January 2019 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

Page 1

auto

FRAN

CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS

C-STORES • INSTALLERS • RECYCLERS

& trucking

RACING INTO THE 2019 SEASON (STORY ON PAGE 36)

CARWASHES • SERVICE STATIONS DEALERS • GARAGES • BODY SHOPS

JANUARY 2019 $4.95

A NEW DIMENSION OF LABOUR RATES (SEE PAGE 12)

CLEANING UP IN 2019 (SEE PAGE 22)

THE STATE OF THE INDUSTRY AUTOMOTIVE TRENDS, TRUCKING PREDICTIONS, THE NEXT RACING SEASON AND MORE...

TRUCK DRIVER PAIN CAN BE ALLEVIATED (SEE PAGE 32)

WIN PRIZES!!!

A RUST CHECK SWAG BAG OF GOODIES OR A STANLEY 123-PIECE SOCKET SET FROM NAPA!

CROSSWORD GUESS & WIN DETAILS ON PAGES 45 AND 46!

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EDITOR’S LETTER – GM announces shutdown of a major production facility in Oshawa, ON, plunging an entire city into uncertainty.

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THE STATE OF THE INDUSTRY – Jon Barry offers a primer on what to keep an eye on in 2019

Page 10

UNI-SELECT CELEBRATES their 50th anniversary with a massive trade show in Moncton, NB.

Page 12

WHY YOU NEED TO EDUCATE SHOP OWNERS ON THE NEW DIMENSION OF LABOUR RATES –The old way of thinking about wages is over.

Page 14

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – New Traffic Safety Act on the way for NS & More!

Page 18

NEWS OF THE WEIRD – What would you do if you thought your engine was purring but it was really a lion in your Lamborghini?

Page 21

2019 – TRUCKING HR PREDICTIONS – Employers prepared to be productive, creative and flexible will be the big winners for the coming year says Kelly Henderson

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CLEANING UP IN 2019 – The Canadian Carwash industry is undergoing some radical changes in surprising new ways writes Brenda Jane Johnstone

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FULL SPEED AHEAD: FIVE AUTOMOTIVE TRENDS TO LOOK OUT FOR IN 2019 – They include: electric, shared, autonomous, connected and updated writes Carter.

Page 28

REPAIRING THE STRIPPED DODGE CV AXLE…For the Last Time! The pundits say Dodge Ram owners need to take special care this winter….here’s why

Page 32

TRUCK DRIVER PAIN AND DISCOMFORT CAN BE ALLEVIATED – Musculoskeletal pain is a major problem for many truckers but it’s a problem that can be prevented.

Page 34

NAPA NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK – Susan Bradley celebrates the family unit at dealerships in Dalhousie and Campbellton

Page 36

RACING INTO THE 2019 SEASON – It’s a long way from here to May, but there’s still lots to look forward to during next year’s racing season says Tim Terry

Page 40

EARLY RUST PROTECTION PAYS OFF AS CARS GET OLDER – A new study shows a little rust protection goes a long way.

Page 45 Page 46

WIN BIG! Rust Check Jacket, hat, touque and winter package, or a Stanley 123-Piece socket set from NAPA in our contests!! autoatlantic.com

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Letter from the Editor

THE ONLY THING THAT STAYS THE SAME IS CHANGE

W

By Carter Hammett

HEN GM ANNOUNCED A MAJOR RESTRUCTURING IN NOVEMBER OF LAST YEAR, CLOSING FIVE PLANTS ACROSS NORTH AMERICA, SHOCK WAVES WERE FELT THROUGHOUT THE CONTINENT. The automotive giant, which ranks second only behind Ford in Canadian vehicle sales, stated that 15% of its staff would be cut, including 25% of its company executives. These steps mark a sharp turn in priorities for GM, which says the recent moves will save up to $6 billion by 2020 annually as it shifts interests towards electric and self-driving vehicles. The bottom line is that the company is marching in time with the current zeitgeist and turning its attention to the vehicles that people want to drive. Thus, sedans will gradually become a thing of the past. It also means that SUVs and hatchbacks are the autos of the moment. Another ele-

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ment present in GM’s slim down plan is that technology will be able to be shared across all its output thereby reducing time and people it takes to assemble cars. Along with plants in Warren Ohio, White Marsh, Maryland, Warren, Michigan and Detroit, other plants outside North America - including one in South Korea - will also be shut down. When all is said and done, 8,000 salaried workers and 6,000 hourly workers will be unemployed or reassigned. Closest to home and the source of both much local anxiety and a helluva lot of media noise lately is the announcement that the plant in Oshawa ON will also be closing its doors. This means that 2,900 people will be out of work. It will also have an indirect but huge impact on services such as local restaurants that depend on the workers for much of their business. All in all it’s estimated that over 15,000 jobs will be affected by the plant closure. Oshawa - pejoratively known to locals as “The Shwaw”—was constructed in 1953, and produced cars for many GM models, including Buick and Chevrolet. It was also recently outfitted to produce vir-

