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FEBRUARY 2017: MENTAL HEALTH & DEPRESSION

Suicide Prevention

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What is Good Mental Health?

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The Brain Is Amazing

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Supporting a Loved One with Depression

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Mental Health and Teens

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Anger Management

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The Many Faces of Anxiety

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How to Beat Anxiety Without Medication

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Depression Ebbs and Flows

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Exercise Can Be a Fountain of Youth

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How Faith Helps You Survive a Loved One’s Mental Health Disorders

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Current Research Reveals Four Depression Subtypes

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Support Improves Outcomes, Reduces Risks for LGBT Adolescents

NEWS MAKERS Clips from Current Health News

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Stress and Your Famil

DEPARTMENTS

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What Type of Mental-Emotional Help Is Best For You?

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Innovative Research Findings Suggest New Direction in Mental Health Care

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FAMILY DOC Medicare Covers Screening for Depression SENIOR LIVING Senior Independent Living Redefined HEALTH & FITNESS Make a Vow to Lower Blood Pressure and Reduce Sodium Intake FAMILY VISION Sports Vision Therapy Helps Athletes Improve Recognition and Response

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FUNERAL PLANNING Got Winter Grief?

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FOOD BITES

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NATURE'S BEAUTY Spinach

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Events Calendar

FROM THE

EDITOR

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Dr. Tom Miller Jonathan Phillips Harleena Singh Martha Evans Sparks TaNiqua Ward, M.S.

COLUMNISTS/GUESTS John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP MIND BODY STUDIO

Dr. Brewer

AUDIOLOGY ASSOCIATES

Dr. Jeffrey Foxx

FAMILY PRACTICE ASSOCIATES OF LEXINGTON, P.S.C.

Jacqueline Kennedy

LEGACY RESERVE AT FRITZ FARM

Dr. Rick Graebe

FAMILY EYECARE ASSOCIATES AND VISION THERAPY

Kim Wade, Community Relations Director MILWARD FUNERAL DIRECTORS

ROCK POINT PUBLISHING Brian Lord / Publisher Kim Blackburn / Sales Representative Jennifer Lord / Customer Relations Specialist Barry Lord / Sales Representative Anastassia Zikkos / Sales Representative Janet Roy / Graphic Designer

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HEARING Which Style Best Suits You and Your Hearing Loss?

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WRITERS Michelle Chalkey Angela S. Hoover Jean Jeffers Jamie Lober Dr. Barry Lord

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Symptoms of and Treatment forDepression

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE Seasonal Affective Disorder

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FEATURES

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CONTENTS COLUMNS

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Schizophrenia: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

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Moving from Parent to Empty Nester

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Dealing with Depression

Tanya J. Tyler, Editor | Share your story: editor@healthandwellnessmagazine.net

ROCKPOINT Publishing

Health&Wellness Magazine can be found in 20 central Kentucky counties and is distributed to over 90% of medical facilities, including chiroprator’s, eye doctor’s and dentist’s offices. You can also pick up your FREE copy of Health&Wellness at most grocery and convenience stores as well as many restaurants throughout Central KY. For advertising rates and to find out how to get YOUR article published:

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Dear Friends, How’s your mental health? If you have resolved this year to take better care of yourself, don’t forget to focus on your mental health as well as your physical health. Being aware of symptoms of mental illness and knowing what resources to turn to if needed will help you be proactive about keeping and expanding your resolution. Did you know Medicare covers screening for depression? A simple but thorough questionnaire can assess if you are at risk for or have symptoms of depression, and

Health&Wellness is a proud product of

your primary care physician can refer you to a mental health professional if necessary. This issue of Health & Wellness Magazine offers a wealth of information about all kinds of mental health issues. You see, we believe in promoting the health and wellness of your whole body, from head to toe. We hope you have a great, vigorous, strong new year. Here’s to your health,

Tanya

e-mail brian@rockpointpublishing.com © Copyright HEALTH&WELLNESS Magazine 2017. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine in whole or in part without written prior consent is prohibited. Articles and other material in this magazine are not necessarily the views of Health&Wellness Magazine. Health&Wellness Magazine reserves the right to publish and edit, or not publish any material that is sent. Health&Wellness Magazine will not knowingly publish any advertisement which is illegal or misleading to its readers. The information in Health&Wellness should not be considered as a substitute for medical examination, diagnosis or treatment.

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Symptoms of and Treatment for Depression Men, women, teens all display different signs of illness

By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Depression is a mental health disorder characterized by a continual low mood, a loss of interest or pleasure in activities and a deep feeling of sadness. Depression is a persistent problem, not a passing one; the average length of a depressive episode is six to eight months. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is the most common illness worldwide and the leading cause of disability. The WHO estimates 350 million people are affected by depression globally. In a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found women between the ages of 40 and 59 years have the highest rate of depression (12.3 percent) of any group based on age and gender in the United States.

Depression in men mainly is expressed in self-loathing and hopelessness. Men tend to complain about fatigue, irritability, sleep problems and loss of interest in work and hobbies. They are more likely to experience symptoms such as anger, aggression, reckless behavior and substance abuse. Depressed women are more likely to experience symptoms such as pronounced feelings of guilt, weight gain, excessive sleeping and overeating. Hormonal factors impact depression in women during menstruation, pregnancy and menopause. As many

as one in seven women experience depression following childbirth, a condition known as postpartum depression. Depression in teens is evidenced by anger, irritability and agitation. Teens may complain of stomachaches, headaches and other physical pains. Symptoms of depression in older adults include memory problems, unexplained aches and pains, fatigue and wanting to stay home rather than going out and socializing. These patients may neglect their personal appearance and stop taking medications.

The average length of a depressive episode is six to eight months.

Depression is also manifested in physical symptoms, such as: • lack of energy; • loss of libido or low sex drive; • poor posture and lack of eye contact; • speaking or moving slower than usual; • changes in the menstrual cycle; • constipation; and • disturbed sleep patterns. Psychological symptoms of depression include: • feeling helpless, hopeless, tearful, guilt-ridden, irritable and intolerant; • difficulty making decisions; • being pessimistic, humorless, lethargic and hypercritical of self and others; • complaining; • having thoughts of harming oneself or committing suicide; and • feeling worried or anxious. Socially, a person with depression may neglect hobbies and interests


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he or she previously enjoyed. He or she may not do well at work or have difficulties in his or her family life. The person may avoid contact with friends and participate in fewer social activities. Usually, the treatment for depression involves a combination of medicines, including selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants along with counseling or psychotherapy and self-help therapies. Exercise is one of the main treatments for mild depression. Talking through your feelings with self-help groups or a relative, friend or clergyperson can be helpful. If your depression is very severe, you maybe referred to a mental health team composed of psychiatrists, psychologists, occupational therapists and specialist nurses, who provide medication as well as intensive therapy treatments. About the Author Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer and blogger who has a keen interest in health and wellness. She can be approached through her blog (www.aha-now.com) and Web site, www.harleenasingh.com. Connect with Health&Wellness_HalfPage_Feb17.pdf her on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

Talking through your feelings with self-help groups or a relative, friend or clergyperson can be helpful. 1

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Suicide Prevention Risk factors, resources – and what not to say By Author, Staff Writer Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and 44,193 Americans die by suicide annually, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). Kentucky, which ranked 16th of all 50 states, was slightly above the national average of 13.26 per 100,000 people at 17.06. Who Is at Risk? Anyone is susceptible to feeling hopeless. Prolonged feelings of hopelessness or depression can lead to thoughts of suicide. Nationally averaged, white middle-aged men are the highest risk population, according to the AFSP. White males accounted for seven out of 10 suicides in 2015, and all men die by suicide 3.5 times more often than women. What Are Some Risk Factors? Existing mental health issues increase one’s risk of suicidal thoughts. Depression, manic-depressive bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, borderline or antisocial personality disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety disorders and psychotic symptoms

in context with any disorder all include possible symptoms of suicide. Substance abuse, serious or chronic health conditions and prolonged physical pain can also lead to suicidal feelings. Stressful life events – a death, divorce, job loss, harassment, bullying, relationship problems – and exposure to another person’s suicide or graphic or sensationalized accounts of suicide can raise suicide risk. A family history of suicide or suicide attempts can also increase one’s likelihood of thinking of suicide. What Are Some Warning Signs? If someone has any of the above risk factors, keep an ear open for any talk of being a burden to others, feeling trapped, experiencing unbearable pain or loneliness, having no reason to live or thinking about killing themselves. Watch out for the following behaviors: • increased use of alcohol or drugs; • looking for ways to kill oneself via online searches; • acting recklessly; • withdrawing from activities; • isolation from family and friends; • sleeping too much or too little; • visiting or calling people to say goodbye; or

• giving away prized possessions. Mood changes such as depression, loss of interest, humiliation, irritability, anxiety, aggression or rage should not be ignored. What Should You Do? When you suspect someone you know is feeling suicidal, do not ignore it! The first step is to gather local suicide crisis resources to share with the person when you talk to him or her. Begin a conversation with the person. Provide concrete examples of signs that are prompting you to ask about suicide. This makes it more difficult for the person to dismiss your concerns and deny he or she is troubled. Immediately after listing clear signs, directly ask if the person is considering suicide – for example, say: “Sometimes when people feel like you do, they are thinking of suicide. Are you thinking about suicide?” Talking about suicide does not put the idea into someone’s head. It often gives the suicidal person a sense of relief and shows your willingness to discuss it frankly. If you ask, “Are you thinking about ending your life?” and the person answers, “Yes,” stay calm and don’t leave the person until further help is involved. If the person doesn’t answer with an absolute “Yes,” listen for the reasons they share for both living and dying. Remind him he won’t always feel this way. Let him know you care about him and are taking him and his feelings very seriously. Ask if he has access to any prescription medications or weapons. (Firearms account for nearly 50 percent of all suicide deaths, says the

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AFSP.) Together, create a safety plan: Who will the person call if she feels suicidal again while waiting to see a mental health professional? Try to get the person to agree to promise to call someone for help. Ask if she will refrain from using alcohol or other drugs or agree to have someone monitor her use of these substances until she gets help for the underlying causes for feeling suicidal. Ask the person to promise he will not self-harm or act on any thoughts of suicide until he meets with a mental health professional. Provide the person with the resources you gathered prior to initiating the conversation. If you feel the situation is critical, take the person to the nearest ER or walkin psychiatric crisis clinic or call 911. What Should You NOT Say? • Do not ask questions in ways that indicate you want “No” for an answer: “You’re not thinking about suicide, are you?” or “You’re not thinking about doing something stupid, are you?” • Do not tell the person to do it. This is extremely dangerous. Do not say, “Fine! If you want to be selfish and kill yourself then go right ahead! See if I care.” • Do not promise secrecy. Sources and Resources • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255 • Lexington: Bluegrass Regional Mental Health Comprehensive Care Center 1-800-928-8000

SUICIDE: KENTUCKY 2016 FACTS & FIGURES SUICIDE: KENTUCKY 2016 FACTS & FIGURES SUICIDE PREVENTION PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES Suicide Death Rates Number of Deaths by Suicide Kentucky

727

Nationally

42,773

Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death overall in Kentucky.

Based on most recent 2014 data from CDC

Suicide cost Kentucky total of $746,659,000 The Suicide Prevention Consortium of Kentucky (SPCK) abrings together of combined lifetime medical and work loss individuals and organizations dedicated to reducing the impact of suicide Rate per 100,000 State cost in 2010, or an average of $1,183,295 Population Rank and suicide attempts in the Commonwealth. SPCK is open to the public and per suicide death. is currently supported by a State Suicide Prevention Coordinator within the 15.88 19 Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. 12.93

IN KENTUCKY, 4th leading 2nd leading of death cause of SUICIDE DBHDID provides consultation and resources related todeath education cause and for ages 10-14 for ages 15-34 IS THE... awareness materials and training for secondary schools as per legislated

requirement; implements evidence-based suicide prevention training for leading 4th leading 8th leading providers serving youth; and increases public/private collaboration16th among cause of death cause of death cause of death youth-serving institutions and for child serving agencies. for ages 65 & older ages 34-54 for ages 55-64 The DBHDID received a Garret Lee Smith Grant in 2014 for the Kentucky On average, oneZero Suicides (KIZS). Initiative for Over three times as many people person dies by suicide Kentucky’s state Preventing Kentucky’s by suicideSuicide: in Kentucky annually Plan, was approximately everyplan, titleddie released in 2005. As of spring 2013, the plan isthe currently in thetoprocess of than by homicide; total deaths 12 hours in the state. being revised. suicide reflect a total of 13,627 years of potential life lost (YPLL) before Kentucky law (KRS § 158.070) that school personnel receive four agerequires 65. days of professional development training along with two hours of suicide prevention training each year. This training may be completed through a selfreview of appropriate suicide prevention materials. Kentucky is now the second state in the U.S. (the first was Washington State) to require suicide prevention training for mental health and other

GET INVOLVED

TheAFSP AFSPLouisville LouisvilleMetro Metro Chapter brings The Chapter brings together peopl of all backgrounds in communities throughout the state together people of all backgrounds in to fight suicide.throughout For more information volunteer, communities the state or to to fight please contact: suicide. For more information or to volunteer, please contact: AFSP – KENTUCKY

AFSP – KENTUCKY

Kentucky@afsp.org

Kentucky@afsp.org

BECOME AN ADVOCATE IN KENTUCKY BECOME AN ADVOCATE IN

KENTUCKY AFSP’s Kentucky advocacy volunteers build AFSP's Kentucky volunteers relationships withadvocacy public officials and build advocate on relationships with publicprevention officials and advocate behalf of sound suicide policy. on behalf of sound suicide prevention policy.

To get involved, contact: Nicole To getGibson involved, contact: Director of State Policy & Grassroots Advocacy Nicole Gibson ngibson@afsp.org Director of State Policy & Grassroots Advocacy

ngibson@afsp.org


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What is Good Mental Health? A state of well-being, ability to contribute to the community

By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Mental health affects how we act, feel and think as we cope with life. It includes our emotional, psychological and social well-being. Mental health also determines how we relate to others, make choices and handle stress. Good mental health is a sense of self-esteem and confidence. It is

important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence right through adulthood. According to estimates, only about 17 percent of U.S adults are considered to be in a state of optimal mental health. The World Health Organization (WHO) says mental health is not just the absence of any mental disorders. WHO stresses good mental health is

“a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.� Mental illnesses are serious disorders that can affect your behavior, mood and thinking. There are various causes of mental disorders, including

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biological factors. Your family history and genes could play a role, and even your life experiences, such as a history of abuse or stress, may impact your mental health. Mental illness results from complex interactions between the body, mind and environment. Factors that could contribute to mental illness are acute, long-term stress; biological influences such as hormones, chemistry and genetics; drug and alcohol abuse; and social factors such as financial problems, family breakdown, isolation or violence. People with positive mental health work productively, cope with the stresses of life, realize their full potential and make meaningful contributions to their communities. You can maintain positive mental health by connecting with and helping others, getting help if needed, staying positive, remaining physically active, getting enough sleep and developing coping skills.

Only about 17 percent of U.S adults are considered to be in a state of optimal mental health.

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The Brain Is Amazing It’s efficient, created with purpose and symbiosis By Dr. Barry Lord, Staff Writer That 3-pound, self-aware,

sophisticated machinery between your ears is the

only organ that counselors rarely consider when treating clients. Counselors generally treat behaviors, feelings, perceptions and the client’s history, but not the organ itself, nor necessarily should they. Anthropologists hypothesize

Consider these brainy facts:

...the surface of the human brain, if laid out flat, is about the size of four sheets of paper? A monkey’s brain would only cover about one sheet of paper if laid out flat.

