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Fruits &Veggies

Step Up Your Nutrition Game

Recipe: Banana Chia Seed Pancakes

Expand Your Taste Horizons

Vol. 14 • Issue 1 • September 2016

Make them the stars of your diet!

THERE ARE SOME EXCITING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES NOW AVAILABLE IN YOUR LOCAL SUPERMARKET. GIVE THEM A TRY – PERHAPS YOU’LL FIND A NEW FAVORITE.


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SEPTEMBER 2016: EAT YOUR FRUITS & VEGGIES

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Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables

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Eat Your Vegetables

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE Mindful Eating for Healthy Mind and Healthy Body

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Step Up Your Nutrition Game

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Understanding Daily Recommended Servings of Fruits and Vegetables

HEARING The 411 on Hearing Aids

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Charles Sebastian Harleena Singh Tanya J. Tyler (editor) TaNiqua Ward, M.S.

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AUDIOLOGY ASSOCIATES

Kathleen Fluhart, R.N., Dipl.Ac., M.Ac., L.Ac. ARTEMESIA

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Expand Your Taste Horizons

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Banana Chia Seed Pancakes

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Add More Fiber to Your Diet

Lauren Ashley German

HIGHGROVE AT TATES CREEK

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FAMILY DOC Go Natural: Find Health in Fruits and Vegetables FITNESS Variety is the Spice of Life: Benefits of a Diverse Fitness Routine

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Foods that Promote Good Dental Health

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Foods That Are Good for Your Eyes

DETOX Heated Stone BioMats Help You Relax

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Five Healthy Snacks Kids Can Make Themselves

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How Many Fruits and Vegetables Have You Eaten Today?

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Going Vegetarian: Pros and Cons

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Food Safety First

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How to Get More Fruits and Vegetables Into Your Diet

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NEWS MAKERS Clips from Current Health News

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NATURE'S BEAUTY Passion Fruit

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FOOD BITES

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SENIOR LIVING The Search for Senior Living:

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Tanya J. Tyler, Editor | Share your story: editor@healthandwellnessmagazine.net

Dear Friends, I heard it almost every night at the supper table, and I am sure you did, too. “Eat your vegetables!” I heard something else sometimes when I reached into the cookie jar: “Eat a piece of fruit instead!” Our parents and caregivers knew the incomparable benefits of vegetables and fruit. I admit when I was a kid I ate my vegetables grudgingly, for the promise was always if I cleaned my plate, I could have dessert. Nowadays, the goal for me is not the cake or the ice cream. I know if I want to live a long, healthy life, fruits and vegetables have to be the stars of my diet. It’s funny how the things you might have despised as a youngster – for me, it was broccoli – turned into your favorite foods. This issue of Health & Wellness

celebrates these healthy additions to your diet. You’ll find advice if you are seeking ways to get more fruits and vegetables on your plate; you’ll learn all about fiber; and you’ll discover how fruits and vegetables enhance your dental health. Some fun and easy recipes will help you get your children excited about fruits and vegetables and introduce them to their wonderful tastes and textures. There are some exciting fruits and vegetables now available in your local supermarket. Give them a try – perhaps you’ll find a new favorite. Here’s to your health,

Tanya

ROCKPOINT Publishing

Health&Wellness Magazine can be found in 20 central Kentucky counties and is distributed to over 90% of medical facilities, including chiroprator’s, eye doctor’s and dentist’s offices. You can also pick up your FREE copy of Health&Wellness at most grocery and convenience stores as well as many restaurants throughout Central KY. For advertising rates and to find out how to get YOUR article published:

859-368-0778 e-mail brian@rockpointpublishing.com © Copyright HEALTH&WELLNESS Magazine 2016. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine in whole or in part without written prior consent is prohibited. Articles and other material in this magazine are not necessarily the views of Health&Wellness Magazine. Health&Wellness Magazine reserves the right to publish and edit, or not publish any material that is sent. Health&Wellness Magazine will not knowingly publish any advertisement which is illegal or misleading to its readers. The information in Health&Wellness should not be considered as a substitute for medical examination, diagnosis or treatment.

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Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables Vitamins, minerals, fiber all found in these essential foods By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Fruits and vegetables should be part of your daily diet. They contain vitamins and minerals that help keep you healthy. They are low in fat, salt and sugar and are a good source of dietary fiber. A high intake of fruit and vegetables can help you reduce your cholesterol and blood pressure as well as combat obesity and maintain a healthy weight. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Alternatively, eat at least five servings of vegetables and two servings of fruit daily, choosing different colors and varieties, in accordance with the dietary guidelines of Australia’s National Health and Medical

Research Council. Try to eat a rainbow of colorful fruits and vegetables daily to get the complete health benefits. • Red foods such as watermelon and tomatoes contain lycopene, which fights heart disease and prostate cancer. • Blue and purple foods such as blueberries and eggplant contain anthocyanins, which can help protect the body from cancer. • Green vegetables such as kale and spinach contain lutein and zeaxanthin, which may help fight agerelated eye disease. foods such as cauliflower contain sulforaphane, which may protect against some cancers. Vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet because they provide

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potassium include prunes, bananas, apricots, dried peaches, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and orange juice. Strawberries, cranberries, blueberries and citrus fruit contain phytochechemicals, which provide additional health benefits. Fruits and vegetables are nutritious in any form, whether they are dried, juiced, canned, frozen or fresh. They provide fiber that helps you remain full and keeps the digestive system happy. They also add texture, color and appeal to your plate. They are nature’s treat and are easy to have as a snack anytime. They help you feel energized and healthy. Round out your diet with nutrientdense foods such as whole grains, seafood, lean meats, poultry eggs, beans and peas, nuts and seeds and fat-free and low-fat milk and milk products.

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many nutrients such as fiber, folate (folic acid), potassium and vitamins A, E, and C. Dietary fiber from vegetables helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and lowers the risk of heart disease. Folate helps form healthy red blood cells. Potassium may help maintain healthy blood pressure. Vitamin A keeps the eyes and skin healthy and protects against infections, while vitamin C helps heal cuts and wounds and keeps the gums and teeth healthy. A meta-analysis of clinical trials and observational studies in 2014 found consumption of a vegetarian diet was associated with lower blood pressure. A diet rich in vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke and type 2 diabetes. Depending on how many calories you need, one to four cups of vegetables is recommended daily. Fruits play a major role in preventing vitamin deficiencies. Most fruits are naturally low in fat, calories and sodium, and none of them contain cholesterol. Fruits are also an important source of many nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, folate and potassium. Potassium in fruit can reduce the risk of stroke and heart disease and the development of kidney stones, besides decreasing bone loss as you age. Fruit sources of

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Eat Your Vegetables Simple lifestyle changes can have enormous benefits By TaNiqua Ward, M.S., Staff Writer

Certain simple lifestyle changes are important to an individual’s health and future. Obesity is continually on the rise, and this puts people at risk for a variety of health complications and chronic diseases, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancers. Making the change to following a diet rich in vegetables can help you fight obesity and all its ramifications. According to www.choosemyplate.gov, vegetables provide nutrients that help you maintain a healthy body. You’ll gain a number of positive benefits from eating vegetables. Instead of eating high-calorie foods, try having a cup of vegetables. They are naturally lower in fat and do not contain any cholesterol. They are important sources of

nutrients such as potassium, dietary fiber, folate and vitamins A and C. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend individuals consume two to three cups of vegetables every day. The Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention found only 9 percent of Americans are meeting this daily recommended amount. The other 91 percent have not been able to meet the guidelines. Since the majority of Americans do not consume the daily recommended amount, it is important to know how to include more vegetables in your diet. Here are a few tips to help you: • Most salads, pizzas and soups call for a certain amount of vegetables. Try to double the amount required for recipes that feature vegetables.

Veggies are important sources of nutrients such as potassium, dietary fiber, folate and vitamins A and C.

• Vegetables should be a priority at meals. Make sure at least half your plate is full of vegetables as well as fruit. • Start your week with a Meatless Monday. Instead of beef or chicken, have a nutrient-dense salad loaded with vegetables. • Instead of having a sweet or salty midday snack, nosh on carrots or celery. • You don’t always have to eat your vegetables. You can drink them, too. Start your morning with a vegetable smoothie for a quick and easy breakfast. Eating more vegetables is not only beneficial to your current health but also to your future wellbeing because it will prevent disease and help you live a longer, healthier life. Try some creative new ways to eat vegetables. Find a vegetable you’ve never eaten and give it a try. Make this change a lifelong habit and help improve the statistics for recommended vegetable consumption based on the dietary guidelines.

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Find a vegetable you’ve never eaten and give it a try. Ever had a Parsnip? Try roasting them like carrots.

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What Should I Eat to Stay Healthy or Improve My Health? Food guides & gardening are good places to start By Kathleen Fluhart, R.N., Dipl.Ac., M.Ac., L.Ac., Artemesia Over the past few decades, there has been a lot of discussion about what constitutes a healthy diet. It has been very confusing to hear, “Don’t eat eggs,” then “Eggs are a superfood.” Or “Don’t eat meat” and “Beef is back.” “Eat all the meat you want, Paleos!” “Limit your meat to occasional small portions.” One thing we do know is that all sensible diets now are plant (vegetable and fruit) based. In 2011, the USDA’s 19 years of ever-changing food pyramid diagrams were replaced with MyPlate as the current nutrition guide (www.choosemyplate.gov). MyPlate is a pie-shaped place setting that consists of vegetables, protein, grains, dairy and fruit and recommended portions of each. Noticeably, vegetables and fruit take up half the plate or 50 percent of the daily diet in a two-to-one vegetable-to-fruit ratio. The government’s updated stance on fruits and vegetables is a great improvement from the earlier food pyramids.

I am more likely to tell grain eaters to follow Harvard’s MyPlate (www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate-vs-usdamyplate/), which advocates choosing whole grains over refined grains as much as possible rather than half and half as the government’s MyPlate suggests. Even better would be to use “pseudo” grains, which are really seeds, such as amaranth or quinoa, for all or most of the grain portion. MyPlate’s protein portion has no indication that processed or red meat may be harmful to one’s health. But the Harvard MyPlate tells us to choose chicken and fish over red meat and to avoid processed meat all together as a way to avoid weight gain, colon cancer, heart disease and diabetes. MyPlate also suggests having dairy at every meal while the Harvard MyPlate recommends having only one to two servings per day. High dairy consumption has been linked to prostate and possible ovarian cancer and cow’s milk is the most common food allergen (www.

foodallergy.org). Also, according to the Harvard MyPlate Web page, there is little evidence that dairy prevents osteoporosis. Calcium and other bone-building nutrients can be obtained from the plant world, espe-

cially dark green vegetables such as kale, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Another guide I like to use for my patients with inflammation is Dr. Andrew Weil’s Food Pyramid for Inflammation (www.drweil.com/

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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016 drw/u/ART02995/Dr-Weil-Anti-Inflammatory-FoodPyramid.html), which has vegetables and fruits at the bottom, indicating these should be the most prominent food group. Weil also has a little room at the top of his pyramid for one to two glasses of red wine per day and a bit of chocolate. In all the guidelines suggested above, notice the predominance of vegetables and fruits. Then there are food writer Michael Pollan’s 7 Rules for Eating (www.webmd.com/food-recipes/news/20090323/7rules-for-eating#1): “Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food. Don’t eat anything with more than five ingredients or ones you can’t pronounce. Stay out of the middle of the supermarket; shop only on the perimeter of the store. Don’t eat anything that won’t eventually rot. Always leave the table a little hungry (‘tie off the sack before it is full’). Families traditionally ate together – around a table, not a TV – at regular meal times. Don’t buy food where you buy your gasoline.” Tying all this together, we can narrow it down to Pollan’s three basic eating rules: 1. Eat food. 2. Not too much. and 3. And mostly plants. I have worked my entire adult life in health-related jobs, as a registered nurse, health educator and acupuncturist, and I have kept up with the advice of food experts during the past 50 years. I am also a “backyard farmer” who grows a lot of my own fruits and vegetables. There are many benefits to gardening, such as knowing where your food comes from; getting great pleasure watching things grow; teaching children about health and nature; experiencing the joys of generosity with your bounty; getting good exercise; giving back to the earth through organic practices; attracting pollinators and other beneficial insects and birds; beautifying your landscape; and sitting down to enjoy a great dinner with family and friends. Food cannot be any fresher than carrying it from the yard to the kitchen! Realizing many people cannot garden due to their living situations and health, there are still things they can do, such as starting a community garden with neighbors (www.sustainlex. org/gardens.html) or joining a Community Supported Agriculture. For CSA options in our region that supply fresh local produce about seven months of the year, visit www. google.com/#q=CSA+lexington+ky or Farmers Markets (www.lexingtonfarmersmarket.com). Many Americans have forgotten what it’s like to have a slow leisurely meal with family and friends. They have also forgotten what it’s like to spend time outdoors. We have a growing obesity epidemic due to our dietary practices and lack of exercise. Years ago, I was introduced to the Slow Food Movement (www.slowfoodusa.org) and in 2015, I visited Bra, Italy, where the movement began in 1986 as a reaction by Carlos Petrini and a group of other ecoconscious, mindful food lovers to fast food coming to Italy. The Slow Food movement encourages people to appreciate full sit-down meals with wholesome, sustainable, as-localas-possible and preferably organic food. This movement has taken off and is now celebrated internationally by many enthusiasts in over 850 chapters or “convivia” worldwide. Its goals are to protect the world’s eco-diversity and food supply, connect growers to each other and their communities, organize tastings and educate people on the delights of fresh food. The chapters have been very active in helping develop community gardens in neighborhoods and schools. Whether you garden on your own or with a group, join a CSA or shop at the local farmer’s market, there are many places to obtain fresh vegetables and fruits and opportunities to improve your health, help save our beautiful planet for future generations and enjoy the company of others. Gardening for me is hard but enjoyable work with the result of having beautiful vegetables and fruit. There is something to be said for working hard and then enjoying the fruits (and vegetables) of your labor. As they say in Italy, “Dolce far niente,” which means sweet idleness and the value of leisure after doing hard work. Buon appetite!