tually every brand GM makes. PM Justin Trudeau was quick to offer help to families affected by the closure while, predictably, unions weren’t happy and vowed to fight the decision tooth and nail. Throughout the decades GM’s story has risen and fallen like the temperature. In 2009 the company filed for bankruptcy protection. It bounced back however and now sits poised at number 10 on Forbes Top 500 list. The company has gone in new directions, becoming a leader in R and D on alternative fuel cells and electric vehicles, among other achievements. GM even collaborated on the development of a successful research hub, The Automotive Centre for Excellence (ACE) at the Oshawa-based University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Between them, the Ontario and Canada governments invested over $10 billion in GM Canada in 2009. In return, the company made promises that included a $1billion investment on innovation that focused on electric vehicles and energy diversification, among other commitments through ACE until 2016. In their eternal wisdom, both Ontario and Canada governments sold all of their GM stock in 2015, which effectively killed whatever leverage they might have had to lengthen GM’s promise to transition the Oshawa plant to greener vehicle production. Despite the huge job losses and blow to the economy, we are witnessing an act of flux and not a downward spiral. GM is in a healthy position and will hopefully transition workers into new roles, including money into ACE. Our country has been a source of great profit for the automotive giant for decades and it’s time for the company to step up to the plate and formally recognize that in a variety of ways, including its years of exemptions on duties and tariffs on cars, trucks and parts, which gave them a leg up on their European and Asian competition. Canada’s position in the manufacturing sector of the future is now at stake. Its next course of action remains to be seen.



THE STATE OF THE

A HANDY PRIMER ON WHAT TO EXPECT IN TH By Jon Barry

2

019 IS COMING DOW N THE ROAD

AND THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY STILL HAS ITS FOOT ON THE GAS. WHILE TRENDS IN THE GLOBAL TRADE MARKET COULD PUT A FEW BUMPS IN THE ROAD, A GROWING TREND OF NEW DOMESTIC LEGISLATIVE MEASURES ARE STARTING TO STRENGTHEN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY’S ABILITY TO DO BUSINESS. The first big legislative impact is the impending implementation of the mandatory use of electronic logging devices (ELDs). According to the Federal Ministry of Transport, the new law makes “mandatory the use of electronic logging devices by drivers who are currently maintaining a daily log; and [establishes] more specific requirements for

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supporting documents that must be kept by the driver and motor carrier.” This is something the industry has been pushing for, for a variety of reasons. First it makes the job of the operator more efficient thus saving on labour costs by reducing time spent on consuming paperwork. Secondly, the ELD mandate will create a more level playing field and increase safety standards. ELDs make it harder for carriers and operators acting unprofessionally to fudge their paper books and spend more time on the road than they are legally allowed. Secondly we have the push towards more standardization of operator education and training. While Ontario was the first province to have mandatory training requirements prior to taking a road test, things have changed following the terrible crash in Saskatchewan explains Marco Beghetto from the Canadian Trucking Alliance: “The Humboldt tragedy as awful as it was, I think was a catalyst for some of the provinces to move. I think Saskatchewan has announced a program and Alberta has announced a program… Up until this point other than Ontario, and Quebec to some extent, we don’t have any.” Trucking HR Canada’s CEO Angela Splinter is also in favor of increased training standardization: “Our national occupational standard for commercial vehicle operator for truck drivers forms the basis for mandatory entry level training in Ontario. It’s now forming the basis of mandatory entry


E INDUSTRY 2019

HE MOTIVE SECTORS FOR THE COMING YEAR. level training in Alberta as well as Saskatchewan. That’s really the consistency in training that we need to see. Ultimately our goal is to see all of the occupational level training also match to the national occupational standard that will increase standards overall, give consistency, and support labour mobility.” Finally we have the impending end of the Drivers Inc phenomenon that has been plaguing the industry for some time. According to the Canadian Trucking Alliance, the system of Drivers Inc is “based on commercial vehicle operators, who do not own/lease or operate their own vehicle, becoming incorporated and receiving payment from their carrier with no source deductions.” This practice opens the door to the possibility of widespread tax evasion by those engaged in Driver Inc. The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) has been lobbying the government to address the Drivers Inc issue for a while now. Finally, in October, The Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) announced it was going to put the brakes on the Drivers Inc model. The CRA has clarified that going forward “if an individual incorporates, but has no labour characteristics that are different than an employee – for example, working exclusively for one employer

or not having registered any equipment assets – that person is then deemed a Personal Service Business (PSB).” According to reports from the CTA “PSBs are: not entitled to income tax deductions available to other corporations; cannot deduct most expenses available to other corporations; are subject to a combined federal and provincial tax rate of 33%”. This makes it much harder to skirt the tax rules while creating a more level playing field for both employers and employees. While most recent legislative trends have aimed towards strengthening requirements, responsibilities and liabilities in relation to the trucking industry, there is one other large new law that seems a little hazy in relation to the industry: marijuana legalization. The Canadian Trucking Alliance talking with the CBC stated they are in favour of implementing mandatory testing for cannabis similar to standards that are already in place for operators concerning alcohol consumption. But roadside cannabis tests are still being developed, with no magic equivalent of the breathalyzer emerging so far. But it’s not just on Canadian roads that the issue of marijuana seems a bit foggy. The US border policy is fairly blunt: if you have consumed marijuana at any point, even post legalization, you could be inadmissible to the United States. Further, there were also threats of barring anyone associated with the cannabis industry, regardless if the individual consumed the product themselves. This could bar cannabis retail workers, stock in-

