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THE RIGHT STUFF IN ST. JOHN’S, NL (PAGE 14)

THE NEXT FIVE YEARS OF VEHICLE CONNECTIVITY: WHERE WILL WE BE?

TRUCKING MENTAL HEALTH HAZARDS (PAGE 16)

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EDITOR’S LETTER: FAREWELL TO A FRIEND – Auto and Trucking Atlantic bids farewell to long-time friend and contributor Bob Greenwood.

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THE NEXT FIVE YEARS OF VEHICLE CONNECTIVITY: WHERE WILL WE BE? We’re living in a connected world right now, says contributor Dave Elniski, and with it, the future looks bright.

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NEW NAPA KENMOUNT LOCATION is about customer service and providing the right part, to the right people, in the right place, at the right time

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MENTAL HEALTH HAZARDS: RESOURCES FOR THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY – Truck drivers have a disproportionately higher level of mental health concerns than other sectors, but working together, employers and staff can shift workplace culture.

Page 20

NAPA XPO SALE 2021 – NAPA chocks up a successful first XPO with over 8000 attending.

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – Nova Scotia and New Brunswick reach agreement in principle to allow Serious Investigation Response Team to oversee both provinces • More!

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KEEP YOUR TRUCKS MOVING! Contrary to what you may have heard, there’s still plenty of good reasons to consider a career in trucking, writes Dana Smith.

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MOTOR MATTERS: Introducing our new roundup feature which gathers the latest automotive news you need to know. Our inaugural column kicks off with news about funding for emergency service providers bidirectional charging and much much more!

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SPOT THE TRUCK! Big Rig Wraps launches a new app and with it, a slew of cool prizes

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD: Wildlife edition. Don’t say you weren’t warned….

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INSURANCE FOR THE CARWASH BIZ – Melissa Pirkey offers a primer on insurance considerations to keep your car wash reputation spotless and shiny.

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Letter from the Editor

FAREWELL TO A FRIEND

I

By Carter Hammett

T WAS WITH SHOCK AND SADNESS THAT I LEARNED THAT LONG-TIME AUTO AND TRUCKING ATLANTIC CONTRIBUTOR BOB GREENWOOD HAD PASSED AWAY SEPTEMBER 9 OF A SUDDEN HEART ATTACK. A force of nature, Bob’s was a distinct voice in the automotive world. Whether functioning as a business coach, trainer, speaker or writer, he was a force to be reckoned with. He was perhaps best known as president and CEO of Automotive Aftermarket E-Learning Centre Ltd. (AAEC). AAEC is a company focused on providing business management resources and development for the independent sector of the aftermarket industry utilizing the Internet environment as a learning platform. He was one of only 150 AMI-approved instructors in the world. He successfully created business management learning materials for aftermarket shop employers/ managers, and other stakeholders which are among the most highly touted, com-

prehensive, industry-specific training of their kind in North America. Always concerned with a shop’s profitability and bottom line, he tackled issues intended to help shops become prosperous. He always stood behind the little guy and over the years, his common-sense, plain spoken approach resonated with hundreds of people employed in the industry. He seemed to be a bottomless

pit of information and from this source sprang articles advising small business owners on everything from succession planning to calculating the costs, fiscal and otherwise—sometimes down to the penny—of unnecessary spending. He was by no means, what you would consider a “natural” writer and I often felt a twinge of guilt every time I altered one of his bold, italicized and underlined sentences. I felt as if I was knocking part of his personality out of the column somehow, and yet, that, of course, would be impossible. His voice was too distinct and pragmatic in tone, application; the personality simply too strong to be altered that easily. In addition to his work with us, Bob’s byline also appeared in a wide variety of sector publications including CARS, Jobber Newsmagazine and HDA Truck Pride among others. “Bob was always a fan of our publication; was always there to help with advice and direction. I think he had a soft spot for us here in Atlantic Canada. He was very proud of his son who works in fire services. When he had the occasion to be down here teaching skills for automotive types, he enjoyed it and was respected by one and all. His death came as quite a shock to me, and he will be missed by myself and our readers,” said Auto and Trucking Atlantic publisher Rob Alfers. He developed a reputation as someone you could count on. Bob was always available to lend an ear and provide guidance to everyone from manufacturers to jobbers across the automotive industry. And four decades in the business never once left him snide or cynical. Greenwood served on the board of directors for the Automotive Industries Association of Canada (AIA Canada) and was one of only 37 Canadians in the Canadian automotive industry honoured by the Governor General of Canada and awarded the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal on November 23, 2012. Join us in celebrating the life of Bob Greenwood.

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The Connected Car

THE NEXT FIVE YEARS OF VEHICLE CONNECTIVITY: WHERE WILL WE BE?

WHETHER FOR REASONS LIKE SAFETY, OR UPDATES OR COMMUNICATION, CAR CONNECTIVITY IS HERE TO STAY AND OFFERS EYE-OPENING POSSIBILITIES AS WE LOOK TO ITS FUTURE By Dave Elniski

W

HENEVER APPLE, S A M SUNG, OR OTHER TECH COMPANIES MAKE ANNOUNCEMENTS ABOUT NEW SMARTPHONE TECHNOLOGY, THEY CREATE INTENSE CONSUMER INTEREST. New digital technology now dominates conversations about both personal and commercial vehicles; today’s car nut is just as likely to be enthralled by developments in connected vehicle technology, autonomous driving, and enhanced driver digital experiences as they are by anything related to internal combustion powertrains or traditional luxury features. We are in the age of vehicle connectivity, a term that means vehicles that have the ability to communicate with other vehicles, the environment around them, and the internet. The technology in vehicles is advancing as quickly as it is in any other part of our lives. Today’s science fiction could very well be standard features in a few short years. While personal vehicle manufacturers like Tesla, Rivian, and GM are making headlines with their connected features and electrification endeavours, commercial Class 8 truck manufacturers are also bringing these features to their vehicles. Truckers today can enjoy truck-specific navigation systems and driver-assist technologies like lane control while their carriers enjoy advanced real-time telematics to assist in route planning, dispatching, and preventative maintenance. In the sections below, we’ll explore what vehicle connectivity may look like in the near future (i.e. the next five years). We’ll also look at how these changes will impact the vehicle experience of trucking companies and private consumers alike.

AUTONOMOUS DRIVING Self-driving cars frequent the headlines when it comes to vehicle connectivity and car-related news. This is no wonder considering how significant our society could change once fully autonomous cars become common. The Society of Automotive Engineering (SAE) has established levels of vehicle autonomy to help distinguish between vehicles with differing levels of self-driving capability [1]. Vehicles at Level 0 require complete driver engagement in all aspects of driving (although they may have some automatic emergency braking features and advanced safety features that alert the driver to hazards). As vehicles progress through the levels they require less driver interaction. Level 5 vehicles (vehicles with the greatest self-driving capabilities) require no driver at all and as such, can drive themselves in all conditions. At this point in time, there are no fully autonomous Level 5 vehicles for sale in North America. However, manufacturers already offer cars to the general public that provide extremely high levels of autonomy. Tesla, for example, offers vehicle packages for their cars titled “Autopilot” and “Full Self-Driving Capability” which provide driver-free control of the vehicles steering, braking, and accelerating when on the highway, but they state clearly on their website that these cars require a “fully attentive driver, who has their hands on the wheel and is prepared to take over at any moment” [2]. This isn’t to say that fully autonomous vehicles haven’t been on the road in North America; they have, but have had drivers present and have been part of larger research and pioneering efforts. Take Waymo, as an example: since its start as the Google Self-Driving Car Project in 2009, Waymo vehicles have operated millions of self-driving miles on public roads through the USA as part of an effort to advance self-driving car technology [3]. In the commercial trucking world, pi-

lot projects on heavy truck automation are already underway in Canada. In Alberta, Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) is currently overseeing a project where two Class 8 tractor-trailers will be platooning between Calgary and Edmonton [4]. In this project, the second of the two trucks in a close convoy is driven automatically based on information from sensors on the front truck. There is, of course, a fully qualified driver behind the wheel of each truck, but what this project shows is that vehicle autonomy is being actively trialed in heavy commercial vehicles. True self-driving cars are not currently available and we probably won’t see steering-wheel-optional cars at dealerships in the next five years. But, self-driving features are already here, and Level 5 autonomy is being operated as part of projects around the world.

NETWORK ADVANCES Connected vehicles rely on reliable wireless connections to communicate with the environment around them. While a human driver does not need an electronic connection outside the vehicle, an autonomous vehicle can take advantage of data available to it from external sources to improve its performance and safety, which means connected vehicles have access to additional information not available to drivers of non-connected cars. As the demand for data for connected vehicles grows, the wireless networks that support these features will play a role in how quickly this technology advances. 5G networks are being seen as a gatekeeper for advanced connected vehicle technology implementation [5]; there is a bit of egg-versus-chicken going on in the connected vehicle world as future features will require 5G network performance to operate at their best. Consumers and fleet managers who are interested in vehicle connectivity should be watching for 5G advances. When asked about timelines for conautoatlantic.com

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The Connected Car

sumers, Scott McCormick, president of the Connected Vehicle Trade Association (CVTA), says “5G cellular is not a single thing, but a suite of technologies that all must be in place to accomplish the sub1-millisecond latency vehicles need for safety communications, and this will take years to deploy nationwide.” Whether or not the next five years will bring about 5G networks throughout Canada remains to be seen, but this isn’t the only variable affecting the deployment of advanced vehicle features. According to McCormick, “The four primary communi-

cations protocols in or coming to vehicles are Satellite, Cellular, WiFi and Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC).” He says that consumers should monitor which protocols offer the best connectivity and price points as developments occur over the coming years.