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Food cannot be any fresher than carrying it from the yard to the kitchen.

Kathleen Fluhart enjoys plenty of fresh, seasonal vegetables from her backyard garden.


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INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

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Mindful Eating for Healthy Mind and Healthy Body What you eat and how you eat are both important factors in determining your overall health By John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP What to Eat? The world’s leading nutrition researchers are sending a very clear public health message based on the best scientific evidence available: To promote health, prevent disease and extend life, half your food servings should come from fruits and vegetables. For more than 70 years, the Department of Nutrition of the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) has conducted rigorous scientific research on the relationship between food and health. HSPH researchers agree the healthiest eating plan includes a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, focusing on a “rainbow” of colors (dark green, red, yellow, orange) to provide abundant amounts of antioxidants and phytonutrients, both known to have special healthpromoting and disease-preventing properties. HSPH researchers created the Healthy Eating Plate as a science-based guide that recommends a dietary approach to protect against cancer, heart disease, high

blood pressure, digestive problems and other chronic medical conditions. These same researchers recently published new results from the world’s oldest and largest ongoing health research projects, the Nurse’s Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Comparing dietary protein sources, they found high dietary animal protein intake, especially from processed red meat, was linked to earlier death. Higher plant protein intake was linked to longer life. These lifespan differences were most striking for individuals with at least one lifestyle risk factor, such as smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and alcohol use. These research results are clearly illustrated in the protein section of HSPH’s Healthy Eating Plate, which advises you to favor fish, poultry, beans and nuts while limiting red meat and cheese and completely avoiding bacon, cold cuts and other processed meats. This message was recently dramatized by the World Health Organization’s International Agency

for Research on Cancer (IARC), which classified processed meat as a carcinogen (something that causes cancer). Processed meats include hot dogs, ham, bacon, sausage and some deli meats. It refers to meat that has been salted, cured, fermented and smoked to preserve or flavor it. The IARC also classified red meat (beef, pork, lamb and goat) as a probable carcinogen (something that probably causes cancer). How to Eat? Mindfulness is the world’s leading behavioral, mind-body practice for promoting health, managing stress-related chronic conditions and enriching your experience of being alive. Mindful eating and food preparation can be important ingredients in your overall practice of mindful living and enhance your overall relationship with food – its production, distribution, preparation and consumption. Those with eating-related conditions such as overweight, obesity, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge-eating disorders, body-image disorders and night-eating syndrome can also benefit by including mindful eating in an overall treatment plan. A useful review of the various ways to conceive of hunger is offered by Jan Chozen Bays in her book Mindful Eating – A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food. Based on her work as a pediatrician and mindfulness meditation teacher, Chozen helps patients and families reconnect with health-promoting, physiologically based hunger signals

and avoid the temptation of false appetites. Bays describes seven types of hunger: 1. Eye hunger: Your emotional appetite and physical hunger are strongly influenced by sight and visual presentation. To avoid overeating and to satisfy eye hunger, intentionally appreciate the visual appearance of your food as you begin to eat. 2. Nose hunger: Remember how you begin salivating at the smell of food? Much of your sensation of taste comes from your sense of smell rather than your taste buds. Honor this aspect of your eating experience by focusing on the smell of the food you are about to eat. 3. Mouth hunger: So many of your preferred tastes are socially conditioned from your family and acquired eating habits. How would your food taste with less sweet, salty or spicy condiments? Can you eat with curiosity, openness and experimentation as you add more or fewer amounts of different spices and seasonings? Observing your eating experience this way can put you in charge of your food consumption. You are less likely to be a victim of your old habits and preferences. 4. Stomach hunger: Abdominal rumbling and growling may suggest hunger when the body doesn’t need to eat. These sensations may reflect stress, anxiety or an artificial eating schedule you may have developed out of social convenience more than physiological need. Listen to overall hunger cues before trusting stomach hunger.


September 2016

5. Cellular hunger: This is the underlying physiological need hunger and eating addresses. Becoming more attuned to your body through body-scan meditation and other mindfulness practices can put you back in touch with this deeply physiological “true” hunger. 6. Mind hunger: Your food choices may sometimes be driven more by advertising and fad diets than your true body needs. Pay attention to your food as you eat. Avoid eating while watching television. If you typically eat with family, practice attending to mind hunger by eating some meals alone and really tuning in to the full experience – physical, mental and emotional. 7. Heart hunger: Your eating choices may sometimes be driven by a desire for comfort foods and feeding emotional needs that you can address in a healthier way. A hot bath with candlelight, journaling, talking with a good friend or walking in nature are low calorie/high nutrition options for feeding heart hunger. Practical, ancient meditation practices and modern scientific research can be combined to help you achieve a healthy mind and healthy body through mindful eating. A detailed description of Mindful Eating Instructions can be found on my Mind Body Studio Web site at www. mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1503. Sources and Resources

• Mindful Eating – A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food. Jan Chozen Bays, M.D. • The Nutrition Source. Harvard School of Public. www.hsph. harvard.edu/nutritionsource

About the Author Dr. John Patterson is past president of the Kentucky Academy of Family Physicians and is board certified in family medicine and integrative holistic medicine. He is on the family practice faculty at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Saybrook University’s School of Mind Body Medicine (San Francisco) and the Center for Mind Body Medicine (Washington, D.C.). He operates the Mind Body Studio in Lexington, where he offers integrative medicine consultations. He can be reached through his Website at www.mindbodystudio.org.

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September 2016

Step Up Your Nutrition Game Compare fruits and vegetables, look for the heavy hitters

By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Most people need to step up their fruitand-vegetables game. Packed full of minerals and vitamins, these foods truly do a body good. There is lots of hype about the next “super food,” such as acai berries and kale, but evidence shows there’s really no such thing as super foods. However, this doesn’t mean all foods are equal. When faced with numerous choices on both the fruits and vegetable fronts, which ones pack the most nutritional punch per serving? If you had to subsist for a week with just several cans of fruits and vegetables in your cupboards, which ones would provide the most calories, protein and energy? Which offer more nutrient density – more bang for your buck? Fruit Heavy Hitters The overall winner – if you could only eat one fruit – is blueberries. All berries are a powerhouse of flavor, vitamins and antioxidant potency. Raspberries, strawberries and wolf berries are all excellent choices. Kiwifruit (once called Chinese gooseberry) has more vitamin C than an orange and about as much potassium as a banana. But blueberries are truly the rock stars among berries for their phytochemicals that can cross the blood-brain barrier, giving protective effects to the brain, including improving memory in older adults. Thankfully, you’re not relegated to just one choice in fruit. In general, it’s always good to gravitate toward the ones that are high in potassium. These include bananas, peaches, apricots, oranges and prunes. For antioxidant quality, opt for any citrus fruit in addition to berries. Cantaloupe, cranberries, grapes and pineapple are also very good fruit choices, as are apples, bananas, figs, grapefruit, lemons, limes, papaya, pears, plums, watermelon, tomatoes and avocados. Vegetable Heavy Weights Vegetables are a bit more complex than fruits. There are many different types of vegetables and all are

needed for optimal health. There’s a two-way tie for champion vegetable between beans and potatoes. Just like berries, beans are highly nutritious. Black (turtle), red (kidney), pinto and soy are the most nutrient-dense beans. But you can’t subsist on beans alone. High-carb powerhouse potatoes contain lots of potassium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, vitamin C and most of the B vitamins. Potatoes contain a little bit of almost every nutrient we need. They’re also incredibly filling. In contrast to beans, there have been accounts of people living on nothing but potatoes for a long time. An equal contender for a place on your plate is seaweed. Kelp, alaria and laver (known as kombu, wakame and nori in Japanese cuisine) are the most common types of seaweed, although almost all kinds are edible. Loaded with vitamins and minerals – particularly calcium, iron, magnesium and manganese – seaweed is more nutritious than most land vegetables and will last for months once dried. Seaweed is also high in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory qualities. It also has a high content of iodine, a mineral used to make thyroid hormones. Eating a high-iodine seaweed such as kelp a few times a month can give your body all the iodine it needs. Kale is crowned the king of leafy greens because it’s rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber, antioxidants and bioactive compounds. Kale was bred from wild cabbage, and its close cousins include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, collard, kohlrabi, mustard and rapini. Spinach is also a great leafy green that is higher in oxalates than kale. Oxalates are substances that bind minerals such as calcium in the intestine, preventing them from being absorbed. Other highly nutritious vegetables are beet greens, peas, sprouts, watercress, dandelion, turnip greens, asparagus, sweet potatoes, bok choy and parsley. Round out your vegetable intake with anything from the wide variety that’s available. Try something new!


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Potatoes contain a little bit of almost every nutrient we need.

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The 411 on Hearing Aids By Dr. Brewer, Audiology Associates To say there is an infinite number of options regarding different forms of amplification and hearing aids is an understatement. Too often, the decision about which device is the right choice can be very overwhelming. I would like to spend time breaking down some important differences patients need to know. Hopefully this information can make the decision-making process a little less stressful. Why in the world do hearing aids cost so much? Have you ever questioned why you can’t just order a hearing aid through the mail, especially when the price ranges are so different? If so, you are not alone. This is a question we get asked weekly. Too often the decision about which hearing aid to choose is typically made based on price. However, for many hearing aid users, the difference is really between a good value and a true investment. A good value is just that. The mail-order hearing aid is typically made of a plastic that is not high quality. Additionally, when sounds are amplified, everything is made louder or softer at the same time. What if the unit breaks? If it was ordered online, there isn’t typically a place to go to have it fixed. Seeing a professional is part of the reason the investment is so much more costly. Services you receive include but are not limited to understanding how to properly insert and remove the device, clean it and change the battery. Additionally, adjustments are necessary as your brain gets used to the new units. Being able to follow up with a professional will allow those adjustments to be completed. As to how the hearing aids work, they

do not treat all sounds equally. The increase in volume is based on your hearing evaluation. Each frequency in the hearing aid is adjusted differently based on your specific needs. Repairs are no problem. A professional can often fix the units while you’re in the office and if not, we know where to send them for repair. Mistakes When Getting Hearing Aids 1. Believing hearing aids will immediately fix everything. Hearing loss is typically a progressive issue. It took years – based on research, likely more than seven, to be exact – before the hearing loss began to become bothersome. During that time, your brain got used having a hearing loss. When hearing aids are fit, it is going to take time for your brain to once again adjust. The added volume and the ability to filter unwanted sounds takes time. That is why there is always an adjustment period built into the investment. Research shows it can take up to 60 days before the brain adjusts to the new units. It is crucial you take every moment of that time to familiarize your brain with as many sounds as you can in order to fully acclimate and benefit from the technology. Another way to adjust to the amplification more quickly is to make sure you wear the units consistently. If the hearing aids are only worn in certain situations, you never fully get the help you need. When they are worn inconsistently, the brain is sometimes getting the volume it needs while other times it is not. Therefore, the brain cannot fully adjust because it doesn’t know which volume it is going to get. 2. Focusing on price rather than technological capabilities. It is of utmost importance to understand that what the hearing