vestors, and of course companies that deliver the products from entering the country. And the issues at the American border are not the only issues emerging from afar. Many of the macro trends that could impact the industry are trends occurring south of the border or abroad. While the big worry of a heavily renegotiated NAFTA or even worse no deal at all is out of the way, that doesn’t mean trade issues are all clear. The United States continues to escalate its ongoing trade war with China, and in many ways Canada could be caught in the middle. Plus there’s also the ongoing issues surrounding global oil prices and Middle East politics in Iran and Saudi Arabia that could cause a spike in oil prices. But while many of the driving macro trends are occurring globally, one of the industry’s oldest trends back home could be reaching a breaking point: The driver shortage As the driver shortage continues to escalate, it is starting to cause some real problems within the industry. Splinter explains the growing issue: “We are seeing shortages across the country, there’s no region that’s been immune and there’s no fleet that’s been immune. We are hearing from fleets all across the country that at this point they are really struggling to get the drivers that they need, not to grow their business, they are looking for drivers specifically to maintain current contractual obligations. We are bordering on a crisis right now of not being able to get the drivers you need.” While some have been

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Industry News

banking on self-driving cars to hopefully bridge the gap, Beghetto doesn’t believe that autonomous vehicles are the answer to the shortage at all: “If you listen to Wall Street or Bay Street venture capitalist community types...It would be easy [to think] that we’re gonna have driverless cars on the road in the next five years. That is not going to happen. We have our doubts whether it will even happen in this generation.” Splinter agrees that autonomous vehicles are a ways off: “We don’t see that as something that’s going to be happening in the short to medium term. The technology is just not fully there yet and the challenge we have is it’s hard to attract and recruit people to an occupation that many believe could be obsolete in a few years. We really want to take a good hard look at how this role will change so that we’re still able to recruit the drivers we need”. Splinter continues, “The role of a truck driver will absolutely change, but to be honest we are not exactly sure how it is going change. And we are really trying to get a good handle on that so we make sure we are still clearly defining the role and defining the skill set that we need within the occupation.” Beghetto agrees that the role of the operator isn’t going anywhere fast: “The ability to command an 80 thousand pound piece of equipment. Get the load. Do all the sorts of things you need to do with that equipment, such as tarping and things for flat beds. Taking care of your equipment in various types of terrain. We will always see a role for the truck driver.” In relation to the driver shortage, Beghetto is certain selfdriving cars will not be the answer but that attracting more talent and increasing pay will be: “Autonomous vehicles,

ON THE ROAD, BUT BY THE BOOK

Beghetto believes that legislation like the ELD mandate, enforcement of environmental regulations, and the end of Drivers Inc would actually go a long way to addressing the driver shortage as it relates to operator pay. Many of these new regulations are about one thing: leveling the playing field so those within the industry are all working on the same page: “It is all well and good to say you need to pay drivers more and they deserve to be paid more, which they do. But they have this underbelly of the industry that is not playing by the rules on a whole host of issues. The environment for example, you have mandated emission controls and you have a carrier population or an opera-

whether they come to fruition, is not the answer. In the short term, I think the answer is, obviously, driver pay is always going to be a factor. I think the market has been reacting over the last few years. Driver pay is at unprecedented levels and carriers are looking for new and innovative ways to attract and retain drivers.” Trucking HR Canada is hard at work doing just that: “Right now we are doing some research around what younger workers in particular are looking for, what their perceptions are of our industry and how we can work to make it more attractive.” says Splinter. “We do have one of the oldest work forces in the country. We are struggling in getting the next generation of workers in that we need in our industry. We need more young people, we need women, and we need people from more diverse groups. The indigenous population as an example.” Speaking with Employment and Development Canada, they explained how they are working with Trucking HR Canada to address the problem: “To better understand the trucking sector labour market and to identify their challenges in addressing labour shortages, the Sectoral Initiatives Program is currently funding a labour market information project with the Trucking HR Canada. The project will produce relevant and industry-validated labour market information that will outline labour supply and demand information of key occupations of the trucking and logistics industry.” “At the end of the day we need to better connect with the next generation of Canadian workers and we need the government to help us in doing that.” says Splinter While autonomous vehicles are still a dream, that doesn’t mean that there’s no

movement in the tech trends side of the industry however. The ministry of Transport explained how they are funding research into cooperative truck platooning systems that “use wireless communications, cameras, sensors and automation to enable the “close platooning” of two or more trucks. Each following truck uses information from its own in-vehicle sensors, plus data received via wireless link from the lead truck to “cooperatively” measure and adjust its position, based on the speed, direction and acceleration of the preceding truck. Close platooning helps reduce “wind resistance” experienced by the truck platoon, which translates into lower fuel consumption and reduced emissions while travelling at highway speed.” In early November 2018, Transport Canada partnered with FP Innovations and Auburn University to conduct Canada’s first on-road trial of cooperative truck platooning systems in Quebec. While it’s not the dream of self-driving cars, it’s a step towards a more connected, coordinated and efficient fleet system that many have been pushing for. While the overall state of the industry remains strong, global trends could cause turmoil for the economy and thus the shipping industry. But thankfully back home there has been a growing trend of legislation working to strengthen the state of the industry and address several previously held concerns. While the operator shortage is still a problem, fleets, human resources organizations and government departments are hoping further research and legislation will help level the playing field for driver pay and make their industry more attractive and accessible to new demographics.