VEHICLE OBSOLESCENCE There is a potential area of concern as vehicle connectivity rapidly advances: obsolescence. Computers and phones that are cutting-edge today quickly become less appealing as technology advances,

and depending on the device and its intended purpose, useable lifespans can be frustratingly short. There is a chance that connected car features could change the way we think about vehicle lifespans. When asked about the possible impacts advanced connectivity features could have on vehicle obsolescence, McCormick says “I don’t think anyone really needs to worry about vehicle obsolescence”, adding “almost all automakers attempt to forecast how long each communication protocol will be around and include antennas for what they see will be

A NEW TYPE OF PERFORMANCE

C

Dave Elniski

ARS, TRUCKS, AND ALL OTHER VEHICLES HAVE LONG BEEN JUDGED ON THEIR PERFORMANCE. A SPORTS CAR WILL BE ADVERTISED IN TERMS OF HORSEPOWER AND HOW LITTLE TIME IT TAKES TO GET TO A CERTAIN SPEED.

A pickup truck will be lauded on how much weight it can tow. SUVs might be celebrated for passenger capacity, luxury features, and off-road capabilities (or perhaps them all). We measure vehicle performance numerically. Ground clearance, engine displacement, cargo volume, rim diameter: these can all be assigned numerical values, and enthusiasts will use these values to explain why they like a particular vehicle. In the commercial vehicle world, payload, powertrain and axle capacities, and gradeability are important elements when selecting the right vehicle for the job. Vehicle connectivity is opening up an entirely new way of measuring a vehicle’s performance. Digital specifications like 5G/ LTE connectivity, WiFi hotspot capability, and level of autonomy are new ways in which we can classify and value vehicles. Throughout the world, people are becoming increasingly aware and in awe of digital technology. Smartphones and tablets have revolutionised business and recreation and provided us 8

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with tools that have brought social media into every aspect of our lives. Regardless of how people view these trends, they are here to stay. People want to be connected. People want digital convenience. When people take vacations and other breaks to “get away from it all”, they take their devices with them. Vehicle connectivity is showing us that tomorrow’s drivers will use their cars as digital extensions of themselves to increase entertainment, maintain connectivity with those they care about, and keep them safe on the highways. It is truly astounding to think about the differences in options between a vehicle from the early 2000s and a new vehicle on the lot today. In the 1990s, center high mount brake lights and airbags were relatively new; in the decade prior, gasoline fuel injection was so novel that many vehicles had plaques advertising the feature on their rear ends. Today, multi-stage airbags, automatic braking, and drivermonitored autopilots are the new features, and enough electric vehicles are on the roads that such technology is long past the proof of concept stage. The ways we talk about new cars are changing and so are our expectations for the vehicles of tomorrow. To some, processing speed is of greater importance than top speed. What connected vehicles are showing us is there is an entirely new way to define “a great car”, and in this new definition, software means just as much as hardware.


needed if technology evolves.” Those inclined to own the newest connected vehicle technology are likely resigned to the fact that they will have to regularly trade in their cars; however, automakers are unlikely to want to hold reputations for building vehicles that cannot remain on the road for a reasonable amount of time. There are negative environmental and reputational consequences to selling cars that don’t last and don’t hold their value, so while connected vehicles may increase fears around rapid obsolescence, automakers will do what they

can to combat these fears. One key to keeping any vehicle on the road for a long period of time is designing it in such a way that components can be replaced for reasonable costs. Consumers - both private and commercial should pay attention to design modularity. Modularity, which in this context refers to the construction of a vehicle from smaller, replaceable components (modules), allows a car built today to be updated more easily in the future. As battery, sensor, and other hardware technology improves, vehicle manufacturers who allow for these

upgrades in their original designs will be better prepared to advertise longer vehicle lifespans.

COMMERCIAL VERSUS PERSONAL Commercial carriers are more likely than private consumers to be concerned with safety-related liability. News related to alternative fuels and environmental regulations may be more interesting to fleet managers than vehicle entertainment systems, and advances in fleet telematics will be of bigger interest to commercial operators since such technology provides

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data that can help with cost control. When asked how private consumers and commercial vehicle operators might differ in their adoption of and attitudes to connected vehicle technology, Jean-Marc Picard, executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association (APTA), says “for carriers, there are a lot of regulations to follow and much is mandated, like electronic logging devices (ELDs). For consumers, it is more of a social choice. Carriers will adapt faster when and if governments create mandates.” Asked the same question, Scott McCormick predicts “commercial vehicles will adopt the technologies that improve driver awareness, reduce liability and reduce operating costs.” Even though personal and commercial vehicle safety needs are similar, he adds “personal vehicles offer their safety packages across the board, but the infotainment packages offered are based on the general persona of the people that buys or leases each type and trim level of vehicle.” While government mandates and liability will be major factors in the attitudes carriers have towards vehicle connectivity, they will be wise to monitor advances in vehicle connectivity from a driver retention standpoint. Picard 10

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says heavy truck connected technology could probably help with recruitment to some extent by improving the perceptions people have about the trucking industry, an industry which Picard and many others believe needs an image overhaul.

SAFETY Regardless of whether someone is buying a personal vehicle or is in charge of ordering trucks for a fleet, safety enhancements are universally appealing. With human and driver error being the most common factor leading to a collision [6], dreams of a safer future for all road users are fueled by advances in vehicle technology that can reduce the role a human plays in driving. “Everything that is developed in terms of technology is done to enhance safety - tires, cameras, sensors, these all have a safety component,” says Jean-Marc Picard, when asked how enhanced vehicle technology will impact highway safety. Scott McCormick says “Adding connectivity to provide data about the road, weather and traffic conditions along your route is of tremendous value.” Vehicle connectivity already offers consumers options to enhance their safe-

ty while driving. Currently, higher-end vehicles on the market offer features like heads-up displays which provide the driver with important information without requiring them to look away from the road. Connected technology allows features like this to provide the driver with information from beyond just their vehicle, like the current speed limit, navigation information, weather, and upcoming road hazards [7]. The ability for a car to gather information about its surroundings and from other vehicles will only increase as wireless technology capabilities grow. As these improvements are made, cars will be able to interact with each other to alert drivers to hazards they can’t see. For example, a connected vehicle stopped for a road hazard in a wooded area could send signals out to other vehicles to alert them that it is stopped. Drivers of connected cars that can receive these signals could then be alerted of the upcoming hazards long before they are able to visually see them; drivers of vehicles without such features would lack the advanced notice. Vehicle connectivity takes vehicle safety to new theoretical heights. Our highways and cities are already monitored


The Connected Car

by countless sensors that provide information for road monitoring services, weather stations, traffic monitoring services, and emergency alert services. Connected vehicles could potentially tap into this data through a wireless connection, allowing drivers to learn about developing safetysensitive situations while they are driving. Many of the pieces needed to bring about a connected vehicle safety revolution are already here; the next five years will see these pieces continue to fall into place.

CONTINUOUS UPDATES As vehicles increasingly rely on software to deliver greater performance, efficiency, and safety to those who own and drive them, software updates become more of a factor. Present-day vehicles already receive occasional software updates to enhance performance or fix defects, but much of this work is done at shops as part of a repair or service. Connected cars offer increased options for software updates outside of a shop or dealership. Tesla, for example, can provide software updates through WiFi [8]. As network capabilities grow, updates for connected cars may be done through cellular connections and occur without interrupting the regular use of the vehicle. The ability of a vehicle to be updated both improves the safety of the vehicle and can potentially address concerns over quickened obsolescence that were discussed in an earlier section in this article. A vehicle bought today contains hardware that might, through better software, be capable of greater performance than what is currently possible. As the automaker’s en-

gineering teams think of ways to improve their products, updates could be issued to all existing vehicles when improvements are made. Connectivity allows consumers to enjoy such benefits without increasing the amount of time the vehicle needs to spend at the dealership. Commercial fleet managers will certainly appreciate anything that can reduce vehicle downtime. Finally, cybersecurity threats can be more readily addressed when vehicles have connected capabilities. Of course, driving-related cybersecurity threats are new highway hazards that are only made possible because of vehicle connectivity, but consumers will receive protection from these threats in the form of software updates from automakers who work to defend against such threats.

SUMMARY With longstanding and start-up manufacturers racing to innovate, choices in new car technology will only accelerate in the near future. Consumers - whether private or commercial - should be paying attention to this connectivity race because no matter what the next five years bring, one thing is certain: they will not be dull.

