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Representing Representing the the Roofing Roofing Industry Industry

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Florida

February 2018

ROOFING A Publication of the FRSA – Florida’s Association of Roofing Professionals

Florida Building Codes

Florida Product Approval and Miami-Dade NOA NRCA  Alliance Construction Management Student Competition Fighting AOB Abuse Cotney Construction Law – Changing the Face of Construction Law 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code Changes The Importance of Construction Documents

Florida Quality Roofing, Inc. 2017 S.T.A.R. Awards Sustainable Roofing Project Winner


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TABLE OF CONTENTS February 2018

Florida

ROOFING Available Online at www.floridaroof.com/florida-roofing-magazine/

FRSA-Florida Roofing Magazine Contacts: For advertising inquiries, contact: Heidi Ellsworth at: heidi@floridaroof.com (800) 767-3772 ext. 127 All feedback including Letters to the Editor and reprint permission requests (please include your full name, city and state) contact: Lisa Pate, Editor, at: lisapate@floridaroof.com (800) 767-3772 ext. 157 Florida Roofing Magazine, PO Box 4850 Winter Park, FL 32793-4850 View media kit at: www.floridaroof.com/ florida-roofing-magazine/

11 | S.T.A.R. Awards Sustainable Roofing Project Winner 6 | Fighting AOB Abuse Following Hurricane Irma, the Florida insurance and roofing industries have the attention of the media. Let's use that attention to continue the fight against AOB abuse.

12 | Florida Product Approval and Miami-Dade NOA

On the iPad

When and where do you need to use the state's product approval or MiamiDade's notice of acceptance? How do you know if the materials you are using on a project are compliant?

17 | Cotney Construction Law – Changing Construction Law

www.is.gd/iroofing

19 | 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code Changes What's new in the 2017 Florida Building Code? What's been removed? We provide a color-coded guide to some of the most important changes that affect the roofing industry. Any material submitted for publication in Florida Roofing becomes the property of the publication. Statements of fact and opinion are the responsibility of the author(s) alone and do not imply an opinion or endorsement on the part of the officers or the membership of FRSA. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without permission from the publisher. Florida Roofing (VOL. 3, NO.2), February 2018, (ISSN 0191-4618) is published monthly by FRSA, 7071 University Boulevard, Winter Park, FL 32792. Periodicals Postage paid at Orlando, FL. POSTMASTER: Please send address corrections (form 3579) to Florida Roofing, PO Box 4850, Winter Park, FL 32793-4850.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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See us at the IRE - booth 744 Captiva Fire Department Station 181, Captiva, FL Owner: Captiva Island Fire Control District Architect: Sweet Sparkman Architects Installing contractor: Saint Raphael Roofing General contractor: JL Wallace Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc. Profile: Tite-Loc Plus Color: Silver


PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Charlie Kennedy

FRSA at the International Roofing Expo As you read this issue, the entire Executive Committee and staff members Lisa Pate and Cheryl Sulock will be attending the NRCA Convention and the International Roofing Expo in New Orleans. Each year, we attend these events and take a booth on the expo floor where we meet many Florida-based contractors, attendees looking for code or technical guidance in dealing with the Florida Building Code, and manufacturers and distributors looking for information on membership, advertising and exhibiting. It’s great exposure for FRSA and a wonderful opportunity for us to support NRCA and the industry. FRSA is also partnering with NRCA for “Roofing Day in D.C. 2018,” which kicks off in March. Roofing contractors will be converging on Capitol Hill for a unique and exciting opportunity to speak with one voice as a united industry. The event will bring together roofing professionals from all industry segments to deliver our message to Congress and their staffs about the most important legislative and regulatory issues affecting the roofing industry and your business. FRSA will be hosting a group from Florida, so if you’d like to participate, please contact Lisa Pate at 800-767-3772 ext. 157 or by email at lisapate@floridaroof.com. One of my goals for the year is to visit each FRSA Affiliate location, providing convention and expo information, along with an update on FRSA. Unless you’re involved at the Board or Executive level, you really have no idea all that the staff works on year-round to make the Association function and the industry a bit better. Much of the work we do as an Association benefits the entire industry, not just members. If you have considered joining FRSA, now is the time. Please contact Maria Armas at 800-767-3772 ext. 142 or by email at maria@floridaroof.com. There are many benefit options that come with membership, such as availability to the Self Insurers Fund, Credit Union and Educational Foundation. Everyone has to have workers’ comp insurance and we all pay the same rate, so why not belong to the Self Insurers Fund (SIF) where you’ll have the opportunity to receive yearly dividends? In 2017, the SIF distributed $10 million back to its members. Did your current insurance company do that for you? If not, you should consider speaking with Debbie Guidry at the SIF at 800-767-3772 ext. 233 or by email at debra@frsasif.com to see if you qualify for coverage. The FRSA Credit Union now has shared branching, which means that you can belong to the Credit Union and bank at local participating credit unions. As you’re probably aware, the Credit Union offers financing options for your residential customers at no cost to you. Financing is available for roofing or reroofing projects, gutters, painting, solar – basically any work that your

company offers to consumers. All you need to do is provide your customer with the contact information for the Credit Union and let them take it from there. The Credit Union will work directly with your customer and provide them with an answer within 48 hours of receiving all the paperwork. Once a check is cut for the work, you and the customer will receive it. I can’t think of a better financing option for your customer! Want more information on this program? Contact Adrienne FRSA President Charlie Kennedy, Paul at 800-767-3772 ext. 300 or Gainesville Roofing & Co. Inc. by email at apaul@frsacu.org. The FRSA Educational and Research Foundation offers many different programs for members. There are industry-specific seminars (see page 34), scholarship opportunities for your family members, your employees and their family members (visit FRSA’s website, www.floridaroof.com and click on the Foundation page to download a scholarship application – deadline for submitting applications is March 31, 2018), and the Silent Auction – a great place to purchase products, gift baskets, sporting event tickets and vacation packages. These are just a few of the benefits you’ll receive with your membership. For a complete list of benefits, visit FRSA’s website and click on the button labeled “Learn More.” You’ll also notice on the home page a place for consumers to find members in their area. Is your company missing out on this free additional exposure? If so, give us a call and join the team of Florida roofing industry professionals.

Charlie Kennedy FRSA President charliekennedy1@aol.com

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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FRSA Legislative Counsel Cam Fentriss

Leveraging the Media in Fight Against AOB Abuse How often do you face an angry customer who yells at you for the shoddy work done by the roofing contractor who just replaced his roof? You give him an estimate on a roof repair only to be met with outrage because he just paid thousands to another contractor for roofing work and there is no way there should be a leak and there is definitely no way he should have to pay another cent! Classic “kill the messenger.” Don’t you wish there were something better you could do than just stand there and listen until the anger passes? Well, there is. Right now, we have the eyes and ears of the media when it comes to residential insurance work where the contractor includes an assignment of benefits (AOB) provision in the contract. They often seem to be interested in stories about storm scams, and that story is even bigger now with the enormous increase in the abuse of the AOB provision. Not all AOBs are bad and not all contractors who use AOBs are bad. But the bad contractors out there seem to have learned how to use AOBs to cause even more damage, making them even worse than unlicensed contractors who disappear into the shadows never to be found. These unscrupulous contractors take good business away from you and hurt our industry. If we do not take action where we can, this will have a damaging impact on legitimate insurance claims, our ability to keep the construction lien law, and our overall reputation. Common problems with these AOB abusers include:

■■ Telling the customer he cannot contact his insurance company ■■ Telling the customer he is not entitled to an itemized estimate ■■ Telling the customer either he cannot cancel the contract at all or he has to pay some huge fee to do it ■■ Threatening to file a lien if the customer “disturbs” the contractor’s fight with the insurer, or ■■ Delay in performing the repair or re-roof (or not doing it at all) While this is a growing problem that has the attention of the media, you can give these customers an outlet better than you to channel their anger and frustration. If you do not know a local reporter who is covering this, let us know and we will get you the contact information for a reporter who wants consumers for interviews. Anna Cam Fentriss is an attorney licensed in Florida since 1988 representing clients with legislative and state agency interests. Cam has represented FRSA since 1993, is an Honorary Member of FRSA, recipient of the FRSA President’s Award and the Campanella Award in 2010.

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Industry Updates TAMKO Announces Energy Efficient Ratings for Asphalt Shingles

TAMKO Building Products, Inc. has combined the reflectivity of “cool” roofing with the affordability of asphalt shingles to make energy efficient roofing an option for more consumers than ever. TAMKO’s Heritage series laminated asphalt shingles and shingle accessories in Glacier White (dependent upon the region of the United States), and TAMKO’s Elite GlassSeal 3-Tab asphalt shingles in White and Glacier White, are now ENERGY STAR qualified for their ability to reflect a portion of the sun’s rays, potentially lowering the amount of energy needed to cool a home. Additionally, both products have also been rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). “These new ratings for TAMKO products put energy efficient roofing within the reach of even the most cost-conscious consumer,” said TAMKO’s Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Stephen McNally. For instance, TAMKO’s Elite Glass-Seal 3-Tab shingle is one of TAMKO’s entry-level roofing options, and this includes the ENERGY STAR qualified White and Glacier White color options. With TAMKO’s Heritage laminated asphalt shingles in the Glacier White color option, it’s possible to achieve the appearance of traditional wood shake roofing with the added bonus of an ENERGY STAR qualification. For more information on product availability, CRRC rating and ENERGY STAR qualifications, visit www.tamko.com.

president. “The addition of Brian reflects the firm’s growth strategy and our intentions to provide clients with the best service possible as it relates to construction law.” Prior to joining Cotney Construction Law, Lambert was a partner at a national full-service business law firm in Tampa, Florida. He graduated with honors from the Stetson University College of Law and is active in various professional associations, presenting seminars and writing articles regularly on construction-related topics.