tor population out there that is bypassing the environmental regulation and disabling the emissions control units. So they have a competitive advantage. You have a situation called Driver Inc. It’s a misclassification issue where certain carriers work with certain “independent operators” to convince them to file as corporations. Except that they’re not. They drive the company equipment, and only work for that one company, so for all intents and purposes they are employees. But they skirt tax rules which the CRA is now going to be cracking down on. But they have been doing this for a while so they have a competitive advantage in terms of taxes. So while you would like to pay drivers more and you

need to pay them more it is difficult to do that when you are playing by the rules in terms of environmental regulation, speed control, safety control, abiding by the tax rules and some people don’t. So this is where you get this unequal playing field. When enforcement starts to take hold on all those issue and you have that playing field level, then you can start talking about proper pay across the board. It’s not widespread. The large majority of carriers are law abiding citizens and responsible corporate citizens. They are competing against the underbelly that’s not playing by the rules. Until all that gets solved we are never really going to see what true market realities are in terms of driver pay.”



Around the Atlantic

2018 UNI-SELECT ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

U

N I - S E LE C T C E LE B R ATE D THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY ALONG WITH A RACE CAR THEME AT THEIR OPEN HOUSE EVENT THIS YEAR.

The Open house is a large trade show in the Uni-Select Moncton DC warehouse with over 85 Supplier booths. Hundreds walked through the event to take advantage of some great ‘Super Specials”, gathered information from suppliers, brought home some great swag and door prizes. Prior to the Open House Uni-Select host-

ed a Social Event the night before, where they had live entertainment - this year Ray Chance (Illusionist) along with a silent auction where they raised over $2,300.00 for the Canadian Cancer Society. Uni-Select would like to thank all their Members and Installers for taking the time to come out to their Annual Open House.

USI OPERATIONS MANAGER: CHRIS LESPERANCE WITH ILLUSIONIST: RAY CHANCE

USI GIRLS WORKING THE OPEN HOUSE, LEFT TO RIGHT: JILL LEWIS, MEAGHAN BENNETT, TANYA MILLICAN, NADINE COLLETTE, TARINA TRITES, JEN SIPPLEY, JANICE PAQUETTE, CONNIE DOW AND EMILIA SAVOIE

LEFT TO RIGHT: KEN GODIN WITH MAGNACHARGE, CHARLIE TAYLOR WITH GROTE, AND GARY WALSH WITH NGK

A FULL HOUSE AT THE OPEN HOUSE

STEVE STOCKDALE, JOHN COYLE, ANNE MAYO, MEAGHAN BENNETT AND ERIC ALLEN ENJOYING THE SILENT AUCTION HELD AT THE CROWNE PLAZA MONCTON.

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Bob’s Business Development

WHY YOU NEED TO EDUCATE SHOP OWNERS ON THE NEW DIMENSION OF LABOUR RATES

T

By Bob Greenwood

OO MANY SHOP OWN ERS STILL USE ONE “CATCH ALL” LABOUR RATE FOR THEIR BUSINESS. IF THEY DO NOT CHANGE THE WAY THEY CHARGE THEIR CUSTOMER/ CLIENT FOR SERVICES RENDERED, IT CAN BE A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO THE DEMISE OF THEIR SHOP. A new dimension that must be understood today is the “tier” labour rate system. The tier labour rate denotes the level of competency that is under the roof of a shop. This rate is invoked when diagnostic services or re-flash services are required for the client’s vehicle. There is no “flat rate” manual to follow, and it is solely based on the skill level of the technician involved. Many shops fail to understand that the future of their services will be based on their knowledge and skill to diagnose the technology under the hood that has failed inside the vehicle. When technology fails, a systemized strategy which consumes “time” is required to diagnose and fix the problem. This issue involves special ex-

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pertise by a qualified technician, coupled with the knowhow of using high end, expensive equipment along with internet savvy. One other element to diagnosis is the fact that management, or the service writer, is required to spend more time with the client explaining the procedures and progress of the diagnosis element. This time is substantial when compared to the amount of time to explain a mechanical repair or maintenance service. Building this level of trust with the client/ customer takes time. When examining the door rate of diagnostic work, the mathematical formula must take into account the above mentioned issues plus the cost of numerous pieces of specialized diagnostic equipment, the cost of on-going software upgrades to said equipment, continuous, and numerous, diagnostic training courses. The financial equation in the year 2019 to set the retail door rate for mechanical/ maintenance work is 85% of your cost per billed hour. If your cost per billed hour is $150.00 then the diagnostic rate would be $127.50 ($150.00 X 85%) In the past we referred to a multiple of the technicians’ hourly wage but in today’s new aftermarket it is all about “efficiencies” within the business. If you are inefficient your cost per billed hour goes up and you price yourself out of the market, however if you run an efficient business which brings down your

cost per billed hour, you have a competitive labour rate and the net income of the business is also in place. In the case of diagnostic work, the shop would be looking a minimum of 125% of the cost per billed hour, therefore based on a cost per billed hour of $150.00, the diagnostic rate would be $187.50. For the re-flash rate, due to subscription fees required to access the OEM website, the multiple for 2019 is 145% of the cost per billed hour which would equal 217.50 per hour for the re-flash portion of the job. The shop now charges a minimum of three door rates depending on the efficiency level of the technician doing the work. The Trade days are over as the Aftermarket shop business moves to a truly highly skilled Profession from the Management level over to the Service Advisor to the Technician level. Consider taking the time to talk and discuss diagnostic billings to your shop client base. If the client does not recognize the skill level and technological expertise that is required to maintain today’s vehicles, the Owner and Service Advisor had better enroll, and receive, some competent business management training to truly understand this new aftermarket. Diagnostic time is here today, it is real, it is here to stay, and it is an important element to be efficient and contribute to the service shops bottom line.