aids look like on the outside does not indicate how much help they will provide. Similar-looking hearing aids can range from being completely digital and incredibly smart to very basic and only amplifying sound. Specifically, in the age of digital technology, true hearing aids can have the technology to be fully automatic and switch from program to program without any work from the user. Similar-looking hearing aids can be purchased over the counter and turn everything up or down with no flexibility. These hearing aids do not take your hearing loss into account and unfortunately could cause further damage due to the variability of volume within the device. Additionally, comparing apples to apples is very important because one provider could only be charging for the units themselves while another provider is including office visits, hearing evaluations, warranties and batteries, as well as the units, in their cost. Understanding what the investment means and how the specific technology inside the unit will help is CRUCIAL. Also understand that this can affect your benefit and that should not be taken lightly. 3. Deciding which option to wear based on looks rather than needs. If we are being honest with ourselves, no one is excited about wearing hearing aids. When that time comes, most patients decide to move forward with hearing aids because they want to be able to communicate more easily. As a consumer, when you are talking with your provider, identify situations that are most important to you when it comes to communication to make sure your expectations can be met. Myths About Hearing Aids “Only people with serious hearing loss need hearing aids.” An individual’s lifestyle will determine an individual’s need for hearing aids. More often than not, hearing aids will be necessary for day-to-day communication. Whether a patient is a teacher, lawyer, doctor, manager or someone working with people all day long, just to name a few, amplification can help. “Hearing aids will make me look ‘old’.” If hearing aids help an individual function like a “typical” person day to day, the stigma can be removed. Audiologists and hearing aid manufacturers fully understand the cosmetic issues associated with hearing aids, and that is why they offer many types of hearing aids to fit ALL their patient’s needs. I think

it is important to remember that someone with an untreated hearing loss is more noticeable than a hearing aid. It can be the difference between being involved in a conversation or just smiling and pretending to be part of it. “Hiding hearing loss is better than wearing hearing aids.” This has already been touched on, but there is more to be said regarding this issue. What happens when someone misses a joke a friend or family member tells? Or what if a question is answered incorrectly? Don’t you think those situations are more noticeable than a vanity issue? While untreated hearing loss may mean giving up sounds that you once enjoyed, is it truly worth reducing the overall quality of life? “Do hearing healthcare professionals really know what they are doing?” The Better Hearing Institute recently conducted research regarding this very topic. Hearing healthcare professionals received a customer satisfaction rating of 92 percent. Additionally, nine out of 10 people reported an improvement of their quality of life with hearing aids. Conclusion Working with a professional and determining what is appropriate for the patient based on his or her hearing health history, hearing evaluation and lifestyle is the best starting point when considering which route to take as a new hearing-aid user. Do your research and ask friends or family who wear hearing aids. When everything is all said and done, the correct hearing aid can absolutely change a person’s life. About the Author

Dr. Brewer completed her Doctor of Audiology degree at the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine and her undergraduate degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University in Oxford, OH. She is licensed by the state of Kentucky as an audiologist and hearing instrument specialist. She is also a member of the American Academy of Audiology, Academy of Doctors of Audiology, Kentucky Academy of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.   Dr. Brewer specializes in diagnostic audiologic evaluation as well as hearing aid services, including selection, fitting, and follow-up care. Her passion is to provide her patients with the most appropriate form of treatment for their hearing health care.


COGNITIVE DECLINE Those with untreated hearing loss experience A 30%–40% GREATER DECLINE in thinking abilities compared to those without hearing loss.

TINNITUS PEOPLE WITH TINNITUS 90% OF ALSO HAVE HEARING LOSS. Tinnitus affects 1 in 5 people. Tinnitus can be caused by hearing loss, an ear injury, or a circulatory system disorder.

HEART HEALTH

Hypertension can be an accelerating factor of hearing loss in older adults.

THE INNER EAR IS EXTREMELY SENSITIVE TO BLOOD FLOW.

TOTAL-BODY

HEALTH

BEGINS WITH

TIMES

HYPERTENSION

THERE IS A SIGNIFICANT ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND UNTREATED HEARING LOSS.

EYE HEALTH

If you have vision and hearing loss, your ability to target sound location is compromised. The amplification from hearing aids helps compensate for the vision loss.

SAFETY/BALANCE

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Studies show that a healthy cardiovascular system — a person’s heart, arteries, and veins — has a positive effect on hearing. Inadequate blood flow and trauma to the blood vessels of the inner ear can contribute to hearing loss.

SMOKING

BETTER HEARING

CURRENT SMOKERS HAVE A 70% HIGHER RISK OF HAVING HEARING LOSS THAN NONSMOKERS.

HEALTH

DIABETES

HEARING LOSS IS TWICE AS COMMON IN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES COMPARED TO THOSE WITHOUT.

OBESITY

Adults whose blood glucose is higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis have a 30% higher rate of hearing loss compared to those with normal blood sugar.

HIGHER BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) AND LARGER WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF HEARING LOSS IN WOMEN.

OTOTOXICITY

OSTEOPOROSIS A study linked osteoporosis and hearing loss, theorizing that demineralization of the three middle-ear bones may contribute to a conductive hearing impairment. 259 Soutland Dr • Lexington 859.277.0491

THERE ARE MORE THAN 200 MEDICATIONS ON THE MARKET TODAY THAT ARE KNOWN TO CAUSE HEARING LOSS (TOXIC TO THE EARS). The list of known ototoxic drugs includes: • Aspirin • Some anticancer drugs • Quinine • Some anesthetics • Water pills • Environmental chemicals • Certain antibiotics like carbon monoxide, hexane, and mercury

Sources: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) | National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDC) | National Council on Aging (NCOA) | Sergei Kochkin, Ph.D. The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life - Better Hearing Institute, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from: www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia. Frank Lin, M.D. (2014 January 22) Hearing Loss Linked to Accelerated Brain Tissue Loss. Johns Hopkins Medicine News Release. | Ha-Sheng Li-Korotky, Au.D., Ph.D., M.D. (2012) Age-Related Hearing Loss: Quality of Care for Quality of Life. The Gerontologist, Volume 52, Issue 2: 265-271 | Karen J. Cruickshanks, Ph.D.; Ronald Klein, M.D.; Barbara E. K. Klein, M.D.; Terry L. Wiley, Ph.D.; David M. Nondahl, M.S.; Ted S. Tweed, M.S. (1998) Cigarette Smoking and Hearing Loss: The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study. JAMA. 998;279(21):1715-1719. doi:10.1001/jama.279.21.1715 | Hull RH, Kerschen SR. (2010) The influence of cardiovascular health on peripheral and central auditory function in adults: a research review. Am J Audiol. 2010 Jun;19(1):9-16. doi: 10.1044/1059-0889(2010/08-0040). | De Moraes Marchiori LL, de Almeida Rego Filho E, Matsuo T (2006) | Hypertension As a Factor Associated with Hearing Loss. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. Jul-Aug;72(4):533-40. Babich M., Hoffmeister D. & Doughty, A. (2009). Osteoporosis and Conductive Hearing Loss: A Novel Model of Clinical Correlation. Retrieved from: PHILICA.COM Article number 148. | American Tinnitus Association, ATA.org | www.mayoclinic.com/health/tinnitus/DS00365 © 2016 Audigy Group LLC. All rights reserved. 81705-820 2/15 POST3101-01-EE-AY

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VISION HELPS YOU IDENTIFY WHERE A SOUND IS COMING FROM.

PEOPLE WITH MILD HEARING LOSS (25 dB) ARE more likely to have a history of falling. Every additional 10 decibels of hearing loss increases the chances of falling by 1.4.

September 2016

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Go Natural

FIND HEALTH IN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES By Dr. John E. Reesor, Family Practice Associates Hippocrates, the father of modern-day medicine, put it bluntly: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food.” Another variation on this theme is the admonishment to “Eat to live; don’t live to eat.” Too often we look for healing in medicine bottles. But perhaps it would be better if we looked elsewhere – to the fruits and vegetables sections of our local grocery store. Fruits and vegetables can be your best, relatively inexpensive nonprescription medicine. You can find almost anything you take for various ailments in pill form in natural abundance in different fruits or vegetables. For instance, people who have high blood pressure can eat foods rich in potassium, such as dried apricots, squash, fish, sweet potatoes, beans, beets and bananas. Calcium and magnesium also battle high blood pressure. You will get these essential minerals from halibut, spinach, bran cereal, almonds and pumpkin seeds. Omega 3 fatty acids from oily fish such as tuna have also been shown to lower blood pressure. While adding these to your diet, be sure to subtract salt,

using fresh herbs and spices to give food a better taste. We’ve all heard vitamin C is our best defense against the common cold. It may be easier to pop a vitamin C tablet, but it would be better to eat an orange. There simply is no substitute for food in its most natural state. A tablet can’t totally duplicate the compounds plants use to protect themselves from decay and biological attack. Ingesting the fresh fruit imparts its protective elements directly to you. For example, if you eat a fresh tomato, you not only get the powerful antioxidant lycopene but a number of other antioxidants as well, along with vitamins, minerals and nutrients that work together to prevent heart disease by decreasing cholesterol and lipid levels. Another element that helps keep your body strong and flexible is calcium. Including calcium-rich foods into your diet will help you combat osteoporosis. Foods that rebuild bone tissue include dairy products such as milk and cheese. However, some people are lactose intolerant, so good alternatives are canned sardines, salmon, dark green vegetables such as broccoli, collard greens and bok choy, tofu and calcium-fortified juices. Vitamin K increases bone density and thus reduces fracture

rates. Prime sources of vitamin K include leafy green vegetables such as spinach. Get outside and soak up the sun to get vitamin D into your bones. Raw food in a rainbow of color can help you gain and maintain health and wellness. Be sure to use cooking methods that don’t diminish the nutrients in these foods. Usually your best bet is to boil or sauté vegetables or eat them raw – without adding fatty dressings or sauces. Pair wise food choices with a solid, consistent exercise program, and you’ll find your

health rapidly improving in astonishing ways. But be sure to discuss your plans to use food as medicine with your family care physician, and don’t toss out all your prescriptions before consulting with him or her. About the Author

A native of Louisville, Dr. John Reesor joined Family Practice Associates in 2001. He is on the community-based faculty of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Dr. Reesor’s goal is “to help patients live a long, healthy and prosperous life.”


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September 2016 –COLUMN PROVIDED BY–

FITNESS

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859.559.0222 | www.prooffitness.com 4101 Tates Creek Centre Drive, Suite 164 AND 230 West Main Street (7th Floor)

Variety is the Spice of Life: The Benefits of a Diverse Fitness Routine BEAT BOREDOM, PREVENT INJURY AND SEE THE RESULTS YOU’RE AIMING FOR By Rachel McCord, Proof Fitness Personal Training Director As a fitness professional, people often ask me, “What kind of workouts should I be doing?” My answer is usually, “All of them!” While your fitness program should be tailored to your specific goals, that doesn't mean you should focus 100 percent of your workouts on one workout style. A well-rounded fitness program should incorporate multiple workout platforms for several reasons. Avoiding boredom with your routine is key. If you don’t enjoy something, chances are high you won’t stick with it, and consistency and long-term commitment are absolutes for those seeking great results. By implementing both indoor and outdoor activities such as weight lifting, studio fitness classes, yoga, running, foam rolling, rowing, hiking, tennis, rock climbing and kayaking, you decrease the risk of getting bored with a mundane and repetitive routine. Mix it up! Focus three or five days per week on the type of exercise that is most in line with your goals and branch out the other days. Preventing injury is another major reason to vary your exercise regimen. Repetitive movements

done without ample recovery over time put the body at high risk for injuries such as tendinitis, runner’s knee, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, iliotibial band syndrome, bursitis and stress fractures. By working the body in multiple environments with variable resistances and ranges of motion, you prevent overworking certain muscles while under-working others and you also avoid developing imbalances in the body. Incorporating recovery exercises such as yoga, foam rolling and LISS cardiovascular work such as walking with a proper gait is imperative to keeping your hardworking body happy and healthy. Everyone who exercises does so with a result in mind. If you do not adjust your fitness plan as your body adapts to the stimuli you choose to participate in, you will plateau and you will stop seeing results. Failure to implement periodization – that is, long-term cyclic structuring of a training and practice program to maximize performance – is something I see and hear about at the gym on a daily basis. I see the same members come in at the same time each day and climb on the same elliptical machine for the same amount of time and they never

experience positive change. The same goes for the guy bench pressing the same weight for the same number of reps the same day of the week for a year. No progress. When you vary your routine, you expose your body to new stimuli, forcing new adaptation (aka change!). If you hold onto anything from this info, it should be this: Embrace variety and get out of your comfort zone. Yoga increases mobility, core stability and blood flow. Weight training with a well-put-together program increases lean mass, boosts

the metabolism and improves bone density. Rowing is a total body workout that engages all the major muscle groups; it also improves cardiovascular capacity. An individual who participates in all three of these activities will find herself fitter and more balanced than a person who pursues only one. If you’re not sure what kinds of activities align with your specific fitness goals, seek out a professional who can design for you a well-rounded exercise program that suits your lifestyle and your goals.

Embrace variety and get out of your comfort zone.


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The daily recommended serving is different for each person.

