objects. Ca. 340-325 BC. H. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.); W. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm.); Diam. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex English collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 161 PAESTAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP A seated nude female or hermaphrodite. Reverse: A seated half-nude female. Ca. 340-330 BC. H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.); W. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 162 PAESTAN RED-FIGURE VOLUTE KRATERISKOS A satyr with a kithara in his left hand, another object in his right. Reverse: A draped youth holds a staff. Ca. 450 BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex Clark collection, Michigan. Exhibited: Detroit Institute of Art, 1983-2004. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 117.

73


163 PAESTAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE SMALL CALYX KRATER FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP A seated nude youth. Reverse: A nude youth with his foot on a plant, his hand on his hip. Ca. 330 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.); W. and Diam. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Unusual quality and shape for an applied red-figure vase. Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 164 PAESTAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE SQUAT LEKYTHOS FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP A dancing youth, nude, holding a large phiale. Ca. 340-330 BC. H. 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 165 PAESTAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE PELIKE FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP A standing nude youth holding a bowl. Reverse: A seated paniskos holding a bowl. Ca. 340-330 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 166 SICILIAN OR EARLY PAESTAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER, FROM THE GROUP OF LOUVRE K 240 Two satyrs and a maenad holding a tambour in an ecstatic thyasoi (a frenzied dance). Reverse: A draped youth and a maenad. Ca. 370 BC. H. 14 5/8 in. (37.2 cm.); W. and Diam. 15 in. (38.1 cm.); Ex collection of J-M R., Dijon, France, acquired in Paris in 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 118. The 'phlyax' vases of Magna Graecia are now known to represent actors and staging of Middle Comedy. More than half of the comic vases dating from the third quarter of the fourth century BC were painted in Paestum by Asteas and his circle, who were influenced by the Sicilian Painter of Louvre K 240.

74


167 GREEK LARGE RED-FIGURE AMPHORA Three females and a reclining Eros around a laver; three swans in the laver. A female at the left regards herself in a mirror, the one at the right holds an oinochoe, and the third, nude, kneels as she puts on her chiton. On the neck sits a winged Eros. Reverse: Three women stand around an altar. Early 4th Century BC. H. 22 1/2 in. (57 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired in London in 1993. The painting style clearly relates to a Sicilian workshop, however, the form is identifiable to red-figure vases found in Albania (ancient Illyria); accompanied by a photocopy of a letter from Prof. A. Dale Trendall about this unusual amphora. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 154. 168 SICILIAN RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE CHEQUER PAINTER A komos procession led by a nude youth holding a grain sheaf, followed by a draped female playing the double-flute and followed by another nude youth holding a torch and staff. Reverse: Two nude youths, one holding a strigil and the other an aryballos. Ca. 400 BC. H. 14 1/8 in. (35.9 cm.); W. and Diam. 13 cm. (33 cm.) Ex German collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 145.

75


169 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE BELL KRATER FROM THE KNUDSEN GROUP with typical designs of grape clusters and foliage in added color. Ca. 300 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.); W. 12 1/2 in (31.8 cm.) Ex English collection. 170 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE TREFOIL OINOCHOE FROM THE KNUDSEN GROUP The elongated body is typical of late Gnathian oinochai of shape III, with trefoil mouth, low handle and continuous, curving profile; polychrome collar of grapevine, rays. Ca. 300 BC. H. 9 1/8 in. (23.2 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia. 171 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE SKYPHOS FROM THE KNUDSEN GROUP On the obverse is a horizontal grapevine with a straight red stem; dilute glaze tints parts of the leaves and grapes yellow. Below this is a more delicate ivy vine with white leaves. On the rim above are three ornamental bands. Ca. 300 BC. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex German collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. 172 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE SQUAT NET LEKYTHOS, the body decorated with a fine net in added white, a female bust amid tendrils on the neck. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm.) Ex private collectioon, Zurich, Switzerland; American private collection, acquired in 1985. 173 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE LEBES GAMIKOS, the high knopped lid decorated with a pair of hounds; ivy trail, and pendant bands on the front of the body. 4th Century BC. H. 5 in. (12.7 cm.) Ex Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich. Published: K. Schauenburg, Studien zur unteritalischen 76 Vasenmalerei, vol. IX/X, Kiel, 2006, pl. 129 1-b.