REFERENCES 1 - “SAE International Releases Updated Visual Chart for Its “Levels of Driving Automation” Standard for Self-Driving Vehicles”, The Society of Automotive Engineering, accessed October 13th, 2021, https:// www.sae.org/news/press-room/2018/12/ sae-international-releases-updated-visual-chart-for-its-%E2%80%9Clevels-ofdriving-automation%E2%80%9D-stand-

ard-for-self-driving-vehicles 2 - “Autopilot and Full Self-Driving Capability”, Support, Tesla, accessed October 13th, 2021, https://www.tesla.com/support/ autopilot 3 - “Waymo Driver, Waymo, accessed October 13th, 2021, https://waymo.com/ waymo-driver/ 4 - “Release: Canada’s first automated commercial trucks to roll onto Alberta highway”, Alberta Motor Transport Association, accessed October 13th, 2021, https:// amta.ca/release-canadas-first-automatedcommercial-trucks-roll-onto-alberta-highway/ 5 - “5 things to know about 5G if you work in the auto industry”, ericsson.com, accessed October 15th, 2021, https://www. ericsson.com/en/5g /5-things-to-knowabout-5g-if-you-work-in-the-auto-industry 6 - “Waymo Simulated Driving Behavior in Reconstructed Fatal Crashes within an Autonomous Vehicle Operating Domain”, John M. Scanlon, Kristofer D. Kusano, Tom Daniel, Christopher Alderson, Alexander Ogle, Trent Victor, Waymo 2021, accessed October 15th, 2021, https://storage.googleapis.com/waymo-uploads/files/ documents/Waymo-Simulated-DrivingBehavior-in-Reconstructed-Collisions.pdf 7 - “Head-up Display: Why You Need It in Your Next Car”, Russ Heaps, Kelley Blue Book, accessed October 15th, 2021, https://www.kbb.com/car-advice/head-updisplay-why-need-next-car/ 8 - “Software Updates”, Support, Tesla, accessed October 15th, 2021, https:// www.tesla.com/en_CA/support/softwareupdates

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Around the Atlantic

THE RIGHT STUFF NEW KENMOUNT NAPA SHOP HAS FOUND THE RIGHT LOCATION; NOW THE GOAL IS TO KEEP PROVIDING ‘THE RIGHT PART, TO THE RIGHT PEOPLE, IN THE RIGHT PLACE, AT THE RIGHT TIME

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By Kristen Lipscombe

EAMWORK IS THE ABSOLUTE KEY TO SUCCESS FOR STAFF MEMBERS AT NAPA KENMOUNT IN ST. JOHN’S, NFLD. AFTER ALL, IT WASN’T LONG AGO THAT THE KENMOUNT LOCATION DIDN’T EXIST AT ALL. The brand-new member of the NAPA Auto Parts family represents the coming together of two separate corporate franchises, one formerly nestled on Freshwater Road in St. John’s and another shop that had been located just down the road on Commonwealth Avenue in Mount Peral, Nfld. “This used to be a furniture mart warehouse… and it was up for lease,” said store manager Andrew Coady of the new site, which is conveniently nestled between the two former locations in order to serve all of the company’s loyal customers. The two NAPA stores were merged, and the new store opened its doors, all between May and June of last year – right in the midst of the pandemic that rocked the world to its core. “It was just a big challenge because of COVID; that threw some wrenches into it,” Coady said, “because when we were doing the move last (spring), you were limited to 10 people per building, you could only have so many people working there, and we weren’t able to get much help from the mainland.” “Normally, when we close a store and move millions of dollars’ worth of inventory, you need extra help to do that, but we didn’t have that,” Coady said. “We had to do that on our own to the best of our abilities.” Like many companies, after sending some workers off on fur14

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lough for a short time due to the pandemic, Coady was quickly able to bring his workers back on the payroll so that they could work together to open up their shiny new shop. “There was a lot of great teamwork and morale between the staff, and everybody working together, and helping out and pitching in and staying late and doing what was needed to get the job done,” he recalled. In fact, when the NAPA “bosses” visited the new location last July, they were “blown away,” Coady said. “They couldn’t believe it was all done and that we were operating at full capacity in this ‘new normal.’ ” NAPA Kenmount now proudly boasts 11 delivery vehicles, 10 drivers, a dispatcher, two parts pickers, a manager, an assistant manager, a warehouse supervisor, about a half dozen auto parts specialists working the counters, two parts handlers, a shipping and receiving clerk, extra storage capacity to better serve client needs, a new and improved delivery management system, and yes – plenty of happy and satisfied customers. And for this proud NAPA team, “servicing customers” is what it’s all about, day in and day out, at every location, said Coady, who with more than three decades of management experience oversees the province’s three corporate NAPA stores and enjoys mentoring employees to be the best that they can be for those they serve. “It’s about providing the right part, to the right people, in the right place, at the right time,” he said, adding it doesn’t matter whether their customers are retailers, garages, car dealerships or even do-it-yourself backyard mechanics. “It’s being there when they need us.” Coady is extremely impressed with the resilience and reliability of the team he is leading, through the pandemic and beyond, and can’t wait to create even more business efficiencies with the talent he has on the NAPA staff. “We’ve got a great crew – and that’s going to be the key to moving ahead in the future.”



Human Resources

MENTAL HEALTH HAZARDS: RESOURCES FOR THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY By Dave Elniski

“I

T COSTS NOTHING TO BE KIND TO SO M E BO DY.” THESE WORDS, SPOKEN BY TRUCKING MENTAL HEALTH ADVOCATE AND PODCAST HOST DAVID HENRY IN HIS VIDEO FOR THE BELL LET’S TALK PROGRAM SUMMARIZE A KEY THEME IN ADDRESSING MENTAL HEALTH HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE. The theme is kindness and compas-

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sion, and it is found at the core of any initiative aimed at improving mental health. Workplaces around the world will continue to grapple with the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic for years to come. But the current pandemic did not create psychological danger in a world that was previously psychologically safe. Instead, industries that struggled to address pre-pandemic psychological hazards are now facing considerable additional challenges, and the trucking industry is no exception. The demand for truck drivers is high, thanks to strong consumer spending on goods in North America. But as the industry works to meet this challenge, the demand on those drivers and other workers within the industry grows higher. In an industry characterized by isolation, long hours, and high stress, companies need to

address mental health concerns and not expect workers to remain psychologically healthy without employer support.

WHAT CAN EMPLOYERS DO? Trucking companies, and especially those with long-haul operations, face unique challenges in addressing hazards related to mental health. Furthermore, it is difficult to equitably address these concerns amongst all staff when some workers report to an office during predetermined hours and other workers spend days or weeks away from home, facing considerable uncertainty on a daily basis. According to the Government of Canada and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, “only 23% of Canadian workers would feel comfortable talking to their employer about a psychological health issue.” What employers



Human Resources

should take away from this statistic is that direct questioning of employees and management’s perception of worker psychological health and safety are unlikely to give an accurate picture of the company’s overall mental health status. And since trucking is an industry that experiences high turnover and difficulties in recruiting talent for key positions, a proactive mindset towards mental health in the workplace can help an organization remain competitive. One of the first initiatives an employer should consider is the implementation of an Employee and Family Assistance Plan (EFAP). EFAPs are benefits programs that are paid in full or in part by the employer and provide the employee and their family with access to resources for a variety of physical and mental health concerns. The Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association (NSTSA) and the Trucking Human Resources Sector Council (THRSC) Atlantic have collaborated on a program to bring EFAP benefits to employers of all sizes - including owner-operators. Offered through Homewood Health, this trucking-focused EFAP offers a wide variety of counselling and coaching services specifically aimed at preventing mental health disorders and reducing staff turnover. Trucking HR Canada is another organization that can aid employers in the adoption of best practices related to improving workplace mental health. In addition to providing the trucking industry with labour market information and training services, Trucking HR Canada recognizes the efforts of fleets that implement excellent human resource policies and practices through their Top Fleet Employers program. In their document Gearing Up for Workplace Mental Health, they present best practices related to improving and maintaining mental health that are in use by some of their Top Fleet Employers. By reading up on what other organizations are doing to improve mental health in their workplaces, fleet managers will find that many companies are implementing initiatives. The adoption of an EFAP and openly addressing the psychological concerns in operations will put a carrier in a position to help and retain workers. Those fleets that do nothing may eventually find themselves unable to meet their labour demands.

WHAT CAN WORKERS DO? In terms of implementing systems and policies, the employer must be the one to act when addressing mental health con18

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cerns. But workers themselves play an active role both in managing their own mental health on their own and within the workplace. The first thing a worker can do in improving their workplace’s mental health is to return to the opening quote of this article: be kind to others. We are often indifferent to those around us when we are caught up in daily activities. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but if our indifference leads us to miss many opportunities to be kind then we should reflect on our priorities. While indifference to others may be at times excusable for a busy worker, being rude and mean are not. Mean-spirited workplace pranks, bullying, and inappropriate language are not acceptable in today’s workplaces, and while employers bear the burden of ultimate responsibility for the culture at work, workers who negatively influence culture can themselves become hazards to the psychological safety of their coworkers. Another important way workers can help is to be receptive to their employer’s positive initiatives. When a workplace implements an Employee and Family Assistance Plan (EFAP), some may take a cynical approach and look for problems in the program or doubt the employer’s intentions. An open mind to new programs and policies coupled with a willing attitude to participate is a way workers can directly benefit from the efforts of their employers. Change to a new system or program is a stressor even if it is well-intentioned. This can be especially difficult to longstanding workers who may perceive the change as an implication that they and their work habits are somehow flawed. Newer workers can help in these transitions by being patient with those who are struggling in good faith to embrace new dynamics. Longstanding workers can help - and even test - their employer by being open about their fears and uncertainties. Finally, workers should not be afraid to leave workplaces that are unhealthy and dysfunctional. It is reasonable to expect work to be imperfect and employees need to see things in perspective. But, not all employers will commit to the wellbeing of their workers or to improving mental health. Workers in the trucking industry are in demand and have value; it’s a free market, so there is nothing wrong with seeking employment at better places instead of trying to make an unworkable situation work.