Cotney Construction Law Welcomes Partner Brian Lambert

Cotney Construction Law, a leading national law firm for construction, specialty trades, and OSHA law, is pleased to announce the addition of attorney Brian Lambert as a partner to the firm. Lambert is Board Certified in Construction Law by the Florida Bar and has 15 years of experience as an attorney with the majority of his practice focused on all facets of construction law. “Brian has handled a wide array of complex construction disputes and his expertise in construction law will be a huge asset to the firm,” said Trent Cotney, www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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FRSA Legal Counsel Trent Cotney, PA, Cotney Construction Law

The Importance of Construction Documents

This article will discuss the importance of maintaining and retaining documents on construction projects. Twenty years ago, a contractor could complete a construction project with a handshake and an invoice. Getting payment from customers has always been an issue, but the need for contracts and written documents was not as important as it is today. Owners have become litigation and insurance savvy and know how to take advantage of an unprepared contractor. If a problematic project results in litigation, 9 times out of 10 the party with the best “paper” will win the day. In other words, the party that has the most detailed and descriptive paper trail supporting its side will more than likely succeed in court. A contractor or supplier’s first line of defense to claims on a construction project is always the contract. The contract contains pertinent provisions that a roofing contractor may use to pursue and defend potential claims. Although it is often difficult to negotiate the terms of a contract, to the extent possible, a contractor, subcontractor, or supplier should be aware of provisions that would help shield it from potential liability from claims. These provisions may include limitations on the types of damages that can be awarded, such as a provision that waives the ability to obtain consequential damages (pain and suffering, lost profits, loss of business reputation, etc.). In addition, contract provisions

that require owners to provide written notice to contractors within a certain time period (24 hours) after the discovery of water intrusion or defective workmanship, may create a defense to an owner’s claims if the owner failed to provide sufficient notice. Anyone involved in the construction industry should also keep accurate written records of all communications involving defective workmanship, leaks or mold on a project. These written communications can include daily reports, e-mail, memoranda, phone messages, and letters. Furthermore, if you notice defective work, water leaks or mold make sure to take extensive photographs and/ or video of the alleged problems. Visual depictions of leaks and mold are especially useful in defending claims where contractors are hired to repair systems that are already suffering from defective conditions. Once the contractor has generated documents such as the contract, daily reports and follow-up correspondence, it is important that the contractor retain those documents in an organized file, especially if there is the possibility that the project could result in litigation. By generating and retaining documents which support the contractor’s position, a contractor will be better able to defend itself against litigious owners. Author’s note: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation. Regulations and laws may vary depending on your location. Consult with a licensed attorney in your area if you wish to obtain legal advice and/or counsel for a particular legal issue. Trent Cotney is an advocate for the roofing industry, General  Counsel of FRSA, NWIR, WCRCA and PBCRSMA, and a Florida Bar Board Certified Construction Lawyer. For more information, contact the author at 813-579-3278 or visit www.trentcotney.com.

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Florida Roofing | February 2018


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S.T.A.R. Awards Sustainable Roofing Project Winner Florida Roofing is continuing coverage of the winning projects from the 2017 S.T.A.R. Awards – the Spotlight Trophy for the Advancement of Roofing – which highlights industry projects throughout Florida. FRSA members submitted their roofing projects completed during the previous year, along with an application detailing the project, and in-progress and completion photos for placement in one of six categories. Project submission required a description including tear-off (if applicable), preparation, design work, installation, problem solving and any other information that might be unique to the job, such as safety requirements or field fabrication. Categories for submission included: Sustainable, Community Service, Steep Slope, Low Slope, Specialty Metal, and Unique. A panel of three industry professionals was established to review the submitted projects. Judging criteria included, but was not limited to: aesthetics, size, completion time, special circumstances, unique project design, complexity of project, workmanship, teamwork, testimonials, and creative problem solving. The judges selected three projects in each of the six categories to receive either first, second, or third place S.T.A.R. Awards. Florida Quality Roofing won first place in the sustainable category for their Coral Gables Office Building project. Their team consisted of: Contractor: German Duarte Estimator: German Duarte Project Manager: Rodolfo Gonzalez Superintendent: Justo Duarte Foreman: Jose Abel Espinosa Manufacturer: Henry Company Mfg. Representative: Eric Thompson Project MVP: Justo Duarte The project was a four-story multi-tenant office building located in downtown Coral Gables, Florida, with 12, 454 sq. ft. of modified bitumen flat roof. The roof was restored with a highly reflective, Energy Star rated 15-year silicone roof system.

Challenges

“During the initial phone call, the building owner asked for a silicone roof restoration estimate. Like we always do, we educate the owner/consumer as to the proper way to find out if a roof is a candidate for silicone restoration,” stated Stella Amador, partner, Florida Quality Roofing. To begin, the company ordered a roof moisture survey to determine the level of moisture in the roofing system. If this level is below 25 percent, they could proceed with the silicone roof restoration after removing wet or moisture-ridden areas. Once the building owner agreed to a roof moisture survey, it was determined that 9.02 percent of the roof was wet. Florida Quality Roofing now had these facts and were able to provide the proper proposal and contract to perform the required scope of work. A representative from Florida Quality Roofing and Henry Company met to conduct a site visit to test the adhesion of Henry Pro-Grade 988 Silicone to the existing acrylic coating. Test patches were applied with Henry Silicone and fabric strips were embedded into the silicone and allowed to cure. A week later, another site visit was made and all test patches passed with a minimum pull of 2.5lbs to 3.5lbs before cohesive failure (2lbs is all that is required in order to pass). The silicone passed the adhesion test and the team from Florida Quality Roofing were ready to proceed with the work as planned. This building presented many challenges; first, and most notably, is that there were power lines around the entire building. These power lines were only 4 feet away from the edge of the building. This became a big challenge for them when loading the material. The distributor did not, could not, and would not be able to use a lift, crane or any hoisting equipment, as it would be too close to the power lines. At this point, Florida Quality Roofing needed to hand load all of the materials, walking up the stairs all the way up to the roof access door. Before loading, all safety equipment on the roof, such as warning lines, cones, eyewear and fall protection were set up, and a designated staging area and all coordination took place with the management of the building, production crew and safety monitors on site. It took two days to load all of the material on the roof. Once Continued on page 13

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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Do Products You Install Have a Florida Product Approval or Miami-Dade NOA? Lisa Pate, Executive Director, FRSA We all have heard the terms “Florida Product Approval” and “Miami-Dade NOA,” but what do they really mean? Why is it important that we understand how these certifications work and why we need to make sure the products we’re installing have these numbers? There are two ways that products for construction trades are approved in Florida – through the Florida Product Approval System and through Miami-Dade Notice of Acceptance (NOAs). Florida Product Approvals are products that the state approves for use in all areas of Florida. Many of the roofing products that are listed with Florida Product Approval numbers are also linked to a Miami-Dade Notice of Acceptance, which are set forth by Miami-Dade County, and have additional performance requirements than other areas of the state. Florida Product Approvals are for products and components, while Miami-Dade NOAs are based on the system being approved. The Florida Product Approval System was implemented on October 1, 2003 by Florida Statutes section 553.842 and provides an optional statewide approval for eight identified building envelope and structural frame products (panel walls, exterior doors, roofing products, skylights, windows, shutters, structural components, impact protective systems) that are intended to be replicated during the manufacturing process. The Product Approval System, in coordination with the Florida Building Code, ensures safe product technologies are used in building construction and encourages development of new products and technologies that increase safety or meet safety requirements less expensively. Florida Product Approvals fall under the guidance of the Florida Building Commission, which is comprised of 26 members appointed by the governor. Along with their primary responsibilities, some of which include adopting and amending the Florida Building Code (FBC), they coordinate with the State Fire Marshall to minimize conflicts between the FBC and the FFPC, issue interpretations on Declaratory Statements, determine types of products which may be approved by the Commission for statewide use, and implement the state Product Approval System. The Florida Building Commission ensures accountability, a higher standard of practice for product evaluations, and uniformity and consistency of enforcement statewide. Evaluations of products covered by the Commission’s rule can only be conducted by nationally accredited and state approved entities or by state licensed engineers (PEs) and architects (RAs). These entities must meet national standards for independence from the manufacturers whose products they evaluate. Manufacturers of covered products must also maintain third-party monitored quality assurance programs to verify continued compliance of approved products. Once the manufacturers’ PE has verified compliance, a different PE must evaluate and verify the product being submitted for 12

Florida Roofing | February 2018

approve. In return, building departments must accept Florida Building Commission approved products evaluated by approved entities or Florida PEs and RAs without requiring further testing, evaluation or documentation. Building officials can appeal the required acceptance to the Commission, but must accept the evaluation until the Commission rules on the appeal. There is no mandate for state product approval in the law or the rule. Local building officials must offer local product approval to a manufacturer when requested (553.8425 F.S.), requiring that “products or systems of construction shall demonstrate compliance with the structural windload requirements of the FBC through one of the following methods: a certification mark, listing or label from a commission, a test report from a commission, a product-evaluation report from a commission, a product-evaluation report from a Florida professional engineer or registered architect, or a statewide product approval issued by the Florida Building Commission.” Local building officials may accept modifications to products or their installations provided sufficient evidence is submitted to the official to demonstrate compliance with the Code or the intent of the Code, including such evidence as certifications from a Florida Registered Architect or Florida Professional Engineer. Is there an advantage to using the state approval option vs. the local approval? Yes. State approval by the Florida Building Commission shows builders, architects, building officials and inspectors that your products have completed rigorous testing requirements and meet the standards specified in the Florida Building Code. No further documentation is required. However, the local approval option requires the same level of documentation and is good in that jurisdiction only. The FBC establishes standards for performance of products, materials and systems of construction. When the designer selects and the contractor installs building products, the building department verifies compliance with the Code through plans review and inspection. The project/site-specific use of a product is based on the product’s performance and limitations of use and compared to the design requirements for the project. (For instance, the required design pressure ratings for roofing based on the wind speed map in the Florida Building Code.) To have a product approved through the state Florida Product Approval, manufacturers must first register with the Florida Building Commission and submit an application for approval for products or subproducts, sorted alphabetically by model, number or name. There are four ways to apply for a Florida Product Approval: as a new application, through a full revision of an existing application, editorial change, or self-affirmation of existing application. If standards or restrictions pertaining to products change when a new code goes into effect, then a full revision application must be submitted. New


evidence such as a certification, test report or an evaluation report demonstrating compliance must also be submitted with the application. If there are multiple products within the same application (with the same FL Product Approval Number), then evidence for all the products must be submitted. Once all the correct paperwork is completed, the process usually takes about two months for approval by the Commission, except for the Certification Mark or Listing Method, which could take as little as two weeks. Once approved, the product receives a Florida Product Approval Number, commonly known as the “FL number.” Why should you care about an updated Florida Product Approval Number? Because when you apply for a roofing permit, you’ll need to provide the FL Product Approval Number and documentation that the roofing system you’re installing is in compliance with the current code, and will also serve as your installation guidelines. Miami-Dade County NOAs are issued only to manufacturers and their private labelers. Manufacturers outside the USA must have a distributor in the USA and must submit a properly executed distributor agreement. NOAs are required with: new product approvals, revision to a current Notice of Acceptance, renewal of a current Notice of Acceptance (without changes), Association Member, one-time approval (special project), private labeler, or distributor agreement. In addition, testing and engineering reports, manufacturers’ design drawings, and

calculations must be included. Tests must be performed by laboratories approved by Miami-Dade County per TAS 301. Tests over 10 years old require verification testing for NOA renewal. Reports with test standard version/edition not referenced in the current code edition must be complemented with an equivalency of standards letter. In Miami-Dade and Broward Counties you must comply with the Miami-Dade building code, which over-rides the Florida Product Approval. Now that you know what Florida Product Approvals and Miami-Dade NOAs are, how do you find them? For Florida Product Approvals, visit www.floridabuilding.org and on the home page you’ll see the Product Approval link on the left. Here you’ll be able to view all Florida Product Approvals by product, application, number or organization (manufacturer). Make sure that you are viewing the “2017 Code” version. To search for products with Miami-Dade NOA’s, visit www.miamidade.gov/building/ and select the Product Approvals button on the left and use the “Product Control” button in the upper-center portion of the screen to search by products, certificates and listings. The Florida Building Code is the minimum standard for building. Florida Product Approvals, NOAs and the authority having jurisdiction can require more stringent guidelines.