Understanding Daily Recommended Servings of Fruits and Vegetables What constitutes a serving? By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Eating more fruits and vegetables has been linked to a lower risk of lung, oral, esophageal, stomach and colon cancer, in addition to providing you with all the nutrients you need for optimal health and wellness. The USDA recommends two to four servings of fruit and three to five servings of vegetables a day. Combined, this equals anywhere from five to nine servings, but what is a serving? This is the question that’s been stumping many Americans for ages. Thankfully, the USDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have stopped using the term “serving” and instead talk in terms of cups – as in measuring cups. This cuts down the mystery of what constitutes a serving significantly.

First off, the daily recommended serving is different for each person. It depends on your age, sex, caloric intake and physical activity level. Individuals who get 30 minutes or more of moderate physical activity a day may want to consume more fruits and vegetables while staying within calorie needs. Fruits The CDC considers juice a serving of fruit, but nutritionists caution that fiber and other nutrients are missing from juice. When it comes to dried fruit, cut the amount in half: a half-cup serving will be a quarter cup and a one-cup serving will be half a cup of dried fruit. Generally speaking, one piece of a large type of fruit – an apple, an

orange, a peach, etc. – is one cup. A half cup of fruit could include a medium wedge of cantaloupe, half a grapefruit or a quarter cup of raisins. One cup of fruit is equal to a large banana; a small apple (about the size of a baseball); eight large strawberries or blueberries; two large plums; 15 to 23 grapes; a pear; a large tomato or a cup of diced or chopped tomato; and a quarter of a pineapple or a cup of diced or chopped pineapple; Vegetables When it comes to salad, a cup is not a cup. It takes two cups of leafy greens to equal one cup of vegetables. The typical size of a salad in a café, deli or restaurant is five cups of greens plus other vegetables. This kind of salad alone is a full day’s serving of vegetables. A half cup of vegetables is five broccoli florets; six baby carrots; half a baked sweet potato; a cup of raw spinach or other leafy greens, including romaine and other lettuces and kale; or a small yellow, red, orange or bell (green) pepper. One cup of vegetables is 12 baby carrots or two medium whole carrots; a large ear of corn; two cups of leafy greens or salad; a large yellow, red, orange or bell (green) pepper; two celery stalks; four asparagus

spears; a quarter head of cauliflower; half a medium cucumber (about eight to nine inches); 20 fresh, whole green beans; two cups of raw spinach; a cup of cooked spinach or other greens such as kale, cabbage, or collard greens; or a medium potato.


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September 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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Consider trying Jackfruit. A world of intriguing taste awaits the adventurous eater!

Expand Your Taste Horizons Take an adventure; try some exotic fruits and vegetables By Charles Sebastian, Staff Writer

The old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” is as true today as it was when you were a kid and Grandma tried to set you up with some good life habits. While the usual apples, bananas, oranges, pears and a grocery aisle full of green “leafies” have been mainstays for decades years, many exotic fruits and vegetables are coming more into public

consumption. From abiu to yuzu and other choices that include rambutan, durian, jackfruit and Buddha’s hand, a world of intriguing taste awaits the adventurous eater. You can make eating fruits and vegetables accessible, exciting and fun by trying some offerings that seem unusual, different and interesting. Their other traits and benefits may

appeal to you as well. For instance, the prickly pear, which is richer in magnesium than apples, oranges, pears or any other fruit, is great for combatting type 2 diabetes. Crammed with vitamin C and betacarotene, papayas have long been a source of high-quality nourishment. They also contain antioxidants that doctors believe may work against certain cancers. The low-calorie longan, which is often associated with the lychee, is a smaller fruit packed with vitamin C. Another fruit high on the vitamin C chart is the starfruit. It’s also great for fiber content, which plays a big role in diet and disease formation. The calabaza is a sweet squash that’s great for fiber and is low in fat and calories. Many of these fruits and vegetables can be made into shakes, put into salads, added to soups and used in a myriad of other ways that will

enhance your eating experience. For many people who are on medications and supplements, the same amounts taken by pill can often be obtained by eating fruits and vegetables that are rich in the same substance. Digesting natural products is definitely easier than trying to digest some of the more highly dense and fat-rich foods that permeate our culture and make our bodies work overtime to process and expel them. So the next time you plan your grocery list, start to gradually add in a few fruits and vegetables that weren’t part of your diet before. This adventure can move you closer to health, longevity and overall wellness. To find more exotic fruits and vegetables, visit: www.tradewindsfruit.com/content/fruitscommon.htm www.boredpanda.com/weirdunusual-food-fruits-vegetables


September 2016

DETOX

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Heated Stone BioMats Help You Relax Gemstones make it a jewel of a product By Sonja Gregory, Wrap Me Day Spa What’s all the buzz about heated stone BioMats incorporating beautiful gemstones such as amethyst, jade and tourmaline? Asia has utilized these natural elements in healing for millennia and it’s like we’ve just learned about it here in America. What makes these stones so special? How can a heated gemstone BioMat help you relax, de-stress and feel your best? According to traditional Chinese culture, jade is believed to provide a cozy, comfortable feeling, excellent for recuperation from chills or flu in the winter while also providing coolness and relaxation in the summer. Because of its composition, jade emits negative ions and far infrared energy when heated, which penetrates as deep as

five and a half inches into the body. This produces benefits from the skin’s surface down to the level of the joints, bones and muscle, bringing relief for symptoms such as stiffness and soreness, poor circulation and chronic pain. Jade is an efficient absorber of natural infrared heat and passes it along to the body gently and smoothly. And since negative ionization happens quickly with heated jade BioMats, daily 20- to 30-minute sessions may be enough to produce immediate results. Tourmaline is another popular mineral used in stone BioMats due to its piezoelectric nature. When heated, tourmaline produces an electrical potential (different electrical charges at opposite ends) as well as negative

ions. And just like jade, when heated tourmaline emits far infrared radiation, which penetrates deep into the body. In traditional Chinese culture, tourmaline is said to benefit people suffering from insomnia, sluggish lymphatic flow and a suppressed immune or endocrine system. Used regularly, it is promoted to stimulate regeneration throughout the body, bringing wellness and detoxification at a cellular level. Brown tourmaline is reputed to be an excellent grounding stone, emitting between 700 to 1,500 negative ions per square centimeter when heated in a HealthyLine gemstone BioMat. HealthyLine is a direct-from-China manufacturer of high-quality gemstone BioMats newly available in Central Kentucky at Wrap Me Day Spa. Direct-to-consumer pricing and attention to detail in construction make HealthyLine the brand of BioMats I have chosen to carry. HealthyLine’s most innovative product is the SoftPad 055A-PH, a durable fabric BioMat constructed with 5 pounds of natural amethyst gemstones and 12 integral red light LEDs. This mat incorporates the best of all worlds: heat, light, far infrared and negative ions. In traditional Chinese culture, amethyst is said to relieve stress, anxiety, depression and chronic pain, bringing a more profound physical and mental shift than other materials. Amethyst crystals drastically reduce energy consumption by 60 percent or more over traditional mats because they are an efficient superconductor of energy waves and other high-vibration frequencies. Regular use of amethyst BioMats has resulted in some fantastic results for people suffering from chronic conditions such as persistent Lyme disease or other parasitical invasions. Others have found using the high heat setting on a BioMat allows them to experi-

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ence a sauna-like effect, burning up to 900 calories per hour, aiding their weight-loss efforts. Those sensitive to electromagnetic fields and background radiation, ever-present as electrical smog, enjoy the BioMat’s ability to counteract the effects of static electricity and EMF radiation, giving them a sense of well-being. Even a half-hour nap on a pad can provide benefits. Some have found when they allow their pets to have access to their BioMats, even animals can feel the beneficial effects of a 15- to 20-minute session. Sleeping all night on a soft fabric amethyst BioMat is made possible by the low temperature setting and automatic shut-off feature of the HealthyLine SoftPad 055A-PH, which retails for $399. Some users have described it as the ultimate in relaxation and restful sleep to enjoy their bedroom on the cool side while luxuriating in the toasty warmth of healing far infrared energy waves. It’s made it possible to wake up in the morning with reduced pain and stiffness while using no medication or ointments. Others keep their BioMat with them at work during the day, draping it in their chair, having it at a low enough setting to do them good while not making them perspire. Still others have reported taking it with them when they go to the dentist or for chemotherapy treatments, since its warming infrared rays help them relax and stay comfortably warm. Any way you use it – while riding in the car, sleeping with it at night or sitting on it during the day – you’re sure to reap a myriad of health benefits from your BioMat with regular use. Call Wrap Me Day Spa to enjoy your complimentary session on a HealthyLine BioMat and see what everybody’s talking about. Hours are by appointment, so call today to schedule your free initial consultation.

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events 26

September 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

SEPTEMBER 2016

Ongoing Al-Anon

Free support group for anyone affected by someone else’s drinking. Local meetings and information at www.LexingtonAl-Anon.org or call 859.277.1877.

Mondays: Sept 12, 19 and 26 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR).

8 week series beginning Monday September 12th. The leading mindfulness program worldwide. Learn to promote resilience, prevent burnout, cultivate compassion and manage stress-related chronic conditions. Instructor- John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859373-0033. Full details at www.mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1262 UK employees see Wellness Program benefits here: https://www.uky.edu/hr/ wellness/bewell/mindfulness-basedstress-reduction

Mondays

Free Yoga Classes for Vets, Servicemembers and their Family Members Every Monday from 9:30am–10:30am at Ageless Yoga Studio, 611 Winchester Rd., Suite 200. 859-303-6225. Preregister online at agelessyogastudio. com. Click “class” tab to sign up now! Email info@agelessyogastudio.com for more info.

Mondays & Wednesdays

MELT Method Hand, Foot and Body Healing Class by Shayne Wigglesworth Mondays and Wednesdays at 12pm - Discover pain-free living at any age! Enjoy a gentle foam roller class to reduce pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety and more! MELT Method certified instructor Shayne Wigglesworth will teach you healing techniques you can use for self care at home. All materials and rollers are provided. Perfect for all ages, body types and experience levels.

Learn more at www.centeredlex.com or call 859-721-1841

Tuesdays

Community Flow This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. 10:30am–11:30am. Donation only (great portion of all donations go to the Backpack Food Program at Ashland Elementary.) Inspiring, Educating & Supporting our World through the Moving,  Visual & Healing Arts! Daily classes, therapies, workshops & a great spot to host your next event! 309 N Ashland Ave Ste.180, Lexington, KY 40502. 859-721-1841. www.centeredlex.com

Tuesdays Swing Lessons

Every Tuesday, starting September 30: 8pm–10pm at Tates Creek Recreation Center, 1400 Gainesway Dr. $5.00 per person per lesson. Call for more information: Glenn and Rosalee Kelley 859233-9947; OR Peter and Robin Young 859-224-3388.

Tuesdays

Community Yoga Class with Lauren Higdon Every Tuesday 10:30am–11:30am at Centered Studio, 309 n Ashland ave suite 180 in Lexington. This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. Classes may include chair yoga, restorative, yin yoga, tai chi, and more. Perfect for beginners as well as experienced yogis! Donations-based class.

1st Tuesdays

Lupus Support Group: Living & Coping with Lupus The Lupus Foundation of America support groups are intended to provide a warm and caring environment where people with lupus, their family members, caregivers and loved ones can share experiences, methods of coping and insights into living with chronic illness. Imani Baptist Church, 1555 Georgetown Road, Lexington from

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7:00pm–8:00pm first Tuesday of every month. 877-865-8787. www.lupusmidsouth.org

r Yoga Iyenga gton of Lexin

2nd Tuesdays

PFLAG Support for LGBTs and Families We are a support group of family members and allies united with LGBTQ* individuals. Our meetings provide a safe, confidential space where you can feel respected and accepted wherever you are in your journey or family struggle. Monthly speakers help us to broaden our understanding of these issues in our families and in society. Lexington meetings are held the 2nd Tuesday of each month, 6:30 at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, 2025 Bellefonte Drive. Frankfort chapter meets the 3rd Monday of the month, 5:30 at the Unitarian Community, 316 Wilkinson Blvd. More information and resources at www.pflagcentralky.org For questions, call 859-338-4393 or info@pflagcentralky.org. *lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning.

$

10 OFF IR YOUR F

REGISTER

ION ST SESS

“Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured and endure what

TODAY!

Kim Blitch, CIYT 859-230-2510 Kbblitch@yahoo.com The Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Dr

cannot be cured”

— BKS Iyengar

Iyengarlex.com

RENT THIS CABIN

In the Beautiful Red River Gorge CAMPING CABINS AND PRIMITIVE CAMPSITES ALSO AVAILABLE

Wednesdays Mindfulness and Relaxation for Health

6:30-8:00pm (come as early as 6:00 to slow down and relax). No prior experience of yoga or meditation required. Mobilize your inner resources for promoting health, self care and managing the stress of caregiving, burnout and chronic disease, cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion, study and practice in a supportive group. Gentle yoga, mindful movement, deep relaxation, sitting meditation and discussion. Cost $5–$10. Instructor- John Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859373-0033. Full details at http://www. mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1055

Fridays

Argentine Tango “Dance of the Heart” Passionate and Romantic- Mindful and Meditative. A uniquely transformative social skill, art form and movement therapy. No partner or dance experience required. Times 7:30-9:00pm. You may drop-in to any class- this is not a series. Cost $5–$10. Instructors: Dr. John Patterson and Nataliya Timoshevskaya, Mind Body Studio 517, Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859373-0033. Full details at http://www. mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=214

September 8 AARP Driver Safety

Learn how age-related changes affect driving at this driver safety course. Held the second Thursday of every month

Call or visit website for reservations.