East Coast Road Report

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT NEWS AND VIEWS GATHERED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION. KEEPING YOU SAFE AND OUR ROADS RUNNING! NEWFOUNDLAND

Numerous Highway Safety Upgrades near Exploits River Enhance Safety for Motorists in Central Region Motorists travelling on the Trans-Canada Highway in central Newfoundland now benefit from a number of safety upgrades to highway infrastructure near the Exploits River. The completion of safer, upgraded approaches to the new Sir Robert Bond Bridge marks the end of the final phase of the federal-provincial cost-shared bridge replacement project. The Honourable Al Hawkins, Minister of Advanced Education, Skills and Labour and MHA for Grand Falls-Windsor-Buchans, was joined by Jerry Dean, MHA for Exploits, to announce completion of the project October 26. The full scope of the Sir Robert Bond Bridge replacement project included the reconfiguration of the Botwood interchange and the east and west approaches to the bridge, as well as demolition and

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removal of the former bridge and an upgraded underpass for the nearby Newfoundland T’Railway. Motorists now encounter a more familiar and universal diamond interchange and approach the bridge along a flatter, straighter portion of road, which allows for increased visibility and safety, especially in inclement weather. The project also resulted in the relocation of the Route 351 intersection with the Trans-Canada Highway to a safer location further from the bridge. The new bridge first opened to traffic in October of 2017. The project was completed in partnership with the Government of Canada through the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and represents a total shared investment of approximately $22.5 million. “We are proud to conclude this significant project for the benefit of residents in the central region and all motorists who travel the Trans-Canada Highway across our province. While motorists in this area will benefit from safer upgraded highway infra-

structure, we continue to urge safe and responsible driving as well. We are continuing to work with law enforcement to ensure motorists are slowing down and driving to conditions to keep everyone on our roads safe, ” said Honourable Steve Crocker, Minister of Transportation and Works For updates on active road work and construction slow downs, visit www. roads.gov.nl.ca

NEW BRUNSWICK

Route 105 Two Nations Crossing Roundabout The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure is preparing for the construction of a roundabout at Route 105 (Ring Road) Two Nations Crossing intersection. Route 105 from Brookside Drive to the Westmorland Street bridge experiences significant traffic congestion during peak periods. The roundabout will improve safety and traffic flow, reduce travel delays, congestion, queueing and idling.


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East Coast Road Report

All users will benefit from the new roundabout, which will provide full access to the commercial and retail area along Two Nations Crossing and linking streets. As part of this project, the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure will also extend the concrete median barrier from Two Nations Crossing to Maple Street. The removal of the southbound leftturn lane at Maple Street will significantly reduce collision rates. With improved traffic flow, these upgrades will reduce greenhouse gas emissions resulting from congestion and enhance travel for all commuters. Work is anticipated to be completed in the summer of 2018. The drawing below shows the configuration of the new roundabout, and the video simulation on this page provides an example of traffic movements through the roundabout.

Significant initiatives in the new act include: • defining vulnerable road users and imposing stiffer fines for drivers who injure vulnerable road users on our highways • clarifying the term distracted driving to reflect changes in modern technology • managing the advancement of autonomous vehicles • enabling municipalities to make bylaws regarding noise, including mufflers Mr. Hines also introduced two amendments to the existing Motor Vehicle Act to address the issues of drug impaired driving and the use of facial recognition technology as part of driver’s licence and photo identification card issuance. Both topics will be addressed in the Traffic Safety Act, however, because it will be more than one year before it is proclaimed, amendments have to be made to the existing Motor Vehicle Act.

NOVA SCOTIA

Winter tires prevent serious collisions Government and police are reminding Islanders of the safety benefits of installing four matching winter tires. Lack of suitable winter tires can be a factor in serious collisions because winter tires provide almost twice the traction of all-season tires on snow or ice. Visit https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/winterdriving for more information on winter tires. “We all have a role to play in keeping Island roads safe and one easy step to protect you and your family on the road is to install winter tires in November and keep them on until April,” said RCMP S/ Sgt. Kevin Baillie. “Highway Safety, RCMP, and other police agencies will be out on Island roads this week at road checks to

New Traffic Safety Act Nova Scotia’s outdated Motor Vehicle Act is being replaced with a new, modern Traffic Safety Act that will help make the province’s roads and highways safer. The new act follows significant stakeholder engagement with 31 groups and 23 partners, and online engagement with Nova Scotians that received 865 comments. “The Motor Vehicle Act has not been rewritten since the early 1920s and has been amended numerous times. As a result, it is unclear and inconsistent,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “The new Traffic Safety Act will enable us to quickly address the more technical and day-to-day issues that arise in the administration of road safety.”