Important Code Change for the 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code Portable Rollformers will Require Third Party Quality Assurance. With the implementation of the new code, those contractors who use portable rollformers will now be required to obtain third-party quality assurance certification, the same as factory metal manufacturers are required to do. If you purchase metal from a third-party contractor with a portable rollforming machine, please make sure you obtain a copy of the certification with your product. FBC Building, Chapter 15 – Section 1507.4 Metal roof panels. The installation of metal roof panels shall comply with the provisions of this section. Metal roofing panels shall be factory or field manufactured in accordance with the manufacturers’ Product Approval’s specifications and limitations of use. Metal roofing panels

shall be factory or field manufactured under a quality assurance program that is audited by a third-party quality assurance entity approved by the Florida Building Commission for that purpose. FBC Residential, Chapter 9 – Section R905.10 Metal roof panels. The installation of metal roof panels shall comply with the provisions of this section. Metal roofing panels shall be factory or field manufactured in accordance with the manufacturers’ Product Approval’s specifications and limitations of use. Metal roofing panels shall be factory or field manufactured under a quality assurance program that is audited by a third-party quality assurance entity approved by the Florida Building Commission for that purpose.

Continued from page 11

the material was loaded, they proceeded to remove the wet roof areas and replaced it with 1.5 inches of insulation and a three-ply modified bitumen system. Three coats of Henry Pro-Grade 988 Silicone were applied within two weeks. Since there were cars parked alongside the street next to the sidewalk, the crew from Florida Quality Roofing carefully hand rolled the entire silicone and used a lot of brushes on the edges to avoid any coating falling onto the sidewalk or damaging any vehicles or adjacent property. The entire job was completed in under four weeks and

the owner received a 15-year Henry Gold Seal Warranty, which covers labor and material. The owner is not only enjoying a leak-free roofing system, but his tenants are also enjoying the benefits of saving on cooling and electrical costs as it is reflecting 88 percent of the sun’s rays, which in turn, keeps the building inside cooler. Congratulations to the team from Florida Quality Roofing!

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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FRSA Self Insurers Fund Declares Another Dividend The Trustees of the FRSA Self Insurers Fund announced another dividend in December of $3.5 million payable to all eligible FRSA-SIF Members who were in the Fund as of December 31, 2016! Dividend checks were mailed to the FRSA-SIF members just in time for the 2017 holiday season! This dividend, when added to the previous $6.5 million dividend paid in June 2017 made this another historic total dividend return to members of the FRSA Self Insurers Fund. A total distribution in 2017 of $10 million represents an incredible average 40.7 percent dividend premium return to the membership. The FRSA Self Insurers Fund stresses safety and loss prevention to its membership, and the results speak for themselves. Fewer accidents leads to increased productivity, safer and healthier employees, and better

profitability for all involved. There is no other provider of workers’ compensation coverage for the roofing industry that can match the incredible results of the FRSA Self Insurers Fund and its membership. If you are a quality, safety conscious contractor and you are not a member of the FRSA-SIF, you should call Underwriting Manager, Debbie Guidry, CPCU to see if you qualify for FRSA-SIF workers' comp coverage – 800-767-3772, ext. 233.

Not a member? Join today! Contact Maria Armas at 800-767-3772 ext. 142. Start saving today!

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Florida Roofing | February 2018


Cotney Construction Law – Changing the Face of Construction Law FRSA Staff

Cotney Construction Law is changing how roofing contractors handle legal, compliance and safety challenges. In fact, Trent Cotney, principal of Cotney Construction Law, previously Trent Cotney, P.A., is changing how people view lawyers overall. Since 1999, Cotney has dedicated himself to serving the roofing industry. As a Florida Bar Board Certified Construction Lawyer who is also licensed in Illinois, Tennessee, and Texas, Cotney and his team of lawyers, currently 19 strong, have represented hundreds of roofing contractors in roofing litigation and arbitration. Cotney has a long history with the Florida Roofing and Sheet Metal Association (FRSA). He became involved with the statewide roofing association in 2003 when he presented a seminar on construction defects and mold claims. He officially joined the association in 2004, became General Counsel for the association in 2006, and has been a director of the association since 2007. He is a Governor-Level member of the FRSA Educational and Research Foundation. As an author of a monthly column in FRSA’s Florida Roofing magazine, he writes on construction-related legal topics and also provides seminars each year that offer contractors continuing education credits. Cotney continues to provide legal services to FRSA by advocating for roofers in front of the Construction Industry Licensing Board and reviewing and revising technical advisory opinions on roofing-related issues. He participated in the drafting of the original mitigation statute under Chapter 558, Florida Statutes, as well as serving on construction committees to encourage contractor-friendly changes to the construction lien law. His Florida experience has launched him nationally. Cotney Construction Law offers extensive services across the country including defending roofing contractors on construction defect claims, prosecuting lien and bond law claims, defending OSHA citations, contractor licensing

defense and bid protests. Having reviewed and drafted thousands of roofing-related contracts for roofing contractors, suppliers, manufacturers and associations, the Cotney team has a wealth of knowledge that is used to navigate and negotiate the contractual process. Their focus on key challenges such as alternative dispute resolution, employment law, immigration and succession planning make them a truly unique group. The firm is one-of-a-kind because their attorneys have a background in construction, ranging from licensed contractors to work as estimators for construction companies, structural contractors, roofing contractors, manufacturers and distributors. The firm understands construction – not

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because it is written in a book, but because the Cotney team has real world experience that allow the lawyers to provide clients with both legal and practical advice. With offices in Tampa, Jacksonville, Orlando, Tallahassee, Ft. Lauderdale, Houston, Nashville, Mobile, and Grand Rapids, Cotney Construction Law works nationally to provide OSHA support to contractors, and is consistently adding states to its list of active practice areas. “We have lawyers barred in nine different states. We already help contractors across the country with OSHA claims and defense,” said Cotney. “Ongoing legal risk is a huge problem for roofing contractors. Whether it is around safety, contracts, employees or immigration; contractors need to not only have a lawyer they can trust but a proactive legal program that eliminates a majority of the risk before anything happens.” As general counsel for Florida Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association, West Coast Roofing Contractors Association, Tennessee Association of Roofing Contractors, Roofing Technology Think Tank and National Women in Roofing, Cotney’s firm understands not only the legal elements of roofing, but also the day-to-day challenges of roofing contractors across the country. “There are ongoing concerns in the industry such as labor, immigration, technology and diversity,” continued Cotney. “Cotney Construction Law looks at the larger picture of what is

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Florida Roofing | February 2018

keeping roofing contractors awake at night. We focus on staying ahead of risk and helping roofing companies protect their business while navigating current challenges and opportunities.” The name of the firm, Cotney Construction Law, is new but Trent Cotney has nearly two decades of roofing and construction law experience. All told, the legal team at Cotney has over a hundred years of experience. Every day that number is growing as new lawyers join the firm. “There is a huge need for legal, risk and safety services. We truly believe that working together as an industry, we can help the roofing contractors and professionals develop programs that limit risk and potentially negate legal actions. The team of lawyers we have are part of the culture of the industry,” concluded Cotney. “I am very proud of this team and our new name signifies the scope and depth of the legal services and experience that we are committed to providing to the industry.” Cotney Construction Law is a full service law firm for roofers, specializing in construction, employment, immigration, bankruptcy, corporate, and trademark law. One of FRSA member’s benefits include up to 15 minutes of free legal advice in any of our practice areas. To use, the member must say they are FRSA members when they call any of our office and request to use the member benefit.


2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code Changes FRSA Staff The 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code went into effect on January 1, 2018. This article will cover some of the roofing-specific changes made to the code with regards to the Florida Building Codes (FBC) Building Chapter 15, Residential Chapter 9 and Existing Chapter 7, and the requirements for roof coverings, noting changes from the 2014 Fifth Edition Florida Building Code. In the current code, Florida uses the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) as the base code and adds in Floridaspecific modifications to create the FBC. In black text you’ll see the 2014 and 2017 FBC shared language, in blue text you’ll see the new 2017 FBC language, and in red text is the 2014 FBC language that has been removed. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 1502.1 Definitions. FLASHING. The roofing component used to seal roofing systems, where the system is interrupted or terminated. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 FBC 1503.2 & R903.2 Flashing. Flashings shall be used to seal roofing systems, where the system is interrupted or terminated and shall be installed in a manner that prevents moisture from entering the wall and roof through joints in copings, through moisture permeable materials and at intersections with parapet walls and other penetrations through the roof plane. 1503.2.1 & R903.2.1 Locations. Flashing shall be installed at wall and roof intersections, at gutters, wherever there is a change in roof slope or direction and around roof openings. Where flashing is of metal, the metal shall be corrosion resistant with a thickness not less than provided in Table 1503.2 or in compliance with RAS 111. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 1503.5 Roof ventilation. Attic ventilation shall be provided in accordance with Section 1203.2 and the vent product manufacturer’s installation instructions. 1505.8 Building-integrated photovoltaic products. systems. Building-integrated photovoltaic products installed as the roof covering shall be tested, listed and labeled for fire classification in accordance with Section 1505.1. RESERVED New Sections from 2015 ICC: 1505.9 Photovoltaic panels and modules. RESERVED. 1505.10 Roof gardens and landscaped roofs. RESERVED

2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and FBC Residential, Chapter 9 1506.3 & R904.4 Product identification. Roof-covering materials shall be delivered in packages bearing the manufacturer’s identifying marks and approved testing agency labels required in accordance with Section 1505. Bulk shipments and/or site manufactured materials shall be accompanied with the same information or issued in the form of a certificate or on a bill of lading by the manufacturer. 1506.5 & R904.5.1 Nails. Nails shall be corrosion resistant nails conforming to ASTM 1667(2015) ASTM A641, Class 1 or an equal corrosion resistance by coating, electro galvanization, mechanical galvanization, hot dipped galvanization, stainless steel, nonferrous metal and alloys or other suitable corrosion resistant material, or corrosion resistance shall be demonstrated in accordance with TAS 114, Appendix E. 1506.6 & R904.5.2 Screws. Wood screws conform to ANSI/ASME B 18.6.1-81(2016). Screws shall be corrosion resistant by coating, galvanization, stainless steel, nonferrous metal or other suitable corrosion resistant material. The corrosion resistance shall be demonstrated through one of the following methods: 1. Corrosion resistance equivalent to ASTM A 641 (2014), Class 1; 2. Corrosion resistance in accordance with TAS 114, Appendix E; or 3. Corrosion resistant coating exhibiting not more than 5 percent red rust after 1000 hours exposure in accordance with ASTM B 117(2016). 1506.7 & R904.5.3 Clips. Clips shall be corrosion resistant clips. The corrosion resistance shall meet 0.90 ounce per square foot (0.458 kg/m2) measured according to ASTM A 90/A 90M (2013), TAS 114 Appendix E or an equal corrosion resistance coating, electro galvanization, mechanical galvanization, hot dipped galvanization, stainless steel, nonferrous metals and alloys or other suitable corrosion resistant material. Stainless steel clips shall conform to ASTM A240/A240M (2015b), Type 304 ASTM A 167, Type 304. 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 R905.16 Building-integrated photovoltaic products roofing modules/shingles. The installation of building-integrated photovoltaic roofing modules/shingles shall comply with the provisions of this section, Section R324 and NFPA 70. www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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Photovoltaic roofing: R905.16.1 Material standards Deck Requirements. RESERVED. R905.16.2 Attachment Deck slope. RESERVED.