SUMMARY Employees and employers together have the ability to shift the culture of their workplace in a positive direction. Mental health can be talked about and employer support can exist without disrupting operations. As we make our way through this pandemic, trucking can participate in the growing dialogue around healthy minds at work - and it can be part of the movement that creates a better psychological future for industry workers at all levels.

REFERENCES

1 - “David K. Henry”, Our Initiatives, Bell Let’s Talk, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://letstalk.bell.ca/en/our-initiatives/ team/david-k-henry 2 - “After freight demands propped up trucking in 2020, industry braces for postvaccine world”, Fleet Owner, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://www.fleetowner. com/news/economics/article/21152636/ after-freight-demands-propped-up-trucking-in-2020-industry-braces-for-postvaccine-world 3 - “The Weary Road Ahead: Contronting Driver Mental Health Threats”, Safety for the Long Haul, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://safetyforthelonghaul. com/2021/06/10/the-weary-road-aheadconfronting-driver-mental-health-threats/ 4 - “Psychological Health in the Workplace”, Government of Canada referencing the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/healthsafety/reports/psychological-health.html 5 - “Trucking Sector Employee and Family Assistance Program”, joint publication from the Trucking Human Resources Sector Council Atlantic and the Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://9cdeb509-346947ef-9688-cb6c849e490e.filesusr.com/ ugd/e00d1e_ f3940a211d8144f4be10b68e7ae10414.pdf 6 - “About”, Trucking HR Canada, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://truckinghr.com/about/ 7 - “Gearing up for Workplace Mental Health”, Trucking HR Canada, accessed August 15th, 2021, https://truckinghr.com/ wp-content/uploads/2020/01/THRC_Report_MentalHealthGuide-WEB-FINAL.pdf



Industry News

NAPA XPO SALE 2021 A SUCCESSFUL FIRST NATIONAL EDITION

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ONTREAL, OCTOBER 19, 2021 – THE FIRST NATIONAL EDITION OF THE NAPA XPO SALE TOOK PLACE FROM AUGUST 30 TO OCTOBER 8, 2021, WITH CLOSE TO 8,000 PARTICIPANTS TAKING ADVANTAGE OF EXCLUSIVE SPECIAL PRICES AND A WIDE RANGE OF PROMOTIONS BY VISITING THE VIRTUAL KIOSKS OF OVER 100 EXHIBITORS. The theme of the XPO Sale this year,

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Reload, perfectly reflected its name, with the event generating more than 12,000 orders. Installers had the opportunity to stock up on products at the best prices for fall 2021 and winter 2022. Visitors also had a chance to pick up great rewards by redeeming the XPO points they collected with their purchases. In total, 4,000 rewards were ordered from among those offered by the XPO’s 4 partners: MALGA, Global Tourisme, Centre Hi-Fi and Sépaq. “We built on the success of the first virtual edition in Quebec and the Atlantic provinces last year to reach installers across the country this year, and they answered the call. Thanks to a team that

is very involved with our customers, we were able to make this event a huge success,” noted John O’Dowd, Vice President Marketing, NAPA Canada. Developed by Victoire Events and Web specifically for NAPA, the XPO Sale platform is a unique event space where suppliers can showcase their products and provide installers with value- added content. This year’s event featured podcasts, videos, articles and 2 virtual car races. For more info: Eric Dufresne UAP Director, Marketing and Corporate Communications Phone: 514 251-6540, ext. 7205 Mobile: 514 805-1435 edufresne@uapinc. com.



East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE COLLECTED FROM ACROSS THE ATLANTIC REGION

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Public Advisory: Construction Begins on Diversion on Trans-Canada Highway at Aspen Brook Bridge Work is underway to construct a diversion around Aspen Brook Bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway, approximately 20 kilometres west of Grand Falls-Windsor. A contract valued at $684,000 was awarded to Edward Collins Contracting Ltd. and involves the construction of a two-lane road diversion to allow eastbound and westbound traffic to travel around the bridge. The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure anticipates work on the diversion being completed this fall. The department will be issuing a tender to replace Aspen Brook Bridge this winter. Additional details on this project and other highway construction projects are available on www.nl511.ca and the NL 511 smartphone app.

NEW BRUNSWICK Carbon-pricing system for large emitters one step closer The provincial government has posted the proposed Reporting and Reduction of

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standard to support its output-based pricing system for large emitters, for public review and comment. Since Jan. 1, 2019, large emitters of greenhouse gases in New Brunswick have been subject to the federal system while a provincial one was being developed. The federal government approved in principle the province’s system in September 2020. Changes to the province’s Climate Change Act, which were necessary to make the transition from the federal system to the provincial one, were introduced in November 2020. In June 2021, the provincial government published the Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulation under the Climate Change Act to provide supporting information for the output-based pricing system. The standard posted today is intended to further support the legislation and regulation. The New Brunswick output-based pricing system will drive incremental greenhouse gas reductions in the province’s industrial and electricity generation sectors. Facilities that emit 50,000 tonnes

WE’RE BIG ON

SECOND CHANCES. 22

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or more of greenhouse gas emissions annually will be required to participate in the system. Facilities that emit between 10,000 tonnes to 50,000 tonnes may voluntarily opt-in. The provincial government anticipates fewer than 20 facilities will participate in the system. “We have proven that we are committed to reducing our carbon footprint,” said Environment and Climate Change Minister Gary Crossman. “Having our own system will reduce our carbon emissions while recognizing that our economy is heavily dependent upon trade.” New Brunswick is a national leader in lowering emissions, having reduced emissions by 38 per cent since 2005. The province has a 2030 target of 10.7 megatonnes, which is equivalent to a reduction of 47 per cent below 2005 levels.

NEW BRUNSWICK AND NOVA SCOTIA CREATE PARTNERSHIP TO INVESTIGATE SERIOUS INCIDENTS INVOLVING POLICE The following joint news release was issued October 4 by the provincial governments of New Brunswick and Nova





East Coast Road Report

dedication and commitment.” The Emergency Services Provider Fund offers money to fire departments and ground search and rescue organizations, including hazardous materials teams, to upgrade equipment that is used directly in response to a fire or emergency. “Cape Breton Search and Rescue is grateful to have been chosen to receive funding this year through this program. With this money the team is able to purchase essential equipment to keep our volunteers safe in the field and improve our communications to help reunite loved ones in our community during a time of need,” said Greg O’Flaherty, president, Cape Breton Search and Rescue Quick Facts: 65 organizations are receiving funding under the program this fiscal year categories include personal protective equipment and self-contained breathing apparatus, communications, rescue equipment, miscellaneous firefighting equipment, hazardous materials equipment and emergency power for buildings organizations can apply every three years the program provides up to 75 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $20,000

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND Scotia: New Brunswick and Nova Scotia have reached an agreement in principle that would allow Nova Scotia’s Serious Incident Response Team (SiRT) to act as the police oversight body for both provinces. SiRT is an independent agency that has a mandate to investigate serious matters such as death, serious injury, sexual assault or other public-interest concerns involving the police. The collaboration ensures both provinces will benefit from SiRT expertise and independent oversight in the interest of public safety. Premier Blaine Higgs and Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston agreed that citizens can be assured these investigations will be undertaken in an efficient, professional manner, as has been and continues to be the case in Nova Scotia. “We know the importance of having an independent oversight body to investigate serious incidents involving police and we are pleased with this agreement in principle,” said Higgs. “This is an example of how the provinces in our region can work together to ensure we have ready access to the expertise that we need to serve our communities.” Both provinces have committed to make the necessary changes in legislation and related policies. Additional resources 26

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will also be required to support the expanded service. The partnership is expected to start in 2022. “Citizens need to have confidence that serious incidents involving police are thoroughly and independently investigated. Nova Scotia’s Serious Incident Response Team is highly regarded and we are proud of the work they do,” said Houston. “Collaboration between the provinces promotes and supports public safety in both provinces.”