...the outer surface of the human brain (neo cortex) is thought to be about 1½ inches or about 3 cm thick?

Since the 1970s, our knowledge of the brain has increased exponentially; it is akin to coming out of the Dark Ages. With the advent of brain imaging machines (MRIs), neurologists have begun watching the brain in action. We can see what happens when someone is asleep, awake or angry, depressed, anxious and, yes, when a person is happy or industrious (Michio, 2014). In 1985, scientists at the University of California in Berkeley published structural studies of slices of Einstein’s brain. After counting the different cells in the tissue, researchers discovered the only difference between Einstein’s brain and the brain samples of other deceased doctors

... the central nervous system (CNS) is made up of two kinds of brain cells? They include neurons and glial cells. Neurons constitute about half the volume of the CNS and glial cells make up approximately the other half. Glial cells are very important because they provide support and protection for neurons. Glial cells surround neurons; it has been argued they hold the neurons in place. They supply nutrients and oxygen to the neurons, insulate them from each other and remove the remains of neurons that have died (Solfka, 2016).

...the statement that says we only use 10 percent of our brains is a myth? This untruth has been quoted for many decades by the media and has never been supported by any scientific evidence. The 10-percent usage myth was probably started from misquotes of Albert Einstein and others in the medical research community of the 1800s and early 1900s (Kalat, 1998).

...there are over 100 billion neurons that fulfill a specific plan and structure in the brain?

in the study was that Einstein had a greater ratio of glial cells to neurons (Hopper, 2007). Scientists are currently studying if intelligence has a correlation to the ratio of glia cells to neurons in the brain. The miracle of the human brain is not its parts but rather how it talks to itself. The more I study this organ, the more I am stunned by its beautiful design and the loving grace of its designer. This unique organ is the wonder of the universe and cannot be simply explained away through chaos and evolutionary processes. References • Brice, M. (2012). Scientists explain how the brain cleans itself. Medical

...you constantly create new brain cells (Nursing, 2015)?

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the brain evolved from chaos to complex order all on its own. The human brain is the most amazing object in the entire universe.

Did you know... ...your brain produces enough electricity to power a 20-watt bulb at any one time? According to neurologists who have studied the brain extensively, this amazingly created organ uses about 20 watts of electricity at any one time, albeit much more efficiently than a light bulb (Kalat, 1998).

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Daily. www.medicaldaily.com/ scientists-explain-how-brain-cleansitself-241989 Hooper, J. and Sample, I. (2007). Brain cells clue to genius of Einstein. The Guardian. www.theguardian.com/ science/2007/feb/21/neuroscience. highereducation Kalat, J. W. (1998). Biological Psychology, 6th edition. Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. (p. 43.) Michio, K. (2014). The scientific quest to understand enhance, and empower the mind. The Future of the Mind. Doubleday: New York. Nursing Assistant Central (2015). 100 interesting facts that you never knew about the brain. www.nursingassistantcentral.com/blog/2008/100-

... the ratio of glia cells to nerve cells in the brain is about 3 to 1? Even though glial cells have multifaceted processes, they are generally smaller than neurons and lack the axons and dendrites that we associate with the neurons they service (Solfka, 2016). Dendrites in neurons enable information to pass from one cell to another.

... your brain cells poop? Every organ in the body has to expel waste. The structure researchers dubbed the “glymphatic system” because of glial cells is an important part of the process, pumping fluid along the outside of blood vessels, literally flushing cell waste away (Brice, 2012).

...the entire brain is constructed with purpose and symbiosis? Each part has a structural purpose and all its parts are interdependent.

fascinating-facts-you-never-knewabout-the-human-brain/ • Sofka, Meredith (2016 ). Glial Cells. http://blustein.tripod.com/

About the Author Dr. Barry Lord is a licensed psychotherapist in California who has worked in the field of counseling for over 25 years. He was an adjunct professor and the Dean of Behavioral Sciences at Southern California Seminary. He retired as professor emeritus from Southern California Seminary. He continues to teach as an adjunct professor in the graduate program at SCS and lectures at national and international seminars, Webinars and radio programs throughout the United States.


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Supporting a Loved One with Depression It involves more than just ‘snapping out of it’ By Michelle Chalkey, Staff Writer Depression is a difficult diagnosis, not only for those who suffer from it, but also for their family members and friends. It’s tough to see a loved one unhappy and unmotivated, struggling with his or her mental state every day. You want to do everything you can to help him or her get back to his or her normal self and find the joy in life again, but what can you say and how much can you intervene without making things worse? Where family members tend to get it wrong is in thinking depression is just a “bad mood” that can be fixed by “snapping out of it.” Depression is a disorder that is not easily understood and should not be underestimated in its seriousness. While this disorder can be treated, it takes time. It’s common to feel helpless, frustrated, fearful, sad or even guilty when trying to help someone you love who has depression. Here are some things you can try to positively support your loved one’s recovery: Learn about depression. Part of the reason you may struggle to help your loved one is you haven’t experienced the illness yourself. You have no idea what is happening in his or her mind. Make an effort to understand what the person is going through. Understanding his or her thought process and feelings may keep you from saying hurtful things out of frustration. Express your willingness to help. Provide assistance in any way the person is willing to accept. You may need to help the person make an appointment with a doctor or therapist, and other times you simply may need to offer your ears. Always listen with no judgment rather than giving advice. It may take time before your loved one accepts your help, but your persistence will let him or her know you haven’t given up on him or her. Encourage uplifting activities. Physical activity is one of the best things to do to get the blood mov-

ing and possibly lift one’s mood. Offer to take a walk with the person or play a game of tennis. Invite him or her out to see a funny movie or join you at a restaurant. Again, be lovingly persistent. Don’t place blame or shame. Understand the person is not choosing to be negative. Someone suffering from depression is truly unable to access positive feelings. He cannot force himself to be happier. Blaming the person for not trying will only make her blame herself for what she cannot help and make her feel more depressed. Take care of yourself. You’re likely suffering from your own heartache as you watch a loved one battle this disorder. When someone is depressed, he or she may say things that are hurtful or negative and your emotions are sure to take a hit. Your emotional health is just as important, and your loved one needs your positive strength to draw from. Keep doing things that make you happy. You may need someone to talk to as well. Seek support to work through your own thoughts and feelings about the situation. Recovery is different for everyone who suffers from depression. Symptoms may only last a couple of weeks for some, but if left untreated, depression can last up to eight months. Understand recovery doesn’t happen overnight. Being persistent and patient with your loved are the best things you can do.

Recovery is different for everyone who suffers from depression.

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Mind Body Studio 859.373.0033 | www.mindbodystudio.org 517 Southland Drive, Lexington

Seasonal Affective Disorder By John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP In addition to cold weather, winter sometimes brings sadness and depression. Some people experience depression only during the winter. Others with year-round depression have worsening symptoms in winter. Terms such as “winter blues,” “wintertime depression” and “winter-onset depression” refer to a potentially serious form of depression called “seasonal affective disorder” (SAD), which affects people during the coldest and (most importantly) darkest months of the year. Though most people are affected from the fall into the winter, some suffer this annual

change in mood in the spring and early summer. Common symptoms of SAD include depression, anxiety, low energy, loss of interest in previously pleasurable activities, headache, changes in appetite, weight and sleep, impaired concentration and memory, social withdrawal and isolation from friends and family. As with depression of any kind, it is important to take seriously any of these symptoms, especially if they occur each year, last more than a few days or interfere significantly with work or personal life. It is especially important to seek professional help if there are any suicidal thoughts or a dependency on alcohol or other recreational drugs as a form

Letting more light into the home and office can help. Spending more time with supportive friends, family and pets can help.

or escape, denial or self-medication. Although the exact cause of SAD is unknown, there are several possible contributors. A reduction in natural daylight in fall and winter can affect the body’s internal clock, causing changes in the circadian rhythms (variations in normal physiology related to time of day) and blood levels of hormones and chemicals important in mood regulation. Changes in serotonin and melatonin levels are two examples. About 5 percent of Americans experience moderate to severe SAD symptoms and up to 20 percent experience a mild form. SAD affects women more than men. People living in the far northern and far southern latitudes, farthest from the equator where winters are darkest, are more affected. Those with a personal or family history of depression of any kind are more likely to be affected. As with other forms of depression, self-care approaches may help SAD and are worth trying if symptoms are mild, especially if such approaches have helped in previous years. Letting more light into the home and office can help. Spending more time with supportive friends, family and pets can help. Vigorous physical exercise can help most forms of depression, including SAD. Exercising outdoors combines both these approaches. Yoga, meditation, mindfulness training, prayer, massage and acupuncture may be helpful. Ask your primary care provider (PCP) for a referral to a complementary provider in whom he or she has confidence. Although several herbs and supplements are promoted as having anti-depressant

activity, some of them may also have adverse health effects, including interacting with medications or nutritional supplements. Always discuss such approaches with your PCP as part of your partnership to establish your own unique, individualized plan of care. Your PCP can help you determine the cause of depression and other symptoms, provide educational resources and referrals and work with you to develop your unique plan of care. There is no diagnostic test for SAD. To establish the diagnosis of SAD and distinguish it from other forms of depression, it is necessary to document the recurrence of symptoms for at least two consecutive years at the same time of year. There must be depression-free intervals between periods of depression and your PCP must have ruled out other causes of depression. If your PCP determines your symptoms are the result of SAD, he or she may recommend light therapy (phototherapy), anti-depressants, mental health counseling or a combination of approaches. Phototherapy involves sitting a few feet away from a light box with bulbs that emit light simulating the daylight wavelength spectrum. Phototherapy may worsen symptoms in those with bipolar disorder and menstrual irregularities, so discuss its use with your PCP for maximum safety and to choose a reputable product. Tanning beds should not be used for phototherapy because their light is high in ultraviolet rays that can harm both the eyes and skin. Anti-depressant medications used for SAD include those used for other


February 2017

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About 5 percent of Americans experience moderate to severe SAD symptoms and up to 20 percent experience a mild form.

forms of depression. You and your PCP should select them after doing a thorough review of your symptoms and medical history. Please never self-medicate by taking someone else’s anti-depressant medication. Your needs and unique medical history will determine what is best for you. Antidepressants may take several weeks to show a beneficial effect. This is why it is important to discuss several treatment options with your PCP or mental health provider and stay in close contact with him or her during treatment. Any conversation with your PCP, mental health counselor or chaplain/spiritual counselor must honestly describe the extent of the symptoms you are experiencing, especially if there has been any thought of self-harm or suicide. Many people, especially men, minimize the severity of such symptoms, believing they should be able to “snap out of it” on their own. Mental health counseling can offer help not provided by medication alone. There are several ways to use such counseling to manage overall stress and re-train thoughts, attitudes and behaviors so they are more mood elevating and life affirming. Please remember it is not a sign of weakness to ask for help and share the extent of your emotional anguish with a trusted friend, faith community member, PCP or mental health professional. Sources and Resources • FamilyDoctor.org Seasonal affective disorder https://familydoctor.org/condition/seasonal-affectivedisorder/ • Mayo Clinic.org Seasonal affective disorder www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/seasonalaffective-disorder/basics/definition/con-20021047

About the Author Dr. Patterson is past president of the Kentucky Academy of Family Physicians and is board certified in family medicine and integrative holistic medicine. He is on the family practice faculty of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Saybrook College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (San Francisco) and the Center for Mind Body Medicine (Washington, D.C.). He operates the Mind Body Studio in Lexington, offering integrative medicine consultations and group classes specializing in mindfulnessbased approaches to stress-related chronic disease and burnout prevention. He can be reached through his Web site at www.mindbodystudio.org.

Relax the body, quiet the mind and open the heart

Individual consultations, group classes, coaching, half day and all-day retreats Practice mindfulness, meditation, relaxation and gentle yoga for stress-related conditions and burnout prevention

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Mental Health and Teens

Shift in behavior and mood could signal bigger problems By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer

Being a teenager is not easy. They are under stress to do well in school, make big decisions, get along with family and friends and be liked. Most of these pressures cannot be avoided, and it is very normal for teens to worry about them. However, feeling persistently hopeless, sad or worthless may be warning signs of a mental health problem. According to a study by the National Institute of Mental Health, 90 percent of people who develop a mental health problem show warning signs during their teen years. When left untreated, these problems may

lead to family conflicts, school failure, trouble with the law, alcohol and drug abuse and even suicide. Teenagers are known for their sudden shifts in behaviors and moodiness. However, if you notice a significant change in your teen, that can be a danger sign. Some common mental health disorders are depression/ anxiety disorders, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Help may be required if your teen: • uses drugs or alcohol;

• is obsessed with dieting and/or binge eating and exercising; • destroys property or hurt others; • does reckless things that could harm you or others; • often feels very worried or angry; • is aggressive or consistently disobedient or has temper tantrums; • thinks someone is controlling their mind; • feels grief for a long time after death or a loss; • sleeps too much or not at all; • is not interested in academics; • experiences loss of self-esteem; • abandons or loses interest in his

or her favorite pastime; or • displays excessive isolation and secrecy. According to research, teens with mental health problems who got appropriate treatment showed an increase in scholastic test scores, and effective mental health interventions and a positive school climate contributed to improved student achievement. As parents and caretakers, you must communicate constantly with your children by being honest and open about anything and everything. Talking about your fears and experi-


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

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ences can help your teens know they are not alone. Show love and affection and care for your child. Encourage him to speak about his feelings with you. Deal with problems as they arise, rather than letting them build up. Lastly, be alert and attentive to your teen’s behavior. Avoid sarcasm, threats, yelling and whining. Speak in a calm voice and be prepared to listen without interrupting your teen. Don’t demean or make personal attacks. If things get too heated, take a break and come back to the discussion later. Remember what it was like to be a teen. Teens need to know mental health problems can be treated. To find help, they can talk to their school counselor, health care providers and, of course, their parents.

90 percent of people who develop a mental health problem show warning signs during their teen years.