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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

remind Islanders of this life-saving message.” Vehicle owners are reminded to have their tires checked for adequate tread depth to ensure they are ready to take on PEI’s winter driving conditions. Highway Safety recommends vehicles are equipped with four matching winter tires bearing the mountain/snowflake symbol. At the check-stops, drivers will be provided with air pressure gauges and winter tire brochures, thanks to the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada. Islanders can also expect to see officers checking for valid vehicle registrations, driver licenses and motor vehicle inspections stickers. In other road safety initiatives, government also introduced two amendments to the Highway Traffic Act. The first amendment builds on previous impaired driving amendments earlier this year, and will bring PEI in line with federal Criminal Code changes related to impaired driving. The second amendment will designate tow trucks and recovery vehicles as emergency vehicles so they fall under existing provincial ‘slow down, move over’ rules. If Islanders see any emergency vehicles parked at the side of the road with their lights flashing - including tow trucks - they must move over a lane if safe to do, and slow down to half the speed limit. The fine for not slowing down for parked emergency vehicles is $200 - $1000, plus $75 for victims of crime surcharge and three demerit points. “It is our collective responsibility to protect the lives of emergency responders and recovery workers who are helping our neighbours as they deal with emergency situations,” said Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy Minister Paula Biggar.



Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WIERD BITS AND PIECES OF WHEELY-WEIRDNESS COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE INTERNET…SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. LE GRRRR… Autoblog reported on Paris police finding a lion cub inside a green Lamborghini Nov. 12. The Lamborghini and

the cubs’ reported owner were sitting near the Champs-Elysses when bystand-

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ers alerted the police of what they thought was a lion cub in a car. These people were right, because the police officers found the 33-year-old man in the Lamborghini taking selfies with the lion cub. According to reports, authorities took the driver into custody and gave the lion to the 30 Million Friends Foundation (animal rescue foundation). The Lamborghini didn’t even belong to the lion owner — it was a rental, possibly explaining the lack of concern for the Lamborghini’s leatherextensive interior (with the claws, and all). We still don’t know which Lambo the lion was charioted (trafficked?) around in, but the Aventador would be our best guess. Nobody that owns a lion is going to drive around in the cheaper Lamborghini, especially if it’s a rental. To thicken the plot, police say the man named his lion Putin, but it has since

been renamed Dadou. Although, one has to expect things like this from people who keep exotic animals as play things. France seems to have an ongoing problem with lions being kept as pets. This past month, a man was sentenced to six months in prison for attempting to sell a lion cub. The government is also currently investigating the presence of three other lion cubs in Paris suburbs.

STEPHEN KING HAS NOTHING ON THIS CAR According to wowamazing.com, The Golden Eagle was a 1964 Dodge Limited Edition. Many have considered the car as haunted, earning itself the title the “most evil car in America.” Its story started when it was purchased as a police car for a unit based in Old Orchard Beach, Maine. All three officers who drove the car died in


unexplained murder-suicides, brutally murdering their families and themselves. Not long after, the car went to the hands of Wendy Allen and her family where it would begin its second wave of terror. The Golden Eagle would randomly open its doors while out on the highway, jam the steering wheel, and would put

actly the way it used to be, Allen was able to retrieve most of the car’s parts.

BECAUSE WE’RE TOO NICE TO KEEP THEM? Autoblog recently reported about a piece of Canadian Content after dozens of cars used for the G7 summit were put up for sale. Are you looking for a deal on a lightly used 2018 Chrysler 300C? Do you feel like

purchasing several at a time? Do you feel like visiting Canada? If all of these apply, you might be able to catch a pretty decent bargain. The Canadian government is offloading Chryslers and hundreds of other cars it bought for the G7 Summit held in Québec in the summer, and the cars can be had quite cheaply. Originally, over 600 brand new cars were bought to ferry summit guests around Québec, some of them in motor-

the family in other life-threatening situations. Strangely, even though the situations were alarming, the Allens never did experience the same amount of violence that the Golden Eagle inflicted upon its other victims. According to Wendy Allen, the Golden Eagle had killed 14 people, but many have disputed that the number is actually much higher than that. Sometime between the 1980s and 1990s, rumors about the killer car began to spread. It prompted members of local churches to vandalize the car out of fear that it would murder again. But their efforts backfired and the individuals involved found themselves on the receiving end of the Golden Eagle’s wrath. According to stories, some members of the said group died after being decapitated by 18-wheeler trucks. Others passed away from even stranger circumstances such as being struck by lightning. Perhaps the most disturbing case connected to the Golden Eagle was the deaths involving children. On separate cases that happened during the sixties and eighties, two kids were violently hit by cars and landed on the hood of the Golden Eagle. Before paramedics could reach the scene, both victims were already dead. The stories would get even more sinister from there. A 2007 case claims that a child who merely touched the car ended up killing his entire family before burning down his home to the ground. Recently, a church group has stepped up and claimed that there was a demon inhabiting the Golden Eagle. They took action by stealing the car, chopping it up, then distributing each piece to junkyards. Wendy Allen pleaded online to have her beloved family car returned to her. Although it wasn’t exautoatlantic.com

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19


Carter’s Corner

cades, necessitating the choice of very official-looking black on black 300C models with tinted windows. The RCMP said it turned out to be more affordable to buy the vehicles than to rent or lease them, but it still didn’t come cheap for Canada. The bulk purchase price of all the cars exceeded $23 million CAD, and just $6.3 million has been recouped so far through selling