NOVA SCOTIA Province Supports Emergency Services Providers Ground search and rescue, volunteer fire departments and other emergency services provider groups will get more than $1.14 million from the province to buy equipment that will help them save lives. “Every Nova Scotian deserves to feel safe in their community and know that help is available, if needed,” said John Lohr, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing. “We rely on these people, many of whom are volunteers, to keep us safe and help us in our worst moments. I know personally what it is like to need those services. I’d like to thank them for their

PEI Implementing Mandatory Covid Testing Upon Entry Sept 30 The Government of Prince Edward Island is implementing Covid testing at all points of entry into the province, effective September 30 – regardless of immunization status and time outside of province – as an additional measure to protect local residents from increasing cases of COVID-19. Information provided to CTA by the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association indicates the following will apply to truck drivers entering the province: Drivers who make regular trips to PEI (e.g. at least twice weekly) will only be required to be tested every 5 days; Drivers who don’t make regular trips to PEI will be asked to be tested upon entry; All testing must be completed by PEI authorities; Test results from other jurisdictions completed in advance of arrival will not be accepted; Drivers who are not fully vaccinated are required to work-isolate when in PEI; Drivers who are fully vaccinated are NOT required to isolate when in PEI, but they are still required to get tested based on above frequency of trips. The province’s website also highlights that “due to increased testing at the points of entry, travel delays, especially in Borden-Carlton, are to be expected”.





Truckers Corner

KEEP YOUR TRUCKS MOVING THE MINDFUL TRUCKER REMINDS US THAT THERE’S STILL PLENTY OF GOOD REASONS TO CONSIDER A CAREER IN TRUCKING.

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By Dana Smith

EING IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY FOR 32 YEARS NOW, I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF DRIVERS COME AND GO. WHY DO THEY STAY AND WHY DO THEY DEPART? THAT’S THE MILLION DOLLAR QUESTION.

and the share of older drivers is increasing. Immigrants make up for about 20%

of drivers and non-permanent residents make up about 0.5% in Canada. (Canadian

For some it’s not enough money, for others it’s poor working conditions, too many regulations, wanting more home time, and the list goes on. For the most part the average age of a driver is increasing in Canada, and according to the Canadian Trucking Alliance (2016) is about 48-50 years of age. There are a large number of drivers upwards of 50-60 years of age. Also the share of younger drivers seems to be decreasing, Trucking Alliance). So as you can see the older drivers are soon retiring, and/or cutting back on hours to part-time work. Because of the Covid pandemic, some have left the industry altogether. The younger drivers do not see trucking as a very glamorous career choice. Yes, most companies will offer you a brand new truck to drive, others will try and entice you with more money or better runs, but at the end of the day you still have to endure the sector the way it operates: as a supply and demand industry. It seems the Covid pandemic has changed things a bit. During the pandemic truckers were seen as heroes, delivering and keeping the supply chain moving. This is causing a renewed interest in trucking for people who otherwise may not have thought about trucking as a career. As great as this is, it’s still not enough to fill all the vacancies in the industry. Because of this renewed interest, I’m seeing more young people coming into the industry through the training schools these days. Therefore, the labour shortage is still brewing. Trucking is at the top of that list. Trucking labour shortages were present before the pandemic and are a cause for great concern in the midst, and after the 30

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fact. The basic things you use every day may no longer be available, or are being delayed in getting to you. How will this affect your life? Stop and think about how this affects trucking companies, present truck drivers, and everything else that is reliant on the trucking industry. Air, rail, and sea shipping. This is known as the supply chain, which includes all of the things you purchase online as well as in-store. So how do we find the people we need to keep the trucks moving? By looking in new geographical areas, or for people looking to change careers, women, and/or young people who are interested in trucking. Going into high schools and educating younger people on why they may want to choose a career in trucking and so on. If you’re going to attract someone to the trucking industry, you may want to look at what will attract them to it in the first place. Company culture has a lot to do with this. If you have a rotating door policy, drivers won’t want to work for you. If you’re someone who can build trust, value, and lead them to be a better version of themselves, who are happier and more productive, then they will be lined up at the door to work for you. Also keep in mind that drivers talk to each other and know which ones are the good companies to work for, and which ones aren’t. Training is another factor in recruiting people and having the proper training in the trucking industry is a crucial component. The Mandatory Entry Level Training Program is a huge step in the right direction to make sure that qualified candidates are trained in a way that will keep them, and everyone else safe on the road. Learning what they need to know because there are no shortcuts in training, no matter what industry you are in. The Humboldt bus crash was a prime example of that. One such business that is helping is The Mindful Trucker, who has partnered with Green Light Canada as an authorized agent to offer small-to-medium sized Canadian trucking companies a new way to find the drivers they need for tomorrow, today! It can be a daunting expensive task looking for drivers to fill your trucks. On average, it can cost thousands of dollars to replace a driver or find a new one. The Mindful Trucker offers an experienced, professional driver finder service which includes the following: • Identifying your driver needs, • (how many you need & for what runs).

Advertising and marketing for the positions. • Searching world-wide. • Qualifying all leads coming in. • Assisting with the application process. • Assisting with the interview & hiring process if needed. Added services may include, online training courses, pre-trip, coupling/uncoupling, and driving assessments at an

approved Canadian training school as required. Also, further safety training to provide candidates with ongoing safe driving habits for their future in trucking. If you’re a small or medium sized transportation, manufacturing/logistics, or warehousing business and are looking for help finding your drivers/workers of tomorrow, today, contact The Mindful Trucker at info@themindfultrucker.com to get started.


Carters Corner

MOTOR MATTERS: ROUNDUP OF AUTO AND TRUCKING NEWS

NOVA SCOTIA SUPPORTS EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDERS Ground search anrescue, volunteer fire departments and other emergency services provider groups will get more than $1.14 million from the province to buy equipment that will help them save lives. “Every Nova Scotian deserves to feel safe in their community and know that help is available, if needed,” said John Lohr, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing. “We rely on these people, many of whom are volunteers, to keep us safe

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and help us in our worst moments. I know personally what it is like to need those services. I’d like to thank them for their dedication and commitment.” The Emergency Services Provider Fund offers money to fire departments and ground search and rescue organizations, including hazardous materials teams, to upgrade equipment that is used directly in response to a fire or emergency. “Cape Breton Search and Rescue is grateful to have been chosen to receive funding this year through this program. With this money the team is able to purchase essential equipment to keep our volunteers safe in the field and improve our communications to help reunite loved ones in our community during a time of need,” said Greg O’Flaherty, president, Cape Breton Search and Rescue QUICK FACTS: 65 organizations are receiving funding under the program this fiscal year, categories include personal protective equipment and self-contained breathing apparatus, communications, rescue equipment, miscellaneous firefighting equipment, hazardous materials equipment and emergency power for buildings organizations

can apply every three years the program provides up to 75 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $20,000

CTA SPELLS OUT HOW SUPPLY CHAIN CAN LIMIT DISRUPTIONS Canadians are wondering if recent disruptions in the European supply chain can also occur here. More than any other time in recent memory, Canadians have come to appreciate and understand that our nation’s economy moves by truck and truck drivers are critical to keeping our factories open and stores shelves full. The Canadian Trucking Alliance, which represents over 5,000 Canadian motor fleets, wants to assure the Canadian public that our industry and professional workforce are cooperating with customers and all levels of government through the pandemic to ensure all Canadians continue to have access to all the products and essential goods our economy depends on. This is not to dismiss the challenges the Canadian supply chain faces – because they are indeed very real. The Canadian supply chain has been fragile throughout the COVID-19 crisis and some uncertainty persists, but with businesses and govern-



Carters Corner

ments working together we can overcome many of these challenges to safeguard against widespread disruptions while emerging from these extraordinary times with a stronger and safer truck transportation sector. There is no escaping the fact the trucking industry is facing a significant labour shortage of commercial drivers. According to Trucking HR Canada, there were nearly 20,000 vacant truck driver positions this year. Even before COVID-19 emerged, the trucking industry already faced a sharp labour crunch. A pre-COVID report published by the Conference Board of Canada found that there could be 30,000 to 40,000 jobs vacancies for Canadian truck drivers by 2023.

The pandemic has only made this capacity crunch worse as more drivers – already one of the oldest workforces in Canada – increasingly choose to retire. The labour shortage has also extended to other critical industry positions, like heavy truck mechanics, which is causing longer periods of downtime for equipment in need of repair. Additionally, the industry is currently facing a shortage of pre-owned equipment and significant delays in new equipment deliveries for trucks and trailers. Wait times for new equipment – currently between eight months and over a year – is more than three times longer than normal. Furthermore, the lack of equipment is creating issues for shippers in the supply chain who rely on trailers as mobile warehouses to store preloaded goods for pickup. There are several actions the industry is taking to mitigate the combined 34

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disruptions and economic impact caused by labour shortages, including a national recruitment campaign to attract a new generation of workers; ongoing training; competitive compensation packages and flexible work schedules and giving drivers power over deselecting customers who treat drivers poorly and unnecessarily detain drivers and waste their limited time at loading docks. Companies purchasing trucking services who do not want drivers to deselect them can be ‘shippers of choice’ and limit potential service disruptions by eliminating as much detention time as possible, loading unloading in a timely manner and treating drivers with respect. Meanwhile, the government can act in

several ways: Trucking receives a much smaller share of training funding than other related sectors. CTA is calling on the federal and provincial governments to provide known, trusted trucking companies greater access to training dollars to assist a new generation of Canadians in becoming safe and compliant commercial vehicle operators; Trucking also has very limited access to foreign labour. With declining birth rates in Canada, trucking, like all sectors of the economy, will rely on new entrants for sustainable growth. CTA is calling on federal provincial governments to provide known/trusted trucking companies greater access to foreign labour so newcomers to Canada can learn to become professional truck drivers from safe and labourcompliant fleets; The pandemic has brought to the sur-

face a preexisting problem in trucking – the growth of unscrupulous trucking fleets who use the underground economy, cheat on tax and labour rules and sidestep safety regulations to lower operating costs and attract drivers away from safe and compliant fleets. CTA is asking the government to broaden national enforcement against the practice – known as Driver Inc. Governments and the supply chain must continue to work together to keep Canada moving. Source: CTA Spells Out How Supply Chain Can Limit Disruptions - Canadian Trucking Alliance (cantruck.ca)