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Which Style Best Suits You and Your Hearing Loss? By Dr. Brewer, Audiology Associates As we have discussed in previous articles, there are many factors that go into investing in hearing aids. Our priority, first and foremost, is basing technology and components inside the units on your lifestyle to ensure they are doing their job for the life you want to live. It should not be based on what the hearing aid looks like. With that being said, there are many different styles of hearing aids. The range of style options allows hearing care professionals to work with the wants and needs of each patient; however, it is important to remember that some hearing aids may not be appropriate depending on the degree of hearing loss the individual has. Style Options: Invisible-In-Canal (IIC) IIC hearing aids are the smallest hearing aid option on the market today. This device fits deeper down into the canal to create a more invisible look; it is custom made based on an impression taken from your ear. Additionally, from the outside, this hearing aid cannot is not visible. Because the fit of this unit is deeper, it is the most secure fit within all the hearing aid options. Battery life for this unit is typically 3-5 days. Completely-In-Canal (CIC) CIC hearing aids are slightly larger than the IICs. This custom hearing aid

also sits down in the ear canal but is slightly more visible from the outside. The fit of this unit is still quit secure because of the deeper fit. Due to the slightly larger size of these units there is the flexibility of having manual controls on the units, as well as software that is Bluetooth compatible should you desire an accessory for the hearing aid. Battery life is typically in the 3-5 day average. In-The-Canal (ITC) ITC hearing aid is a custom fit hearing aid which provides comfort, as it is made for your ear and your ear only. It is one of the easier hearing aids to insert and remove because of the size. There are external controls and Bluetooth capabilities in this style option as well. Additionally, because of the increased size of the unit, the battery is slightly larger providing a longer battery life between changes, on average lasting one week. Half Shell (HS)

HS hearing aids are custom hearing aids that are also one of the easiest hearing aids to insert and remove. They are a great option for patients with dexterity issues. Slightly larger than the ITC hearing aids they are visible units. They have external control options and Bluetooth capabilities as well as a battery life of typically one week. Full Shell (FS) FS hearing aids are custom hearing aids the fill the entire portion of

the ear, making them very easy to insert and remove. Again, like the HS hearing aids, this is a great option for individuals with any dexterity issues. This hearing aid is suitable for most treatable hearing losses and has external controls/ Bluetooth options for ease of use. Average batter life ranges from one to two week depending on the battery size ordered. Behind-The-Ear (BTE) BTE hearing aids are the most flexible hearing aid to fit, as they can be utilized for all degrees of treatable hearing loss. The hearing aid sits behind an individuals’ ear while tubing and an earmold are used to funnel the sound from the unit into the ear canal. The earmold is custom made to the individuals’ ear in order to provide a comfortable fit. This style can also be made in a Power BTE which is for patients with severely-profound hearing loss and need a larger boost in amplification. Both options of BTE hearing aids allow for external controls, Bluetooth compatibility and battery life averages one to two weeks. Receiver-In-Canal/ReceiverIn-Ear (RIC/RIE) RIC and RIE hearing aids are very similar to the BTE arrangement requiring a portion of the unit to sit behind the ear. The difference between this and the BTE is the wiring that sits next to the face and enters the ear canal is much smaller and

not hallow. This allows for a much more discrete visual appearance, as well as a more comfortable and nature feel. RIC/RIE hearing aids can encompass an open fit which is for someone with a mild to moderate hearing loss. It can also have a custom earmold attached to allow someone with a more severe hearing loss to utilize the comfort of this style. Battery life ranges from one to two weeks depending on the size of the physical unit behind the ear. Bluetooth accessories are also an option for these devices. Regardless of what option you may feel is best for you, please be open to hearing the recommendation by your hearing healthcare provider, as they want what is best for you and your hearing loss. About the Author Dr. Brewer completed her Doctor of Audiology degree at the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine and her undergraduate degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University in Oxford, OH. She is licensed by the state of Kentucky as an audiologist and hearing instrument specialist. She is also a member of the American Academy of Audiology, Academy of Doctors of Audiology, Kentucky Academy of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.   Dr. Brewer specializes in diagnostic audiologic evaluation as well as hearing aid services, including selection, fitting, and follow-up care. Her passion is to provide her patients with the most appropriate form of treatment for their hearing health care.


COGNITIVE DECLINE Those with untreated hearing loss experience A 30%–40% GREATER DECLINE in thinking abilities compared to those without hearing loss.

TINNITUS PEOPLE WITH TINNITUS 90% OF ALSO HAVE HEARING LOSS. Tinnitus affects 1 in 5 people. Tinnitus can be caused by hearing loss, an ear injury, or a circulatory system disorder.

HEART HEALTH

Hypertension can be an accelerating factor of hearing loss in older adults.

THE INNER EAR IS EXTREMELY SENSITIVE TO BLOOD FLOW.

TOTAL-BODY

HEALTH

BEGINS WITH

TIMES

HYPERTENSION

THERE IS A SIGNIFICANT ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND UNTREATED HEARING LOSS.

EYE HEALTH

If you have vision and hearing loss, your ability to target sound location is compromised. The amplification from hearing aids helps compensate for the vision loss.

SAFETY/BALANCE

3

Studies show that a healthy cardiovascular system — a person’s heart, arteries, and veins — has a positive effect on hearing. Inadequate blood flow and trauma to the blood vessels of the inner ear can contribute to hearing loss.

SMOKING

BETTER HEARING

CURRENT SMOKERS HAVE A 70% HIGHER RISK OF HAVING HEARING LOSS THAN NONSMOKERS.

HEALTH

DIABETES

HEARING LOSS IS TWICE AS COMMON IN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES COMPARED TO THOSE WITHOUT.

OBESITY

Adults whose blood glucose is higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis have a 30% higher rate of hearing loss compared to those with normal blood sugar.

HIGHER BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) AND LARGER WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF HEARING LOSS IN WOMEN.

OTOTOXICITY

OSTEOPOROSIS A study linked osteoporosis and hearing loss, theorizing that demineralization of the three middle-ear bones may contribute to a conductive hearing impairment. 259 Soutland Dr • Lexington 859.277.0491

THERE ARE MORE THAN 200 MEDICATIONS ON THE MARKET TODAY THAT ARE KNOWN TO CAUSE HEARING LOSS (TOXIC TO THE EARS). The list of known ototoxic drugs includes: • Aspirin • Some anticancer drugs • Quinine • Some anesthetics • Water pills • Environmental chemicals • Certain antibiotics like carbon monoxide, hexane, and mercury

Sources: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) | National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDC) | National Council on Aging (NCOA) | Sergei Kochkin, Ph.D. The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life - Better Hearing Institute, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from: www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia. Frank Lin, M.D. (2014 January 22) Hearing Loss Linked to Accelerated Brain Tissue Loss. Johns Hopkins Medicine News Release. | Ha-Sheng Li-Korotky, Au.D., Ph.D., M.D. (2012) Age-Related Hearing Loss: Quality of Care for Quality of Life. The Gerontologist, Volume 52, Issue 2: 265-271 | Karen J. Cruickshanks, Ph.D.; Ronald Klein, M.D.; Barbara E. K. Klein, M.D.; Terry L. Wiley, Ph.D.; David M. Nondahl, M.S.; Ted S. Tweed, M.S. (1998) Cigarette Smoking and Hearing Loss: The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study. JAMA. 998;279(21):1715-1719. doi:10.1001/jama.279.21.1715 | Hull RH, Kerschen SR. (2010) The influence of cardiovascular health on peripheral and central auditory function in adults: a research review. Am J Audiol. 2010 Jun;19(1):9-16. doi: 10.1044/1059-0889(2010/08-0040). | De Moraes Marchiori LL, de Almeida Rego Filho E, Matsuo T (2006) | Hypertension As a Factor Associated with Hearing Loss. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. Jul-Aug;72(4):533-40. Babich M., Hoffmeister D. & Doughty, A. (2009). Osteoporosis and Conductive Hearing Loss: A Novel Model of Clinical Correlation. Retrieved from: PHILICA.COM Article number 148. | American Tinnitus Association, ATA.org | www.mayoclinic.com/health/tinnitus/DS00365 © 2016 Audigy Group LLC. All rights reserved. 81705-820 2/15 POST3101-01-EE-AY

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VISION HELPS YOU IDENTIFY WHERE A SOUND IS COMING FROM.

PEOPLE WITH MILD HEARING LOSS (25 dB) ARE more likely to have a history of falling. Every additional 10 decibels of hearing loss increases the chances of falling by 1.4.

February 2017

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Medicare Covers Screening for Depression By Dr. Jeffrey Foxx, Family Practice Associates of Lexington, P.S.C. Have you made a resolution to take better care of yourself this year? Be sure to consider not only your physical health but your mental health as well. According to a new federal report from the Centers for Disease Control, people in the United States have made great progress in some health areas —for example, they get more exercise and fewer teens smoke cigarettes — but they have lagged behind in many others, particularly in the area of mental health. If you need an incentive to take inventory of your mental health, be aware Medicare covers a yearly screening for depression. It is part of the Annual Wellness Visit, during which you would discuss and create with your doctor a plan of preventive care for the coming year. According to Medicare Interactive (www.medicareinteractive.org), these screenings are designed to be completed by a doctor or other primary care provider to ensure you are correctly diagnosed and treated and receive follow-up care. In order to get Medicare to cover it, the depression screening must take place in a primary care setting. The screening includes a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2 and PHQ-9) that helps discern if you

may be at risk for or have symptoms of depression. If the questionnaire results indicate you are at risk for or have symptoms of depression, your doctor will do a more thorough evaluation and, if necessary, refer you to a mental health professional for further care. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) (www. cms.gov) says screening for depression in adults is reasonable and necessary for the prevention or early detection of illness or disability. The CMS describes depression as a mental disorder characterized by alterations in mood. The symptoms of depression have been recognized as far back as ancient times. (Hippocrates called it melancholia.) Depression is not a single disease, says the CMS; it is a syndrome manifested by a variety of diseases with distinct causes. Its origin includes psychological, social and biological factors. Depression affects people across the age spectrum. In older adults, depression is often linked with comorbidities such as cancer, arthritis, stroke, lung disease and cardiovascular disease. Grief is another important risk factor for depression, and older people generally experience an accelerated loss of friends and loved ones as they age. Diagnosis of depression is based on

a highly variable set of symptoms. These symptoms include depressed mood; diminished interest or pleasure in activities the person formerly enjoyed; significant weight loss or gain; fatigue or loss of energy; feelings of worthlessness; and insomnia or hypersomnia. Depression screening is important because it can help improve mental health and general medical outcomes. Under-recognized and undertreated mental illness is a serious social problem. It creates significant impacts on public health and the economy. One study esti-

mates the combined U.S. direct and indirect costs of depression to be $83.1 billion, including $31.5 billion in direct costs and the remainder in indirect, mostly workplace costs. Depression is projected to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020. About the Author A Covington, Ky., native, Dr. Jeffrey Foxx founded Family Practice Associates of Lexington in 1983. Dr. Foxx holds the belief that “God is first, family is second and medicine is third.”


SENIOR LIVING

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Senior Independent Living Redefined

searching for unique options to meet and enhance their current lifestyle. These discerning seniors want more than the typical offerings. Senior Living Communities are being redefined to allow seniors to live on their own terms, not established by the community regime. Bingo is being replaced with Apple technology sessions. Exercise classes are being by Jacqueline Kennedy, Legacy Reserve at Fritz Farm enhanced to include water aerobics, personal training and yoga. Dining is being reinvented to include upscale restaurant options, quick stop café If asked to According to www.independentlivopportunities, room service menus define “senior liv- ing.org, independence is being able after a busy day, and all-day dining”, what would to control what we do, how we do it, your descripand when. This definition goes hand ing capabilities to allow residents the choice to dine at their leisure tion of this lifestyle include? Many in hand with what an independent immediately gravitate towards the living community may provide. These instead of the community’s schedule. stereotypical skilled nursing scenario, communities often offer the freedom Although day trips are plentiful, travel agents may partner with communities including activities that revolved to enjoy life. Potential residents are to travel out of state and abroad. around pastimes such as bingo or generally 62 years of age or older. Independent Living apartment other more sedative recreation. Is The majority of these residents are homes are also being reinvented. this an option that you or a loved perfectly capable of living in their Downsizing from a home filled with one would be looking forward to in own home, but are yearning for a memories is never easy. Prospective the future? The incredible news is more active setting. Independent residents seek comfort, warmth, that times have definitely changed! living removes the responsibilities function and more when visiting Not only is there much needed of maintaining a house with added growth in senior living options but responsibilities, replacing it with time communities. Modern attention to senior living is being redefined. to spend with peers, an array of recre- detail will apply for new senior living Medical Development Corporation’s ation options, delicious prepared cui- communities with complete kitchens featuring full-sized appliances, granite research resulted with an expected sine and a maintenance free lifestyle. countertops, stunning backsplashes growth in the 75+ population of 20% Many think that relocating to an and more. Often, seniors are looking between the years of 2010 and 2020. independent living community will Furthermore, Medical Development decrease independence, when in fact, to downsize and enjoy community Corp emphasized that senior housthese moves have unlimited opportu- amenities, but still wish to have the opportunity to cook as opposed to ing continues to grow because of our nities to increase independence! An dining with neighbors. Independent increasing senior population. More independent living community lifegrowth, means more opportunities style enhances an already established living communities will often offer a condo feel with full kitchen options, for people to choose options based routine. This may include working, spacious living environments, and on amenities, location, community volunteer services, travel, shopping washer/dryer connections. This features and price point. Everyone and more! enables residents to downsize from has their own idea of retirement, so With the growing senior populaareas that they are not currently utilizit is important to find a community tion, people are desiring increased ing but still have the capability to have that is compatible with not only your amenities and services. Most indeneeds but also your desires. pendent living communities will offer a full residence to enjoy alongside the community offerings. One area of growth involves housekeeping, meals, transportation Independent Living Communities. and activities. Vibrant seniors are

EXPLORING YOUR POSSIBILITIES

One of the most prevalent comments given by a potential resident is “I am not ready for that yet”. This is likely a result of antiquated stereotypical definitions of senior housing. Independent living empowers seniors to live life to the fullest. In a study by James F. Fries that was published in Milbank Quarterly, Fries contended that the aging population will live longer – and in much better condition – for a longer period of time due to improved lifestyles, nutrition, exercise and education. With the reinvention of senior living communities, these opportunities are magnified by the endless opportunities of life-enjoying amenities. Anyone desiring an active retirement should visit several communities to find how you can define this phase of life on your terms. Marc Middleton, the CEO of Growing Bolder, said it best when he said, “The key to aging is to not mourn what’s lost but to celebrate what remains; to not identify with limitation but rather with possibility”. What are your possibilities? About the Author Jacqueline Kennedy has over twenty-six years of experience in senior housing, specializing in independent living opportunities in the Lexington, KY area. Currently, she is the Director of Sales and Marketing for Legacy Reserve at Fritz Farm. This unique new senior living community will open in the Summer of 2017 and is located at 2700 Man O’ War Blvd. To contact Jacqueline, you can reach her at (859) 537-1123 or jkennedy@legacyreserveky.com.


February 2017

Anger Management Understanding anger may help you deal with common emotion By Angela Hoover, Staff Writer Anger is a common emotion everyone experiences. “Anyone can become angry; that is easy,” Aristotle wrote. “But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose and in the right way … that is not easy.” In most situations, it’s clear why people become angry, but other times, anger stems from an underlying feeling of fear, vulnerability or powerlessness. It can also be a defense mechanism against feeling hurt. Anger, like any other emotion, conveys a message – a warning that a situation is upsetting, unjust or threatening. But when your automatic reaction is to explode, you will never know the meaning behind your anger. Experiencing and expressing anger can be difficult for everyone, but for some people, it can make their lives and relationships unmanageable. “We all experience anger,” wrote Raymond W. Novaco, a pioneer in the field of anger management therapy. “Anger only becomes a serious concern when an individual is angry too frequently, too intensely and for too long.” Anger issues can have many causes. They can result from alcohol or drug abuse, biochemical changes in the brain, mental disabilities, a traumatic brain injury or PTSD. Frequent migraines can also cause angry outbursts. Anger can result from psychosocial issues, such as poverty, poor social or family circumstances, abuse or a simple lack of the skill sets needed for dealing with emotions. Anger can be a part of a larger

psychological issue such as anxiety or depression. Prolonged bouts of anger or intense anger can cause physical problems – headaches, digestive problems, diabetes, a weakened immune system, insomnia, high blood pressure and heart disease. Chronic anger consumes a lot of mental energy and clouds your thinking, making it harder to concentrate. Anger can lead to stress, depression and other mental health issues. Three clear signs of an anger management problem are having a hard time compromising; having trouble expressing any other emotion than anger; and viewing different opinions as a personal challenge. If you constantly feel frustrated no matter what you try; if your temper causes problems at work or in your relationships; if you have gotten into trouble with the law due to your anger; or if your anger has led to physical violence, seek professional counseling. Psychotherapy to address anger management began in the 1970s. Novaco modified cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques for anxiety to better suit anger management. CBT remains a popular method of anger management. Other techniques, some incorporated with CBT, include relaxation, breathing, imagery, problem solving, communication strategies and interpersonal skill training. The goal of anger management therapy isn’t to suppress feelings of anger but to understand the message or meaning behind the anger and to learn healthy ways to deal with it.