Etruscan Va s e s 174 ITALO-GEOMETRIC POTTERY CHALICE OF THE METOPE TYPE on a funnel-shaped foot. A frieze of metopes with zig-zag bands and ‘triglyphs’ with stripes below the everted lip; bands of differing width in concentric bands on the rest of the body and foot. Ca. 650 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.3 cm.) Ex private collection, Basel, acquired from H. Cahn in 1976. Cf. A. Akerström, Der geometrische Stil in Italien, 1943, no. 92, pl. 25, 3. 175 ITALO-GEOMETRIC OR GEOMETRIC POTTERY TREFOIL OINOCHOE The body of spherical silhouette with banding formed of three lines; the lip, shoulder, and foot with a broad band; the cylindrical neck with a waterbird between vertical wavy lines, bordered by triple-line bands. 8th Century BC. H. 11 in. (27.9 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. W. E., Staufen, Germany, acquired in 1973. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 103. 176 ITALO-CORINTHIAN POTTERY LARGE TREFOIL OINOCHOE Rays encircling the shoulder, dotted rosettes between; the foot with cross-hatched lines between; the body with multiple bandings. 7th Century BC. H. 13 1/2 in (34.3) Ex C.F. collection, Monte Carlo. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2000, no. 72.

77


177 ETRUSCAN BUCCHERO NIKOSTHENIC AMPHORA An ovoid body, with concave neck, incised with birds; two reticulated broad band handles decorated with horses. Caere, ca. 560-530 BC. H. 10 3/8 in. (26.3 cm.) Ex H. Voigt collection, Essen, Germany, acquired in the 1970s. 178 ETRUSCAN BUCCHERO TREFOIL OINOCHOE An ovoid body decorated with molded nude dancers below a frieze of tear drops. 6th Century BC. H. 9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm.) Ex South German private collection, 1994. Cf. R. De Puma, Etruscan Tomb-Groups, Mainz, 1986, pp. 76-77, no. SP3. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2010, no. 96. 179 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN PIRIFORM ALABASTRON FROM THE PORZ GROUP depicting a winged panther. Ca. 580-570 BC. H. 6 in. (12.5 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1960s70s; D.H.L. Stephens collection, England. Published: J.G. Szilรกgyi, Ceramica Etrusco-corinzia Figurata II, 1998, p. 570 no. 5, pl. 221c-e; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 95. 180 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN KYLIX BY THE PAINTER OF THE CODE ANNODATE OR HIS WORKSHOP with flaring lip, a register of swans heightened with red and umber paint, the body tapering to a flaring foot. Ca. 600-550 BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.); Diam. 5 in. (12.5 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 258.

78


181 ETRUSCAN ‘PONTIC’ TREFOIL OINOCHOE NEAR THE SILEN PAINTER On the shoulder is a frieze of ten nude male dancers cavorting on either side of a volute krater. On the belly is an animal frieze with five lions, a siren, a sphinx, and a griffin; below, a frieze of lotus buds and palmettes. 2nd half of the 6th Century BC. H. 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex private English collection. Exhibited: Ashmolean Museum, 19701989. Published: C.M. Stibbe, ‘Pontic Vases at Oxford,’ in Medelingen van het Nederlands Instituut te Roma XXXIX, 1977, no. 3; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 117.

79


182 ETRUSCAN ‘PONTIC’ TREFOIL OINOCHOE NEAR THE PAINTER OF THE WURZBURG AMPHORA On the shoulder are a siren, lion, panther, and stag; ducks in a band around the lower body. Ca. 530-510 BC. H. 10 5/8 in. (27.1 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired, in the 1960s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 107. 183 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN PLATE FROM THE WORKSHOP OF THE PAINTERS WITHOUT GRAFFITO Around a central depression are a deer, a panther, and two birds. Tarquinia, ca. 580-550 BC. Diam. 9 5/8 in. (24.4 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1970s. Published: J.G. Szilágyi, Ceramica Etrusco-corinzia Figurata II, 1998, p. 448, no. 136, pl. 179c; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 121. 184 ETRUSCO-CORINTHIAN PLATE FROM THE WORKSHOP OF THE FLYING BIRD PAINTERS with a frieze of stylized flying birds. Vulci, ca. 580-550 BC. Diam. 11 7/8 in. (30.1 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired in the 1970s. Published: J.G. Szilágyi, Ceramica Etrusco-corinzia Figurata I, 1992, p. 201, pl. 86d; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 120.