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R905.16.3 Wind resistance Underlayment.: Comply and be installed in accordance with Section R905.1.1. R905.16.4 Underlayment application. RESERVED. R905.16.4.1 Ice barrier. RESERVED. R905.16.4.2 Underlayment and high winds. RESERVED. R905.16.1 R905.16.5 Material standards. R905.16.2 R905.16.6 Attachment. R905.16.3 R905.16.7 Wind Resistance. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 1507.1.1 & R905.1.1 Underlayment. Unless otherwise noted, underlayment for asphalt shingles, metal roof panels, metal roof shingles, mineral surfaced roll roofing, slate shingles, wood shingles, and wood shakes shall conform to the applicable standards listed in this chapter. Underlayment materials required to comply with ASTM D 226 (2009), D 1970 (2015a), D 4869 (2016) and D 6757 (2016) shall bear a label indicating compliance to the standard designation and, if applicable, type classification indicated in Table 1507.1.1 [Table R905.1.1]. 1507.1.1 Underlayment: Underlayment shall be applied and attached in accordance with Table 1507.1.1. R905.1.1 Underlayment: Underlayment shall be applied and attached in accordance with Table 905.1.1.

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1507.1.1 & R905.1.1 Underlayment. Exception: A reinforced synthetic underlayment that is approved as an alternate to underlayment complying with ASTM D 226 Type II and having a minimum tear strength per ASTM D 1970 (2015a) or ASTM D 4533 (2015) of 20 lbs. shall be permitted. This underlayment shall be installed and attached in accordance with the underlayment attachment methods of Table 1507.1.1 [Table R905.1.1] for the applicable roof covering and slope, except metal cap nails shall be required where the ultimate design wind speed, Vult, equals or exceeds 150 mph. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15

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Florida Roofing | February 2018

TABLE 1507.1.1 UNDERLAYMENT TABLE (new) 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 TABLE R905.1.1 UNDERLAYMENT TABLE


2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 TABLE 1507.1.1 & R905.1.1 Underlayment Table. Underlayment Attachment: 1. Roof slopes from two units vertical in 12 units horizontal (17-percent slope), and less than four units vertical in 12 units horizontal (33-percent slope). Apply a 19 inch (483 mm) strip of underlayment felt parallel to and starting at the eaves, fastened sufficiently to hold in place. Starting at the eave, apply 36-inch-wide (914 mm) sheets of underlayment, overlapping successive sheets 19 inches (483 mm), end laps shall be 6 inches and shall be offset by 6 feet. The underlayment shall be attached to a nailable deck with corrosion-resistant fasteners with one row centered in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 inches (305 mm) o.c., and one row at the end and side laps fastened 6 inches (152 mm) o.c. Underlayment shall be attached using metal or plastic cap nails with a nominal cap diameter of not less than 1 inch. Metal caps shall have a thickness of not less than 32-gage sheet metal. Power-driven metal caps shall have a minimum thickness of 0.010 inch. Minimum thickness of the outside edge of plastic caps shall be 0.035 inch. The cap nail shank shall be not less than 0.083 inch for ring shank cap nails and 0.091 inch for smooth shank cap nails. Cap nail shank shall have a length sufficient to penetrate through the roof sheathing or not less than 3/4 inch into the roof sheathing. 2. Roof slopes of four units vertical in 12 units horizontal (33-percent slope) or greater. Underlayment shall be applied shingle fashion, parallel to and starting from the eave and lapped 4 inches (51 mm), end laps shall be 6 inches and shall be offset by 6 feet. The underlayment shall be attached to a nailable deck with two staggered rows in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 inches (305 mm) o.c., and one row at the end and side laps fastened 6 inches (152 mm) o.c. Underlayment shall be attached using metal or plastic cap nails with a nominal cap diameter of not less than 1 inch. Metal caps shall have a thickness of not less than 32-gage sheet metal. Power-driven metal caps shall have a minimum thickness of 0.010 inch. Underlayment shall be attached using metal or plastic cap nails with a nominal cap diameter of not less than 1 inch. Metal caps shall have a thickness of not less than 32-gage sheet metal. Power-driven metal caps shall have a minimum thickness of 0.010 inch. Minimum thickness of the outside edge of plastic caps shall be 0.035 inch. The cap nail shank shall be not less than 0.083 inch for ring shank cap nails and 0.091 inch for smooth shank cap nails. Cap nail shank shall have a length sufficient to penetrate through the roof sheathing or not less than 3/4 inch into the roof sheathing.

3. Roof slopes from two units vertical in 12 units horizontal (17-percent slope), and greater. The entire roof deck shall be covered with an approved self-adhering polymer modified bitumen underlayment complying with ASTM D 1970 (2015a) installed in accordance with both the underlayment manufacturer’s and roof covering manufacturer’s installation instructions for the deck material, roof ventilation configuration and climate exposure for the roof covering to be installed. Exception: A minimum 4-inch-wide (102 mm) strip of self-adhering polymer-modified bitumen membrane complying with ASTM D 1970 (2015a), installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for the deck material, shall be applied over all joints in the roof decking. An approved underlayment in accordance with Table 1507.1.1 [Table R905.1.1] for the applicable roof covering shall be applied over the entire roof over the 4-inch-wide (102 mm) membrane strips. 1507.2 & R905.2 Asphalt shingles. The installation of asphalt shingles shall comply with the provisions of this section or RAS 115. 1507.2.3 & R905.2.3 Underlayment. Unless otherwise noted, required underlayment shall conform to ASTM D 226, Type I, ASTM D 4869, Type I, or ASTM D 6757. Underlayment shall comply and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1]. R905.2.4 Asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles shall comply with ASTM D 3462 or ASTM D 225. 1507.2.5 Asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles shall have self-seal strips or be interlocking and comply with ASTM D 225 or ASTM D 3462. Shingles shall also comply with Table 1507.2.7.1. Asphalt shingle packaging shall bear labeling indicating compliance with one of the required classifications as shown in Table 1507.2.7.1 1507.2.4 Selfadhering polymer modified bitumen sheet. Self-adhering polymer modified bitumen sheet shall comply with ASTM D 1970 (2015a). 1507.2.6 & R905.2.5 Fasteners. Fasteners for asphalt shingles shall be galvanized, stainless steel, aluminum or copper roofing nails, minimum 12 gage [0.105 inch (2.67 mm)] shank with a minimum 3/8 inch-diameter (9.5 mm) head, of a length to penetrate through the roofing materials and a minimum of 3/4 inch (19.1 mm) into the roof sheathing. Where the roof sheathing is less than 3/4 inch (19.1 mm) thick, the nails shall penetrate through the sheathing. Fasteners shall comply with ASTM F 1667 (2016). R905.2.5 Fasteners. Exception: If the architectural appearance is to be preserved from below, an alternate method of attachment complying with the wind load requirements of Chapter 16 of the Florida Building Code, Building may be proposed unless otherwise addressed in www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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Chapter 9. The alternative attachment shall be prepared, signed and sealed by a Florida-registered architect or a Florida-registered engineer, which architect or engineer shall be proficient in structural design.

or field manufactured under a quality assurance program that is audited by a third-party quality assurance entity approved by the Florida Building Commission for that purpose.

Asphalt shingles:

R905.4.4 Material standards. Metal roof shingle roof coverings shall comply with Table R905.10.3 (1) R905.4.4. The materials used for metal roof shingle roof coverings shall be naturally corrosion resistant or be made corrosion resistant in accordance with the standards and minimum thicknesses SPECIFIED IN THE STANDARDS listed in Table R905.10.3 (2) R905.4.4.

1507.2.8 Underlayment application. Underlayment shall comply with Section 1507.1.1. R905.2.7 Underlayment application. 1507.2.9 Flashings. Flashing for asphalt shingles shall comply with this section or RAS 111. Flashing shall be applied in accordance with this section, the asphalt shingle manufacturer’s printed instructions or RAS 111. R905.2.8 Flashings. Flashing for asphalt shingles shall comply with this section or RAS 111. 1507.2.9.1 & R905.2.8.1 Base and counter flashing. Base and counter flashing shall be installed as follows: 1. In accordance with manufacturer’s installation instructions, or 2. In compliance with RAS 111, or 3. A continuous metal minimum 4" × 4" "L" flashing… 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 1507.3.3 Underlayment. Unless otherwise noted, required underlayment shall conform to: ASTM D 226, Type II; ASTM D 2626 or ASTM D 6380, Class M mineral-surfaced roll roofing underlayment shall be applied according to the underlayment manufacturer’s installation instructions or the recommendations of the FRSA/TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, Fifth Edition where the basic wind speed, Vasd, is determined in accordance with Section 1609.3.1 or the recommendations of RAS 118, 119 or 120. 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 R905.3.7 Application. Tile shall be applied in accordance with this chapter and the manufacturer’s installation instructions, recommendations of the FRSA/TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, Fifth Edition (2012) or the recommendations of RAS 118, 119 or 120. R905.3.7.1 Hip and ridge tiles. Hip and ridge tiles shall be installed in accordance with FRSA/TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, Fifth Edition (2012) where the Vasd is determined in accordance with Section R301.2.1.3 or the recommendations of RAS 118, 119 or 120. R905.4 Metal roof shingles. Metal roofing shingles shall be factory or field manufactured in accordance with the manufacturers’ Product Approval specifications and limitations of use. Metal roofing shingles shall be factory 22

Florida Roofing | February 2018

TABLE R905.4.4 METAL ROOF COVERINGS: a. For Group U buildings, the minimum coating thickness for ASTM A 653 galvanized steel roofing shall be G-60. 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 R905.5.4 Material standards. Mineral-surfaced roll roofing shall conform to ASTM D 3909 or ASTM D 6380, Class M or Class WS-03(2013). 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 1507.4 & R905.10 Metal roof panels. The installation of metal roof panels shall comply with the provisions of this section. Metal roofing panels shall be factory or field manufactured in accordance with the manufacturers’ Product Approval specifications and limitations of use. Metal roofing panels shall be factory or field manufactured under a quality assurance program that is audited by a third-party quality assurance entity approved by the Florida Building Commission for that purpose. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 9 1507.4.4 Attachment: 3. ALUMINUM-ZINC COATED FASTENERS ARE ACCEPTABLE FOR ALUMINUM-ZINC COATED ROOFS 3. Stainless-steel fasteners are acceptable for all types of metal roofs. 4. Aluminum fasteners are acceptable for aluminum roofs attached to aluminum supports. 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 R905.10.4 Attachment. 3. Stainless-steel fasteners are acceptable for all types of metal roofs. 4. Aluminum-zinc coated fasteners are acceptable for aluminum-zinc coated roofs. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 Metal Roof Panels: 1507.4.5.1 & R905.10.5 Underlayment: Underlayment


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shall comply with and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1].

comply with ASTM D 226, Type I or ASTM D 4869 and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1].