There are several things you can do to more effectively handle anger: • Recognize anger warning signs – Anger can trigger the body’s “fight-or-flight” response. Notice how your body feels: knotted stomach, clenched fists or jaw, tense muscles, pounding heart. • Recognize the feelings behind your anger – Ask yourself what initiated the angry feeling. Identify what triggers your anger and avoid those situations if possible. • Think before you speak – Take a few moments to collect your thoughts before saying anything. • Wait until you calm down to express your anger – Once you are thinking clearly, express your frustration in a firm, assertive but nonconfrontational way. State your concerns and needs clearly and directly without being hurtful. Use “I” statements. Be respectful and specific, such as saying, “I’m upset you left your socks on the floor” as opposed to “You never do any housework.” In this way, the other person will not feel blamed, criticized or defensive, allowing him or her to better hear what you have to say and understand how you feel.

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• Evaluate the situation – Ask yourself, “Is this really worth getting worked up over?” • Identify solutions – Focus on ending the cause of the anger rather than on what is making you angry. • Incorporate daily techniques for anger management – Exercise is a great way to reduce stress. Take short breaks throughout the day; this quiet time will energize and restore you so you are better able to handle whatever comes your way. Develop relaxation practices such as breathing exercises, imagining a relaxing scene, repeating a calming word or phrase, stretching, listening to music, writing in a journal or working on a hobby. If you’re dealing with a loved one who has anger issues, be sure to take care of yourself. Set clear boundaries about what you will and will not tolerate. Wait for a time when you are both calm to talk to your loved one about the anger problem – don’t bring it up when either of you are already angry. Remove yourself from the situation if your loved one does not calm down. Consider counseling or therapy if you have a hard time standing up for yourself. Put your safety first. If you feel unsafe or threatened in any way, get away from your loved one.

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February 2017 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

The Many Faces of

Anxiety

It’s now the most common U.S. mental health problem By Jean Jeffers, Staff Writer

Emily burst into her parents’ bedroom one night, crying and moaning. “I think I’m dying,” she gasped, clutching her chest. Her heart was pounding wildly and sweat soaked her nightshirt. Her mother called

911 when Emily fell to the floor in a daze. This was not some exotic West African disease; this was a panic attack. Daniel Watson, MSW, LISW, says depression was at one time

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the most common mental health problem in the United States. Today anxiety has surpassed depression to become the No. 1 mental health problem in this country. Anxiety disorders affect 40 million adults (18 percent of the population) yearly. The National Institute of Health says about one in five adults are affected. Daniel A. Barlow, in his book, “Anxiety and Its Disorders” (2004) says there are different types of anxiety: • Generalized Anxiety Disorder — chronic, excessive, uncontrollable worry. Symptoms include restlessness, irritation and fatigue. • Social Phobia — a marked fear and avoidance of social situations. Feeling hopeless and obsessing about being watched are characteristics of social phobia. • Panic Disorder — recurrent, unexpected, intense panic attacks the patient often mistakes for a more serious malady. • Agoraphobia — fear and/or avoidance of situations due to severe stress when in a place other than home. • Specific Phobias — fear and/ or avoidance of objects or situations. Here, excessive, constant fear of an event is prominent, such as riding in an elevator. • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) — reliving a trauma repeatedly or having a recurring distressing dream or flashbacks of a traumatic event. • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

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(OCD) — a person with OCD may have frequent unwanted thoughts (obsessions) or behaviors (compulsions) that create anxiety. A person with this disorder may check the oven frequently, wash his hands repeatedly or perform any number of activities obsessively, all to allay his anxiety. Anxiety disorders are complex. They often interfere with daily life and may last a lifetime, especially if left untreated. A significant number of people do not seek help, at least not until the problem becomes very uncomfortable. Professional help can make a difference, but there is much someone can do on his or her own along with the assistance of an expert. The following activities often help those with anxiety: • Consult your family doctor and have a physical to make sure nothing else is wrong that could be contributing to the anxiety. • See a mental health expert for an evaluation. It is impossible for the layperson to accurately diagnose his or her particular type of anxiety. • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, smoking and recreational drugs. • Practice stress management, relaxation techniques and deepbreathing exercises. Give yourself a time out. Do something relaxing, such as listening to music. • Start an exercise program. Physical activity may have a calming effect. • Eat well-balanced, healthy meals. • Aim for seven to eight hours of sleep at night. • Give your medication a chance before giving up on it, and do not go off it without your physician’s OK. • Create a support network.

Anxiety has surpassed depression to become the No. 1 mental health problem in this country.


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

25

Work at creating more peace in your life.

How to Beat Anxiety Without Medication Create more peace in your life with lifestyle changes

great for your mental health. Exercise releases neurotransmitters that have an uplifting effect on your mood and also burns stress hormones. You don’t have to go all out every day. The important thing is to find a form of exercise that you enjoy and that brings you peace.

Diffuse oils. Smells have the power to influence the production of dopamine and serotonin, neurotransmitters that make us feel good. Lavender especially is said to have a calming, relaxing effect. Many clinical trials have been conducted that show inhaling lavender essential oil leads to a reduction in stress and anxiety. Diffusing lavender oil in your home or dabbing it on your temples can help restore your nervous system, releasing tension and working to develop inner peace. You don’t know what kind of side effects medication will have on you. Implementing natural, healthy habits to your lifestyle, however, is guaranteed to do more good than harm. Over time, the peace in your body will outweigh the stress and you can enjoy life without so much worry.

By Michelle Chalkey, Staff Writer While anxiety brews in your worrying mind, it has many undesirable affects on your body as well. Stomach aches, muscle pain, skin irritation, full-out panic attacks – you may feel these common symptoms are taking over your life and you want them gone. You’re ready to make an appointment with your doctor and get a prescription for something to take your stress away. But will a pill fix the problem forever? Medication won’t get to the root cause of your anxiety. A pill won’t cure it for good and, with its own set of side effects, medication is not always the safest choice. If you want to prevent panic attacks, work at creating more peace in your life. You can naturally manage your anxiety by making a few changes to your lifestyle. While anxious feelings may not completely go away, implementing these healthy remedies can prevent anxiety from physically affecting you. Some might work for you right away while others will take time. The longer you strive to create peace in your mind and body, the better you’ll become at managing anxiety. Here are some techniques to try: Practice breathing techniques. Breathing practices can calm your body and reduce the likelihood of

hyperventilation. In the busy world we live in, we often neglect giving ourselves time to connect with our breath. A trick for making this a habit is to pause at the top of every hour and take 10 long, deep breaths. With your hand on your stomach, feel your belly as it inflates and deflates with each inhale and exhale. Listen to the sound of your breath. You may soon find yourself taking advantage of more opportunities to take time and breathe. Eliminate caffeine and alcohol The idea of giving up coffee may be anxiety inducing in itself, but it’s worth it to see how closely it relates to your anxiety. Caffeine is a big culprit in feelings of anxiety; it increases stress hormones, reduces calming neurotransmitters, depletes nutrients and reduces blood flow to the brain. Both caffeine and alcohol have negative effects on your sleep, another crucial factor to maintaining a peaceful mind and body. Stretch and move your body regularly. Exercise is known to be one of the best anti-anxiety medicines. What’s good for your physical health is also

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February 2017 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

FEBRUARY 2017

Ongoing Al-Anon

Free support group for anyone affected by someone else’s drinking. Local meetings and information at www.LexingtonAl-Anon.org or call 859.277.1877.

Mondays (thru March 13) Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

8 week series beginning with Monday Jan 9th orientation. The “gold standard” mindfulness program. Learn to promote resilience, prevent burnout, cultivate compassion and manage stress-related chronic conditions. Instructor: John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859373-0033. Full details at www.mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1262 UK Wellness Program offers deep discount for UK employees, retirees and spouses.

Mondays

Free Yoga Classes for Vets, Servicemembers and their Family Members Every Monday from 9:30am–10:30am at Ageless Yoga Studio, 611 Winchester Rd., Suite 200. 859-303-6225. Preregister online at agelessyogastudio. com. Click “class” tab to sign up now! Email info@agelessyogastudio.com for more info.

Mondays & Wednesdays MELT Method Hand, Foot and Body Healing Class by Shayne Wigglesworth

Mondays and Wednesdays at 12pm - Discover pain-free living at any age!

suite 180 in Lexington. This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. Classes may include chair yoga, restorative, yin yoga, tai chi, and more. Perfect for beginners as well as experienced yogis! Donations-based class.

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Tuesdays & Thursdays

Free "How to Stay Young" Class Enjoy a gentle foam roller class to reduce pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety and more! MELT Method certified instructor Shayne Wigglesworth will teach you healing techniques you can use for self care at home. All materials and rollers are provided. Perfect for all ages, body types and experience levels. Learn more at www.centeredlex.com or call 859-721-1841

Tuesdays

Community Flow This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. 10:30am–11:30am. Donation only (great portion of all donations go to the Backpack Food Program at Ashland Elementary.) Inspiring, Educating & Supporting our World through the Moving,  Visual & Healing Arts! Daily classes, therapies, workshops & a great spot to host your next event! 309 N Ashland Ave Ste.180, Lexington, KY 40502. 859-721-1841. www.centeredlex.com

Tuesdays

Swing Lessons Every Tuesday, starting September 30: 8pm–10pm at Tates Creek Recreation Center, 1400 Gainesway Dr. $5.00 per person per lesson. Call for more information: Glenn and Rosalee Kelley 859233-9947; OR Peter and Robin Young 859-224-3388.

Tuesdays

Community Yoga Class with Lauren Higdon Every Tuesday 10:30am–11:30am at Centered Studio, 309 n Ashland ave

Saturdays thru March 25 Lexington Farmer’s Market Every Saturday at Cheapside Park visit the Lexington Farmers’ Market! You can purchase herbs and spices, honey, beeswax, candles, body care products, organic products, eggs, meats and fresh, seasonal produce. 8am-1pm.

Triple Crown Chiropractic and Wellness offers a free class twice a week explaining how to keep your body young through chiropractic care. Free spinal screening available for anyone who attends the class. To register for the class, please call 859-335-0419. Questions to pr.triplecrownchiro@ gmail.com. Triple Crown Chiropractic and Wellness: 1795 Alysheba Way #4103 Lexington, KY. Free gift from the office to those who attend the class!

Tuesdays & Saturdays (thru March 28) Keeneland Guided Tours Let an experienced guide take you on a walking tour of Keeneland Race Course. Explore the paddock and grandstand while enjoying the morning workouts. Rain or shine. Wear appropriate shoes for wallking. Advance ticket purchase online (www.keeneland. com ) suggested as tours limited to 30 people. 8:30am–9:30am. Admission $8. Children 12 and under free.

1st Tuesdays

Lupus Support Group: Living & Coping with Lupus The Lupus Foundation of America support groups are intended to provide a warm and caring environment where people with lupus, their family members, caregivers and loved ones can share experiences, methods of coping and insights into living with chronic illness. Imani Baptist Church, 1555 Georgetown Road, Lexington from 7:00pm–8:00pm first Tuesday of every month. 877-865-8787. www.lupusmidsouth.org

2nd Tuesdays

PFLAG Support for LGBTs and Families We are a support group of family members and allies united with LGBTQ* individuals. Our meetings provide a safe, confidential space where you can feel respected and accepted wherever you are in your journey or family struggle. Monthly speakers help us to broaden our understanding of these issues in our families and in society. Lexington meetings are held the 2nd Tuesday of each month, 6:30 at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, 2025 Bellefonte Drive. Frankfort chapter meets the 3rd Monday of the month, 5:30 at the

Call or visit website for reservations.

(606) 668-2599 ksbrown@mrtc.com www.kentuckywildflowersllc.com

Unitarian Community, 316 Wilkinson Blvd. More information and resources at www.pflagcentralky.org For questions, call 859-338-4393 or info@pflagcentralky.org. *lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning.

Wednesdays

Mindfulness and Relaxation for Health 6:30-8:00pm (arrive at 6 to relax before class). No prior experience of yoga or meditation required. Mobilize your inner resources for promoting health, self care and managing the stress of caregiving, burnout and chronic disease, cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion, study and practice in a supportive group. Gentle yoga, mindful movement, deep relaxation, sitting meditation and discussion. Instructor: John Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859373-0033. Full details at http://www. mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1055

Fridays

Argentine Tango “Dance of the Heart” Passionate and Romantic, mindful and Meditative, a uniquely transformative social skill, art form and movement therapy, no partner or dance experience required, Friday evening 7:30-9:00 PM. You may drop-in to any class- this is not a series. Instructors: Dr. John Patterson and Nataliya Timoshevskaya. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859-373-0033. Full details at http://www.mindbodystudio. org/?page_id=214

February 7

Eat, Move, Lose Weight Support Group 12 – 1 pm, Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Department PH Clinic South, 2433 Regency Road. Free weightloss support group appropriate for anyone wishing to lose weight or maintain weight loss. Share struggles

EVENTS Continued on p.29


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

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ONGOING EVENTS Bluegrass Ovarian Cancer Support Exists to assist Central Kentucky women and their loved ones during diagnosis, treatment and survival of ovarian and other gynecological cancers. Come meet with us the third Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at Joseph Beth Booksellers, Bronte Bistro Cafe meeting room.

of each month at Word of Hope Lutheran Church, located at the corner of Man O’War and Armstrong Mill Road.  Meetings begin at 4:30. For questions, please contact Charlotte Wong, Education Coordinator, Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates Lexington office at (859) 278-3492 or toll free (800) 525-3456.

munity referral to victims of sexual assault as well as family members and friends. Volunteers at BRCC have the unique opportunity to provide valuable direct services to those impacted by sexual assault. Volunteer opportunities: Crisis Line Volunteer, Medical/Legal Advocate. For more information, please call: (859) 253-2615.

Perinatal Loss Grief Group

Center For Women’s Health Center Classes

Stop Smoking Class Series

First Tuesday of the month, 7pm, Center for Grief and Education. A group for parents who have experienced loss due to miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. Contact Debbie Mueller at (859) 260-6904 for more information.

Compassionate Friends Support Group A support group for parents, siblings, or grandparents who have lost a child regardless of the child’s age or length of time that has passed since that day. The meeting is the 1st Tuesday of every month 6:30pm–8:30pm at Hospice of the Bluegrass, 2312 Alexandria Drive, Lexington. Also meets the 1st Tuesday of every month 7pm-9pm at Hospice East, 417 Shoppers Drive, Winchester. Doors open one-half hour before meeting times to provide the opportunity to visit with old friends and acknowledge new ones.

Spouse Loss Support Group Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Hospice of the Bluegrass. A five-week support group for individuals who have experienced the loss of a spouse or significant other. Contact Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Coping After Loss First Wednesday of the month, 5:30-7pm, Center for Grief and Education. A brief educational program offering an introduction to grief information and hospice bereavement services. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Free Transportation to Cancer Screening Fayette County residents can receive free transportation through HealthLink Transit, a partnership between Kentucky Pink Connection & the Lexington--Fayette Urban County Government. Transportation provided by taxi or gas cards to cancer screening. Call (859) 309-1700 to arrange a ride.