AND FINALLY….FLYING POLICE! Dubai Police Flying Bikes Aka The Hoversurf S3 2019 To Be In Operation The Dubai police force will soon employ flying bikes to fight crime. The fleet of Dubai police cars is already popular across the world, due to the fast and expensive choices it offers. Now, with the addition of the flying bikes, the Dubai po-

bike’, it is actually called the Hoversurf Scorpion-3 2019 E-VTOL (Electric Vertical Take-Off & Landing). From a design point, it looks like a large drone from a sci-fi movie, with the quadcopter setup and forward-inclined riding position. Hoversurf is a California-based Russian company and they unveiled the flying bikes at the GITEX convention which was

167 vehicles, as narcity.com reports. And there are still a bunch of cars for sale, posted on the GCSurplus.ca website. Take a look at the aforementioned Chryslers that were put up for auction yesterday: There are multiple 300Cs on offer with the starting bid of $25,343 Canadian and barely over 1,000 miles on the clock; the purchase price of a new, Canadianspec 300C without motorcade modifications is over $42,000. Chevrolet Suburbans are less cheap, as the minimum bid on them is $53,428, but they appear nicely loaded with similarly low mileage and 4WD. There are also bulk deals, like a fivecar pack of police-specification Dodge Chargers for a combined $133,000 if you can get them for the minimum bid. Other, less interesting but unquestionably fully serviceable vehicles include Toyota Siennas (109 were originally bought), Ford Escapes, Mitsubishi Outlanders and Dodge Journeys.

lice garage will become even more awesome. The Dubai police department has already started training the officers how to pilot the new flying bikes. Though we casually called it a ‘flying

held in the UAE, last year. As per reports, the fully-ready Hoversurf flying bikes will start their duty as Dubai police vehicles, around the time of the ‘Expo 2020 - The Festival Of Human Ingenuity’.

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Truckers Corner

2019 HR TRUCKING PREDICTIONS By Kelly Henderson

A

Executive Director, THRSC Atlantic

S WE MOVE FORWARD TO 2019, WE WILL SEE THE NEED FOR SKILLED WORKERS INCREASE IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY. EMPLOYERS WHO ARE PREPARED TO BE PRODUCTIVE, CREATIVE AND FLEXIBLE WILL BE THE WINNERS IN 2019.

tic provides opportunities for companies for professional development, training for entry level Class 1 professional drivers, strategies on recruiting underrepresented people and more! Ready to kick off 2019 on the right foot? Call us and get ahead

of learning how we can help build your workforce, increase productivity through professional development and provide you with the tools to continue building. Learn more about us at www.thrsc. com or email us at info@thrsc.com.

With multiple generations in the workplace, we are already seeing communication styles change. Many employers are diversifying their rewards programs to respond to the varying generations. And we are seeing professional development being introduced among management teams more so now than ever. Showcasing competitive pay packages, investing in your workforces and diversifying your workplaces will be key in 2019. It is important for all of us in the industry to be celebrating industry successes. There are a lot of great things happening from helping one another to helping those in our communities and beyond. People want to know and we need to be sure to tell them! We also need to promote the trucking industry to our youth. We have partnered with the APTA on an initiative to promote careers to youth in Atlantic Canada. Helping them understand what we can offer them will start making careers in the trucking industry careers of first choice. The biggest thing we can share with you - there is no one solution that will solve our HR challenges in 2019. The good news is that with challenge comes opportunity. And I believe 2019 will provide more opportunity for the trucking industry in Atlantic Canada to showcase their dynamic workplaces, open the door to multiple strategies that will bridge those gaps and diversify all roads that lead to careers in trucking. THRSC Atlanautoatlantic.com

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At The Car Wash

CLEANING UP IN 2019 DESPITE A NUMBER OF CHALLENGES THE CANADIAN CARWASH CONTINUES TO NOT ONLY PERSEVERE: IT THRIVES.

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By Brenda Jane Johnstone

N CANADA, CAR WASHING HAS EVOLVED INTO A LARGE INDUSTRY THAT NOT ONLY CAN BE A LUCRATIVE BUSINESS BUT ALSO CAN BE A REGULAR SOURCE OF LOYAL CUSTOMERS WHO ARE SERIOUS ABOUT THEIR CARS. Western Canada could see the biggest growth in 2019 due to municipal laws that disallow hand washing of vehicles in

was pretty robust with several new washes being built nationally. Some distribution companies across the country believe that a larger portion of growth will come from independently owned carwashes who lean toward big tunnels, such as the recently opened Dreams Exo Xpress Car Wash in Okotoks, AB. These large tunnel washes can process more vehicles per hour than a traditional tunnel and keep costs down while still providing a superior wash. Carwashes are no longer a place where you might take a clean, scratch-free car and chance getting an almost clean car and maybe scratches you didn’t have

on the US dollar exchange rate and lower oil prices. There are quite a few more touchless and in-bay automatic washes across the country than there are friction washes and the expectation among carwash distributors is that there will be an increase in construction of stand-alone wash sites.