80


185 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE PANEL AMPHORA Bearded male head in profile to the right. Reverse: Youthful male head in profile to the right. Ca. 560-550 BC. H. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 179. Inspired by Attic panel amphorae of the same design. 186 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE ONE-HANDELED KANTHAROS BY THE MICALI PAINTER A plastic head, a dancing nude male and dolphins on the handle; on the body, a sphinx and animals. Ca. 530 BC. H. 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: M端nzen und Medaillen, Kunst Werke der Antike, 1983, no. 12; N. Spivey, The Micali Painter and His Followers, Oxford, 1987; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. V, part I, 1988, no. 47. The Micali Painter was one of the most talented of the late 6th century Etruscan vase painters. This type of vase is also often referred to as a kyathos.

81


187 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE A pankration (a combination of wrestling and boxing). The combatant at right, having fallen, looks back at the victor. Both are nude, their hands and wrists bound with mellichai. 5th Century BC. H. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 137. 188 ETRUSCAN RED-FIGURE BEAKED OINOCHOE with a bearded male head in profile, facing left. Caere, late 4th Century BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired in 1990. 189 FALISCAN BLACK-FIGURE PHIALE FROM THE VINE-PHIALAI GROUP A mesomphalos, decorated with interlacing vine leaves and dotted grape bunches around the central omphalos. Ca. 350-300 BC. Diam. 8 1/2 in. (21.5 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. X, 1999, no. 131. Cf. a similar phiale (Oxford 1925.670), in J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, 1947, p. 181, pl. XXXI.3. 190 FALISCAN POTTERY OLPE with arching handle, funnel-shaped neck, conical mouth and slightly splayed foot. On the shoulder, a frieze with alternate long and short leaves; on the lip, a scheme of stripes; on the body, banding. 4th Century BC. H. 8 7/8 in. (22.6 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, acquired in 1961. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 168.

82


191 FALISCAN RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER A nude maenad, holding a thyrsos and shield, is flanked by two taunting satyrs. Reverse: Upper register, a draped maenad holding a thyrsos is accosted by two flanking nude satyrs; lower register, male and female swans cavort. Later 4th Century BC. H. 14 in. (35.8 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired, in the 1960s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 108. Cf. A. Emiliozzi, La Collezione Rossi Danielli nel Museo Civico di Viterbo, 1974, p.168f, no. 220, pl. 116f.

83


192 FALISCAN RED-FIGURE KYLIX Tondo: A winged goddess, probably Nike, wearing an elaborately detailed chiton, declaims to a seated, nude bearded god. On either side, a female and two draped youths. Ca. 380-360 BC. H. 3 5/8 in. (9 cm.); W. 13 in. (33 cm.); Diam. 9 3/4 in. (24.8 cm.). Ex private collection, Ascona, Switzerland, acquired in 1993. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, 1995, no. 72; vol. XX, 2009, no. 129. Cf. a kylix in Boston, J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, Oxford, 1947, p. 111, pl. 26, seemingly by the same workshop. 193 FALISCAN LARGE RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS On one side, a roosting owl, on the other, a draped male figure. Later 4th Century BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.6 cm.); W. 10 5/8 in. (29 cm.); Diam. 6 1/2 in. (16.5) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne, acquired, in the 1960s-70s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 122. For another by the same hand in the University of California, Berkeley, see J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase-Painting, Oxford, 1947, p.158, no. 5, pl. 26-4. Cf. A. Emiliozzi, La Collezione Rossi Danielli nel Museo Civico di Viterbo, 1974, p. 174, no. 228, pl. 122. 194 ETRUSCAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Three nude athletes in conversation; details incised. Reverse: Two draped youths, one bearded, in conversation. 4th Century BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.5 cm.); W. 15 in. (38.1 cm.); Diam. 14 3/8 in. (36.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 167. For a similar krater see: J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, 1947, pl. VIII, 3-4.

84


195 ETRUSCAN RED-FIGURE STAMNOS BY THE THE VOLTERRA CAERETAN PAINTER A winged Artemis (the Etruscan Artumes) in a biga drawn by stags, a hare in front. Reverse: A seated female holding a large basket. Caere, ca. 350-325 BC. H. 13 5/8 in. (35 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, 1991, part II, no. 78. Cf. M. Del Chiaro, Etruscan Red-Figured Vase Painting at Caere, Berkeley, 1974, 29-33. An unusually fine work by this artist, especially the elaborate detail of the biga.