(606) 668-2599 ksbrown@mrtc.com www.kentuckywildflowersllc.com

from 11:30am–4:00pm at Don and Cathy Jacobs Health Education Center, UK HealthCare's Chandler Hospital Pavilion A, 1000 S. Limestone Street, Lexington, KY. Call 859-323-1890 for reservation. $15 AARP members, $20 non-members.

September 12 Diabetes Support Group

10-11 am, Senior Citizens Center, 1530 Nicholasville Road, Free. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept. For more information, call (859) 288-2446.

September 13

“Understanding Fats, Sugar and Oil” Nutrition Class 5 – 6 pm, Bourbon County Health Department, 341 East Main Street, Paris. All are welcome. Food demonstrations, sampling, and recipes will be provided. For more information or to register, call (859) 987-1915.

September 15 Horse Farm Tour

Join us for a complimentary Horse Farm Tour on Thursday, Sept 15. A guided bus tour (Bluegrass Tours, $65 value –free!) will discuss the history

EVENTS Continued on page 29


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

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ONGOING EVENTS Bluegrass Ovarian Cancer Support Exists to assist Central Kentucky women and their loved ones during diagnosis, treatment and survival of ovarian and other gynecological cancers. Come meet with us the third Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at Joseph Beth Booksellers, Bronte Bistro Cafe meeting room.

Perinatal Loss Grief Group First Tuesday of the month, 7pm, Center for Grief and Education. A group for parents who have experienced loss due to miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. Contact Debbie Mueller at (859) 260-6904 for more information.

Compassionate Friends Support Group A support group for parents, siblings, or grandparents who have lost a child regardless of the child’s age or length of time that has passed since that day. The meeting is the 1st Tuesday of every month 6:30pm–8:30pm at Hospice of the Bluegrass, 2321 Alexandria Drive, Lexington. Also meets the 1st Tuesday of every month 7pm-9pm at Hospice East, 417 Shoppers Drive, Winchester. Doors open one-half hour before meeting times to provide the opportunity to visit with old friends and acknowledge new ones.

Spouse Loss Support Group Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Hospice of the Bluegrass. A five-week support group for individuals who have experienced the loss of a spouse or significant other. Contact Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Coping After Loss First Wednesday of the month, 5:30-7pm, Center for Grief and Education. A brief educational program offering an introduction to grief information and hospice bereavement services. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Free Transportation to Cancer Screening Fayette County residents can receive free transportation through HealthLink Transit, a partnership between Kentucky Pink Connection & the Lexington--Fayette Urban County Government. Transportation provided by taxi or gas cards to cancer screening. Call (859) 309-1700 to arrange a ride.

2nd Chance Ambassadors Lexington: a support/volunteer group comprised of organ transplantation recipients, donor family members, those on the waiting list and community members interested in transplantation meets the 3rd Sunday of each month at Word of Hope Lutheran Church, located at the corner of Man O’War and Armstrong Mill Road.  Meetings begin at 4:30. For questions, please contact Charlotte Wong, Education Coordinator, Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates Lexington office at (859) 278-3492 or toll free (800) 525-3456.

Center For Women’s Health Center Classes Held at Frankfort Regional Medical Call Mediline at 502-226-1655 or toll-free 800-242-5662 to register or for more information. Classes include: • Prepared Childbirth • Baby Care For The Early Weeks • Breast Feeding Basics • “That’s My Baby” • Sibling Classes

Cancer Classes The American Cancer Society offers women undergoing cancer treatments the opportunity to attend the Look Good...Feel Better workshop. This free workshop helps women deal with the appearance-related side-effects of cancer treatment in a private setting. Each participant receives a complimentary custom cosmetic kit. The American Cancer Society offers Prostate Cancer Educational and Support Classes called Man to Man for men with prostate cancer. This is an educational and networking program that provides information about prostate cancer and treatments options. For more information about these classes, please call Kristy Young at 859260-8285. For cancer information 24 hours a day, please call 1-800-ACS-2345 or go to www.cancer.org.

Survivors of Suicide First & third Tuesday of the month, 6-7:30pm, Center for Grief and Education. For adults affected by the loss of someone by suicide. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Bosom Buddies A support group designed to meet the ongoing needs of women with breast cancer. The purpose of Bosom Buddies is to create a safe and comfortable environment in which women diagnosed with breast cancer can receive information and emotional support during and after treatment. Meets are the third Thursday of every month 6:00pm at the Frankfort Regional Hospital: Frankfort Medical Pavilion, Conference Room C. 279 King’s Daughters Drive, Frankfort, KY.

BRCC Volunteer Opportunities The Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center provides a 24-hour crisis line, hospital and court advocacy, crisis intervention counseling, long-term therapy, and information and community referral to victims of sexual assault as well as family members and friends. Volunteers at BRCC have the unique opportunity to provide valuable direct services to those impacted by sexual assault. Volunteer opportunities: Crisis Line Volunteer, Medical/Legal Advocate. For more information, please call: (859) 253-2615.

Stop Smoking Class Series 5:30-6:30, weekly until April 17. Tates Creek Library, 3628 Walden Dr. Based on the Cooper-Clayton method. $10/week for 10 weeks covers the cost of nicotine replacement. Call 288-2457.

GrassRoots Yoga Classes Chair yoga: 10:30–11:30am Tuesday and Thursday. Hatha Vinyasa Flow: 5:30–6:30pm Thursday. Yoga Basics for Stress Relief: 5:30–6:30pm Friday. Partial proceeds from all yoga classes benefit the Latitude Artist Community for adults considered to have disabilities. All instructors certified through Yoga Alliance. For more information, visit www.grassrootsyoga.org.

ANAD Overcoming Eating Disorders Support Group Free support group for people who want to improve their relationship with food and body image. Safe, comfortable place. Facilitated by Megan Roop, RYT, supervised by Tina Thompson, MS, RD, LD, Bluegrass Nutrition Counseling, sponsored by ANAD. Introduction meeting on October 3 from 7:15-8:30pm at Bliss Wellness Center, 2416 Sir Barton Way, Ste 125. 8 week session Oct 17-Dec 5 from 7:15-8:30pm. Contact Megan Roop 561-779-0290 for details.

Diabetes CHATS Nathaniel Mission Health Clinic CHAT: 1109 Versailles Road, Suite 400 from 4pm to 5:15pm the 4th Tuesday of each month. The Refuge Clinic: New Location, 2349 Richmond Road-Suite 220, Lexington, KY, 40502. 859225-4325. Free. Sponsored by the LexingtonFayette Co. Health Dept and UK Healthcare.

on Yoga principles and practical skills also offered. Free parking provided for most classes. For information, please call 859-254-9529 or visit www.yogahealthcenter.org.

Mind Body Studio The Mind Body Studio is a service of John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP, certified in family medicine, integrative medicine, mind body medicine and integral yoga, Dr. Patterson specializes in stress-related chronic disease and burnout prevention for caregivers and helping professionals. Mind body skills and lifestyle behaviors may help prevent and provide safe, effective and affordable relief of chronic conditions that are often poorly controlled by conventional medicine alone. Our integrative medicine consultations, group classes, workshops and coaching can help you meet your unique health and wellness needs through experiential education to help you mobilize your natural healing ability by integrating mind, body, spirit and our relationship to each other and the earth. Visit our website to schedule an appointment with Dr. Patterson or see a schedule of classes in yoga, mindfulness, meditation, Pilates and dance. “Mindful, empowered self care is the heart of healing” 517 Southland Drive, Lexington 859-373-0033 www.mindbodystudio.org

Monthly Reiki Classes

9-10am. Every Saturday morning in the month of February at Body Structure Medical Fitness Facility, 2600 Gribbin Drive, Lexington. This class will increase your heart rate and respiration while using large muscle groups repetitively and rhythmically to create a great workout. (859) 268-8190.

Turn your hands into healing hands! Reiki is Universal Life Force Energy Learn to improve your mind, body, and spirit! Classes taught by Robert N.Fueston, Reiki Master/Teacher and Acupuncturist, 17 years of experience and Member of The Reiki Alliance. Approved for Continuing Education hours (CE hours) for Massage Therapist. CE’s for nurses pending. Register online at www. robertfueston.com. 859-595-2164.

Taoist Tai Chi Society

Ongoing Journey Circle

We offer classes in Louisville and Lexington. All classes are led by nationally accredited volunteer instructors in a friendly and helpful environment. The meditative movements of taijiquan can reduce tension, increase flexibility and strength, and improve circulation and balance. To contact us, phone 502.614.6424 or e-mail kentucky@taoist.org.

This circle meets the 4th Sunday of every month and is for those who are experienced in the practice of journeying OR are interested in learning more about this ancient spiritual practice. Join us every month as we will be journeying on different topics that will be discussed at time of circle. Please feel free to bring drums, rattles etc. Questions or need directions or have questions? Please feel free to email/call me: 859-492-2109,info@jennifershawcoaching.com

Free Cardio Classes

Consumer Support Groups (Individuals with a Mental Illness) Every Sunday, 869 Sparta Court, Lexington. 2:30-4:00pm. 859-309-2856 for more info. NAMI Lexington is a local affiliate of NAMI, the “National Alliance on Mental Illness”  we provide numerous support groups and recovery programs for families and Individuals living with mental illness.

Yoga • Meditation • Stress Reduction The Yoga Health & Therapy Center offers daytime and evening Yoga classes with slow stretch, breathing awareness and relaxation training. Small classes provide personalized instruction. New yoga students receive a series discount. Meditation classes and ongoing group practice sessions available for all levels. Stress-Reduction classes based

Overeaters Anonymous Overeaters Anonymous (OA) is not a diet club. We do not count calories or have scales at meetings. OA is based on the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. There are no dues or fees. OA is self-supporting through member contributions. The only requirement for membership is the desire to stop eating compulsively. Please go to oalexingtonky. org for meeting dates and times. OR are interested in learning more about this ancie


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September 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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RECIPE

Banana Chia Seed Pancakes Have a healthy start to your day By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Banana pancakes are healthy, and this recipe is especially nutritious because it’s made with chia seeds, one of the healthiest foods around. The seeds add a crunchy texture that makes it even better. Chia seeds are full of fiber, protein and antioxidants as well as nutrients that can have important benefits for your body and brain. According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, one ounce of chia seeds contains 138 calories, 8 grams of fat, 12 grams of carbohydrate, 10 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein. Chia seeds contain omega-3, fatty acids and various micronutrients that help reduce appetite and cravings. Due to their fiber, chia seeds can absorb nearly 10 to 12 times their weight in water.

They become gel-like to expand in your stomach. This increases fullness and slows the absorption of food. Chia seeds also contain essential amino acids, which help the body use protein. Chia seeds are high in calcium, phosphorous and magnesium, nutrients essential for bone health. According to one study, chia seeds reduced blood pressure and inflammation. The best part is that unlike flax seeds, these seeds don’t have to be ground, which makes them easier to prepare. You can eat them raw, soak them in juices, add them to baked goods, porridges and puddings or sprinkle them over rice dishes, yogurt, cereal or vegetables. Since this recipe also contains bananas, here are a few benefits

of this wonderful fruit: They are high in antioxidants, protecting you from free radicals and chronic disease. They can help prevent kidney cancer, build strong bones with increased calcium absorption and protect the eyes against macular degeneration. Tryptophan, the natural mood-enhancer in bananas, helps relieve Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The high fiber in bananas can help normalize bowel motility. They are a natural antacid, providing relief from acid reflux, heartburn and GERD. Since they are low in salt and high in potassium, bananas are officially recognized by the FDA as being able to reduce blood pressure. They also protect against stroke and heart attack. You can eat these pancakes at once or freeze and reheat them for another day. With so many goodies in this recipe, your kids will definitely ask you to make them often. INGREDIENTS

4 small bananas 4 large eggs

3 tablespoons chia seeds 2 tablespoons all purpose flour 5 tablespoons almond flour 2 tablespoons milk 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1/2 tablespoon baking powder

Peel the bananas and mash until smooth. Whisk the eggs and combine them well with the bananas. Add the remaining ingredients gradually while blending the mixture well, and continue until it becomes a thick, smooth liquid. Heat a medium-sized pan and add a little butter to it to prevent the pancakes from sticking to the pan. Scoop about 2 tablespoons of the mixture into the hot pan. Let the pancake cook for a minute, turn it over gently and cook for another minute. Once it turns golden brown and looks firm on both sides, remove it from the pan. Serve the pancakes warm. If you wish, top them with fresh fruits or berries or add melted honey, if you like it sweeter.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016 EVENTS continued from P. 26 behind some of Kentucky's most beautiful horse farms! Provided by Legacy Reserve at Fritz Farm. RSVP by calling 859.537.1123. Seating is limited.