INTRODUCING THE FLUKE FEV100 ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING STATION ADAPTER As more electric vehicle charging stations are installed to meet the growing demand, the need to ensure stations are operating properly and safely takes on new urgency. One of the first of its kind in North America, the new Fluke FEV100 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Test Adapter tests the safety and performance of level 1 or level 2 electric vehicle AC charging stations (EVSEs) with type 1 connectors. One of the challenges of testing EVSEs is that they traditionally have required an electric vehicle (EV) to be connected before they will fully operate — which means every technician must drive an EV to perform certain tests. The Fluke FEV100 simulates the presence of an EV, allowing technicians to test the charging station in combination with appropriate test instruments, such as digital multimeters and ScopeMeters®. “Ensuring charging stations are operating properly and safely is one of the most important aspects of electric vehicle infrastructure,” said Allison Wyatt, Product Marketing Manager at Fluke. “The FEV100 eliminates many testing obstacles by emulating an electric vehicle, so technicians can isolate the charging station and ensure that any issues are originating from the station, not from the vehicle.” The Fluke FEV100 features: Protective Earth (PE) Pre-Test to test for dangerous voltage in the earth; Control Pilot (CP) for vehicle simulation, eliminating the need for an electric vehicle to test the EVSE; PE and CP error notification; Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) testing to ensure user safety; Voltage, waveform, loop impedance, and resistance testing;



Carters Corner

Connectivity with other Fluke test and measurement tools to perform additional tests, such as viewing the maximum available current and Control Pilot signal analysis. Compliant with the SAE J1772 standards for North American charging stations, the FEV100 allows a technician to verify that after installation, a charger can communicate and deliver power to vehicles. The FEV100 Kit includes the Fluke FEV100/BASIC Test Adapter, FEVCOM/TY1 Type 1 Connector and Cable, and a soft carrying case. For more information on the Fluke FEV100 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Test Adapter, visit: https://www.fluke. com/en-us/product/electrical-testing/installation-testers/fev100.

BIDIRECTIONAL CHARGING: A FIRST IN ATLANTIC CANADA Electric vehicles are transforming the transportation industry. From automakers accelerating their electrification plans and shifting to all electric line-ups, to the Ca-

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nadian Government spending more than $1 billion to support zero-emission vehicle adoption, the electric vehicle movement has picked up momentum, and shows no signs of slowing down. By 2035, all new cars and light-duty trucks sold in Canada are planned to be zero-emission vehicles. And on a local level, our communities are committing to reduce emissions and prioritize sustainable transportation. Halifax Transit is adding 210 electric buses as part of their goal to electrify over half their fleet by 2028. As more communities, businesses, and Nova Scotians choose to go electric,

we’re planning for the future. This means understanding how additional charging will impact our electrical system and peak demand—the time of day Nova Scotians are using the most energy. It’s why we’re exploring emerging technologies like bidirectional charging, as part of our Smart Grid Nova Scotia pilot. This new technology can help electric vehicle owners make an even bigger impact—for the environment, and for our electrical grid. What is bidirectional charging and why do we need it? Bidirectional charging allows electric vehicle drivers to not only charge their EV battery, but to also take the energy stored in their battery and push it back to a home, building or the power grid. It also enables smarter EV charging during offpeak hours, or when clean energy generation is high. Vehicle batteries can be four to five times larger than current home batteries on the market. The bidirectional capability has the potential to support our plans for a greener and more efficient power


grid. How will this benefit Nova Scotians? This technology has the potential to benefit more than just EV owners. The bidirectional charging capability can benefit the whole power system. It can even provide back-up power in the event of an outage. And when it comes to clean energy, “renewable following,” allows us to control when to use energy from the grid to serve a building or charge a vehicle based on the amount of renewable energy in the system. This means that we can “follow” the greener generation by pulling from the grid when it’s abundant and shifting to the EV battery when there is less available. As of right now, only a few EV manufacturers have bidirectional charging capabilities, but other manufacturers are exploring the technology. In the future, we hope to provide both residential and commercial customers the opportunity to realize energy cost savings and lower their household emissions by participating in a bidirectional charging program.

dents can see and learn about this technology firsthand. Some will also participate in analysis of the test data for their senior projects or by completing an internship on the Applied Energy Research team. “Hands-on experience in the growing field of smart electric vehicle charging will help prepare students for the future,” said Dr. Groszko. In addition to bidirectional charging,

we’re also testing solar, batteries and electric vehicle smart charging to better understand their benefits to customers and the grid. To learn more about how we’re testing smart grid technology as part of our clean energy transition, visit nspower. ca/smartgridns. Source: Bidirectional charging: A first in Atlantic Canada | Nova Scotia Power (nspower.ca)

WORKING TOGETHER As we work to integrate more clean energy technologies and build the grid of the future, collaboration is critical. We installed the first bidirectional charger at the NSCC campus in Middleton last March, as part of our continued and innovative partnership with the college. It’s the first in Atlantic Canada and one of the first in Canada. The first vehicle-to-building charge as part of our Smart Grid Nova Scotia pilot program took place in June. The first bidirectional charger used was made by Coritech, which is primarily for commercial use – and we’re planning to collaborate with other vendors to test their bidirectional chargers. By doing so, we’ll be able to install up to 20 bidirectional chargers across the province in 2022, most of which will be for residential use. NSCC Applied Energy Research Scientist, Dr. Wayne Groszko, is excited to be helping test this technology. “When we first could see that the vehicle was providing power to the building, that was a great moment, and hopefully the start of something much bigger,” said Dr. Groszko. “There will be a lot of electric vehicles operating in Canada, and bidirectional charging gives us more options for how to use them.” NSCC students will also benefit from this collaboration at the three campuses where the chargers are being installed. The Energy Sustainability Engineering Technology (ESET) program is based at the Middleton campus, where the stuautoatlantic.com

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Truckers Corner

SPOT THE TRUCK NEW APP LAUNCHED BY BIG RIG WRAPS PUTS A NEW SPIN ON OLD ADVERTISING FORMS

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By Carter Hammett

OT OFF THE PRESS, A NEW APP LAUNCHED BY TRANSPORT TRUCK ADVERTISING COMPANY BIG RIG WRAPS, ADDS DEPTH AND A TOUCH OF FUN TO TRADITIONAL MARKETING FORMATS, SOMETHING THAT’S SORELY NEEDED DURING THESE TROUBLED TIMES.

Indeed, Spot the Truck! (www.spotthetrucks.com) is a rewards program that offers users a diverse suite of prizes ranging from oil changes to Telus mobility bonuses. Users are invited to snap a picture or take a video every time they notice truck advertising and then submit it to social media where they earn points with the hashtag #bigrigwraps.

“While you’re sitting in rush hour traffic we thought, let’s turn this into something more fun,” says Big Rig Wraps CEO Angela Baltokis (above). Simply enter the date and time and approximate location of your photo, tap in your email and it’s as simple as that. Participants are of course encouraged to drive safely. Users can receive extra points 38

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if the imagery is a Big Rig Wraps ad and can enter up to three times daily. Rewards are actually obtained from Big Rig’s partner companies, which creates a win-win for both Big Rigs and the organization being highlighted. “They get notifications when people see their trucks,” says Baltokis. “We’ll feature and highlight different rewards and the companies get sales and increased visibility.” But users also have another option. If they like they can opt out of the prize and redirect their winnings to a non-profit organization. “We’re going to have a section where you can dedicate points to charity,” says Baltkois. “We’ve worked with several charities over the years; everything from mental health to cats. Rather than taking a gift, you can donate points towards a specific cause.” Baltkois says the app was actually in development prior to COVID’s entry into the daily consciousness but the pandemic scuttled initial plans, and it wasn’t until March of this year that the idea regained its footing. Compatible with both Apple and

Android, the app looks substantially different than when it was first conceived, Baltokis says. Before its release, it was far more complicated. “We’ve made it as simple as possible. We needed to make information more secure…we’re on top of that.” The app is the latest promotional initiative for the company Baltokis founded in 2013, after she identified a barely-touched marketing medium: transport trucks. She created a business model where all-sized businesses could buy large scale ads on trucks ranging from 20-to-53 feet. The company currently partners with over 50 fleet owners who make both their rigs and routes available to advertisers. Prior to her current position, Baltokis spent two decades as a brand strategist and owner of a successful internet marketing firm when online advertising was still in its infancy. She still hones these skills through relationship building and a strong presence online and on all the major social media outlets. For more information on Big Rig Wraps, visit their site at: https://bigrigwraps.ca/


Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD: WILDLIFE EDITION

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ITS AND PIECES OF THE BIZARRE, THE HORRIFIC AND THE DOWNRIGHT PUZZLING SCOOPED UP FROM VARIOUS PARTS OF THE WEB SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. YER WELCOME.