85


31

32

33

37

43

44

45

50

86


58

81

80

82

83

87

87

88


89

90

91

92

93

94

88


97

96

99

98

101

89

102

100

105


103

104

116

119

117

118

123


120

121

127

149

91

125

126

146


152

150

155

156

160

158

161

92

157

162

163


165

166

168

167

186

93

192

186

193


his objects of art, rather than depositing them in a vault or holding receipts. Also, art is not as volatile as stocks and bonds, the coin, gem, and collectibles markets, and especially the gold and silver markets. Sylvia Porter in her New Money Book recommends classical antiquities as one of the best types of art for rapid growth. Dr Eisenberg was first quoted on the investment value of ancient art in the February 9, 1966 issue of Newsday - over 40 years ago! - and most recently in Business Week.

Why Collect Ancient Art? There are several reasons for collecting fine works of ancient art: • The excitement of owning a beautiful work of art that has survived for perhaps some 2,000 years or more. • The decoration of one's home or office with unique objects whose beauty and desirability have withstood the test of time. • The creative satisfaction, enjoyment, and pride in forming a truly fine collection. • The probable appreciation in value.

Royal-Athena Galleries Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., the founder and director of Royal-Athena Galleries, is usually at the New York gallery and visits the London gallery several times each year. He is available by appointment for consultation, expertise, and appraisals; or for a telephone conference. At no obligation he will arrange a private viewing with guidance on a sophisticated long term program of collecting and investing in the fine arts. He also is in attendance at all the fairs in which we exhibit. Over more than 50 years we have sold more than 600 works of ancient art to many of the country's leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Sackler Art Museum at Harvard University, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Walters Art Gallery, the Detroit lnstitute of Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Milwaukee Public Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as the British Museum, the Louvre, and a large number of museums in Canada, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, Australia, and Japan. The catalogs of classical marble sculptures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and from the J. Paul Getty Museum illustrate no less than 39 pieces acquired from our galleries. In addition, over one thousand objects purchased from us have been donated to many other museums, including the Freer Gallery of Art, the Sackler Gallery (The Smithsonian Institution), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Dr. Eisenberg travels overseas several times annually to visit collectors, museums, clients, and many of the nearly 150 private sources, agents, dealers, and auction houses with whom he is in frequent contact. Since 1954 he has made over 230 overseas trips, purchasing over forty thousand antiquities for over 100 million dollars. This aggressive purchasing policy, perhaps without parallel in the field, enables us to offer an extraordinary number of choice objects at very reasonable prices. Our willingness to buy in volume and to purchase our inventory outright, rather than to take it on consignment, results in extremely competitive pricing, often considerably below that of other galleries. Furthermore, exchanges and purchases are fre-

How to Collect Ancient Art Sylvia Porter lists ten sound rules as a guide in art collecting: 1. Study the field which interests you as much as possible. 2. Buy cautiously at first. 3. Make sure that your work of art has quality. 4. Deal with a top gallery or art dealer. “Some dealers and major galleries will guarantee the authenticity of the art works they sell, so check this point as well." (Not only have we been guaranteeing our ancient art for over fifty years, but to the best of our knowledge our two-day auction sale conducted by Parke-Bernet Galleries (now Sotheby's) in 1964 was the first auction sale by several years in which every piece was guaranteed - but by us!) 5. Have an understanding with your dealer or gallery about trading up - so he’ll repurchase or resell your works as you have more money to invest in high quality art. (We normally allow full credit for the exchange or upgrading of objects purchased from us.) 6. Do not buy art works just because they are a current rage. 7. Ask the advice of museum directors or curators whenever possible. 8. Decide upon your investing limit before you buy. If you fall in love with a more expensive object try to arrange for a time payment. (We certainly encourage this and offer flexible time payments!) 9. Spread your financial risks by buying a variety of art unless you are an expert in a particular field. 10. “Buy the best examples you can afford in any category.” We would add two other important rules: 11. Ask for the provenance of any potential acquisitions. 12. Do not buy objects that have been significantly restored. Beware of overly restored faces in both vase painting and sculpture.

Ancient Art as an lnvestment Historically, ancient art investments have yielded excellent long-term capital appreciation, usually 8% to 10% annually. Any investment in tangibles, especially works of art, should be projected for at least five to ten vears. Normally one should not hold more than 10% of their investment portfolio in art. Collecting fine art is a pleasurable way of hedging against inflation because the investor can enjoy

94


quently made from many past and present clients who may be upgrading their collections or liquidating some of their holdings in order to collect in other areas. Exchanges or purchases are sometimes carried out with museums both in the United States and in Europe for their duplicate accessions or for objects not in their recent or current fields of specialization.