1507.4.5.2 & R905.10.5.1 Underlayment Application.

1507.6.3.2 & R905.6.3.2 Underlayment Application.

Metal shingles:

Slate shingles:

1507.5.3 & R905.4.3 Underlayment. Underlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type I or ASTM D 4869 and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1].

1507.7.3 & R905.6.3 Underlayment. Underlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type II or ASTM D 4869, Type III or IV and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1].

1507.5.3.2 & R905.4.3.2 Underlayment Application.

1507.7.3.2 & R905.6.3.2 Underlayment Application.

Mineral-surfaced roll roofing: 1507.6.3 & R905.6.3 Underlayment. Underlayment shall

Wood shingles: 1507.8.3 & R905.7.3 Underlayment. Underlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type I or ASTM D 4869 and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1]. 1507.8.3.2 & R905.7.3.2 Underlayment Application. Wood shake:

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1507.9.3 & R905.8.3 Underlayment. Underlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type I or ASTM D 4869 and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1]. 1507.9.3.2 & R905.8.3.2 Underlayment Application. Building integrated photovoltaic roofing: 1507.17.3 & R905.16.3 Underlayment. Unless otherwise noted, required underlayment shall conform to ASTM D 226, ASTM D 4869 or ASTM D 6757. Underlayment shall comply and be installed in accordance with Section 1507.1.1 [R905.1.1]. 1507.17.4.2 & R905.16.4.2 Underlayment Application.: RESERVED. Underlayment shall be installed using one of the following methods: Two layer underlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type I or Type II or ASTM D 4869, Type II or Type IV or ASTM D 6757: Apply a 19-inch (483 mm) strip of underlayment felt parallel to and starting at the eaves, fastened sufficiently to hold in place.

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Florida Roofing | February 2018


Starting at the eave, apply 36-inch-wide (914 mm) sheets of underlayment, overlapping successive sheets 19 inches (483 mm), and fastened with 1 inch (25 mm) round plastic cap, metal cap nails or nails and tin-tabs attached to a nailable deck with one row in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 in. o.c. (305 mm), and one row at the overlaps fastened 6 in. o.c. (152 mm). Synthetic underlayment shall be fastened in accordance with this section and the manufacturer’s recommendations.

through the sheathing. Each shingle shall be attached with a minimum of two fasteners. RESERVED 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9

R905.7.5 Attachment. Application. Wood shingles shall be installed in accordance with this chapter and the manufacturer’s instructions. Wood shingles shall be laid with a side lap not less than 11/2 inches (38 mm) between joints in courses, and two joints shall not be in direct alignment in any three adjacent courses. Spacing between One layer underlayment shall comply with ASTM D shingles shall be not less than 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch (6.4 226, Type II or ASTM D 4869, Type IV or ASTM D 6757: Underlayment shall be applied shingle fashion, parallel to mm to 9.5 mm). Weather exposure for wood shingles shall not exceed those set in Table R905.7.5(1). Fasteners for and starting from the eave and lapped 2 inches (51 mm), untreated (naturally durable) wood shingles shall be box fastened with 1 inch (25 mm) round plastic cap, metal nails in accordance with Table R905.7.5(2). Nails shall be cap nails or nails and tin-tabs attached to a nailable deck stainless steel Type 304 or 316 or hot-dipped galvanized with two staggered rows in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 in. o.c. (305 mm), and one with a coating weight of ASTM A 153 Class D (1.0 oz/ft2). row at the overlaps fastened 6 in. o.c. (152 mm). Synthetic Alternatively, two 16-gage stainless steel Type 304 or 316 staples with crown widths 7/16 inch (11.1 mm) minimum, underlayment shall be fastened in accordance with this 3/4 inch (19.1 mm) maximum, shall be used. Fasteners insection and the manufacturer’s recommendations End stalled within 15 miles (24 km) of salt water coastal areas laps shall be offset by 6 feet (1829 mm). shall be stainless steel Type 316. Fasteners for fire-retarAs an alternative, the entire roof deck shall be covered dant- treated shingles in accordance with Section R902 with an approved self-adhering polymer modified bitumen or pressure-impregnated-preservative-treated shingles sheet meeting ASTM D 1970 or an approved self-adherof naturally durable wood in accordance with AWPA U1 ing synthetic underlayment installed in accordance with shall be stainless steel Type 316. All fasteners shall have a the manufacturer’s installation instructions. minimum penetration into the sheathing of 3/4 inch (19.1 mm). For sheathing less than 3/4 inch in (19.1 mm) thick1507.8 & R905.7 Wood shingles. The installation of wood ness, each fastener shall penetrate through the sheathing. shingles shall comply with the provisions of this section Wood shingles shall be attached to the roof with two and Table 1507.8. All wood shingles shall be installed in fasteners per shingle, positioned in accordance with the accordance with this chapter and the manufacturer’s manufacturer ’s installation instructions. Fastener packinstallation instructions, the Cedar Shake and Shingle aging shall bear a label indicating the appropriate grade Bureau New Roof Construction Manual (2015) or RAS material or coating weight. RESERVED. 130. The product approval shall state the allowable uplift resistance for the attachment system. The installation of R905.7.6 Attachment for Vasd as determined in accordance wood shingles shall be limited to roofs where the allowwith section R301.2.1.3 Greater than 100 MPH Valley able uplift resistance is equal to or greater than the design flashing. Roof flashing shall be not less than No. 26 gage uplift pressure for the roof in compliance with 1504.1 [0.019 inches (0.5 mm)] corrosion-resistant sheet metal [Table R301.2(2)]. and shall extend 10 inches (254 mm) from the centerline each way for roofs having slopes less than 12 units vertiWood shingles: Table 1507.8 (REMOVED) cal in 12 units horizontal (100-percent slope), and 7 inches (178 mm) from the centerline each way for slopes of 12 1507.8.1 & R905.7.1 Deck requirements. Wood shingles units vertical in 12 units horizontal and greater. Sections shall be installed on solid or spaced sheathing. Where of flashing shall have an end lap of not less than 4 inches spaced sheathing is used, sheathing boards shall be not (102 mm). RESERVED. less than 1-inch by 4- inch (25 mm by 102 mm) nominal dimensions and shall be spaced on centers equal to the 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 weather exposure to coincide with the placement of fasteners. RESERVED 1507.8.6.1 & R905.7.6.1.1 Nails. Fasteners to attach wood shingles shall be Type 304 (Type 316 for coastal 1507.8.2 & R905.7.2 Deck slope. Wood shingles shall be areas) stainless steel ring-shank nails with a minimum installed on slopes of not less than three units vertical in penetration of 0.75 inch into the sheathing. Each shingle 12 units horizontal (25-percent slope). RESERVED shall be attached with a minimum of two fasteners. 1507.8.6 Attachment. Fasteners for wood shingles shall be corrosion resistant with a minimum penetration of 3/4 inch (19.1 mm) into the sheathing. For sheathing less than ½ inch (12.7 mm) in thickness, the fasteners shall extend

2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 1507.8.7 Application. Wood shingles shall be laid with www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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a side lap not less than 1-1/2 inches (38 mm) between joints in adjacent courses, and not be in direct alignment in alternate courses. Spacing between shingles shall be 1/4 to 3/8 inch (6.4 to 9.5 mm). Weather exposure for wood shingles shall not exceed that set in Table 1507.8.7. RESERVED TABLE 1507.8.7 & TABLE 905.7.7 905.7.5(1) WOOD SHINGLE WEATHER EXPOSURE AND ROOF SLOPE RESERVED. TABLE 1507.8.7 & TABLE 905.7.7 905.7.5(1) Wood shingles: 1507.8.8 Flashing. At the juncture of the roof and vertical surfaces, flashing and counterflashing shall be provided in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions, and where of metal, shall be not less than 0.019-inch (0.48 mm) (No. 26 galvanized sheet gage) corrosion-resistant metal. The valley flashing shall extend at least 11 inches (279 mm) from the centerline each way and have a splash diverter rib not less than 1 inch (25 mm) high at the flow line formed as part of the flashing. Sections of flashing shall have an end lap of not less than 4 inches (102 mm). For roof slopes of three units vertical in 12 units horizontal (25-percent slope) and over, the valley flashing shall have a 36-inch-wide (914 mm) underlayment of either one layer of Type I underlayment running the full length of the valley or a self-adhering polymer-modified bitumen sheet complying with ASTM D 1970, in addition to other required underlayment. In areas where the average daily temperature in January is 25°F (-4°C) or less or where there is a possibility of ice forming along the eaves causing a backup of water, the metal valley flashing underlayment shall be solidly cemented to the roofing underlayment for slopes under seven units vertical in 12 units horizontal (58-percent slope) or self-adhering polymer-modified bitumen sheet shall be installed. RESERVED. 1507.8.9 & R904.7.9 R905.7.7 Label required. Each bundle of shingles shall be identified by a label of an approved grading or inspection bureau or agency. 1507.9 & R905.8 Wood shake. The installation of wood shakes shall comply with the provisions of this section and Table 1507.8. All wood shakes shall be installed in accordance with this chapter and the manufacturer’s installation instructions, the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau New Roof Construction Manual (2015) or RAS 130. The product approval shall state the allowable uplift resistance for the attachment system. The installation of wood shakes shall be limited to roofs where the allowable uplift resistance is equal to or greater than the design uplift pressure for the roof in compliance with 1504.1 [Table R301.2(2)]. Wood shakes: 26