They say cars and animals don’t mix. We beg to differ. Herewith, our round up of some of the strangest auto-fauna stories out there.

ELK FREED AFTER 2 YEARS OF ROAMING COLORADO WITH CAR TIRE AROUND NECK Wildlife officials in Colorado say an elusive elk that has been wandering the hills with a car tire around its neck for at least two years has finally been freed of the obstruction. The 4½-year-old, 600-pound bull elk was spotted near Pine Junction, southwest of Denver, on Saturday evening and tranquilized, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Officers with the agency had to cut off the elk’s five-point antlers to remove the encumbrance because they couldn›t slice through the steel in the bead of the tire. “We would have preferred to cut the tire and leave the antlers for his rutting activity, but the situation was dynamic and we had to just get the tire off in any way possible,” officer Scott Murdoch said. Murdoch and fellow officer Dawson Swanson estimated the elk shed about 35 pounds (16 kilograms) with the removal of the tire, the antlers and debris inside the tire. Wildlife officers first spotted the elk with the tire around its neck in July 2019 on a trail cam while conducting a population survey for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and mountain goats in the Mount Evans Wilderness. They say they have seen deer, elk, moose, bears and other wildlife become entangled in a number of items, including swing sets, hammocks, clotheslines, decorative or holiday lighting, furniture, tomato cages, chicken feeders, laundry baskets, soccer goals and volleyball nets. Source: Elk freed after 2 years of roaming Colorado with car tire around neck (autoblog.com)

SQUIRREL STASHES 42 GALLONS

OF WALNUTS IN A CHEVROLET AVALANCHE Built from 2001 to 2013, the Chevrolet Avalanche was a segment-bending cross between a pickup and an SUV that could

carry a wide variety of items thanks to its clever Midgate system. What no one at Chevrolet bothered to figure out is how many gallons of walnuts can be stored behind the truck’s body panels, but a North


Carter’s Corner

Dakota man found the answer thanks to a red squirrel hoarding food for the winter. Billy Fischer was stunned to find his second-generation Avalanche brimming with black walnuts. They were all over the engine bay, including behind the radiator and around the battery, and dozens were hidden in and under the body panels. He quickly realized that a red squirrel had spent several days carrying them from a tree in his yard to the truck-turned-buffet, where it hoped to live and feast during the winter months. Squirrels aren’t very talkative, so we don’t know why it chose the Avalanche over any of the other cars in the tree’s vicinity. We’re guessing the cavernous engine bay was better suited to becom-

spend the winter, and cars are ideal candidates because they›re full of nooks and crannies. If you park outside, especially if your car sits for several days at a time, take a peek under the hood to make sure it›s not being reclaimed by furry squatters. While taking apart a truck’s front end is annoying, dealing with a chewed-through wiring harness is even worse. Source: Squirrel stashes 42 gallons of walnuts in a Chevrolet Avalanche (autoblog.com)

TOYOTA HIACE DOG VAN HAS SPECIAL DOG SEAT AND CUSTOM BED If you are a dog owner, you know that driving with your puppy can be a joy or a complete fiasco, sometimes on the same

get some fresh air without being able to stick their heads out. Homeowners can even add a fan for even more air circulation. For added style, Flex offers a front spoiler, fender covers and an auxiliary corner mirror for the HiAce. At least your dog would be able to ride in more style. The HiAce in the pictures has all the features of the Dog Van collection from Flex. However, the company actually offers the parts individually, so a person can configure their Toyota to meet their pup’s needs. Unfortunately, the HiAce isn’t available in the US, so you can’t get this dogfocused pickup there. The aftermarket industry for puppy-focused upgrades is quite large, however, whatever vehicle you own, there’s likely a way to make it more comfortable for your dog. Source: Toyota HiAce Dog Van Has Special Doggy Seat And Custom Bed (motor1.com)

STINKING BUGS CAUSE HEADACHES FOR THE GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN

ing a pantry than, say, one sized for a Subaru flat-four. Regardless, Fischer ended up having to dismantle most of the truck›s front end (including the fenders, the grille, and the bumper) to take the walnuts out, but some were stashed in places only a squirrel could reach. «I still have some rolling around the frame, rail wells as well, that I can›t get at,» he told the Fargo-based Grand Forks Herald. At least it sounds like the squirrel was so busy hoarding food that he forgot to chew up the wiring. Fischer pulled out about 42 gallons (or about 150 pounds) of walnuts, a number that›s even more impressive when you consider the squirrel likely brought them in one at a time. He›s giving the pawpicked bunch away on Facebook; black walnuts are edible raw or cooked. This isn’t the first time we’ve seen evidence that cars and rodents don’t mix. Every year when fall begins to settle in, squirrels and other rodents look for a warm, safe place to store food and 40

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trip. At least in Japan, there is now a way to make transporting your pooch easier, as the Flex dealer network offers a customized Toyota HiAce with the obvious name Dog Van. An important part of the customization is the modular bed which has eight moving parts. It can adjust in height according to the size of your dog’s crate. If your puppy prefers to walk around the cabin, a mat can sit on the flat part to give your furry baby a place to lie down. There is also a flat extension that fills the legroom in the second row. This creates more space for your dog to walk around. Owners can pair it with a room that extends all the way to the center console. This allows your puppy to stand between the front seats. There’s even padding and a hook for attaching a leash to keep your pooch in place. Some smaller upgrades include a cargo mat that has a non-slip treatment, in addition to being antibacterial and fighting odors. A mosquito net allows dogs to

Shortages of raw materials, computer chips, labor and almost everything else have caused significant disruption to the global supply chain since the heyday of the pandemic, but new problems have arisen. Australia, And this time it’s one of the excesses. Of what do you ask? A stinking bug. An invasive and nasty stinking bug. The presence of the brown marmorated stink bug delayed the import of cars into Australia by up to a month. ABC news ReportThe importer is working to fumigate the container in which the bug was found. Aggressive pests can be dormant for months in the gap between shipping containers and the goods they carry, making bug detection and elimination even more difficult. Andrew Tang, biosecurity boss of the Australian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Environment, told ABC: “The ability of bugs to feed on hitchhiking, flies and various plant hosts has led to rapid introduction into new areas. Can spread to. ” Radio Brisbane. Exacerbating the problem is the fact that bugs are pervasive around the world. Due to the high probability of bugs, ships are forced to be inspected even from ports where the bugs do not originally exist. Bug habitats now include the United States and countries throughout Asia and Europe. Australia wants to prevent a fullscale aggression. Source: Stink bugs add to global supply-chain headaches (autoblog.com)


At The Car Wash

INSURANCE FOR THE CARWASH BIZ

T

By Melissa Pirkey

HE GLOBAL CARWA S H S E R VICE MARKET SIZE WAS ESTIMATED AT USD 34.19 BILLION IN 2019 AND REACHED USD 35.34 BILLION IN 2020 AND IS ONLY CONTINUING TO GROW. The global carwash service market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 3.2 per cent from 2019 to 2025 to reach USD 41.0 billion by 2025. That being said, it is important if you’re a carwash owner today in this market to ensure that you have the proper coverages in place on carwash businesses to protect your equipment, building, employees and customers to keep you profitable and growing. The cost of a new

carwash to be built from the ground up can range anywhere from $2.5-4.5 million. With statistics reflecting that two-thirds of new businesses close their doors within the first two years and only 50 per cent of the rest survive the first five years, the prospect of becoming a small business owner may sound unappealing. In addition, there are a myriad of expenses to consider, not the least of which is what type of insurance is needed to get started. The purpose of insurance is to transfer a risk that is too great to pay from cash reserves (building fire, theft, lawsuit, injured employee, etc.) in exchange for a predetermined premium. For example, after building a new wash, it may be safe to assume that you and your investors may not have sufficient capital readily available to rebuild that wash in the event of a disaster. So, an investor purchases an insurance policy whereby you transfer the financial risk of loss in exchange for a premium paid for a select period of time. This is where having an agent/agency

who specializes in carwash insurance is extremely important as no two carwash locations are alike. There are many small variances and nuances in each location, resulting in different coverage needs. Commercial insurance is one way of ensuring that you’re in control of your future rather than being controlled by it. Commercial insurance for your carwash operations can provide protection against common risks if you carry the right types of business insurance for your specific and unique operations. Unfortunately, insuring your carwash or auto detailer operations is not as simple as insuring your car or home. Because carwash and auto detailer operations are all so unique, it is important to design a package of insurance that meets your business needs and provides the level of risk transfer that you’re comfortable with and can afford. The more risk you transfer to the insurance carrier, the higher your premiums will be. For example: A lower deductible puts the insurance company


At The Car Wash

at more risk and thus would generate a higher premium. As you start out your carwash operation, know that there are several types of business insurance that all operations need. Who needs builder’s risk coverage? Any person or company with a financial interest in the construction project needs builder’s risk insurance. Some common people you may want to include on your policy as insureds include the: • Property owner • General contractor • Subcontractors • Lender What types of property does builder’s risk insurance cover? A basic builder’s risk insurance policy helps cover buildings and structures under construction. It also helps protect: • Materials • Supplies • Equipment on site, in transit • or at other locations Property insurance: Property insurance protects the assets your business owns, including the building and equipment, from vandalism, fire, destruction or damage.