2nd Chance Ambassadors Lexington: a support/volunteer group comprised of organ transplantation recipients, donor family members, those on the waiting list and community members interested in transplantation meets the 3rd Sunday

Held at Frankfort Regional Medical Call Mediline at 502-226-1655 or toll-free 800-242-5662 to register or for more information. Classes include: • Prepared Childbirth • Baby Care For The Early Weeks • Breast Feeding Basics • “That’s My Baby” • Sibling Classes

Cancer Classes The American Cancer Society offers women undergoing cancer treatments the opportunity to attend the Look Good...Feel Better workshop. This free workshop helps women deal with the appearance-related side-effects of cancer treatment in a private setting. Each participant receives a complimentary custom cosmetic kit. The American Cancer Society offers Prostate Cancer Educational and Support Classes called Man to Man for men with prostate cancer. This is an educational and networking program that provides information about prostate cancer and treatments options. For more information about these classes, please call Kristy Young at 859260-8285. For cancer information 24 hours a day, please call 1-800-ACS-2345 or go to www.cancer.org.

Survivors of Suicide First & third Tuesday of the month, 6-7:30pm, Center for Grief and Education. For adults affected by the loss of someone by suicide. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 2772700 for more information or to register.

Bosom Buddies A support group designed to meet the ongoing needs of women with breast cancer. The purpose of Bosom Buddies is to create a safe and comfortable environment in which women diagnosed with breast cancer can receive information and emotional support during and after treatment. Meets are the third Thursday of every month 6:00pm at the Frankfort Regional Hospital: Frankfort Medical Pavilion, Conference Room C. 279 King’s Daughters Drive, Frankfort, KY.

BRCC Volunteer Opportunities The Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center provides a 24-hour crisis line, hospital and court advocacy, crisis intervention counseling, longterm therapy, and information and com-

5:30-6:30, weekly until April 17. Tates Creek Library, 3628 Walden Dr. Based on the Cooper-Clayton method. $10/week for 10 weeks covers the cost of nicotine replacement. Call 288-2457.

GrassRoots Yoga Classes Chair yoga: 10:30–11:30am Tuesday and Thursday. Hatha Vinyasa Flow: 5:30–6:30pm Thursday. Yoga Basics for Stress Relief: 5:30–6:30pm Friday. Partial proceeds from all yoga classes benefit the Latitude Artist Community for adults considered to have disabilities. All instructors certified through Yoga Alliance. For more information, visit www.grassrootsyoga.org.

ANAD Overcoming Eating Disorders Support Group Free support group for people who want to improve their relationship with food and body image. Safe, comfortable place. Facilitated by Megan Roop, RYT, supervised by Tina Thompson, MS, RD, LD, Bluegrass Nutrition Counseling, sponsored by ANAD. Introduction meeting on October 3 from 7:15-8:30pm at Bliss Wellness Center, 2416 Sir Barton Way, Ste 125. 8 week session Oct 17-Dec 5 from 7:15-8:30pm. Contact Megan Roop 561-779-0290 for details.

Diabetes CHATS Nathaniel Mission Health Clinic CHAT: 1109 Versailles Road, Suite 400 from 4pm to 5:15pm the 4th Tuesday of each month. The Refuge Clinic: New Location, 2349 Richmond Road-Suite 220, Lexington, KY, 40502. 859225-4325. Free. Sponsored by the LexingtonFayette Co. Health Dept and UK Healthcare.

Free Cardio Classes 9-10am. Every Saturday morning in the month of February at Body Structure Medical Fitness Facility, 2600 Gribbin Drive, Lexington. This class will increase your heart rate and respiration while using large muscle groups repetitively and rhythmically to create a great workout. (859) 268-8190.

Taoist Tai Chi Society We offer classes in Louisville and Lexington. All classes are led by nationally accredited volunteer instructors in a friendly and helpful environment. The meditative movements of taijiquan can reduce tension, increase flexibility and strength, and improve circu-

lation and balance. To contact us, phone 502.614.6424 or e-mail kentucky@taoist.org.

Consumer Support Groups (Individuals with a Mental Illness) Every Sunday, 869 Sparta Court, Lexington. 2:30-4:00pm. 859-309-2856 for more info. NAMI Lexington is a local affiliate of NAMI, the “National Alliance on Mental Illness”  we provide numerous support groups and recovery programs for families and Individuals living with mental illness.

Yoga • Meditation • Stress Reduction The Yoga Health & Therapy Center offers daytime and evening Yoga classes with slow stretch, breathing awareness and relaxation training. Small classes provide personalized instruction. New yoga students receive a series discount. Meditation classes and ongoing group practice sessions available for all levels. Stress-Reduction classes based on Yoga principles and practical skills also offered. Free parking provided for most classes. For information, please call 859-254-9529 or visit www.yogahealthcenter.org.

Monthly Reiki Classes Turn your hands into healing hands! Reiki is Universal Life Force Energy Learn to improve your mind, body, and spirit! Classes taught by Robert N.Fueston, Reiki Master/Teacher and Acupuncturist, 17 years of experience and Member of The Reiki Alliance. Approved for Continuing Education hours (CE hours) for Massage Therapist. CE’s for nurses pending. Register online at www. robertfueston.com. 859-595-2164.

Ongoing Journey Circle This circle meets the 4th Sunday of every month and is for those who are experienced in the practice of journeying OR are interested in learning more about this ancient spiritual practice. Join us every month as we will be journeying on different topics that will be discussed at time of circle. Please feel free to bring drums, rattles etc. Questions or need directions or have questions? Please feel free to email/call me: 859-492-2109,info@jennifershawcoaching.com

Overeaters Anonymous Overeaters Anonymous (OA) is not a diet club. We do not count calories or have scales at meetings. OA is based on the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. There are no dues or fees. OA is self-supporting through member contributions. The only requirement for membership is the desire to stop eating compulsively. Please go to oalexingtonky. org for meeting dates and times. OR are interested in learning more about this ancie


HEALTH & FITNESS

–COLUMN PROVIDED BY–

The YMCA of Central Kentucky has several convenient locations | www.ymcacky.org

Make a Vow to Lower Blood Pressure and Reduce Sodium Intake DURING AMERICAN HEART MONTH

February is American Heart Month and as a leading community-based network committed to improving the nation’s health, the YMCA of Central Kentucky urges everyone to help prevent heart disease by lowering your blood pressure. Two ways to keep the pressure off your heart are by monitoring your blood pressure and reducing sodium intake. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease is the nation’s number one killer, responsible for 1 in 4 deaths each year in the United States. Additionally, 1 in 3 adults has high blood pressure with less than half having it under control. High blood pressure is most prevalent in minority communities, and is often referred to as “The Silent Killer” because there are typically no warning signs or symptoms. To address the prevalence of heart disease, the Y has made a national commitment to the Million Hearts campaign, an initiative spearheaded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that aims to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes. As part of this commitment, the YMCA of Central Kentucky encourages heart health through the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. The YMCA of Central Kentucky is increasing the availability of the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program – which is part of the CDC-led

National Diabetes Prevention Program. The YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program helps adults at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles to help reduce their chances of developing the disease. Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and people with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke as those who do not have it. The program provides a supportive environment where participants work together in a small group to learn about eating healthier, increasing their physical activity and making other behavior changes with the goal of reducing body weight by 7 percent in order to reduce their risk for developing diabetes. A trained lifestyle coach leads the program over a 12-month period beginning with 16 weekly sessions followed by bi-weekly, then monthly maintenance sessions. Increased physical activity and moderate weight loss not only reduce diabetes risk, but also have an impact on lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. Participants in the program receive a free membership to the YMCA for themselves and their entire family during the first 16 weeks of the program. Program Qualifications • At least 18 years old, overweight (BMI > 25)*, and • At risk for developing type 2 diabetes or • Diagnosed with prediabetes**

• *Asian individual(s) BMI >22 • **Individuals who have already been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes do not qualify for this program To see if you qualify or for information about program fees and financial assistance, contact: • Director of Community Health • Corey Donohoo • Email communityhealth@ymcacky. org or call 859-367-7317. Besides monitoring your blood pressure, reducing sodium intake is a great way to keep your heart healthy. According to the American Heart Association, too much sodium in your system puts an extra burden on your heart and blood vessels. In some people, this may lead to or raise high blood pressure. Everyone, including kids, should reduce their sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day (about 1 teaspoon of salt). Having less sodium in your diet may help you lower or avoid high blood pressure. “There are many factors in keeping your heart healthy and having a handle on your blood pressure is an effective tool in the preventing heart disease,” said YMCA of Central Kentucky’s Director of Community Health, Corey Donohoo. “Whether you have high blood pressure or are at risk for heart disease, the Y has many options available that can help.” In addition to programs and services offered in Central Kentucky, the Y offers

the following tips from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help reduce sodium in your diet. 1. Think fresh: Most of the sodium Americans eat is found in processed foods. Eat highly processed foods less often and in smaller portions especially cheesy foods, such as pizza; cured meats, such as bacon, sausage, hot dogs, and deli/luncheon meats; and ready-to-eat foods, like canned chili, ravioli and soups. Fresh foods are generally lower in sodium. 2. Enjoy home-prepared foods: Cook more often at home - where you are in control of what’s in your food. Preparing your own foods allows you to limit the amount of salt in them. 3. Fill up on veggies and fruits - they are naturally low in sodium: Eat plenty of vegetables and fruits - fresh or frozen. Eat a vegetable or fruit at every meal. 4. Adjust your taste buds: Cut back on salt little by little - and pay attention to the natural tastes of various foods. Your taste for salt will lessen over time. Additionally, keep salt off the kitchen counter and the dinner table and substitute spices, herbs, garlic, vinegar or lemon juice to season foods. 5. Boost your potassium intake: Choose foods with potassium, which may help to lower your blood pressure. Potassium is found in vegetables and fruits, such as potatoes, beet greens, tomato juice and sauce, sweet potatoes, beans (white, lima, kidney), and bananas. Other sources of potassium include yogurt, clams, halibut, orange juice and milk. About The YMCA The YMCA of Central Kentucky offers a community of diverse individuals who can support all people in meeting their health and well-being goals. Learn more by visiting ymcacky.org or stopping into your local Y.


EVENTS continued from page 26 and ideas with others. Held first and third Tuesdays most months. For more information or to preregister, call 288-2446.

February 8

Breastfeeding 101

Christian Church on Richmond Road). Free. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept. For more information, call (859) 288-2446.

Share struggles and ideas with others. Held first and third Tuesdays most months. For more information or to pre-register, call 288-2446.

February 17 – 19

February 27

Presented by Broadway Live & The Opera House Fund. Times: Friday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 1 and 7:30; Sunday 1 and 6:30 p.m. Tickets online at lexingtonoperahouse.com

9:30 a.m. at Centered Holistic Health and Wellness Center, 309 North Ashland Avenue, Suite 180, Lexington. FREE, open to everyone. For more information, call a Leader at 859-559-8488.

6-8 p.m. Baptist Health-Lexington Education Center, 1740 Nicholasville Rd. (Building E, lower level), FREE, only for those delivering at Baptist Health-Lexington. Register online at https://www. baptisthealth.com/event/breastfeeding-101 or call (859)260-6357.

Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella

February 9 – 12

MaterniTEA

Kentucky Sport, Boat & Recreation Show Shake off the cabin fever and enjoy great outdoor products, exclusive deals, and entertainment that includes fishing, farm animals, and zip lining! Thurs & Fri 2pm–9pm; Saturday 9am–9pm; Sunday 10am– 5pm at the Lexington Center and Rupp Arena. Admission $10 Single Day Pass; $5 Kids. For details, visit www.lexingtonboatshow.com.

February 13

Diabetes Support Group 9-10 am, Senior Citizens Center, 195 Life Lane (behind Southland

February 21

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Legacy Reserve Legacy Res at Fritz Farm at Fritz aFa is offering Legacy Reserve Legacy Reserve is offerin Legacy Reserve SNEAK PEAK Fritz Farm PE SNEAK at at Fritz Farm at Fritz Farm offering aa is is offering is offering a SNEAK PEAK

For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

LLL of Greater Lexington Monthly Meeting

6:30 - 7:45 PM, Baby Moon, 2891 Richmond Rd., Lexington. FREE information session to learn how to navigate the 9 months of pregnancy and beyond. Visit http:// www.babymoonlex.com/ to register.

29

Send us your event listings

If you are hosting a health-related event that is free to the public, list it here for FREE! (Events that are not free to the public can be posted in our calendar for $35).

E-mail your event date, location, description and contact information: living community will open Spring brian@rockpointpublishing.com

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FAMILY VISION

–COLUMN PROVIDED BY–

Family Eyecare Associates 105 Crossfield Drive, Versailles, KY 40383 859.879.3665 | www.myfamilyvision.com www.kentuckyvisiontherapy.com

Sports Vision Therapy Helps Athletes Improve Recognition and Response by Dr. Rick Graebe, Family Eyecare Associates and Vision Therapy Whether they’re swinging at a fastball, shooting free throws, lining up a putt or setting up a dig, athletes depend a great deal on their vision. They have to keep their eye on the ball in order to connect properly and hit a homer, make the basket, sink the putt or send a spike between two opponents. Many pro teams have a vision therapy program for their players. The program works on improving the athletes’ recognition and response. A sports vision therapist will show a baseball player photographers of a pitcher holding a ball to help them recognize when the hurler is about to throw a fastball or a curveball. (Different pitches require different finger positions.) In the major leagues, the time from pitcher release point to bat contact is four tenths of a second, and the average major league baseball player takes about two tenths of a second to get the bat from starting position to contact position. To speed up recognition so the ballplayer can respond more quickly, the vision therapist will show him the photos for a second, half a second, a quarter of a second, down to a hundredth of a second. Football players benefit from this kind of therapy, too, as it allows them to quickly assess what play is about to be run. Sports vision therapists use light boards to help athletes improve their

reaction time. As the lights flash on and off, the athlete must touch them, and as the exercise continues, the flashes speed up. This spurs the athlete to be more accurate. As speed of recognition and speed of response progress, so does accuracy. Other exercises sharpen important skills such as depth perception, visual spatial awareness and peripheral awareness, which enables the athlete to see the whole court instead of collapsing into tunnel vision as he or she gets stressed or tired. Different athletes will have different types of visual strength. For instance, hockey players tend to have better scores in the lower field of gaze because they focus their eyes more downward, following the puck across the ice. Volleyball players score better in upper field of gaze, watching as the ball comes over the net. Coaches can take information from the vision therapist to put players in positions that utilize their strengths. For instance, a vision therapy exam may show a second baseman can move faster to his left than to his right, so the coach can place him in a way that will close any holes in the infield and allow him to cover more ground. But there are also exercises that use lighted arrows and pressure points to measure and help improve an athlete’s foot speed. A recent study at the University of Cincinnati – the first of its kind – dis-

Volleyball players score better in upper field of gaze, watching as the ball comes over the net.

covered athletes who had participated in a sports vision therapy program had a significantly reduced number of concussions. The researchers concluded the athletes’ quickened response and reaction times enabled them to see the potential hit coming and avoid it.

About the Author Dr. Graebe received both his B.S degree in Visual Science and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University. He is a Behavioral Optometrist and learning expert. He has been in private practice here in the Bluegrass area for the past 32 years.