Florida Roofing | February 2018

1507.9.1 & R905.8.1 Deck requirements. Wood shakes shall only be used on solid or spaced sheathing. Where spaced sheathing is used, sheathing boards shall be not less than 1-inch by 4-inch (25 mm by 102 mm) nominal dimensions and shall be spaced on centers equal to the weather exposure to coincide with the placement of fasteners. Where 1-inch by 4-inch (25 mm by 102 mm) spaced sheathing is installed at 10 inches (254 mm) on center, additional 1-inch by 4-inch (25 mm by 102 mm) boards shall be installed between the sheathing boards. RESERVED. 1507.9.2 & R905.8.1.1 Deck slope. Wood shakes shall only be used on slopes of not less than four units vertical in 12 units horizontal (33-percent slope). RESERVED. 1507.9.5 & R905.8.4 Interlayment. Interlayment shall comply with ASTM D 226, Type I. RESERVED. 1507.9.7 Attachment. Fasteners for wood shakes shall be corrosion resistant with a minimum penetration of 3/4 inch (19.1 mm) into the sheathing. For sheathing less than 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) in thickness, the fasteners shall extend through the sheathing. Each shake shall be attached with a minimum of two fasteners. RESERVED. 1507.9.7.1 & R905.8.7.1.1 Nails. Fasteners to attach wood shakes shall be Type 304 (Type 316 for coastal areas) stainless steel ring-shank nails with a minimum penetration of 0.75 inch into the sheathing. Each shake shall be attached with a minimum of two fasteners. 1507.9.8 Application. Wood shakes shall be laid with a side lap not less than 1-1/2 inches (38 mm) between joints in adjacent courses, and not be in direct alignment in alternate courses. Spacing between shakes shall be 1/4 to 3/8 inch (6.4 to 9.5 mm). Weather exposure for wood shakes shall not exceed that set in Table 1507.9.8. RESERVED. TABLE 1507.9.8 WOOD SHAKE WEATHER EXPOSURE AND ROOF SLOPE: RESERVED. Wood shakes: 1507.9.9 Flashing. At the juncture of the roof and vertical surfaces, flashing and counterflashing shall be provided in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions, and where of metal, shall be not less than 0.019-inch (0.48 mm) (No. 26 galvanized sheet gage) corrosion-resistant metal. The valley flashing shall extend at least 11 inches (279 mm) from the centerline each way and have a splash diverter rib not less than 1 inch (25 mm) high at the flow line formed as part of the flashing. Sections of flashing shall have an end lap of not less than 4 inches (102 mm). For roof slopes of three units vertical in 12 units horizontal (25-percent slope) and over, the valley flashing shall have a 36-inch-wide (914 mm) underlayment of either one layer of Type I underlayment running the full length of the valley or a self-adhering


polymer-modified bitumen sheet complying with ASTM D 1970, in addition to other required underlayment. In areas where the average daily temperature in January is 25°F (-4°C) or less or where there is a possibility of ice forming along the eaves causing a backup of water, the metal valley flashing underlayment shall be solidly cemented to the roofing underlayment for slopes under seven units vertical in 12 units horizontal (58-percent slope) or self-adhering polymer-modified bitumen sheet shall be installed. RESERVED.

over spaced sheathing. RESERVED. 1507.17.2 Deck slope. Photovoltaic shingles shall not be installed on roof slopes less than three units vertical in 12 units horizontal (25-percent slope). RESERVED. TABLE 1508.2 MATERIAL STANDARDS FOR ROOF INSULATION SECTION 1509 RADIANT BARRIERS INSTALLED ABOVE DECK

1507.9.10 Label required. Each bundle of shakes shall be 1509.1 General. RESERVED identified by a label of an approved Waterwind_HP-FRSA.qxp 10/6/15 3:50 PM Page 1 grading or inspection bureau or agency. 2017 FBC Residential, Chapter 9 R905.6.5 Application. Minimum headlap for slate shingles shall be in accordance with Table R905.6.5. Slate shingles shall be secured to the roof with two fasteners per slate. Slate shingles shall be installed in accordance with this chapter and the manufacturer’s installation instructions. The product approval shall state the allowable uplift resistance for the attachment system. The installation of slate and slate-type shingle shall be limited to roofs where the allowable uplift resistance is equal to or greater than the design uplift pressure for the roof listed in Table R301.2(2). [Language from R905.6.7 2014 FBC] 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 1507.14 & R905.14 Sprayed polyurethane foam roofing. The installation of sprayed polyurethane foam roofing shall comply with the provisions of this section or in compliance with RAS-109 and 109-A. TABLE R905.14.3 PROTECTIVE COATING MATERIAL STANDARDS RESERVED. MATERIAL STANDARD

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1509.2 Fire testing. RESERVED 1509.3 Installation. RESERVED 1509.4 Material standards. RESERVED 1509 1510 Roof top Structures 1510.9 Structural fire resistance. (Previously 1511.1.1 2014 FBC) The structural frame and roof construction supporting imposed loads upon the roof by any rooftop structure shall comply with the requirements of Table 601. The fire-resistance reduction permitted by Table 601, Note a, shall not apply to roofs containing rooftop structures. SECTION 1510 1511 Existing REROOFING SECTION R907 R908 Existing REROOFING R907.7.1.2 R908.7.1.2 Supplemental fasteners as required by Table R908.7.1.2 shall be 8d ASTM F 1667 classification RSRS-01 ring shank nails with round heads and the following minimum dimensions:

rows in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 in. o.c. (305 mm), and one row at the overlaps fastened 6 in. o.c. (152 mm). Synthetic underlayment shall be fastened in accordance with this section and the manufacturer’s recommendations. (2) For roof slopes that require two layers of underlayment, an approved asphalt impregnated ASTM D 226(2009) Type I or Type II, ASTM D 4869(2016), Type II or Type IV underlayment shall be installed in a shingle–fashion and lapped 19 inch (483 mm) and fastened with 1 inch (25 mm) round plastic cap, metal cap nails or nails and tin-tabs, attached to a nailable deck with one row in the field of the sheet with a maximum fastener spacing of 12 in. o.c. (305 mm), and one row at the overlaps fastened 6 in. o.c. (152 mm). An approved synthetic underlayment shall be installed in accordance with this section and the manufacturer’s installation instruction. (No additional underlayment shall be required over the top of this sheet.)

TABLE R907.7.1.2 R908.7.1.2 SUPPLEMENT FASTENERS R907.8 R908.8 AT PANEL EDGES AND INTERMEDIATE FRAMING R907.8.1 R908.8.1 Roof-to-wall connections for siteR907.7.2 R908.7.2 Roof secondary water barrier for sitebuilt single-family residential structures. built single-family resident structures. TABLE R907.8.1 R908.8.1 REQUIRED UPLIFT A secondary water barrier shall be installed using one of CAPACITIES FOR ROOF-TO-WALL CONNECTIONSa, b the following methods when roof covering is removed and (POUNDS PER LINEAR FOOT) replaced. SECTION R909 ROOFTOP-MOUNTED PHOTOVOLTAIC 1. In either HVHZ or Non HVHZ regions: PANEL SYSTEMS 2. Outside the High Velocity Hurricane Zone: Underlayment shall comply with Section R905.1.1 of the Florida Building Code, Residential. a) The entire roof deck shall be covered with an approved self-adhering polymer modified bitumen sheet meeting ASTM D 1970(2015a) or an approved self-adhering synthetic underlayment installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions. No additional underlayment shall be required on top of this sheet for new installations. b) An underlayment system approved for the particular roof covering shall be applied with the following modification: 1) For roof slopes that require one layer of underlayment, a layer of approved asphalt impregnated ASTM D 226(2009) Type II, ASTM D 4869(2016), Type IV underlayment or approved synthetic underlayment shall be installed. The felt is to be fastened with 1 inch (25 mm) round plastic cap, metal cap nails or nails and tin-tabs attached to a nailable deck with two staggered 28

Florida Roofing | February 2018

R909.1 General. RESERVED. R909.2 Structural requirements. RESERVED. R909.3 Installation. RESERVED. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 and Residential, Chapter 9 1511.1.1 & R908.1.1. Not more than 25 percent of the total roof area or roof section of any existing building or structure shall be repaired, replaced or recovered in any 12-month period unless the entire existing roofing system or roof section is replaced to conform to requirements of this code. [From 708.1.1 2014 FEBC] 1511.6 & R907.6 R908.6 Flashings. Flashings shall be reconstructed in accordance with approved manufacturer’s installation instructions or RAS 111. Metal flashing to which bituminous materials are to be adhered shall be primed prior to installation. 2017 FBC Building, Chapter 15 SECTION 1512 HIGH-VELOCITY HURRICANE ZONES


1512.2 Application. These high-velocity hurricane zone roofing requirements with associated roofing application standards (RAS) and testing application standards (TAS) are solely to be implemented in the HVHZ areas of high basic wind speeds, or and where the jurisdiction having authority has adopted their use. 1512.2.3. For roofing systems to be installed on a specific building or structure, where an existing product approval may not be applied, such roofing system shall be permitted to be approved on a one-time project basis may be granted a one-time approval by the authority having jurisdiction, provided the applicant demonstrates, by testing and/or rational analysis that such roofing system complies with the provision of this code. 1512.2.4. Where a product approval does not address a detail for a specific job condition, the permit applicant may propose to the building official an alternate detail to address the specific need of the job. The building official shall be permitted to approve may accept such proposal if it can be demonstrated that the provisions of this code will be met. 1512.2.5.1 Appearance. Where If the architectural appearance of the underside of the roof is to be preserved from below, an alternate method of attachment complying with the windload requirements of Chapter 16 (High-Velocity Hurricane Zones) may be proposed unless otherwise addressed in Chapter 15. The alternative attachment shall be prepared, signed and sealed by a Florida-registered architect or a Florida-registered engineer, which architect or engineer shall be proficient in structural design. 1512.3. Permits outside these high-velocity hurricane zone requirements shall comply with Section 105. Permits within the HVHZ high wind areas shall be required for all work in connection with the application, repair or maintenance of any roofing component or any roofing assembly and/or any of its components except as otherwise permitted in Section 105 of this code. CONTINUOUS ROOFING SYSTEM. An impervious A roof covering, composed from a single or multiple layers, forming a homogeneous membrane over the entire roof surface, applied to either a flat or pitched roof surface(s). ROOF REPLACEMENT. The process of removing the existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering. 1514.2.2.1. Such felts Membrane flashings shall be embedded in hot bitumen or an approved adhesive. 1514.2.3.1 Incorporated into 1514.2.2.1 Subsequent sections renumbered. 1515.1.5. No loose laid ballasted or nonballasted system shall be permitted allowed. www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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1515.2.4 Impact resistance. Roof coverings installed on low slope roofs in accordance with Section 1519 shall resist impact damage based on the results of test conducted in accordance with ASTM D 3746, ASTM D 4272, CGSB 37, FM 4470 or TAS 114. 1518.7.1. Underlayments meeting or exceeding minimum underlayments specifications, as detailed in Section 1518, shall be applied in compliance with the application methods detailed in the product approval. Where the architectural appearance of the underside of the roof is to be preserved, refer to Section 1519.5.2. 2017 FBC Existing, Chapter 7 SECTION 708 706 REROOFING

2. Outside the High Velocity Hurricane Zone: a) Underlayment shall comply with Section R905.1.1 of the Florida Building Code, Residential. Exceptions: 1. Roof slopes < 2:12 having a continuous roof system shall be deemed to comply with Section 706.7.2 requirements for secondary water barrier. 2. Clay and concrete tile roof systems installed as required by the Florida Building Code are deemed to comply with the requirements of Section 706.7.2 for Secondary Water Barriers. [B] 707.3.2 Roof diaphragms resisting wind loads in highwind regions.