Building/structure: All structures should be accounted for and valued for what it would cost to replace. This would include wash buildings, vacuum bays, payment kiosks and storage buildings. Business personal property: Also known as “contents insurance,” this protects your business inventory and equipment. Think of it this way: If you turned

your operation upside down and shook it, most everything that fell out would be considered business personal property. To determine how much property or contents insurance you’ll need, create an itemized list of your business assets and their individual dollar values. Remember, at the time of loss, you will be required to provide a detailed inventory of all items


lost/damaged. The total dollar amount of insurance required will be listed as your limit of insurance.

GENERAL LIABILITY INSURANCE General liability insurance protects your business from liability lawsuits arising from negligence that may cause injury to others, such as a customer. It also protects your company if someone is injured because of using your product or service or while on your premises. In addition to general liability coverage, if your wash takes “care, custody or control” of your customer’s vehicle, you will also need to obtain garage keepers liability coverage. This coverage provides liability protection while you have “care, custody or control” of your customer’s vehicle and provides coverage for physical damage to the vehicle. Here are several examples of how your wash may take care, custody, or control of a customer’s vehicle: The customer exits the vehicle and waits within a designated area until the wash is completed (your wash would be assuming temporary custody of the vehicle.) From the moment the customer exits the vehicle and until he or she gets back

into the vehicle, the garage keepers liability form would be providing liability as well as physical damage protection for the customer’s vehicle. The customer pulls into your tunnel and is told to take his or her hands off the wheel and put the vehicle in neutral (your wash would be assuming control of the vehicle). From the moment the customer relinquishes control of the vehicle and until he or she shifts back into drive and resumes control, the garage keepers liability form would be providing liability and physical damage protection for that vehicle.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION Workers’ compensation protects your business and employees by providing wage replacement and medical benefits to employees injured in the course of employment in exchange for mandatory relinquishment of the employee’s right to sue your business for the tort of negligence. Every state has very specific requirements regarding whether an operation is required to carry coverage. For example, in the state of Missouri, you are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance

if you have five or more employees. Even if your state does not require that you carry coverage if an employee is injured on the job, you would most likely be held liable for their lost wages and medical benefits. For the relatively low cost of this coverage, it is recommended to obtain coverage even if not mandated by your state.

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION INSURANCE Business interruption insurance helps protect your wash against the income that is lost due to a covered property loss while it is shut down for repairs. Covered losses may include theft, fire, wind, ice, falling objects and lightning. Read your policy to make sure you know which types of loss your policy may cover. Let us say a fire damages your wash. The fire leaves the building unfit to do business in, and it destroys most of your equipment. Business interruption coverage may help reimburse you in two ways: • For the loss of income during the period, your wash is shut down for repairs. Your pre-loss earnings are the basis for reimbursement under business interruption coverage. Lost earnings are typically defined as revenues minus ongoing


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca 37

Arnott Industries

1-800-251-8993

arnottindustries.com

48

Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

37

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

41

Auto Sector Council

1-877-860-3805

AutomotiveSectorCouncil.ca

41

expenses. • For extra expenses, if it is necessary to expedite the manufacturing of replacement equipment or special shipping arrangements must be made. This coverage may help pay any additional expenses incurred. Employee benefits: Your people are the crucial system underpinning your organization’s ability to grow and thrive. So how crucial are employee benefits to achieving your company’s goals & objectives? They are extremely important.

Bradford Exchange

1-877-595-9507

bradfordexchange.ca

IN

WHAT ARE EMPLOYEE BENEFITS?

Fix Network

1-800-INFO-FIX

Fleet Brake Atlantic

1-902-468-1396

fleetbrake.com

Gear Centre

1-877-277-4327

shop.gearcentre.com

30

Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipmentltd.com

36

John Bean Canada

1-514-214-5373

johnbean.com/en-ca

33

Johnstone Media Inc

1-204-489-4215

convenienceandcarwash.com

42

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

INTERNET

fixauto.com

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2

39

maritimeauto.com

4

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

maritimecarwash.ca

31

Maritime Pro Stock

1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

27

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

2

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

17

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

21

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

28

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

29

NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY

ngksparkplugs.ca

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

5

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

9

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

10

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

12

NLS Products

1-800-465-0500 nlsproducts.ca

13

23

1-902-493-3051

43

Peterbilt Atlantic

1-506-451-2001

peterbiltatlantic.com

24

Rhino Truck Lube

1-506-317-1038

rhinotrucklubecentre.com

25

Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

19

SPCA of NS

1-844-835-47980

Spectra Premium

NSTSA

nstsa.ca

novascotiaspca.ca

22

1-800-641-3090

spectrapremium.com

36

Truck Stop+

1-506-317-1038

truckstopplus.ca

24

1-416-622-9881

wd40.com

WD-40

35

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

worldpac.com

47

Valvoline 1-800-TEAM-VAL

valvoline.ca

15

44

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We often get asked – what are employee benefits? Employee benefits, also known as perks or fringe benefits, are provided to employees over and above salaries and wages. These employee benefit packages may include overtime, medical insurance, vacation, profit sharing and retirement benefits, to name just a few. Choosing an agent: Equal to the importance of choosing the correct coverage is the task of choosing the correct insurance agent. Thanks to the many advances in technology, it is no longer inevitable that you choose the agent that is located closest to your wash. When you start your search for an agent, you’ll have a couple of different types to choose from. You can pick an independent agent or a captive (sometimes called direct) agent. An independent agent will have contracts with many different insurance companies. A captive agent writes exclusively with one company. It is generally to your advantage for your agent to be able to solicit coverage for your operations from multiple sources. At Assured Partners, we are the sixth-largest property and casualty independent broker firm in the U.S. with access to multiple markets, and an entire agency and staff trained and educated on the specifics of carwash operations to assemble a robust policy with coverage offerings to fit your unique business needs. Our team of specialists manage the national carwash program, which offers significant savings on the cost of insurance for our carwash industry clients. We partner with industry specialists, carwash associations, and educate carwash owners about the basics of carwash insurance on a national level. The extra time it takes to locate an agent who is well-versed in the carwash industry and has obtained additional training designations, will help ensure that your operation has the exact coverage needed to protect not only your customers and employees,but also your investment and financial obligations. Melissa Pirkey is the vice president of carwash vertical at Assured Partners, located out of the Dallas, TX office. Since Melissa first entered the insurance industry, she wanted to make a difference and not only help clients get the best coverage for their money but also change the carwash and auto detailer/ auto dealer insurance industry for the better. Melissa resonates with carwash businesses in general as she comes from a family of carwash owners and auto dealer owners. Melissa saw firsthand the struggles carwash owners and auto dealers experienced on a day-to-day basis in relation to management, claims, insurance, and more. Melissa has years of experience in the insurance industry and has invested her time in completing Sonny’s Car Wash College courses to add value to her insurance clients in the way of risk mitigation, equipment safety, equipment valuations and site management. Melissa is responsible for creating and implementing a very successful National Car Wash Insurance Program for reduced rates and better coverage for clients. Melissa can be reached at 214-998-8960 or melissa.pirkey@assuredpartners.com. As previously seen in Convenience & Carwash Canada magazine.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

Ted Curlew of Deer Lake, NL is our latest Crossword45 Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check treatment. Deadline for entry is December 26th, 2021

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NAME:

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IT’S SO EASY TO WIN! Fill out info below and send your Crossword to us at 608 - 56 Jacob Lane, Bedford, NS B3M 0H5, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com

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YOU TOO CAN WIN ONE FREE RUST CHECK ANNUAL SPRAY AT ANY RUST CHECK DEALER! ENTER FOR YOU CHANCE!

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

SEPTEMBER 2021 WINNER!

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ADDRESS:

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1. Fish partner on menu

1. Tailgate party needs

4. Fast lane action

2. Wastes fuel, in a way

8. Engine lube reservoirs (3,4)

3. Fisherman’s Platter item, perhaps

9. Zamboni operating area

4. Engine item with rings and skirt

10. Ford’s famous fifties failure

5. Gentlemen, ____ your engines!

11. New car “package” items

6. Far North seasonal route (3,4)

12. The John B and others

7. Median material, maybe

14. University in Wolfville

13. Highway access lanes

18. Sedan body style

15. Star-shaped Halifax attraction

20. Damage beyond repair

16. Road map books

22. Dragstrip necessity

17. Trunk tires

23. Todays tires, typically

18. The Lord Nelson, for example

24. Car lease signatories

19. “____ deuces & a 4-speed” lyric

25. Halifax’s Chocolate and Williams

21. Scotia Speedworld, for example

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ASCAR fans, we need to know the name of this well known racing team, and please, can you tell us more about the driver too. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more detail the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Email us at rob@autoatlantic.com, and make sure to include your name, town, province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is December 27th, 2021.

Best wishes go to Chris Phillips of Windsor, NS, who correctly answered: “Gerr y Anderson vehicles, Dink y Toy 102, Joe 90 Flying Car . . .” Thank you to all who entered our contest, keep trying, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: PHONE: ADDRESS: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: POSTAL CODE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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