September 15 Healthy Brain Aging

Join us for a special presentation on healthy brain aging! In this free event, Dr. Gregory Cooper with Baptist Health Neurology will present "Understanding Normal Forgetfulness vs. Dementia” along with the latest facts and figures from the Alzheimer’s Association. A light breakfast will be provided and all attendees will be entered to win a gift card. 10am–11am at the Lexington Public Library, Eastside Branch, 3000 Blake James Dr., Lexington, Kentucky 40509.

September 20 Eat, Move, Lose Weight Support Group

12 – 1 pm, Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Department PH Clinic South, 2433 Regency Road. Free weightloss support group appropriate for anyone wishing to lose weight or maintain weight loss. Share struggles and ideas with others. Held first

and third Tuesdays most months. For more information or to pre-register, call 288-2446.

September 27

September 20

Join The Willows at Fritz Farm to learn more about our new campus opening early next year. Be one of the first to reserve a private suite in our campus and you'll receive all kinds of advantages. To learn more, call today: 859-273-0088. Event starts at 6:00pm at Pax Christi Catholic Church, 4001 Victoria Way, Lexington. Light refreshments & door prizes offered.

Meal Planning Nutrition Class 5 – 6 pm, Bourbon County Health Department, 341 East Main Street, Paris. All are welcome. Food demonstrations, sampling, and recipes will be provided. For more information or to register, call (859) 987-1915.

September 27 Hospice of the Bluegrass Lunch & Learn Series

Are you interested in learning more about end-of-life care? Are you curious about the vast array of services Hospice of the Bluegrass offers? Join us for our monthly Lunch & Learn series on the last Tuesday of each month at noon for an informative conversation about our work. Lunch will be provided and each session will be led by a knowledgeable Hospice of the Bluegrass administrator. This overview will touch on how hospice services work and the services provided. This is a free event. Register by emailing or calling (859) 2966895.

Community Sneak Peek

September 27

Send us your event listings If you are hosting a health-related event that is free to the public, list it here for FREE! (Events that are not free to the public can be posted in our calendar for $35). E-mail your event date, location, description and contact information: brian@rockpointpublishing.com

Reiki Practice & Introduction to Reiki

6:30pm- 8:30pm. 2508 Wallace Avenue, Louisville, KY 40205. Free.  Those with Reiki come to practice & receive the Reiki energy. Those who do have not Reiki training—come for an introduction/question & answer.  Contact JoAnn Utley at 502777-3865 or jutley5122@bellsouth. net to register.  More info at  http:// joannutley.byregion.net

Check-in: 1:00 PM Walk: 2:00 PM

REGISTER TODAY! Questions? 502.585.5433 ext 843 tiffany.neal@kidney.org

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Locally Sponsored by: Transplant Center

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September 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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It is healthier to plan diets around whole foods and be assured you’re getting fiber in your diet.

Add More Fiber to Your Diet Whole foods you give a healthy boost By Jean Jeffers, Staff Writer You’ve probably heard those words before: “Eat more fiber. Fiber, fiber, fiber.” We all should know what fiber does for us and appreciate the role of fiber in our daily diets. Fiber is classified as either soluble or insoluble. Soluble fiber is a gel-like substance that dissolves in water. It is found in such foods as fruits, vegetables, oats, barley and psyllium. Insoluble fiber, which does not dissolve in water, is found in wholewheat flour, wheat bran, beans and some vegetables. There are many benefits to following a high-fiber diet: 1. Health experts recommend adding insoluble fiber to your diet to prevent conditions such as constipation, diarrhea and fecal inconti-

nence. Fiber adds bulk to the stool, making it easier to form and pass out of the body. 2. Fiber helps maintain bowel health by lowering your risk for hemorrhoids and small pouches in the colon. 3. Soluble fiber reduces the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke. It also has the ability to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. 4. Soluble fiber helps people who already have diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, by helping control blood sugar levels. 5. Both soluble and insoluble fiber may be beneficial for some people with irritable bowel syndrome. But be aware it might not help others.

6. Fiber helps you maintain a normal weight and can help overweight people lose weight. 7. Fiber lowers cholesterol levels. It may also lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation. 8. Fiber helps prevent colorectal cancer, although evidence is mixed on this matter. Some processed foods have added fiber, including some cereals, yogurt, granola bars and ice cream. Canned fruits, canned vegetables and white bread are examples of foods whose fiber is removed or does not exist. As a general rule, it is healthier to plan diets around whole foods and be assured you’re getting fiber in your diet than to eat highly processed foods. Should you take a fiber supplement? Products such as Citrucel and Metamucil have their place, but eating whole foods is better than using supplements. The Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.org) suggests the following for adding more fiber to your diet: • Power up your day by having a breakfast containing at least five or

more grams of fiber per serving. Try cereals with the words “whole grains,” “bran” or “fiber” in their names. • Make sure at least half of your grains are whole grains. Look for whole grain, whole wheat or whole-wheat flour as the first ingredient on the label. • Cook with whole-grain flour. Use it as a substitute for half or all of the white flour when baking. Add wheat bran or uncooked oatmeal to muffins, cakes and cookies. • Use beans, peas and lentils when cooking; they are rich sources of fiber. • Eat more fruit and vegetables. Try to add fresh produce to your diet and eat five or more servings a day. • Make snacks count by choosing fresh fruit, raw vegetables, low-fat popcorn or a handful of nuts or dried fruits. If you’re adding fiber to your diet for the first time, be aware of how you go about it. Do it slowly to avoid gassiness, bloating and cramping. Also, drink plenty of water.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

MAKERS Possible Method to Inhibit Development of Lung Cancer A team of researchers have discovered a new way to inhibit the development of lung cancer. Inhibiting a protein called BMI1 impaired tumor growth in lung cancer. “This study has established an important link between C/EBPA and BMI1 for the first time,” said lead researcher Prof. Daniel Tenen, director of the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore. “Furthermore, these findings suggest that assessment of expression levels of these proteins could be used as a way to predict which patients might benefit from drugs that inhibit BMI1, some of which are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.” Tenen has been working on the differentiation factor C/ EBPa for several decades, demonstrating it as an important tumor suppressor in both myelogenous leukemia and lung cancer. Additionally, loss of C/EBPa has also been found to have a role in the development of other cancer types, such as hepatic, squamous cell and prostate cancer. But the ways in which C/EBPa suppresses tumor formation is still unknown. Co-lead researcher Dr. Elena Levantini, who has spent the past few years investigating C/EBPa in lung cancer, confirmed that one subtype of lung cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), frequently expressed low levels of C/ EBPa. Low or no levels of C/EBPa caused lower survival rates when they corresponded with a reciprocally high expression of BMI1, a gene implicated in the development of tumors of colon, breast, stomach and some forms of leukemia. Levantini conducted a pre-clinical study that found deleting C/EBPa resulted in NSCLC. Analysis of this study concluded that C/EBPa suppressed lung tumor formation in inhibiting the expression of BMI1. Levantini then demonstrated that reducing levels of BMI1 by genetic means or by using a drug-reducing expression of BMI1 led to the inhibition of tumor formation. Knowing the substantial role BMI1 plays in the formation and development of aggressive lung cancers will help in the development of better therapies for cancer patients. The Harvard Stem Cell Institute collaborated with the Singapore researchers. The results were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine in August.

Brains of Overweight Individuals 10 Years Older at Middle Age The brain naturally shrinks with age, but scientists are finding obesity may also affect the onset and progression of brain aging. Beginning in middle age, the brains of obese individuals show a difference in white matter similar to those of lean individuals 10 years older, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge. White brain matter is the tissue that connects different areas of the brain and allows information to be exchanged between various regions of the brain. The researchers found that typically, a 50-year-old overweight person had comparable white matter volume as a 60-year-old lean person. However, these differences were only seen from middle age onwards, which seems to suggest the brain may be particularly vulnerable during this period of aging. The researchers are curious as to whether weight loss at this age range could reverse the observed white matter changes in the brain. Despite the differences in volume of white matter between overweight and lean individuals, the researchers found no connection between being overweight or obese and a person’s cognitive abilities as measured using a standard test similar to an IQ test. The results were published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging.

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It is critical that we choose that keep our mouths and teeth healthy.

Foods That Promote Good Dental Health Fruits, vegetables, cheese contribute to a beautiful smile By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer When considering dental health, you really are what you eat. One of the first areas to decline when the diet is less than ideal is oral health, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). We all realize sugary foods such as candy and soda contribute to tooth decay, so it is critical that we choose foods that keep our mouths and teeth healthy. Your diet makes a big difference when it comes to having a beautiful smile. Add more leafy greens, dairy products and fibrous vegetables to your diet and pay attention to what you’re drinking. Since it has no calories or sugar, water is always the best drink choice, especially when compared to juices or soda.

While the ADA recommends steering clear of most sweet foods, there are some exceptions. Fruit such as apples may be sweet, but they’re also high in fiber and water. The action of eating an apple produces saliva in your mouth, which rinses away bacteria and food particles. The fibrous texture of the fruit stimulates the gums. Eating an apple isn’t the same as brushing your teeth with a toothpaste that contains fluoride, but it can carry you until you have a chance to brush. Eat either a whole apple or apple slices for lunch to give your mouth a good scrubbing at the end of the meal. Celery and carrots, like apples, are crunchy and full of fiber. Eating a handful of raw carrots at the end of a meal increases saliva production in the mouth, which reduces the risk of cavities.

High on the list of healthy foods for good oral health are almonds. Almonds are great for the teeth because they are a good source of calcium and protein while being low in sugar. Just having a quarter cup of almonds with your lunch or adding a handful to a salad or a stir-fry dinner can contribute to oral health. Cheese can be a great food for dental health, too. A study published in the May/June 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the journal of the American Academy of General Dentistry, found eating cheese raised the pH level in subjects’ mouths and lowered their risk of tooth decay. Cheese also contains calcium and protein, nutrients that strengthen tooth enamel. Like cheese, yogurt is high in calcium and protein, which makes it another great choice for the health of your teeth. The probiotics (beneficial bacteria) found in yogurt also benefit the gums because the good bacteria crowd out bacteria that cause cavities. If you decide to add more yogurt to your diet, choose a plain variety with no added sugar and mix in your fresh fruit of choice. Leafy greens are full of vitamins and minerals and are also low in calories. Kale and spinach particularly

promote oral health. Both are high in calcium, which builds the teeth’s enamel. They also contain folic acid, a type of B vitamin that has numerous health benefits, including possibly treating gum disease, according to MedlinePlus. Take the time to discuss your diet with your dental hygienist and/or dentist on your next dental visit. Sources and Resources

• American Dental Association (2016). Dental Health and Diet. www.adha.org • Henderson, L. (2013). New Research Shows Cheese May Prevent Cavities. Academy of General Dentistry. www. agd.org • MedlinePlus (2016). Foods for Dental Health. www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus • Chris Davis, DMD, and Amanda Thurman, RDH

About the Author Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.


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DEVELOP A LOVE FOR THIS TROPICAL TREAT By Tanya Tyler, Editor/Writer With a name like “passion fruit,” it’s got to be good, right? And so it is. Named by Spanish missionaries in honor of the passion of Christ, passion fruit is the edible fruit of the passion flower. Although it is not readily available in the United States, passion fruit, also known as granadilla, is certainly worth searching for. This tropical exotic fruit is native to South America (specifically southern Brazil through Paraguay to northern Argentina). It is low in fat and calories and full of healthy essentials. It has antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and fiber. It has a lot of vitamin C, which everyone knows fights colds and flu and harmful free radicals and helps the body build and restore cells. Passion fruit also contains a good amount of vitamin A, which is essential for good eyesight and healthy skin. Other enzymes in passion fruit are

Passion Fruit touted for their effectiveness in reducing inflammation in the bronchial tubes. Another important substance found in passion fruit is potassium, which helps regulate your blood pressure and heart rate. Passion fruit is a good source of fiber and can serve as an effective laxative; it protects the colon’s mucous membrane by reducing the amount of time it stays in contact with cancercausing toxic substances. Passion fruit also contains enzymes that help the digestive system work efficiently and increase the amount of digestive juices in the stomach.

There is a slight trick to eating passion fruit.