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

Depression Ebbs and Flows Patient says it never entirely goes away By Martha Evans Sparks, Staff Writer Mark* suffers from depression. “I have times when I am more down than others, but the [down] feeling is always there,” he says. He remembers only two occasions in his life when he was entirely free

of that feeling. One was when he was elected to his local school board, a post he held successfully for years. The other was when he was best man at a friend’s wedding. “On those two occasions, I felt I totally belonged and [was] accepted,” he says. What is clinical depression? How does it differ from the feelings of dis-

couragement or being “down in the dumps” that everyone experiences from time to time as a part of normal emotional swings? Is it a real illness or is it an attitudinal problem? By the time he was a young adult, Mark realized what he was experiencing was more than normal mood swings. He mentioned it to his father, who sneered and said, “To think that a son of mine would have such a viewpoint. That’s no medical issue. That’s an attitudinal issue that you could change if you wanted to.” Deeply disappointed, Mark never told his father about his problem again. Instead, he lapsed into denial and did not seek treatment. Years later, his “patient wife” insisted he get help. Mark believes if it were not for her intervention, he would have continued to suffer with no help. Mark believes the cause of his depression is a familial tendency. “My mother suffered greatly with it and did nothing,” he says. He knows a number of people in his mother’s family deal with depression. It seems clear to him the tendency for depression must be a chemical imbalance in the brain inherited in the genes. Mark says his depression ebbs and flows but never entirely disappears. He holds a job and gets to work on time every day. A business success temporarily eases the pain, he says. In response to his wife’s urging, he visited their family doctor, who prescribed Prozac. It did little for his condition. Over the years, Mark has taken many different drugs with some success. None cleared the depression entirely, but only “leveled the mood.” He found professional counseling to be of no benefit. Mark is a person of Christian faith who attends worship services regularly. He says he has prayed earnestly to God for divine healing. It has not happened. He tells himself if he were a true believer, he would not have depression. Thus he tortures himself with the idea that his suffering is his own fault. The result, of course, is to

drive himself deeper into despair. Modern psychiatry defines depression as a morbid sadness, dejection or melancholy. It is distinguished from grief, which is proportionate to personal loss. Treatment for depression can be difficult. It is aimed in part toward helping the patient understand the underlying cause of his depression. The severely depressed person often expresses one or more of three basic feelings associated with his mental state: a lack of desire to socialize, which leads to physical inactivity; feelings of worthlessness and a loss of selfesteem; and thoughts of self-injury or destruction. Mark’s response to those who believe depression is not a “real” condition is withdrawal. “I try not to argue or try to convince,” he says. “I try to hide the condition from others as best I can. Generally, I am successful in doing this. Perhaps part of the reason I try to hide it is my own sense of shame or fear that if others knew the real me, I would be thought of as damaged goods or not quite measuring up.” Mark does not think he will ever be free of depression. Currently he is on a blend of four drugs. He dislikes being on medication indefinitely, but he finds this combination the most helpful he has had. He declines to see a psychiatrist for fear he will end up on some medical information clearinghouse list as having a “deep psychological problem.” The opinion would almost certainly damage him professionally. Is depression real? Yes, it is. In addition, as Mark says, “It is a difficult cycle.” *Name has been changed.

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FUNERAL

–COLUMN PROVIDED BY–

Downtown: 159 North Broadway | 859.252.3411 Southland: 391 Southland Drive | 859.276.1415 Man O'War: 1509 Trent Boulevard | 859.272.3414 www.milwardfuneral.com

Got Winter Grief?

Whether the deceased dies naturally and it was expected or if death was traumatic and unexpected, it is natural to ask “Why?” and “How?” There is no doubt that death leaves people feeling out-of-control. You may even feel like you or someone else is to by Kim Wade, Community Relations Director, blame for the death. So. the fifth stage Milward Funeral Directors of the grief journey is all about searching for the meaning of why and how someone died. Dr. Wolfelt said, this is the stage that calls on you to confront Although it Embracing the pain of loss is the your own spirituality. took a little lonsecond step of the grief journey. The sixth step of grief is all about ger for the cold, icy and grey weather Dr. Wolfelt states that it is easier to receiving ongoing support from to roll into Central Kentucky this avoid, repress or deny the pain of year, Winter seems like an eternity grief than it is to confront it, yet it is others. Traveling the grief journey should never be done in isolation. for those of us who like the more in confronting the pain that allows You need others to support you moderate Spring temperatures living people the opportunity to travel through each of the 6 steps. You need just south of the Mason Dixon line through the journey. gifts to us. The third step in the grief journey hugs and kind words of encouragement. You need someone to listen to For many people though, the bone is remembering the person who you and cry with you. While many chilling weather bring with it sickdied. When death occurs, it is so ness, depression and grief. These illmuch easier for people to encourage people who are grieving are able to get the help they need from family nesses can be caused by something as you to clean out the person’s closet simple as being vulnerable to sickness and sell your house than it is to share and friends, others need the help from professional counselors. It is to suffering from seasonal affective moments looking at videos and disorder to coping with a recent loss photos together while talking about important to recognize when it is of loved one. Whatever the cause, the wonderful memories you shared time to get professional help. There are several organizations grieving from a loss is difficult. with the deceased. Dr. Wolfelt said who offer support groups in the The death of someone you loved by remembering the past the future changes you forever. Before you can will be open to new experiences. live again, it is necessary to travel a After a death, you simply aren’t journey through grief. the same person you were before the According to Alan D. Wolfelt, death. In such, the fourth step in Ph.D., Director of the Center for the grief journey is developing a new Loss and Life Transition, mourners self-identity. If by chance, your grief traveling the grief journey need to go is a result of a spouse dying, then through 6 steps in order to heal. you go from being a “wife” or “husThe first step according to Dr. band” to a “widow” or “widower”. Wolfelt is the act of acknowledging With the absence of your spouse, the reality of death. Whether the you may have new responsibilities death of the person you loved was such as paying the bills, taking the sudden or anticipated, it can take garbage out or washing the laundry. time to accept that the death has As you travel through the fourth occurred. Reality is difficult to recog- step, you will take on a new identity nize, but with time, you will move on that empowers you to live with your to the next step in your journey. new self-identity.

JOIN A SUPPORT GROUP

Central Kentucky area including churches, Hospice of the Bluegrass, hospitals and your funeral director. Beginning in March on the third Tuesday of every month at 6:30pm, Milward will host a monthly support group at its Man O’ War location at 1509 Trent Boulevard utilizing Dr. Wolfelt’s book, “The Ten Essential Touchstones,”. Anyone grieving is welcome to attend the Milward Support Group; however, Milward is also available to help you find other groups that fit your needs or schedule. RSVP at 859-272-3414. About the Author Kim Wade has been a marketing consultant for more than 20 years specializing in the funeral industry. Currently, she is the Community Relations Director for Milward Funeral Directors, the 37th-oldest continuously operated family business in the United States which operates three locations in Lexington including its Celebration of Life center at 1509 Trent Boulevard. Kim can be reached at marketing@milwardfuneral.com or 859-252-3411.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

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Regular exercise is important to the physical and mental health of almost everyone.

Exercise Can Be a Fountain of Youth

THE LUMINEERS

It also helps treat anxiety By Jean Jeffers, Staff Writer Did you ever dream of finding the Fountain of Youth? Well, you can discover it, in a way. Look for the next best thing: Exercise. Anxiety disorders are rampant. They are the most common psychiatric illness in the United States, surpassing depression. Exercise figures prominently in the treatment and relief of anxiety and related disorders. It has been touted as a life extender for centuries. You constantly hear or read the message about its many benefits. According to Greg Anderson in his book “The 22 Non-Negotiable Laws of Wellness” (Harper, 1995), regular physical activity will: • tone muscle; • add dimension to your figure and posture; • have a good effect on your energy levels; • increase your lung and heart capacity; • prevent bone density loss; • relieve stress; • burn calories; • help keep weight off; • brighten your mood; • improve cognition; and

the risk of chronic disease. Talk to your doctor before beginning an exercise program. When exercising, warm up for about five to 10 minutes and afterwards cool down for the same amount of time. This will increase flexibility and prevent muscle soreness. Working too hard at exercise may bring fatigue, breathing problems, nausea, faintness and irregular heartbeat. To avoid injury, rest some days or alternate between vigorous and light activity. It cannot be stressed enough: Regular exercise is important to the physical and mental health of almost everyone. Give it a try.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advises exercising at least 30 minutes on most days of the week to decrease

AN EXHIBITION MAY

• make you feel and look younger. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (www.adaa. org) says exercise is vital for maintaining mental fitness. It improves alertness and concentration and enhances overall cognitive function. An added benefit is that it reduces stress as well as fatigue. Exercise affects the stress your brain feels. The rest of your body is influenced by the damage stress causes and the relief activity affords. Scientists maintain participation in aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease overall levels of tension, elevate and stabilize mood and improve sleep and self-esteem. About five minutes of aerobic exercise can begin to stimulate anti-anxiety effects. It enables the body to release endorphins, a natural painkiller and mood enhancer. Research has found physically active individuals are less likely to have bouts of anxiety than their sedentary counterparts. In one study, the findings indicated a person getting regular exercise was 25 percent less likely to be affected by an anxiety disorder over the next five years than a non-exerciser.

2020 Cambridge Drive | Lexington, KY 40504 Phone (859) 252-6747 Fax (859) 255-9914

WWW.CAMBRIDGEPL.COM

2014


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February 2017 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

F OD BITES

By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Understanding Sticker Codes on Produce The Price Look Up (PLU) codes on the stickers placed on fruits and vegetables reveal important information. A four-digit code that begins with a 3 or 4 means the produce was grown with modern-day agronomic techniques. This means plenty of fertilizer and pesticides. A 5-digit code beginning with the number 8 means the produce is genetically modified. The most prevalent genetically modified fruits are bananas, papayas and melons. A 5-digit code beginning with the number 9 means the produce was grown without pesticides and is not genetically modified or engineered. These items were grown and harvested using old farming methods and fall under the criteria of organic. There is no law that requires a PLU code on produce, so when you

see no code, the item is not organic and other than that, there’s no information available as to where or how it was grown or harvested. Legumes More Satiating Than Pork Meals based on legumes such as beans and peas increase fullness more than pork- or veal-based meals, according to a study at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports. High-protein diets have been found to lead to weight loss. In this study, released this past December, participants ate 12 percent fewer calories when the proteins were legumes. The researchers conclude diets high in legumes could help with weight loss. The results were published in the journal Food & Nutrition.

Nuts Cut May Health Risks A large analysis of current research by Imperial College London and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology shows individuals who eat at least 20 grams of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and many other diseases. This is the equivalent of just a handful of nuts. Coronary heart disease risk is reduced by 30 percent, cancer risk by 15 percent and risk of premature death by 22 percent, according to the analysis of all current studies on nut consumption. This small amount of daily nut consumption is also associated with a reduced risk of dying from respiratory disease by about a half and diabetes by nearly 40 percent. “In nutritional studies, so far much of the research has been on the big killers such as heart diseases, stroke and cancer, but now we’re starting to see data for other diseases,” said study co-author Dagfinn Aune with the School of Public Health at Imperial. “We found a consistent reduction in risk across many different diseases, which is a strong indication that

Diets high in legumes could help with weight loss.

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@healthykentucky

there is a real underlying relationship between nut consumption and different health outcomes. It’s quite a substantial effect for such a small amount of food.” This includes all kinds of tree nuts, such as hazelnuts and walnuts, and peanuts, which are actually legumes. “Nuts and peanuts are high in fiber, magnesium and polyunsaturated fats – nutrients that are beneficial for cutting cardiovascular disease risk and which can reduce cholesterol levels,” Aune said. “Some nuts, particularly walnuts and pecans, are also high in antioxidants, which can fight oxidative stress and possibly reduce cancer risk.” Even though nuts are quite high in fat, they are also high in fiber and protein, and some evidence suggests nuts might actually reduce your risk of obesity over time. The study further found eating more than 20 grams of nuts per day does not further improve health outcomes. The results were published in the journal BMC Medicine.


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NATURE’S BEAUTY

For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

35

Spinach

Popeye the Sailor Man was on to something By Tanya Tyler,

Editor/Writer

Who didn’t grow up watching those Popeye cartoons and envying the sassy sailor his guns, which popped up from his previously puny arms right after he ate a can of spinach? And who, despite that, didn’t turn up his or her nose when Mom put a bowl of spinach on the dinner table? Luckily, we’ve come a long way from despising spinach. It has quickly evolved into a must-have green for salads and smoothies. Spinach is an annual flowering plant that was first cultivated in ancient Persia (today’s Iran). When it was introduced to ancient China, it was called the Persian vegetable. Spinach belongs to the chenopod family, which includes beets, chard and quinoa. There are three varieties of spinach: savoy, which has dark green, curly leaves and is sold in fresh bunches in most supermarkets; semisavoy, a hybrid variety with slightly crinkled leaves; and flat or smooth leaf. When you have a spinach dish dubbed “Florentine” (such as lasagna Florentine or sole Florentine), it is because spinach was the favorite vegetable of Catherine de Medici, who was born in Florence, Italy. Spinach packs a nutritional punch whether it’s fresh, frozen, steamed, boiled or flash fried. Low in calories, it is a good source of vitamins A, B, C, E and K, as well as magnesium, manganese and folate. You will also find riboflavin, calcium, potassium and fiber in your spinach. Spinach is an

excellent source of beta-carotene, the powerful disease-fighting antioxidant that is known to fight heart disease and cancer. The vegetable has several important phytochemicals, including lutein, which helps prevent age-related macular degeneration. One source says the healthiest way to consume spinach is in juice form. Add a few leaves to your smoothie or blend it with other vegetables and fruit. Regular consumption of fresh, organic spinach juice has been shown to dramatically improve skin health. Popeye probably didn’t realize spinach eases constipation and flush-

es out toxins from the colon. Spinach contains glycoglycerolipids, the main fat-related molecules found in the membranes of light-sensitive organs in most plants. They help protect the lining of the digestive tract from damage. New research shows spinach has the potential to protect against prostate cancer. Although Popeye would have us believe spinach is nothing but iron and that’s why he was suddenly so strong after consuming some, spinach in fact contains substances that inhibit the absorption of iron. High levels of oxalate can bind to the iron

One source says the healthiest way to consume spinach is in juice form.

to form ferrous oxalate, which means the body can’t use it. Another compound in spinach is oxalic acid, which blocks the absorption of calcium and iron. To counteract this problem, boil your spinach for one minute or pair it with a food that is high in vitamin C, such as oranges. The story goes that a scientist miscalculated the iron content in spinach; a misplaced decimal point caused him to give spinach an iron value 10 times higher than it should have had. However it happened, Popeye’s message is still a good one: Eat your spinach!


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February 2017 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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“With Today’s Breakthroughs, You No Longer Have To Live With Type 2 Diabetes or Obesity!" Anna Farmer, age 65, started with Dr. Miller in July 2016. Anna suffered from Type 2 Diabetes for years and was on numerous medications for Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension and High Cholesterol. Anna was Overweight at over 230 lbs. After just 6 MONTHS - her A1c went from to 9.6 to 5.7, Non-Diabetic, and Anna also lost 46 pounds! Q: Anna, why did you go to Dr. Miller? A: “I came to Dr. Miller because of Jack Pattie the radio host (5.90-AM), who is a patient of Dr. Miller’s. My Type 2 Diabetes was bad, my health was getting worse and I was gaining weight. I hated taking all those drugs every day. My A1c was 9.6 and going up. I really needed to lose weight, but couldn’t.” Q: You’ve seen other medical doctors for Type 2 Diabetes, how is Dr. Miller different? A: “Dr. Miller just makes it very clear. His approach is to uncover and reveal exactly what is causing Type 2 Diabetes. Dr. Miller really takes the time to listen and he looked at my whole health history. He makes it clear that Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension and Obesity are being caused by something. My other doctors just didn’t take the time and they didn’t talk about what was causing any of these. The other doctors just gave me more and more medications. I knew these drugs were just masking symptoms and not fixing anything. Dr. Miller’s natural approach made complete sense to me.” Q: What did Dr. Miller do to find out what was causing your Type 2 Diabetes? A: “Dr. Miller does an amazing blood panel lab he orders through Lab Corp and an online ‘Functional Medicine’ computer assessment that uncovers exactly what was causing my Type 2 Diabetes. It is very impressive and very clear.”