Expertise and Ethics Ancient art has been the specialty of our director for some 55 years, and numismatics for 67 years. His many publications on ancient art and numismatics span over five decades. The first volume of Art of the Ancient World by Dr. Eisenberg was published in 1965. Since 1968 Dr. Eisenberg has concentrated on expertise in the ancient arts, having lectured on this subject at New York University and presented several scholarly papers at the annual meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America, most recently on the ‘Roman’ Rubens Vase. His wide range of expertise is further revealed through other recent papers: on Egyptian bronzes at a Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists, on Etruscan bronze forgeries at an International Bronze Congress, on the ‘Greek’ Boston and Ludovisi thrones at the Magna Graecia Symposium in Venice, on Roman bronze forgeries at the 1999 International Bronze Congress, and on the Portland Vase as a Renaissance work of art at the 2003 International Congress of Classical Archaeology. He chaired a conference in London on the Phaistos Disk in 2008. In 1996 he was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology of the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society in 1952; a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1960 (and a Life Member in 1988); a Patron of the American Numismatic Society in 1955 (and a Life Associate in 1998); a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1966; and most recently, a Benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an Honorary Fellow of the Egyptian Museum in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Eisenberg has appeared as an Expert in the Courts of several states and has conducted appraisals for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Customs Service, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as many other prominent institutions. He was elected a Qualified Appraiser by the Appraisers Association of America in 1964 and has recently participated in several episodes of the Antiques Road Show. He served on the vetting committee of the European Fine Art Fair at Maastricht from 1993 to 2001 and was the Chairman and coorganizer of the New York Antiquarian International Fine Art Fair held in November 2001. Dr. Eisenberg has been a leader for several years in the promotion of the ethical acquisition of antiquities by museums and collectors and has delivered papers on this subject at the Archaeology Section of the U.K. Institute for Conservation in 1993 and at

the 1998 International Congress of Classical Archaeologists. He gave an address by invitation on the international trade in antiquities at the UNIDROIT Convention in Rome in 1993. He organized two symposia in New York in 1994 on public policy and the movement of antiquities and in 1998 on the acquisition of antiquities by museums for the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art, of which he is a founding member and was a member of the executive board from 1993 to 2002. In 1999 he presented testimony to the United States Cultural Properties Committee on the legal and illegal trade in ancient art in Italy. In 2003 he was a featured speaker and panel participant in the U.S. Government Conference on Stolen Mideast Antiquities in Washington, D.C. Also in 2003 he featured on the European TV channel Arte and on BBC Radio’s File on Four in indepth interviews on the antiquities trade. He appeared on television on CBS News, Dateline NBC, PBS Jim Lehrer News Hour, and CBC Television (Canada), and was interviewed on the BBC and PBR Radio, and in print in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, The Times, and a dozen other publications. In 2004 he was featured on a Discovery Channel program and on Fox News on the antiquities trade. Also in 2004 he presented a paper on ‘The Mesopotamian Antiquities Trade and the Looting of the Iraq Museum’ to the American Bar Association. In 2005 he was interviewed on the antiquities market and the collecting of antiquities on National Public Radio in the US and in 2006 on National Public Television in Athens, Greece. In 2007 he delivered a paper on ‘Perspectives on the Antiquities Trade and the Collector: Past, Present, and Future’ at the symposium ‘The Future of the Global Past’ at Yale University. He was interviewed in depth for his expertise on Greek television in 2008 and on Artfinding in 2009.

Ancient Coins We carry a fine stock of select Greek silver coins from $100, Roman gold coins from $1,000, and Roman silver and bronze coins from $75. We began our business as ‘Royal Coin Company’ in January 1942, 67 years ago, and Dr. Eisenberg, cofounder of the firm, has specialized in ancient coins, as sole proprietor, since 1952.

Acknowledgements Dr. Eisenberg wishes to express his gratitude to F. Williamson Price who has again diligently prepared and co-authored the catalog, to Brent M. Ridge who did all of the photography, to the scholars who attributed and reattributed some of the vases, especially Kees Neeft and Konrad Schauenburg, and to the several others who prefer to remain anonymous.

95


Our website has been greatly improved and expanded as may be seen by the partial page of Attic vases illustrated below. It is now updated weekly with new acquisitions and features over 1200 antiquities! We invite you to become a regular visitor.

Wanted to Purchase: Fine Antiquities of All Periods We are prepared to travel world-wide to acquire select works of legally acquired ancient art for our continually expanding clientele. We will purchase collections of any size, act as your agent to sell your objects on commission, or exchange them for other select pieces from our extensive inventory. Send photographs and full details with your letter or e-mail.