Where roofing materials are removed from more than 50 percent of the roof diaphragm or section of a building located where the ultimate design wind speed, Vult, determined in accordance with Figure 1609.3(1) of the Florida Building Code, Building, is greater than 115 mph (51 m/s) as defined in Section 1609 (the HVHZ shall comply 706.3 Recovering versus replacement. New roof covwith Section 1620) of the Florida Building Code, Building, erings shall not be installed without first removing all roof diaphragms, connections of the roof diaphragm to existing layers of roof coverings down to the roof deck roof framing members, and roof-to-wall connections shall where any of the following conditions occur: be evaluated for the wind loads specified in the Florida Building Code, Building, including wind uplift. If the dia706.7 Mitigation. Supplemental fasteners as required by phragms and connections in their current condition are Table 706.7.1.2 shall be 8d ASTM F 1667(2016) classifinot capable of resisting at least 75 percent of those wind cation RSRS-01 ring shank nails with round heads and the loads, they shall be replaced or strengthened in accorfollowing minimum dimensions: dance with the loads specified in the Florida Building Code, 706.7.2 Roof secondary water barrier for site-built single Building. family residential structures. A secondary water barrier Please note: these are not all the changes pertaining to shall be installed using one of the following methods when the 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code. For more roof covering is removed and replaced: complete information or to order code books, please visit 706.1.1 Not more than 25 percent of the total roof area or roof section of any existing building or structure shall be repaired, replaced or recovered in any 12-month period unless the entire existing roofing system or roof section is replaced to conform to requirements of this code.

1. 1. In either HVHZ or Non-HVHZ regions: a) All joints in structural panel roof sheathing or decking shall be covered with a minimum 4 inch (102 mm) wide strip of self-adhering polymer modified bitumen tape applied directly to the sheathing or decking. The deck and self-adhering polymer modified bitumen tape shall be covered with one of the underlayment systems approved for the particular roof covering to be applied to the roof. b) The entire roof deck shall be covered with an approved asphalt impregnated 30# felt underlayment or approved synthetic underlayment installed with nails and tin-tabs in accordance with Sections 1518.2, 1518.3, or 1518.4 of the Florida Building Code, Building. (No additional underlayment shall be required over the top of this sheet.) The synthetic underlayment shall be fastened in accordance with the manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations.

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Florida Roofing | February 2018

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Florida Roofing | February 2018


Don’t Underestimate the Importance of Market Intelligence Lee Rust, Owner, Florida Corporate Finance Not long ago, I had a corporate client which was a relatively large manufacturer's representative for a narrow line of large industrial products. For over two decades that company had prospered. For its owners, it generated modest but consistent revenue growth and a nice stream of profits and personal compensation. With little warning, however, several subtle changes in technology combined with some manufacturing problems at this client’s major supplier resulted in a sales decline which quickly led to losses. Struggling to catch up, my client changed suppliers. The old supplier then engaged a competing sales organization and cut prices as a means of maintaining market share. My client’s losses increased. A new mortgage produced enough working capital to support the continuing losses. Finally, the solution turned out to be the addition of several new product lines, an eventual increase in prices by the competition which couldn’t sustain such low margins indefinitely, and a severe reduction in my client’s overhead. That company barely avoided liquidation. There were two lessons in this sequence of events. First, don’t let a single supplier hold the future of your company hostage to a changing marketplace and, second, don’t ever underestimate the importance of market intelligence. As to the first of these lessons, you’ve often heard that you shouldn’t let any single customer represent more than 25 percent of your annual sales. Such a customer can hold you hostage to their control over the prosperity of your company. They can dictate prices as the big three U.S. auto makers did to their parts manufacturers during the early 2000’s driving a number of those major companies into bankruptcy. The same is true for your suppliers. If a single source supplier represents a majority of your products, components, or raw materials, a change at that supplier might cripple your company. Why leave the financial health of your company in the hands of another company over which you have no control? Examine the importance of all suppliers to your ability to service your markets. If an interruption of deliveries from any of those suppliers would have devastating results for your company, find additional sources and reduce your dependence on any single company. As to market intelligence, I can’t overemphasize the importance of understanding and, where possible, anticipating changes in your markets which can have an impact, either positive or negative, on your company. The client I mentioned above should have seen and reacted to the changes in technology long before they resulted in a significant decrease in sales. If their principal supplier wasn’t maintaining a technological lead, they should have located

other suppliers well before the decrease in their sales led to losses. Another of my clients is a producer of extreme weather clothing, principally for hunters and others who might be in temperatures as low as minus 60 degrees. Because that is a narrow market with few competitors, that company had prospered for years with little change in their clothing line. With consistent sales and profits, the owners didn’t see the minor changes in designs and styles introduced by those few competitors. After all, color and style had never mattered before. As sales declined and losses mounted, I was asked to sell the company in what amounted to a liquidation. The new owner, now a new client of mine, redesigned the line without changing the technology underlying the extreme weather protection. New bright colors in striking designs made the line attractive to snowmobilers and other sportsmen and, in particular, the women who participate in cold weather sports. The addition of several overseas suppliers reduced the dependence on what had been a single and not always reliable source for the individual outer garments. And several changes in the level of low temperature protection extended the line into the industrial markets for warehouse freezers and North Sea oil platforms, among others. Revenues and profits are now growing again. Don’t be complacent about your markets. Make sure you not only recognize changes as they occur but also anticipate those changes to whatever extent possible. React to the changes before they cause sales and profit problems. On a frequent basis ask yourself: What product, service, or other changes are my competitors introducing that could have an effect on my sales? What changes in the needs, demands, or buying decisions on the part of my customers might cause them to buy from my competitors? What technological changes might make my products obsolete? How are market prices likely to change over the next year and what can I do to address those changes? What are the market and business risks that could have a major adverse impact on my company? Companies that don’t change disappear. Those companies which continually react to market forces prosper. Make sure your company is in that second group. Lee Rust, owner of Florida Corporate Finance, specializes in Mergers & Acquisitions, Corporate Sales, Strategic Planning, Financing and Operations Audits. He can be reached by phone at 407-841-5676 or by email at hleerust@att.net. Lee will present a business practice seminar at FRSA’s Annual Convention, June 27-29 at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee. www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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FRSA Convention & Expo Sponsorship Stand Out from the Crowd Cheryl Sulock, CMP, CSEP, FRSA Director of Convention and Expo You’ve signed your contract for a great spot on the show floor. You’ve started working on some cool new graphics for your booth display. Maybe you’ve even started ordering the fun logoed gadgets that will fill the bags of FRSA Expo attendees in just a few quick months. But how will you drive traffic to your booth? How will attendees know where to find you? Sponsorship opportunities are the perfect answer to these questions! Statistics show that many attendees plan out their time on the show floor, taking note of the exhibitors that they would like to visit well before they ever enter the exhibit hall. It’s important to grab their attention early and often so you end up on their list of must-see exhibitors. Pre-show marketing is a great tool to help you get on this list, but why not let FRSA do the work for you? FRSA Convention & Expo sponsorships are the best and easiest way to get great company exposure before, during, and after the event. FRSA Sponsorships include opportunities to get your company name, logo, and website in email blasts, in Florida Roofing magazine, on the FRSA website, in the onsite Convention Program, in the FRSA event app, on event signage, and in several promotional pieces. They also include sponsor ribbons for your booth and name badges and points towards booth selection for the 2019 expo. Our standard level sponsorships range from Bronze ($500) to Platinum ($10,000) with increasing benefits as your support increases. You may also choose to sponsor a specific event with opportunities to get your company noticed at the FRSA sports tournaments, the Welcome Reception, or the S.T.A.R. Awards and After-Party. You’ll be shocked at the number of contractors that notice your sponsorship, personally

thank you for your support of FRSA events, and keep your support in mind when placing future orders. As we move to the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center this year, a new venue means lots of new branding opportunities. Proudly display your company advertisement on hotel windows, escalators, or the lobby fountain. These are great opportunities to remind attendees to stop by your booth as they are entering the exhibit hall. Then consider purchasing expo floor graphics inside the hall. These 4’x4’ adhesive vinyl overlays are placed at the cross aisles of the expo floor giving you the ability to direct attendees right to your booth. If you’re looking for the latest and greatest technology opportunities, you might want to consider sponsoring the FRSA online registration website, the mobile event app, or cell phone charging kiosks on the expo floor. An exciting opportunity for 2018, you can also choose to sponsor the event live display monitors which are set up at the busy registration desk and in the lounge area of the expo floor. The monitors display upcoming events, live tweets, and a scrolling newsfeed to keep attendees up to speed on the latest FRSA Expo news. Sponsorship opportunities are now open and available first-come, first-served. For questions, sample pictures, and to select your sponsorships, please contact Cheryl Sulock at 800-767-3772 ext. 177 or cheryl@floridaroof.com. 2018 sponsors are already included on the FRSA website and will start to appear in promotional pieces soon, so confirm your plans right away to get the most company exposure possible and make sure you stand out from the crowd.