Q: After Dr. Miller finds what is causing your Type 2 Diabetes, what does he do? A: “Dr. Miller just goes over everything. He really takes the time to explain. He just takes the time to show what exactly needs to be done and what type of natural treatment he does in order to fix what is causing my Type 2 Diabetes and my Obesity. It all makes perfect sense once you see everything.” Q: Anna, what did Dr. Miller recommend for you to eliminate your Type 2 Diabetes? A: “Dr. Miller just lays it all out so clear. He gets started immediately and showed me exactly what I could do to help eliminate the ANNA FARMER, BEFORE AFTER TRUE HEALTH SOLUTIONS TREATMENT Diabetes. He has clear instructions on life-style improvements so I knew what to do to help eliminate poor health, lose weight and then stay In just 6 MONTHS I’ve eliminated Type healthy. He just makes it all clear and provides great printed instruc2 Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High tions. He just makes it so doable.”

Triglycerides and I’ve lost over 46 pounds.

Q: What are the results of your treatment from Dr. Miller? A: “My results are amazing! After just 6 MONTHS my A1c went from 9.6 to 5.7, Non-Diabetic! In just 6 MONTHs I’ve eliminated Type 2 Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Triglycerides and I’ve lost over 46 pounds. I highly recommend Dr. Miller. Dr. Miller is very informative!”

Integrated Care | Nutrition | Chiropractic Dr. Mark A. Miller, DC and Associates, PLLC

(859) 223-2233

www.TrueHealthSolutionsForYou.com You have the right to rescind within 72 hours any agreement to invest in services that are performed the same day in addition to advertised free services.


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MAKERS Video Game Helps Treat Depression Researchers have found promising results for treating depression with the video game Project: EVO. Developed by Akili Interactive Labs, Project: EVO is a means to focus on underlying cognitive issues associated with depression, as opposed to just managing the symptoms. Project: EVO targets an individual’s core neurological ability to process multiple streams of information, which also helps treat the cause of depression, according to researchers at the University of Washington Health Sciences at UW Medicine and University of California San Francisco. “We found that moderately depressed people do better with apps like this because they address or treat correlates of depression,” said Patricia Areán, a UW Medicine researcher in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and senior lead author of the studies. The treatment technology game runs on phones and tablets and is designed to improve focus and attention at a basic neurological level. In one study, older adults diagnosed with late-life depression either used the game or an in-person therapy technique called problem-solving therapy (PST). The group using the game reported similar improvements in mood and self-reported function as those in the PST group, but also demonstrated specific cognitive benefits, such as improved attention. “While EVO was not directly designed to treat depressive symptoms, we hypothesized that there may indeed be beneficial effects on these symptoms by improving cognitive issues with targeted treatment, and so far the results are promising,” said Joaquin A. Anguera, a UCSF researcher in neurology and psychiatry and lead author of these studies. Individuals 60 years or older with late-life depression are known to have trouble concentrating on personal goals because they are distracted by their worries. Project: EVO was designed to help people better focus their attention and prevent them from being easily distracted. Most participants had never used a tablet or played a video game prior to participating in these studies. They were required to play the game for 20 minutes five times a week, but most participants played more. The researchers did a second study with more than 600 individuals across the nation who were assessed as moderately or mildly depressed. They received one of three therapies: Project: EVO; iPST, an app for PST therapy; or a placebo. Mildly depressed participants saw improvements in all three therapies, but those who were moderately depressed showed a greater level of improvement from using either Project: EVO or iPST. Project: EVO is undergoing multiple clinical trials for use in cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury and pediatric attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Akili is seeking FDA clearance to use the game to treat pediatric ADHD.

Platypus Venom May Produce Potential Diabetes Drug Most people do not realize the male platypus has venom-tipped talon-like spurs on the back of its legs. During mating season, male platypuses wrestle and kick-stab one another to compete for females. Australian researchers are now exploring platypus venom for future diabetes medicine to control blood sugar. The drug exenatide was originally derived from the venom of the Gila monster.

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How Faith Helps You Survive a Loved One’s Mental Health Disorders Praying and praising can make a difference By Martha Evans Sparks, Staff Writer Mental illness is a broad term. It may describe a child born with Down syndrome. Children who develop autism are defined as having a mental health disorder. Schizophrenia is a major public health problem worldwide. Alzheimer’s and numerous other dementias that beset humans as they age are frequently referred to as mental illnesses. Observing any of these conditions in someone who is important in your life is stressful. The occurrence of mental illness in a family changes living habits. Family members may suddenly require new coping skills. If you or a loved one were faced with mental illness, where would you turn for help? Perhaps you would ask a doctor for advice about what to expect in the future or what

physical arrangements in the home must be adopted. But where or to whom would you turn for emotional and psychological support? If you have automobile trouble, to whom do you go? To someone who knows how the car is made. When something goes wrong with another human, would it occur to you to turn to the One who designed and created humans in the first place? Wherever you are on the continuum of faith – from none to the full Christian belief that the great Creator God loved the humans God had created enough to take on the punishment for their sins, as seen in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ – it seems plausible to think that in a time of great stress, someone would turn

for help to a higher power, some entity bigger than himself or herself. How do you survive emotionally as you watch dementia or other mental illness develop in someone you love? Is there a private moment when you cry out, “Oh, God, what do I do now?” Assuming that at least a shred of faith in God exists, here are some survival ideas: • First, pray. However you do it, prayer is talking to God. A conversation with God need not be stilted. Tell God your troubles, just as if you could see God sitting beside you. Tell God the stupid things you’ve done. Tell God how you would solve your problem if it were up to you. Tell God what you really think of your mother-in-law or your spouse. God already knows what you think, but somehow it helps to get it off your chest. God is listening, so go ahead and ask God about the things that totally stump you. • Second, find out all you can about the specific mental illness with which you must deal. Learn the formal, medical name of the condition. Go online to discover what research is going on now and what treatments are available. The more you know, the better questions you can ask and the better you can plan for the future. • Third, keep an upbeat outlook.

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Don’t be embarrassed or intimidated because you believe in God. Begin each prayer with praise to God for what God has done for you today. Praise God for love and continuing mercies. • Fourth, realize there is a lack of understanding of mental health issues, largely because most people have not dealt with mental illness. This ignorance no doubt contributes to the stigma that sometimes surrounds mentally ill people and their families. You may not receive a lot of empathy from other people. You may even be blamed for your loved one’s mental illness. But it’s not your fault no matter what others think. The late John Glenn, the first human to “break the surly bonds of earth” and fly into space, was quoted as saying, “To look out at this kind of creation and not believe in God is to me impossible.” To look out at your own private landscape and not include an active faith in the One who created it all is to miss the source of the best help there is.

Don’t be embarrassed or intimidated because you believe in God.


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Current Research Reveals Four Depression Subtypes

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Better understanding can improve treatment effectiveness By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer Better understanding of the type of depression a person experiences could improve the effectiveness of treatment choices and the management of depressive symptoms. Depression is typically diagnosed based on verbalized symptoms patients experience. This relates to the way the symptoms are assessed and the accuracy of patient reporting. Conor Liston, M.D., a professor of neuroscience and psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, reports his research team, using brain scans, has identified four unique subtypes of clinical depression based on distinct patterns of abnormal brain connectivity. Their findings appear currently in Nature Medicine (December 2016). “The four subtypes of depression that we discovered vary in terms of their clinical symptoms but, more importantly, they differ in their responses to treatment,” said Liston. For psychiatric care and treatment, using brain scans may assist mental health professionals in understanding the nature of a patient’s depression. This collaborative study included 1,180 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans of patients with clinical depression and healthy controls from across the country. Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine and seven other institutions analyzed the scans and identified biomarkers linked with depression by assigning statistical weights to abnormal brain connections. They then pre-

dicted the probability the abnormal connections belonged to a particular subtype versus another. The study showed distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain differentiated among the four subtypes and were linked with specific symptoms. Reduced connectivity in the brain region that regulates fear-related behavior and reappraisal of negative emotional stimuli, for example, was most severe in two of the four subtypes, which demonstrated increased anxiety. The researchers believe their findings may be useful for identifying patients most likely to benefit from targeted neuro-stimulation therapies. In the past, efforts to characterize depression by looking at groups of verbalized symptoms that tend to co-occur and then testing neurophysiological links have produced inconsistent results. Sources and Resources • Drysdale, A.T., Grosenick, L., Downar, J., et al. (2016) Resting-state connectivity biomarkers define neurophysiological subtypes of depression. Nature Medicine, 2016 December 5. • Neuroimaging categorizes for depression subtypes. Weill Cornell Medicine press release, Dec. 5, 2016.

About the Author Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

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Support Improves Outcomes, Reduces Risks for LGBT Adolescents PFLAG stands ready to help families By Jonathan Phillips The facts are frightening. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth and adolescents are more likely than their

heterosexual peers to experience bullying, depression and homelessness; to engage in alcohol use and unsafe sex; and to attempt suicide.

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The facts are also encouraging. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports parental responses to LGBT adolescents can have a tremendous impact on the child’s current and future mental and physical health. Supportive reactions can help adolescents cope and thrive. Indeed, emerging research shows LGBTQ persons with supportive families are no more likely to have psychological or behavioral problems than their age group as a whole. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlines what it calls a strength-based approach: “Addressing LGBT-related stigma, discrimination and violence; building on the strengths of LGBT youth; and fostering supports such as family acceptance and safe, affirming environments in schools and other settings will help improve outcomes for LGBT young people.” Following these recommendations to improve the health, safety and wellbeing of young people who do not fit the traditional heterosexual mold is simple – but not easy. It’s simple in that it is clear that support from parents, families, friends and institutions such as schools improves outcomes and reduces risks. But institutional and cultural change is not straightforward, and even for families, it is not always evident how to provide that support nor even how to respond when a child “comes out.” That’s where PFLAG comes in. PFLAG is a support group for LGBTQ persons, their families and allies, with an emphasis on helping parents and families understand and come to terms with LGBTQ issues in our culture and in their families. The goal is to enable them to provide the support needed to ensure the health and safety of LGBTQ youth. The PFLAG acronym stems from the organization’s founding in 1972 as Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. Its reach has since expanded to the broader community of LGBTQ persons and their loved ones and supporters. PFLAG Central Kentucky

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holds meetings in both Lexington and Frankfort, connecting people with resources and offering support from others who have been through similar experiences. PFLAG meetings are completely confidential. They include an information portion where attendees can increase their knowledge about LGBTQ issues and community resources and a support group session where parents, LGBTQ individuals and allies can share experiences and learn from each other. “When it comes to gender identity and sexual orientation, people vary in their knowledge and things are changing all the time, so people come to meetings with every possible perspective when it comes to familiarity and comfort levels,” said PFLAG Central Kentucky President Linda Angelo. “But the bottom line, wherever you are starting from, is that the child who ‘came out’ today is the same child you loved yesterday, and they need your love and support now more than ever.” Many people are at least aware of lesbian and gay issues but may be confused by transgender, bisexual, queer/questioning, gender fluid and the wide spectrum of new terms. PFLAG can help not only in beginning to understand these issues but also recognizing others are struggling with the same issues as your family or loved one. “In some ways we don’t like to label,” said a teen who spoke to a PFLAG meeting. “But when you discover there is actually a word that describes what you are, it is comforting because it lets you know that you are not alone.” A PFLAG Central Kentucky parent said, “We understood – or at least thought we did – gay and lesbian. Transgender we were not ready for. Even though we were supportive from the beginning, it was difficult to get our heads around.” He credited PFLAG with helping him and his wife understand their newly out child’s orientation and also validating that some of their feelings of confusion and loss were perfectly normal. “PFLAG was there for us when we really needed them,” he said. “We will be there for others, too.” You can contact PFLAG Central Kentucky through its Web site, www. pflagcentralky.org, or Facebook page, www.facebook.com/PFLAGCentral-Kentucky. You are welcome to attend one of our next meetings: Feb. 14 in Lexington at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, 2025 Bellefonte Drive, or Feb. 20 in Frankfort at the Unitarian Universalist Community, 316 Wilkinson Boulevard.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

Stress and Your Family Parents’ stress levels can impact their children By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer As the nation continues to face past year; and if they had seen a menhigh levels of stressful experiences, tal health professional about these families are susceptible to mounting symptoms or received treatment such pressures from numerous sources. as counseling or prescription medicaRaising a family can be rewarding and tion to deal with their symptoms. demanding even in healthy social and Compared to teens who didn’t economic climates, so stressful times report a major depressive episode, can make it much more challenging. those who did were more likely to The American Psychological be older, not in school, unemployed, Association (2016) says 73 percent in households with single parents of parents report family responsibilior no parents and have substance ties as a significant source of stress. abuse issues. Among young adults, More than two-thirds of parents those with depression were more believe their stress level has slight likely to be female, minority and to no impact on their children’s have a substance use or abuse issue. stress level. However, only 14 perRies Merikangas notes trends in cent of teens reported they are not prevalence translate into a growbothered when their parents are ing number of young people with stressed. Furthermore, the connecuntreated depression. The findings tion between high stress levels and call for renewed efforts to expand serhealth may well be a red flag, with 34 vice capacity to best meet the mental percent of obese parents experiencing health care needs of this age group. high levels of stress as compared to Parents should be alert to changes 23 percent of normal-weight parents. in academic or social functionings of It is important to consider the way their children and other manifestaa parent’s stress and corresponding tions of depression, such as social unhealthy behaviors affect the family. withdrawal, long periods of sadDr. Kathleen Ries Merikangas, a ness, frequent crying spells, angry senior investigator and chief of the outbursts and irritability, suicidal Genetic Epidemiology Research ideations or gestures and significant Branch at the National Institute of changes in appetite, weight and Mental Health (NIMH), published energy levels. an important study in a recent issue It is important to remember chilof the journal Pediatrics (2016) that dren model their parents’ behaviors, addresses the prevalence of depresincluding those related to managing sion in adostress. Parents lescents and who deal young adults. with stress Her findin unhealthy It is important to ings clearly ways risk indicate that passing those remember children depression behaviors model their parents’ among teens on to their has increased children. behaviors, including in recent Alternatively, years. For parents who those related to youth ages 12 cope with to 17 years, stress in managing stress. the prevalence healthy ways of depression not only increased promote from 8.7 perbetter adjustcent in 2005 to 11.3 percent in 2014. ment and happiness for themselves, Among adults aged 18 to 25 years, but also the formation of critically the prevalence climbed from 8.8 perimportant habits and skills in their cent to 9.6 percent during the study children. Parents know changing a period. child’s behavior, let alone their own, In the Ries Merikangas study, can be challenging. By taking small, researchers asked participants if they manageable steps in the direction of had experienced a variety of sympa healthier lifestyle, families can work toms that can point to depression; together toward meeting their goals whether they had experienced an of being psychologically and physiepisode of major depression in the cally fit. Children are more likely to

lead a healthy lifestyle and less likely to associate stress with unhealthy behaviors if the whole family practices healthy living and good stress management techniques. Local and national organizations (Kentucky Psychological Association, 2017) provide on-line information and educational materials about depression and its signs and symptoms. They also offer tips to get you and your family started down a healthy path. Communication lines between parents and children need to remain open. Low levels of parental communication have been associated with poor decision making among children and teens. If you notice your children are looking worried or stressed, ask them what’s on their minds. Having regular conversations can help your family work together to better understand and address any stressors the children are experiencing. Talking to your children and promoting open communication and problem solving is just as important as eating well and getting enough exercise and sleep. Create a healthy, uncluttered home environment that can help alleviate stress. Look around your home and even your car and ask yourself, “Does this space feel clear and relaxing?” Cleaning your home space is something you and your children can do