International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art

Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art

Art and Antique Dealers League

Appraisers Association of America

MINERVA Minerva, the bi-monthly, international review of ancient art, archaeology, and numismatics, published in England, was established by Dr Eisenberg, its publisher and editor-in-chief from 1990 to 2009. It features the most extensive and timely coverage by any magazine of worldwide excavations, exhibitions, and auctions emphasizing Greece, Etruria, the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the Near East. The book reviews are concise and objective. It also includes the most extensive annotated listings of international museum exhibitions, meetings, and symposia in ancient art and archaeology. Sample copies: $8 or £4 postpaid. www.minervamagazine.com editorial@minervamagazine.com Subscription (6 issues per year):

U.S.A., Canada, and rest of world:

U.K.: 1 year £21, 2 years £39, 5 years £90. Europe: 1 year £23, 2 years £44, 5 years £100.

Surface: 1 year $50, 2 years $90, 5 years $220. Air: 1 year $66, 2 years $122, 5 years $296.

96


Recent Royal-Athena Catalogs: • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XV, 2004) illustrates in full color 190 objects. (72 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (2004, illustrates in full color 80 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare (2004, illustrates in full color 100 objects, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVI, 2005, illustrates in full color 192 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Mythologies of the Classical World & Ancient Egypt (2006, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVII, 2006, illustrates in full color 233 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVIII, 2007, illustrates in full color 259 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIX, 2008, illustrates in full color 222 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XX, 2009, illustrates in full color 252 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXI, 2010, illustrates in full color 217 objects, 96 pages, $5) • All 10 of the above catalogs (total list price $50), with price lists: $40. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.)

Other Royal-Athena Catalogs Available • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IV, 1985) illustrates in full color over 600 works of art. 208 pages, 192 color plates: $15 • The Age of Cleopatra: The Art of Late Dynastic Graeco-Roman Egypt (1988) illustrates in full color 151 selected works of art. (32 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (1989) illustrates in full color 180 objects. (52 pages, $5) • One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy (1990) illustrates in full color 186 vases. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. VIII, 1995) illustrates in full color 244 objects. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IX, 1997) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. X, 1999) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XI, 2000) illustrates in full color 167 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XII, 2001) illustrates in full color 410 objects; 30 pages of glossaries and mythologies. (161 pages, $10)

• Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIII, 2002) illustrates in full color 203 objects. (80 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIV, 2003) illustrates in full color 225 objects. (80 pages, $5) • A number of the objects in the last several catalogs are still available. Price lists will be included. • All 11 of the above catalogs, 1985 through 2003 (total list price $70), only $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.) Orders for our catalogs may be charged to your credit card. Trade lnquiries We cordially invite inquiries from fellow art dealers, art consultants, architects, interior designers, and institutional collectors and investors. Special Presentations, Condition Reports, and Color Photographs of Objects We can supply special presentations with further information, such as condition reports, and 4 x 6 in. (10x15 cm.) or 8 x 10 in. (20x25 cm.) color photographs, often with other views or close-ups, on any of the objects illustrated in this catalog upon request. A selection of photographs may also be viewed at the various fairs. Conservation and Mounting Services A professional conservator, Alina Bessarabova, working on our premises in New York, does expert conservation and restoration of ancient art and antiques. A same-day or a one day service is available for an additional charge. Small metal and wood mountings and bases are custom made but due to insurance restrictions this work is usually limited to objects purchased from us. We are pleased to accept trade accounts. Terms and Conditions of Sale All items are offered subject to prior sale. All prices are subject to change without notice, otherwise, the current price list is valid through 2011. The following credit cards are honored: American Express,Visa, Mastercard. A deferred payment plan is also available. New York residents must add the appropriate sales taxes (currently 8 7/8%). No cash refunds may be made after 10 days of receipt; however, full credit is allowed on all objects purchased from our galleries with the exception of a few consigned items. All shipping and insurance charges will be billed to the purchaser. Title remains with RoyalAthena Galleries until payment is made in full.

royal-athena galleries established 1942 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., Director

F. Williamson Price, Associate Director

New York Richard M. Novakovich Betty W. Eisenberg Suzanne George

Assistant Director & Manager Comptroller Office Manager

London (Seaby Antiquities) Anthony Law Peter Clayton

Administrator Consultant

Brent M. Ridge Andrew England Alina Bessarabova

Photographer Webmaster & Gallery Assistant Conservator


royal-athena galleries new york

london



Royal-Athena Galleries, One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II - 2011