Passion fruit proponents believe it has numerous medicinal properties, such as an ability to lower blood pressure, treat asthma, enhance the libido and ease muscle spasms. Researchers are working to see if passion fruit extract can kill cancer cells in developing fetuses. According to www.organicfacts.net, passion fruit has benefits such as an ability to prevent cancerous growth, boost immune function, improve eyesight, increase skin health, regulate fluid balance in the body, lower blood pressure, boost circulation and improve bone mineral density. Further claims are that it reduces signs of premature aging, lessens inflammation, improves sleeping habits and eliminates asthma. (As always, be sure to consult with your primary care physician before trying to self-treat with non-traditional medicine.) Passion fruit comes in two distinct forms. Purple passion fruits are

generally smaller but more flavorful than golden passion fruits. There is a slight trick to eating passion fruit. After cutting into its tough outer shell, you’ll see a cluster of seeds nestled in pulpy orange flesh. Scoop out the flesh, trying not to get any of the bitter-tasting white layer, and discard the shell. Use the flesh in sauces, smoothies, jams, mousses, salads or ice cream or simply enjoy it as is. Passion fruit is generally paired with other fruits to ease its tanginess. You can eat the passion fruit seeds or strain them out and drink the juice. Passion fruit grows on a vine that wraps its tendrils around anything it can grasp. Let it grab hold of your taste buds. You certainly won’t want it to let go, and the pursuit of this fruit may become your next passion. Sources and Resources

• California Rare Fruit Growers • Purdue University


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

FOOD BITES

By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Does the Type of Cut Affect Taste? When they begin culinary school, chefs learn about a cut’s influence on palatability. A slice, chop or julienne shapes the taste of vegetables for several reasons. For vegetables that will be cooked, the cut determines how long it takes to cook and when it should be added to the recipe. Surface area is one way the cut can impact vegetables. “The cooking method is going to penetrate more finely cut vegetables more,” said Leslie Brenner, restaurant critic for The Dallas Morning News. More finely cut vegetables will react more with other ingredients, especially butter, salt or a marinade. Texture also affects the perception of flavor. Thin slices, round and smooth cuts, jagged edges and cubes all provide different textures, which in turn shape flavor perception. Food scientists look at the chemistry behind cutting techniques. “Every different type of produce is different in terms of the chemistry and how it responds to cutting or crushing,” said Charles Forney, a physiologist for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Forney studies how produce changes after it’s harvested. When vegetables are cut, their cells break open, and that releases an enzyme that triggers a chemical reaction. This process gives the cut vegetable its aroma. Added together, all these factors combine to create the flavor and texture nuances vegetables add to a dish. Be sure to heed the cut directions in a recipe to maximize the flavor. Updates on Food Labels In July, the U.S. Senate approved a measure that requires food companies to disclose if there are GMO ingredients in their products, but the measure doesn’t require a GMO label directly on packaging. Companies can use a QR code – those square icons that look like video game graphics surrounded by outlined cubes – that customers can scan with a smart phone. Or the companies can include a phone number or Web address for consumers to get more information. Several groups and organizations are protesting this compromise. The bill still needs to go to the House for consideration. If approved by the House, it will overturn the Vermont mandatory GMO-label law that also went

into effect in July. The Vermont law requires GMO information to be listed on the label, and food companies have already produced new labels. Sugar Gets Separate Line on Labels The redesigned “Nutrition Facts” label that the FDA requires to be on packaged food by July 2018 will include a separate line showing how much sugar has been added. The amount will be shown in grams and as a Daily Value percentage, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. The FDA is also trying to stamp out the use of the term “evaporated cane juice.” In its May “Guidance for

Industry,” the FDA instructed food companies to call this ingredient “sugar.” Companies may add modifying adjectives such as “organic cane sugar,” but the word “sugar” should be included. Such FDA guidance is not legally binding, but is still powerful. Just like sugar, evaporated cane juice is made by crushing sugar cane to extract its juice, then purifying it, getting rid of the water and turning it into fine crystals. But it still contains a bit of molasses, which is completely removed from the cane sugar found in the grocery store. Food companies that use this ingredient maintain it’s different from sugar and “evaporated cane juice” is its proper name. Others believe the name is the food industry’s attempt to make it seem like a healthier choice.

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The redesigned “Nutrition Facts” label that the FDA requires to be on packaged food by July 2018 will include a separate line showing how much sugar has been added.

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According to scientists, your eyes need high levels of vitamin C to function properly.

Foods That Are Good for Your Eyes See that you incorporate healthy options to your diet By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer A diet that’s good for your heart is also good for your eyes, so choose a low-fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains to keep your eyes healthy. You need lutein, vitamins C and E, zeaxnthin, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids for good eye health. These help prevent cataracts and the clouding of the eye lens and may fight also against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) when you are older. Here are some foods that are good for your eyes, according to the American Optometric Association and the California Optometric Association: Kale and spinach These leafy greens are loaded with lutein and zeaxanthin, which get into the retina and lens of your eyes and absorb damaging light. Studies show

they lower the risk of AMD and cataracts. Just one cup of either of these cooked vegetables is packed with more than 20 milligrams of lutein and zeaxanthin. Broccoli, collard greens, romaine lettuce and brightly colored fruits such as grapes and kiwis are loaded with them, too. Salmon, sardines and herring Aim for at least two servings of these cold-water fish per week. They have the most omega-3s, although tuna, flounder and halibut are also good sources. These fish are rich in DHA, low levels of which are linked to dry eye syndrome, according to Dr. Jimmy Lee, director of refractive surgery at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Omega-3 fatty acids keep the brain and heart healthy and may also help cells work better. They

protect the eyes by fighting inflammation. If you don’t eat seafood, you can use fish oil supplements or vegetarian supplements that contain flaxseed oil or black currant seed oil. Oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, lemons, tangerines and Brussels sprouts All these citrus cousins are high in vitamin C, an antioxidant that is essential for eye health. According to scientists, your eyes need high levels of vitamin C to function properly, and antioxidants can help delay cataracts and AMD. Seeds, nuts and wheat germ A combination of vitamins C and E helps keep healthy tissue strong. However, since most people don’t get enough vitamin E from food, having a small handful of nuts or sunflower seeds or using a little wheat germ oil in your salad dressing will help. Vegetable oils, pecans and almonds are also good sources. Black-eyed peas These and other beans, such as kidney beans, lima beans, peanuts and legumes of all kinds, contain zinc, an essential trace mineral found in high concentration in the eyes. Zinc protects your eyes from the damag-

ing effects of light and helps reduce macular degeneration risks, according to Dr. Paul Dougherty, medical director of Dougherty Laser Vision in Los Angeles. More foods high in zinc include lean red meat, poultry, fortified cereals, eggs, whole grains, turkey, crab, liver, shellfish, baked beans and oysters. Carrots, pumpkins, sweet potato, apricots and cantaloupe Yellow and deep orange vegetables and fruits contain beta carotene, which converts into vitamin A, which helps prevent night blindness. All these nutritious foods will protect your eyes against threatening diseases and boost their health. Be sure to make them part of your diet. Sources and Resources

• • • • • • • •

www.aao.org www.allaboutvision.com www.aoa.org www.health.com www.health.ny.gov www.health.usnews.com www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov www.webmd.com


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

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5 Healthy Snacks Kids Can Make Themselves Kids love to eat what they make By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer

INGREDIENTS

• • • • •

1/2 cup cream cheese 2 teaspoons honey 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 3 medium whole-wheat tortillas 3 medium bananas

Mix cream cheese, honey and cinnamon in a bowl. Spread the mixture on the tortillas. Place a peeled whole banana on a tortilla and roll it up. Place on a hot pan or griddle and grill till golden on both sides. Slice into small rounds and serve with toothpicks, or slice it in half and eat it like a burrito. Peanut Butter Granola Balls This recipe makes a wonderful afterschool snack. Kids will stay full for a long time without any chemicals and the excess sugar found in many packaged granola bars. INGREDIENTS

• • • • • •

1/4 cup natural peanut butter 1/3 cup honey 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup crisp rice cereal 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1/4 cup dried fruit

In a saucepan over medium heat, heat peanut butter, honey and butter for one to two minutes, stirring till smooth. Remove from heat and add in cereal, oats and dried fruit. Drop mixture using a tablespoon into candy liners or mini paper cupcake cups. Place on a rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate until set (about 15 minutes). To store, refrigerate in an airtight container for up to a week.

INGREDIENTS

• • • • •

1/2 cup cashew butter 1 cup crisp rice cereal 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

Mix together the cashew butter, cereal, maple syrup and salt in a bowl. Form the mixture into 12 oneand-a-half-inch balls. Roll the balls in the coconut. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to five days. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Sandwiches These cute sandwiches look so tempting and are loaded with nutrition as well. INGREDIENTS

• 12 slices white bread, sliced vertically • 6 ham slices • 6 chicken slices • 6 cheese slices • 1 small tomato • 1 green onion stalk* (you can also use celery) • Butter • Toothpicks

Lay out two slices of bread on a chopping board and butter both sides. Place ham on one slice and cover with the other buttered slice. Repeat to make a chicken sandwich, then a cheese one. Using a mini cookie cutter, cut out five circles from each sandwich. Place all the cut pieces on a platter in a wiggly shape to form a caterpillar’s body (alternate each sandwich flavor if you like). Place a tomato at the front of the body to form the caterpillar’s head. Next cut two small ovals of cheese for the eyes. Slice small pieces of green onion for the pupils. Cut two long strands from the onion stalk to make the caterpillar’s feelers and fix onto the tomato using toothpicks.

3-Ingredient Real Fruit Jelly With no additives and real fruit juices, this is a healthy recipe for kids. INGREDIENTS

• 4 cups apple juice • 1 cup frozen raspberries • 1 tablespoon gelatin

remaining apple juice. Strain the juice to remove the raspberry seeds, then pour the juice into a bowl or molds. Refrigerate for a few hours or overnight to set. Sources and Resources

Place two cups of apple juice and the raspberries in a pan. Bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and add in gelatin to dissolve. Add the

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How Many Fruits and Vegetables Have You Eaten Today? 5-A-Day Program encourages all to eat more good food By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

How often do you consider the amount of fruits and vegetables you eat per day? Regardless of your age, a balanced diet featuring plenty of fruits and vegetables is important to your good health. The 5-A-Day Program for Better Health is a national program that seeks to increase the servings of fruits and vegetables Americans eat each day to five or more. The 5-A-Day Program promotes simple ways to add fruits and vegetables to your daily diet. The program is jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Produce for Better Health Foundation, a nonprofit consumer education foundation representing the fruit and vegetable industry. The NCI funds behavior change and communications research to determine effective strategies for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. A daily diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in fat and cholesterol combined with daily exercise can help fight overweight, obesity and other related chronic diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins and min-

erals and other vital substances. Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. Additionally, they are high in fiber, which is filling. For everyone, 5-A-Day is an essential daily dietary practice for a healthier life. Research has demonstrated the unique disease-prevention capacity and long-term health benefits of consuming a colorful variety

Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories.

of fruits and vegetables every day. It’s important to eat from all color groups (red, yellow/ orange, white, green and blue/purple) to get the full health-promoting benefits of fruits and vegetables.

The 5-A-Day program provides consumers specific information about how to include more servings of fruits and vegetables into daily eating patterns. Here are some tips: • Have a fruit or juice at breakfast daily. • Have a fruit or vegetable snack each day. • Stock up on dried, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables. • Microwave vegetables for dinner. There are other benefits to be had from eating five or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day. It reduces the risk of developing hypertension, stroke, diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to the NCI, about one third of all cancers are attributable to poor dietary habits. Poor nutrition may be a contributing factor in a very high percentage of cancers of the large intestine, breast and prostate. Consuming fruits and vegetables can reduce these risks because these foods have a high density of cancer-fighting nutrients such as vitamins A and C and fiber. When fruits and vegetables are eaten as a substitute for less healthy foods and snacks, they lower your daily caloric intake. This may assist in weight loss or maintenance. For more information, visit www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov.