FRSA 2018 Seminar Schedule FREE 2017 Sixth Edition FBC (2 hours G) and Wind Mitigation Methods, the Law! (1 hour WMM) COMPLIMENTARY 3 hour CEU seminars sponsored by DBPR & BASF February 27, 9 am–12 pm – Hyatt Place Sarasota/Lakewood Ranch, 6021 Exchange Way, Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202 OSHA 10-Hour Training for Construction–Presented by Jim Brauner, Brauner Safety Services Cost: $120 per person, FRSA-SIF members receive one FREE registration. February 23, 1 pm–6 pm and February 24, 7 am–12 pm – FRSA Training Center Lead Certification Courses–Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) 8-Hour Training & Mandatory 4-Hour Refresher March 7, 8-Hour Certification Training –$225 per person 8 am–5 pm – FRSA Training Center March 8, Mandatory 4-Hour Refresher–$139 per person 8 am–12 pm – FRSA Training Center Two-Day Asbestos Competent Person and Onsite Roofing Supervisor Course April 5-6, Competent Person Training–FRSA members $250/ Nonmember $295 – FRSA Training Center April 6, Worker or Refresher Training–FRSA members $130/ Nonmember $150 – FRSA Training Center FRSA Training Center is located at 7071 University Blvd, Winter Park, FL 32792. See pages 14-15 for more info. 34

Florida Roofing | February 2018


Three Google Facts Every Roofer Should Know Stephan Boehringer, Managing Partner, Get The Clicks

Getting quality leads on Google is hard. It’s even harder figuring out what you should do to get your website to bring you leads. Here are three facts you need to understand about your website and Google before you spend any money. Fact #1 – Google is not a free search engine with some ad space. Google is a paid search engine with some free space. This is a subtle, but important distinction. If you are looking for SEO (Google marketing without the ads) because you think it’s a cheap way to market your business, you are going to be in for a rude awakening. The fact that SEO is cheap is a misguided concept perpetuated by web marketing agencies that are out to make a quick buck. Why do you think so many people have had a bad experience with a digital marketing agency at least once in the history of their business? It’s because some slick sales person told them they could get them a bunch of leads in just a few months for $200/month. If it sounds too good to be true…it probably is. Google doesn’t want you optimizing your website to rank high, next to the ads. They want you paying for the ads. Google has to produce a profit to please shareholders. They are not in the business of making you money for free. If they made it easy to rank number-one for all of the top producing keywords, no one would spend the money on paid advertising. Organic optimization is not cheap because you need an expert to go up against Google and turn your website into a money-making machine and capture the best potential audience looking for what you have to offer. Fact #2 – Your website is not a marketing tool. It’s a sales tool. Do you have a pretty website? Does it have fancy bells and whistles? Perhaps you have a slideshow or a big picture of a beautiful roof. Would you believe it if I told you that none of that matters? Would you believe that much of the “pretty” is actually counter-productive? What do you want visitors to do when they come to your site? Call you? Email you? Make an appointment for an estimate or bring you the next big commercial client? You bet ya! Your website has one job, and one job only – convince the visitor that you are the best solution for their need…that’s it. The rest is just fluff to satisfy the search engine gods and maybe a little light reading material for the research audience. Your website should be part of a larger system that funnels leads to your front door. Don’t make it your only system. Make it part of your overall business goals and

incorporate a similar brand message in all of your collective lead generation efforts. Remember, people buy with emotion and then justify their purchase with logic. Repeat - people buy with emotion and then justify their purchase with logic. Make sure your website speaks to the viewer’s emotion, not the fact that you are a roofer. Fact #3: Differentiation drives engagement. Does your website represent why you do what you do? Take a minute and think about that. What makes what you have to offer different or better than another company that offers the same thing? Sure, you need to tell people what you do, and maybe how you do it, but it’s the WHY that will make someone choose you over the next. People on the Internet are looking for a solution to satisfy a need because they don’t already know of a company that provides the product or service and they haven’t had any recommendations from their peers. If they learn why you are in business, they will likely give you an opportunity for an estimate. Monitoring the user experience of your site visitors can give you valuable insight into what is working and what is not. You can see these things using tools like Google Analytics or one of our personal favorites, Mouseflow. Pay attention to the way people navigate your site and make adjustments accordingly. You can also tell from this data if they are not finding what they are looking for when entering the site and leaving immediately. Focus on a clear message that communicates your core brand values and speaks to your potential customers. If you have the intention of producing sales from your website, it is imperative that you take these three facts to heart. Stephan Boehringer is managing partner of Get The Clicks, a digital marketing solutions company specializing in SEO services, pay per click management, website design and maintenance, consulting and expert branding. Stephan has also taught courses on social media, website design and marketing for FRSA.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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2017-18 NRCA Alliance Construction Management Student Competition Bennett Judson, NRCA, Executive Director, The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress, Vice President, NRCA Meeting Services The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress is hosting its fourth Construction Management Student Competition. The competition consists of two parts: a written proposal and oral presentation. The Alliance’s 2018 Construction Management Student Competition continues to be a hallmark competition that promotes careers in roofing industry management. In addition to providing a significant learning opportunity, the competition fosters an environment that is meant to bring out the best in each team, encourage dialogue among the students, and foster team spirit as students rise to meet the challenge. The teams had to bid on a reroofing system for the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans. Each team had to research the project, review the plans and specifications, and assemble a full estimate and proposal to submit a qualified bid package. Each team had to work to find a competitive edge to beat the competition while still maintaining a reasonable margin. For this project, each team had to decide on the correct application methods, show overall roofing knowledge, and illustrate its company is prepared to undertake the project. Teams submitted their written proposals to the judges for their review and scoring. Four finalist teams were selected based on their scores and were invited to travel to New Orleans for the final part of the competition – to give their

oral presentations before a panel of judges (acting as the Audubon Aquarium owners, facility management and design team looking to assemble a team of craftsmen that can meet the demands of this difficult roofing project). The presentations will take place Wednesday, February 7, between 8 and 10:30 a.m. at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Room R05. The teams will draw for their presentation times at the Alliance member reception on Monday evening. The successful team solution will be based on the team’s understanding of the project, realistic construction schedule and man-loading financial proposal, written proposal, and presentation. The winning teams will be announced February 7 during the NRCA Industry Awards Ceremony and Cocktail Reception starting at 5 p.m. at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Great Hall AD. The first and second place teams will receive team trophies and a $5,000 L.B. Conway and a $2,500 scholarship for their schools, individual awards; recognition in press releases sent to local and national media and roofing industry trade press, and acknowledgment in Professional Roofing magazine and on the Alliance’s website. And, this year, the judges will also select a Best Individual Presenter. During their visit to the International Roofing Expo, the teams will have the opportunity to go on a site visit of the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas.

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36

Florida Roofing | February 2018

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Four Finalist Teams Presenting in New Orleans Auburn University—McWhorter School of Building Sciences Louisiana State University The Bert S. Turner Department of Construction Management Team members (front, left to right): Matthew Youngblood, Hannah Redifer, Alex Gomez (back, left to right): Jason McCay (team captain) and Jordan Edwards (alternate); Faculty adviser: Lauren Redden

Team members (left to right): Drew Bennett, Caleb Burks, Zach Coulton and Erin Mitchell (team captain); Faculty adviser: Robert Benton

University of Florida The M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction Colorado State University Team members (front, left to right): Kyle Bloesser, Ben Jacobs (back, left to right): Mahoney Bajwa, Sam Hughes (team captain); Faculty adviser: Nick Rubino

Team members (left to right): Sam Mitchell, Alex Idriss (alternate), Schaffer Weeks (team captain), Ron Bergeron and Forrest Wilson; Faculty adviser: James Sullivan

Bennett Judson is executive director of The Roofing Industry convention events held in conjunction with the International Alliance for Progress (Alliance) and vice president of meeting Roofing Expo. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business manservices for NRCA. As executive director for The Alliance, she agement from Roosevelt University. oversees the day to day operations of The Alliance and its programs/projects. As vice president of NRCA’s meeting services section, she coordinates NRCA’s smaller meetings and NRCA’s

U.S. Silica

Highly reflective White Armor cool roof granules feature patented technology to help commercial, municipal and industrial buildings meet increasingly stringent environmental standards. Specifically designed for use with flat and low-sloped modified bitumen roofs and mineral cap sheets, they are whiter and brighter than other granules on the market to provide a reliable long-term performance. Only White Armor cool roof granules are white throughout to provide maximum reflectivity that prevents solar radiation from transferring heat into the building, thus meeting LEED requirements for greater than 70 percent reflectivity. Available from leading roofing manufacturers in the U.S. Visit www.coolroofgranules.com or call 800-345-6170. www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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Problematic Email Scams Steve LaPha, Vice President, Dytech Group Computer users continue to get bombarded with email scams that are more sophisticated and clever than ever before. Many mirror emails from actual companies to catch us off guard and lure us into entering sensitive information. Be diligent in checking emails before clicking on any links or opening any attachments. You can hover your mouse over the link to see the real underlying website name. One of the newest scams targeted Netflix subscribers who have been sent emails notifying them to update their account to avoid suspension, and are directed to a Netflix landing page prompting them to enter their billing information. Once the information is entered, scammers now have subscriber’s valuable information. Email “phishing” scams are also very common. They are used by hackers to gain access to your files and information. They work very hard to gain your email password, credit card information and sometimes convince you to wire them money. “Spear Phishing” is targeted attacks on CEO’s, owners, or accounting contacts. They use information on your website or on social media sites to craft convincing emails and then try to steal from you. Some of the most common phishing notices are your account has expired, invoice is overdue, package delivery information, your mailbox is full, Dropbox links and

Applications for the 2018 S.T.A.R. Awards are now being accepted.

DocuSign links, and Google Docs or links to “documents” are also a concern. They are good at making convincing emails that lure you into clicking on the link or opening the attachment. If you are suspicious or have any doubts about an email, contact your IT person to notify them of the scam. If you have opened an attachment or entered your password on a bogus site, contact your IT person immediately so they can mitigate the damage. If you don’t have an IT person on staff, there are companies available that you can keep on retainer to handle these types of issues. You’ll find that it is worth the investment, should your files become corrupt or deleted. Ransomware continues to be a problem. Hackers are encrypting your files so you lose access to them, and then want you to pay a ransom to unlock them. If you do not have a good backup of your files then they are lost forever. Never save important files on your desktop. Company data and important files belong on the server where they are protected and backed up. There are good and inexpensive options for backing up and storing your data, such as the cloud and external backup drives. Here are some websites that have additional information on preventing these scams: ■■ http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0003-phishing ■■ http://www.webroot.com/us/en/home/resources/tips/ pc-security/security-what-is-phishing ■■ http://www.phishtank.com/what_is_phishing.php ■■ http://lts.lehigh.edu/phishing/examples

Application Deadline: April 10, 2018 www.floridaroof.com 38

Florida Roofing | February 2018

Steve LaPha, a thirty-plus year veteran of the computer industry started with Dytech Group eighteen years ago as a Network Engineer. He came from the government computer sales and service industry where he owned his own computer business for fifteen years supplying personal computers to NASA at the Kennedy Space Center. Steve was promoted to Service Manager, General Manager and now Vice President of operations. He works along with Dennis Bell, the President, running the business and supervising ten employees. The primary business is providing Managed Services to small and medium size businesses in Orlando and the Central Florida area under the DytechONE brand.


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February 2018  

Florida Building Codes, Florida Product Approvals and Miami-Dade NOAs, Fighting AOB Abuse, 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code, The Imp...

February 2018  

Florida Building Codes, Florida Product Approvals and Miami-Dade NOAs, Fighting AOB Abuse, 2017 Sixth Edition Florida Building Code, The Imp...