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together, and it teaches the children to focus on the things they can control when feeling stressed. Changing behaviors usually takes time. Do you remember the advice about how to eat an elephant – one bite at a time? By changing one behavior at a time, family members are more likely to experience success in managing stress. If you or a family member continue to struggle with changing unhealthy behaviors or feel overwhelmed by stress, consider seeking help from a licensed, trained mental health professional. He or she can guide you in developing strategies to manage stress effectively, make behavioral changes to improve the family health environment and promote good health and wellness behaviors. Sources and Resources • Kentucky Psychological Association (2017) APA Consumer Help Center. www.apa.org/helpcenter/index.aspx • Merikangas, K.R., Burstein, M., et al. (2016) National Trends in the Prevalence and Treatment of Depression in Adolescents and Young Adults. Pediatrics, doi:10.1542/ peds.2016-1878

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What Type of MentalEmotional Help Is Best For You? An overview of different therapies

By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Life is emotionally messy. Sometimes we need professional help to work through certain issues. When you need help, how can you know which is the best type of therapy for you and your situation? General counseling is the most prevalent form of therapy because it’s helpful to everyone at some point in his or her life. It involves talking with a therapist. The degree and depth of talking varies between the different types of counseling. General counseling therapies are ideal for mentally healthy individuals who need help with a current issue or crisis, such as anger, a relationship issue, bereavement, work-related stress, infertility or the onset of a serious illness. There are more specific forms of counseling. Family therapy involves the entire family working with one or a pair of therapists. It helps family members communicate with each other better. Family therapy may be recommended if one family member is having a serious problem that affects the rest of the family or if trauma has occurred in the family. Issues family therapy helps with include child and adolescent behavioral problems; mental health conditions; illness and disability; separation, divorce and stepfamily life; domestic violence; and drug or alcohol addiction. Relationship counseling or couples therapy can help when a

relationship is in crisis, such as when a partner has an affair. Both partners talk in confidence to a counselor or therapist to explore what went wrong in the relationship and learn how to improve things. Some sessions will include both partners at the same time. Couples generally learn more about each other’s needs and how to communicate better. Group therapy involves up to around 12 people meeting together with a therapist. It is useful for people who share a common problem to get support and advice from each other. Many find solace in knowing they’re not alone for just about any issue you can imagine – addiction, cheating, sex issues, dieting, grief and terminal illnesses are just a few examples. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) concentrates on eliminating unhelpful thought patterns and behaviors. Like counseling, CBT is used to deal with current situations rather than events from the past. It is useful for a variety of issues, including depression, anxiety, panic attacks, phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and some eating disorders, especially bulimia. Goals are set and often you’ll be given tasks to carry out between sessions. Psychotherapy is concerned with past influences on the present and the choices you make now. This form of therapy delves into the past and childhood events, looking for motives for current behaviors and thought pat-

terns. It generally lasts longer in terms of both individual session time and overall therapy duration. It is most beneficial for those with long-term or recurring problems because it seeks to uncover hidden motivations or root causes. Psychotherapy can help with depression and some eating disorders. Although psychotherapy is its own form of therapy, counseling and CBT can utilize one or more theories and techniques of psychotherapy. There are five broad categories of psychotherapy, according the American Psychological Association. Psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapies focus on changing problematic behaviors, feelings and thoughts by discovering underlying unconscious meanings and motivations. Patients learn more about themselves by exploring their interactions in the therapeutic relationship. Psychoanalysis has been modified a great deal since Sigmund Freud’s early theories. Behavior therapy focuses on learning’s role in developing normal and abnormal behavior. Classical conditioning from Pavlov is an example of behavior therapy. “Desensitizing” can be used to help with a phobia through repeated exposure to the source of anxiety. Cognitive therapy emphasizes what people think rather than what they do. Cognitive therapists believe dysfunctional thinking leads to dysfunctional emotions and behaviors. By

changing their thoughts, people can change how they feel and what they do. CBT is a combination of behavior and cognitive therapies. Humanistic therapy looks at one’s capacity to make rational choices and develop one’s maximum potential. Concern and respect for others are important themes in this type of therapy. Humanistic philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre, Martin Buber and Soren Kierkegaard influenced the theories of this form of psychotherapy. There are three types of humanistic therapies. Client-centered therapy rejects the idea of therapists as authorities about a client’s inner experiences. Gestalt therapy emphasizes “organismic holism” or the importance of being aware of the “here and now” and accepting responsibility for oneself. Existential therapy focuses on free will, self-determination and the search for meaning. The fifth form of psychotherapy, integrative or holistic therapy, blends elements from different approaches to tailor the treatment according to each client’s needs.

General counseling is the most prevalent form of therapy.


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2017

Psilocybin is a hallucinogenic substance obtained from certain types of mushrooms.

Innovative Research Findings Suggest New Direction in Mental Health Care

Further research with larger samples needs to be conducted, but it is clear these initial findings raise the issue that psilocybin holds true potential for treating anxiety and depression in patients with this diagnosis. These results represent a dramatic step forward in the mental health profession’s efforts to help some of the most seriously affected patients needing a more effective protocol of care and treatment for anxiety and depression.

May prove helpful for people with anxiety and depression By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer

The results of two new randomized and controlled mental health research studies demonstrated that just one dose of psilocybin produces significant long-term improvements in patients with anxiety and depression. These findings, recently published in The Journal of Psychopharmacology, are potentially beneficial for individuals who are troubled by anxiety and depression. Psilocybin is a hallucinogenic substance obtained from certain types

of mushrooms indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions of South America, Mexico and the United States. Fifty-one adults participated in the double-blind crossover study at Johns Hopkins University. New York University was the second site. Stephen Ross, M.D., principal investigator of the NYU study and director of substance abuse services in the Department of Psychiatry at Langone Medical Center, said all patients received targeted counseling

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plus a 0.3 mg/kg dose of psilocybin at one of two treatment sessions. A vitamin placebo at the other session realized 80 percent of the subjects experienced a significant reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms after six months. Furthermore, 80 percent of the subjects realized clinically significant decreases in symptomology six months after their final treatment session, suggesting there may be longer-term benefits with less need for medication.

Sources and Resources • Hallucinogenic drug psilocybin eases existential anxiety in people with life-threatening cancer. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; December 1, 2016. • Single dose of hallucinogenic drug psilocybin relieves anxiety and depression in patients with advanced cancer. New York, NY: New York University Langone Medical Center; December 1, 2016.

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Schizophrenia: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments Family support, medication go a long way in helping By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer The term schizophrenia may only be about 100 years old, but the existence of this mental illness can be traced back to 2,000 years before Christ. Schizophrenia is a modern modification of a Greek term that meant “to split the mind” and described the fragmented thinking of people with this disease. Today, schizophrenia is understood as a serious brain disorder in which someone cannot distinguish between what is real and what is imaginary. Alternatively, as described by the Cambridge Dictionary, schizophrenia is a behavior in which a person appears to have two different personalities. However, experts believe schizophrenia is more about splitting off from reality than having a split personality.

Schizophrenia is characterized by delusions of grandeur; hallucinations; disorganized behavior, speech and thoughts; the disintegration of the personality; and other cognitive difficulties. It is a chronic mental disorder that is generally first seen in late adolescence or early adulthood and affects about 1 percent of the population globally. Some symptoms of schizophrenia can include patient complaints about hearing voices or a feeling that others are reading one’s mind or controlling one’s thinking process. As a result, the patient may become distressed and be withdrawn or even get frantic at times. The appearance of schizophrenic symptoms could be gradual or sudden. Schizophrenic patients suffer from negative emotional symptoms

such as blunted emotions. Some even exhibit no facial expressions or movement for hours. The patient may experience a lack of motivation that affects his or her daily life. He or she finds it difficult to concentrate, remember or plan and organize his or her life. Patients in the early phase of schizophrenia may be eccentric, emotionless, reclusive and unmotivated. Not every schizophrenia patient exhibits all the symptoms; these may vary from person to person. Many factors may be the cause for the onset of schizophrenia. Some could be genetic factors, while others could be triggered by the patient’s environment. A person with a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia has more chances of also suffering from the disease. Moreover, some studies suggest faulty neuronal development in the brain of a fetus later develops into a full-blown disease. The imbalance of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin is also believed to trigger the onset of schizophrenia. While stress does not necessarily cause the development of schizophrenia in a person, stressful experiences, including family or relationship stress, often precede the emergence of schizophrenia. Most schizophrenic patients are reported

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to exhibit bad temper and anxiety before developing the acute symptoms of schizophrenia. Besides genetics and the environment, some drugs such as cannabis (marijuana) and LSD and certain steroids are also known to cause schizophrenic relapses. But certain drugs are pivotal for dealing with schizophrenia. These medications help control the patient’s delusions and hallucinations. The patient needs to continue taking his or her medicine even when the symptoms are gone to avoid a relapse. The most effective treatment for schizophrenia is a combination of anti-psychosis medicines, psychological counseling or therapy, lifestyle changes and social support. Therapy and support from family and friends will help the patient comply with the treatment and cope with stress, improve life skills, address relationship issues and improve communication. Since the path to recovery could be a slow, long and lonely experience for the schizophrenic patient, a holistic approach using counseling, support and medicinal treatment is crucial for the successful management of schizophrenia. After undergoing proper treatment, people with schizophrenia can enjoy and live a normal life.

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Moving from Parent to Empty Nester It’s the perfect time to explore new possibilities By TaNiqua Ward, M.S., Staff Writer One of the greatest joys of a person’s life is becoming a parent. Parents enjoy watching their children develop, learn and play. However, those carefree days don’t last forever. Children eventually leave the nest and become adults themselves. They grow up and find careers and their own ways in life. While the children are out creating their own

lives, it is the perfect time for parents to begin to explore the activities they always wanted to do, as well as try new things. Parents spend 18 years or more raising a child. They have dreams and hopes for their children to become well-developed adults. During childhood and adolescence, parents spend

their time teaching their children and helping them develop skills that will be useful throughout life. Good morals are taught and lessons are learned. It is no wonder parents feel a sense of loneliness when their children leave. Everything they know their life to be suddenly changes. It is important for parents to realize their children leaving the nest is actually an achievement. You have provided your children with the knowledge to make them successful adults. That’s your job as a parent. It is natural to have some sadness and nostalgia with the changes that are occurring. Nonetheless, try to reverse your attitude of sadness into an attitude of gladness by celebrating and being proud of what you have accomplished. Having an empty nest is associated with new lifestyle opportunities. You can either resist them or embrace them. Embracing these changes can be fun. Here are a few simple ways to celebrate having an empty nest: • Save money by downsizing and getting a smaller home. You probably don’t need so many extra rooms anymore. That is just space you don’t use and more areas to clean. Purchase a home that better accommodates you. • Since you will save money without children in the house, you can take

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vacations. Take a trip across the country or even out of the country. You don’t have to worry about leaving the children with someone or having the expenses of children on the trip. You can splurge a little on yourself. • Get the vehicle you always wanted. You don’t need a family-sized car that fits all the children or a van that is perfect for carpooling anymore. You can finally get the car of your dreams. Transitioning from parenting to having an empty nest can be challenging, but it doesn’t have to be. “The emptynest moment can be a good time to rediscover the person you used to be,” said psychologist and counselor Anna Hamer. It is important to find ways to cope and enjoy your new lifestyle. Research has shown that women tend to suffer from empty nest syndrome more than men because child rearing is linked to their identity. This transition is also linked to a time in which depression, alcoholism and marital problems can occur. Instead of allowing this phase to be difficult, try to draw closer to your partner and your family. Show your appreciation for the moments you spend together by making family celebrations and dinners extra special. This is a wonderful time for both you and your child. Celebrate this milestone.

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Dealing With Depression By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer

remove obligations when possible. Allow yourself to do less when you feel low. Eat healthfully – If depression tends to make you overeat, get your eating under control. There is evidence that foods with omega3 fatty acids, such as tuna and salmon, and folic acid, such as avocado and spinach, can help ease depression. Get enough sleep – Depression can make it hard to get good sleep, so try going to bed and getting up at the same time daily. Remove all distractions such as the computer and TV from your bedroom and try not to nap during the day. Move vigorously during the day – Research indicates regular exercise can be as effective as medication for relieving depression symptoms and helps prevent relapse once you are well. Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise daily; it doesn’t have to be all at once. A 10-minute walk can improve your mood for two hours. Visit reputable Web sites and read self-help books – Find books and Web sites that will help you educate yourself about depression. Don’t isolate yourself – Participate in get-togethers and social activities with family or friends. Join support groups where you can find

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Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight each day to boost your mood.

Learn some natural ways to cope

Depression can make you feel helpless, but along with some medication and therapy, you can do a lot on your own to deal with it. Changing your way of thinking, your behavior, your physical activity and lifestyle are all natural ways to cope with depression. It’s more like a Catch-22: Recovering from depression requires action, but taking action when you’re depressed is tough. So start with whatever resources you have. You may not have much energy, but you may have enough to pick up the phone to call a loved one or take a short walk around the block. There are many other ways to deal with depression, and often they are best used in combination with each other. The primary options are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), antidepressant medication and, in some severe cases, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Education and coping strategies are also important when working to manage your depression. After consulting with your doctor, you can begin trying various coping skills, including the following tips: • Start keeping a journal – As part of your treatment, journaling could improve your mood by allowing you to express anger, fear, pain or any other emotion. • Try simplifying your life – Set reasonable goals for yourself and

Like us

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people to connect with, who face similar challenges and are willing to share their experiences. Find helpful groups – Many organizations such as the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (www.dbsalliance.org) and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (www.nami.org) offer counseling, support groups, education and other resources to help with depression. On the National Institute of Mental Health Web site (www.nimh.nih.gov), there is a list of outreach partners. Some of these partners sponsor support groups for different mental disorders, including depression. Find ways to relax – You could try yoga, tai chi, meditation or progressive muscle relaxation. Don’t drink too much alcohol – For some people, alcohol can become a problem because they tend to drink more as a way to cope with or hide their emotions. However, alcohol doesn’t solve problems and may make you feel more depressed. Expose yourself to sunlight daily – Lack of sunlight can worsen depression. Enjoy a meal outside, take a short walk outdoors or just sit in a garden. Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight each day to boost your mood.

• Avoid making important decisions when you are down – Don’t make decisions when you feel depressed or down because you may not be able to think clearly. • Structure your time and plan your day – It helps if you make a list of daily tasks and use a planner or sticky notes as reminders to stay organized. • Do something new and have fun – Being depressed puts you in a rut. Push yourself to try something different, such as reading a book on a bench park, visiting a museum, taking a language class, volunteering at a soup kitchen, going to a movie, visiting friends, etc. Trying new things alters your level of dopamine, the brain chemical associated with enjoyment, learning and pleasure. These tips are based on a comprehensive approach that helps you get support while making lifestyle changes and reversing negative thinking. You will soon feel better if you continue to take positive steps daily. However, if you find your depression is not improving, be sure to seek professional help.


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To put your health-related business in front of over 75,000 readers every month, contact:

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Brian Lord, Owner/Publisher

859-368-0778

brian@rockpointpublishing.com

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