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Going Vegetarian: Pros and Cons

BE ON THE LOOK OUT

Thinking of giving up meat? Here’s what you need to consider By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Being a vegetarian helps the body Nutrition revealed vegetarians have in various ways. Eating vegetarian lower mortality rates and lower blood can help prevent pressure. They many diseases. have a reduced For instance, risk of type 2 because such a diabetes because diet is fiber rich, they eat less it helps regulate saturated fat and bowel movehigh amounts ments, prevents of dietary fiber, constipation and certain minerals, reduces the risk phytochemicals There are of colon cancer. and complex Most carbohydrates. three kinds of Americans are Eating vegetarmeat eaters, ian reduces the vegetarians. though USDA carbon footprint stats show a on the environlarge number are ment. A vegbecoming vegans etarian diet also and vegetarians to ensure food safety conserves water. It takes around 2,500 and to adopt ethical eating habits gallons of water to produce a pound and healthier diets. Moreover, they of beef, while only 220 gallons are believe they can help contribute to a needed to make a pound of tofu. better planet this way. CONS There are three kinds • No chicken, beef or pork of vegetarians: • Diets can be low in vitamin B12 1. Total vegetarians/vegans – They and omega-3 fatty acids exclude all forms of animal-based • Special attention is needed at cerproducts, such as meat, milk, buttain stages of life, such as during ter and eggs. pregnancy and lactation 2. Lacto-vegetarians – They don’t If you follow a vegetarian diet, eat meat, chicken or fish, but will it can be tough to get the protein consume milk and milk products. needed for repairing muscle tis3. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians – They eat sue and manufacturing antibodies, milk, milk products and eggs but blood cells, enzymes and hormones. exclude all kinds of meat. Mineral and vitamin deficiencies can develop without a balanced eating Here are some pros and cons of plan. As you cut out meat, fish and going vegetarian. poultry, you reduce your intake of calcium (necessary for strong bones PROS and other functions), vitamin B12 • Fewer heart attacks (required for nerve transmission), • Decreased risk of certain cancers zinc (benefits healing and immunity) • Reduced risk of kidney diseases, and iron (needed to manufacture gallstones and rheumatoid arthritis blood). Those who follow a vegetarian diet A vegan dietary regimen is posare less likely to become obese, comsible. You just need to design a diet pared to those who don’t. This could full of nutrient-rich food. You can do be because vegetarians eat more fillthis by consulting a dietitian. ing foods such as fruits, vegetables and beans. Plant foods are rich in Sources and Resources • www.downtoearth.org nutrients as well as vitamins, protein and minerals. They also contain plant • www.goaskalice.columbia.edu • www.green-talk.com chemicals called phytochemicals, • www.livestrong.com which help protect against disease. A study by Johanna T. Dwyer published • www.nestle-family.com in the American Journal of Clinical

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A new, free issue of Health&Wellness Magazine hits stands in Central Kentucky on the last Friday of every month. Be on the lookout for these upcoming 2016-2017 featured topics:

OCT CANCER AWARENESS NOV LUNG HEALTH DEC DIABETES JAN DENTAL HEALTH FEB MENTAL HEALTH MARCH FITNESS


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4251 Saron Drive, Lexington, KY 859.245.0100 | HighgroveAtTatesCreek.com

The Search for Senior Living:

referred to as “ADLs”, which include bathing, dressing, grooming, eating, transferring, and toileting. Medication reminders and personal laundry services may also be available. Personal Care – In the commonwealth of Kentucky, you will also find personal care communities. Personal care communities are licensed, clinical facilities providing health-related by Lauren Ashley German, Highgrove at Tates Creek services that must include 24-hour supervision, medication management, housekeeping, transportation and laundry services. Residents receive 2.5 million you or the senior in your life. Keep in baby boomers mind any current health issues as well three meals a day which are regulated by a dietician or nutritionist. Nurses across America as future concerns – it’s important to are available onsite to administer injecwill turn 70 this plan for today and tomorrow. tions, provide diabetic management year. And thanks to medical advances, Independent Living – Active and maintain medical records. Personal improvements in health care and mod- seniors that are looking to downsize care communities also provide social ern medicine, the new 70-year-olds or get away from the stress of home and recreational activities in a safe, can expect to live up to 15 years longer repairs may be interested in the caresecure environment. than their ancestors. That means more free lifestyle that independent living Skilled Nursing Care – Skilled people than ever are considering their communities offer. Housing options nursing facilities, sometimes referred to retirement options, which for many range from apartments to garden as healthcare centers, provide medical includes senior living communities. homes and offer seniors the opporand nursing services to their residents. Senior living communities have come tunity to socialize and participate in a long way since the nursing homes life-enrichment activities. Many com- Some residents may need skilled nursing care on a short-term basis following of the past. Today, senior living communities offer meals and housekeepmunities boast resort-like amenities ing services plus scheduled transporta- an illness or injury with an end goal including spas, yoga instructors and tion. On-site amenities such as fitness of returning home or to a lower level of care. Others who need ongoing all-inclusive pricing and exist for all centers, beauty salons, libraries and stages of life – starting with the indechapels create an all-inclusive environ- nursing support are considered longpendent and active 60+. But with so ment that fosters the independence of term residents. In addition to 24-hour skilled nursing care, both short-term many options for services, amenities each resident. and long-term residents have access to and levels of care, selecting a senior Assisted Living – Assisted living rehabilitative services such as physical, care community for yourself or a loved communities are intended for seniors occupational and speech therapies. one can be overwhelming. This causes looking for comfort, convenience Additional services may include carsome to delay their search, sometimes and a peace of mind. Residents enjoy diac or stroke recovery, wound manuntil they are in a crisis situation and the privacy of their own apartment agement, laboratory services, radiology must make a decision quickly. Taking specifically designed for senior safety, the time to research the options near including grab bars and an emergency services and discharge planning. Memory Care – Specialty care for you and making informed decisions call system. Assisted living residents seniors living with Alzheimer’s disease in advance will make the move much are encouraged to maintain an active easier for you and your family when social life with a full calendar of events, or related dementias is often called memory care. These are often secured the time is right. including daily activities and special units staffed by caregivers who have The most important step in selectoutings. Professional caregivers are training and experience working with ing a senior care community is to available 24-hours a day to assist with residents living with memory impairdetermine the level of care needed for activities of daily living, sometimes

THE LEVELS OF CARE

ment. In addition to all the benefits that come with living in a senior living community, memory care programs offer unique activities that are specifically designed to engage their residents which increases self-esteem. Memory care is available at multiple levels of care, including assisted living, personal care and skilled nursing care. The advantages of belonging to a senior living community are too important to ignore. In all levels of care, residents are exposed to a community of like-minded individuals while receiving care and attention in a safe and secure environment. Still, many seniors and their families view senior living communities as a last resort. Some people believe that moving to a senior living community represents a loss of independence, when in reality it’s quite the opposite. For others, it’s a lack of understanding of the advantages that come from living in community specifically designed for them. But as seniors and their families begin to see the benefits of senior living communities, they are turning to senior living communities earlier in life. The seniors of today are making their own plans for the future and why shouldn’t they? These should be the best years of their lives. Sources and Resources

• Boomers Turn 70 http://www.aarp.org/politics-society/ history/info-2016/baby-boomersturning-70.html • The Senior Care Continuum: A quick guide to the options http://www.whereyoulivematters. org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ WhereYouLiveMattersSeniorCareContinuumGuide.pdf • Make an Informed Choice http://www.whereyoulivematters.org/ informed-choice-what-suits-a-seniorslifestyle-best/ • Tips on How to Start Your Senior Living Search http://www.whereyoulivematters.org/ senior-living-basics-12-tips-for-gettingstarted/ • Compendium of Residential Care and Assisted Living Regulations and Policy https://aspe.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ pdf/110481/15alcom-KY.pdf

About the Author Lauren Ashley German is the Community Relations Director at Highgrove at Tates Creek, a premier senior living community opening fall of 2016. Formally with the Alzheimer’s Association, Lauren Ashley has had the privilege of working with families across Kentucky dealing with all levels of dementia as well as the senior living communities that serve them. Lauren Ashley can be reached at 859-245-0100 or lagerman@traditionsmgmt.net.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

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Washing, separating, cooking and refrigerating are four terms that can sum up food safety in a nutshell.

Food Safety First Protect your family from food poisoning By Jamie Lober, Staff Writer

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that each year, one in six Americans gets sick from eating contaminated food or beverages. The CDC stressed there are measures you can take to protect your family from food poisoning. Actions as simple as washing your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds; rinsing fruits and vegetables with water; separating raw meat, poultry and seafood from other foods; cooking food to the right temperature; and refrigerating food properly can make a difference when

it comes to your health. As temperatures climb, people spend more time outdoors, which can include having picnics or grilling out. The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (KCHFS) advises people to use a metal stem thermometer to check meats at the thickest part to make sure they are cooked to the proper temperature. During hot weather, do not leave food out at room temperature for more than two hours. Hot foods should be kept hot and cold foods should be kept cold. The U.S. Department of Agriculture

says when you’re going on a picnic, you should carry cold perishable food in an insulated cooler packed with several inches of ice. Include clean utensils for preparing and serving the food and pack clean, wet, disposable paper towels for cleaning hands and surfaces. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says it’s a common mistake to taste food to see if it is still good. You cannot taste, smell or see the bacteria that causes food poisoning. Some people like to eat raw cookie dough, but it could contain salmonella or other bacteria. Many people enjoy going to farmers’ markets when the weather is nice. It is a great way to support local businesses, but you have to be careful because your purchases may have been exposed to dirt or bugs. They may not be washed or refrigerated properly. If you carry a reusable tote for your market-day purchases, wash it often so it does not breed bacteria

and store it in a clean, dry location. The earlier in the day you shop, the better. Older adults and children are most prone to food poisoning. The KCHFS says foodborne illness can occur within 24 hours of eating contaminated food or even days or weeks later. Common food-poisoning symptoms include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says it is not always easy to differentiate between food poisoning and the flu since symptoms can be similar. If you believe you are ill or if you have a fever, it is a good idea to see your doctor. When you take precautions at every stage of food preparation – as well as when you wine and dine outdoors – you’re more likely to survive the summer months without any occurrences of food poisoning. As in other aspects of your life, your guiding principle should be “safety first.”


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September 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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Reconstruct favorite junk foods and snacks into healthy options.

How to Get More Fruits and Vegetables Into Your Diet There are numerous ways to hit your RDA goals By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Only 27 percent of adults eat their recommended daily amount (RDA) of vegetables, and just 33 get their RDA of fruit, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Yet, when serving sizes – the amount of each food group needed a day (1 cup) – are lined up, that RDA is quite small. It seems like a lot of food – five to nine servings of the two combined each day – but it’s really not. Here are some tips for getting in your daily doses of fruits and vegetables. Strategize Eating habits, health and wallet significantly improve when you plan your meals. Whether it’s weekly, biweekly or monthly doesn’t matter.

Just have a plan and a list. Cooking more at home is not only cheaper but also healthier. Preparing and packing your lunch and snacks at night for the following day gives you more control and less danger of “hangry” (hungry plus angry) impulse consumption of poor choices. Staying stocked up on frozen, canned or jarred fruits and vegetables leaves you zero excuses. If your kitchen is full of these items, it won’t matter if the fresh produce has gone bad. Also, keep a stock of certain staples to make your meal plans a no-brainer. If you know which types of meats, vegetables and cuisine styles you gravitate toward, keeps those items stocked. Prepack individual servings to grab and go. A mix of nuts, seeds and dried

fruits or raw vegetables cut into snack sizes for munching plain or dipped in hummus or ranch dressing are two great examples. Halve your plate. Fill part of it with fruits and vegetables at every meal and snack. Keep fruits out on the counter in easy view. If you see them, most likely you’ll eat them. Change Your Thinking Try thinking of fruits and vegetables as accouterments; they can be extra flavor enhancers like a spice or seasoning. Good examples are onions, bell peppers, tomatoes and avocado. These foods go great in cooked dishes, salads, sandwiches and tacos. Vegetables – spinach, onion, mushrooms – are natural additions to eggs (think omelet or frittata), sandwiches or wraps. Fruit accompanies cereal and oatmeal perfectly. Both vegetables and fruit are yummy additions to chicken and tuna salad. You can use celery, onion, carrots, cucumber, dried cranberries, apple slices and sunflower seeds. Beans, fruits and vegetables really punch up salads. Meat loaf, hamburgers and meatballs are great choices to add vegetables to whether you’re using ground beef, turkey, sausage or chicken. Spaghetti

sauce and soup both scream for vegetable additions. Thinking of fruits and vegetables as snacks is helpful, too. Fruit tastes sweeter than chocolate and is hydrating. Guacamole and salsa are good ways to get some fruits and vegetables when you’re snacking. Add pineapple tidbits to a jar of medium to hot salsa. Reconstruct favorite junk foods and snacks into healthy options. Pizza can be healthy; it offers the perfect vehicle for adding fruits and vegetables, just as salads, wraps and tacos do. Bake your own potato chips or make vegetable chips – kale, zucchini, squash and sweet potatoes are just a few delicious options. Smoothies are another great way to get your RDA of fruits and vegetables. Be Sneaky Perhaps you don’t like the taste or texture of certain fruits and vegetables or you have finicky family members who refuse healthy choices. It’s easy to sneak these foods into diets. Grate or puree them to blend into breads, cakes, muffins, mashed potatoes, mac and cheese, chicken or tuna salad, soups and salads. The list is endless!


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | September 2016

Q: How many Central Kentuckians read Health&Wellness Magazine every month?

A: 75,000 Health&Wellness Magazine can be found in 20 central Kentucky counties and is distributed to over 90% of medical facilities, including chiroprator, eye doctor and dentist offices. Readers can also pick up their FREE copy at most grocery and convenience stores as well as many restaurants throughout Central KY.

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