GREEN CAN BE MEAN And while going green is thought to be forefront in the minds of many, the cost of actually building green can be prohibitive. A typical solar setup is not a system that could be used to power an entire carwash site. Operators are installing LED lighting and purchasing greener chemicals. Some operators have made a conscious decision to switch to re-useable cloths, but these too have their drawbacks. The initial cost to purchase in bulk can be quite attractive, but then you’ll have to factor in the additional cost of water, electricity and labour costs to wash these towels. And what about theft? As one site operator told me, they have their towels logo’d and they lose many because customers take the cloths with them when they leave. This is good and bad in that they purchase towels that their customers like and want but then they have to buy more to replace those lost to theft. Going green can be pricey.

“THE CARWASH AS GIFT” driveways. While these same laws apply in many areas across the country, eastern Canadian municipalities seem less inclined to enforce them. The cost of real estate in large urban centres and prime street locations has become prohibitive to the average investor, which leaves the biggest growth to the major oil companies. With 75 per cent of washes owned by big oil, the belief is that the value is in thruput over quality. The remaining 25 per cent of washes that are independently owned focus on quality over thruput. There is certainly room for everyone, and those who value their cars and trucks above all will gravitate to the independent washes for more personal service. The Canadian carwash sector in 2018 22

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before. They have evolved into high end, technology-driven, welcoming “automobile spas.”

SOMETHING NEW Pet washes are not a new idea but seem to be a renewed one. Canadians spend as much as $6.6 billion a year on their pets, according to a report by the Canadian Pet Market Outlook. “Pet owners treat their cats and dogs like people,” Louis McCann, president, and CEO of the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council of Canada stated. So, with this in mind, if you have space at your carwash why not look into offering this service and attract a new brand of customer? Nationally, the Canadian car washing industry should see steady growth based

With the holidays upon us, many carwash sites are promoting carwash gift cards for stocking stuffers. These are a great option and may promote additional revenues from new customers so it is certainly worthwhile to school your staff on up-selling every person who comes to the checkout and ask if they’d like to purchase a carwash gift card. The carwash industry continues to persevere despite significant challenges. Initial land investments continue to increase and “perfect location” sites are fewer. There are newly-set tarrifs on steel that lead to increased equipment costs and higher water and hydro rates. But it’s not all doom-and gloom. Despite these setbacks, the overall industry demonstrates tremendous resilience as the outlook for 2019 seems extremely positive.


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Carter’s Corner

FULL SPEED AHEAD: FIVE AUTOMOTIVE TRENDS TO LOOK OUT FOR IN 2019 RAPID CHANGE, PERSONALIZED EXPERIENCES AND GREATER CONNECTIVITY ARE JUST A FEW OF THE THINGS TO CONSIDER AS WE ENTER A NEW GENERATION OF THE “VEHICLE EXPERIENCE.”

I

By Carter Hammett

T ’S R ATH E R STARTLING TO REALIZE JUST HOW RAPIDLY THE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR IS EVOLVING AND THE OUTCOMES THOSE CHANGES WILL HAVE ON SOCIETAL VALUES. Moving along at an unprecedented pace, the entire industry is poised for changes impacting almost every sector of

our lives. Whether it’s environmental, corporate, technological and even emotional, the humble car simply ain’t what it used to be. With that in mind, we at Auto and Trucking Atlantic decided to cast our nets far and wide and survey the landscape to determine some of the more impactful changes coming down the pipeline. Mere decades ago, terms like “cloud computing,” “big data” and “connected cars” weren’t part of the automotive lexicon. Today, we consider them a given. There’s some fascinating technology driving innovations for vehicles of the future and these are helping OEMs gain an upper

competitive hand in an intensely competitive marketplace. Thus, despite this story’s title, some of those changes may be still a ways off but they will be nonetheless felt in a big way in years to come. So, without further hesitation, here are five of the biggest trends, coming over the horizon as 2018 comes to a close. Autofacts has created a new acronym for tomorrow’s vehicle: eascy. That is: electrified, autonomous, shared, connected and yearly updated. Broken down, the projection of tomorrow’s vehicle goes something like this: the electrical future means less exhaust and noise polluting the environment. Given the self-driving


promise soon to be on our roads, it’s assumed there will be less of a “time sink” involved in driving and parking. This also means the car will be more accessible since users (in Europe anyway) won’t require a license to use it. Another anticipated benefit to look forward to is the fact that costs will most likely decrease since the car can be paid for in smaller chunks. Let’s take a closer look at some of these other anticipated changes, connected and not.

ulous cost increases associated with fuel expenditures. So prevalent is this that by 2030, with current green values ensuring a reduced carbon footprint, a decrease in traffic on our highways and biways seems a sure thing.

DO YOU FEEL A CONNECTION? If you haven’t heard of the term, “In-

ternet of Things (IoT)” start memorizing that phrase. For the uninitiated, it’s simply meant to refer to the connection of virtually anything to the Internet. Once again, technology’s far reach is being felt. The next generation of vehicles will be fully equipped with Internet access and a wireless area network. Your car will be able to share Internet access with other devices

ELECTRIFIED! If you’re still not convinced about the growth in electrification, consider some very real facts. Most brands have at least one EV on the market currently, and at least a couple of hybrids on the road or in development. The rise in electrical charging stations across our fair land is also a sure sign that this trend is being taken seriously. Not surprisingly, China has taken the lead in this phenomenon, currently the world’s biggest automotive market. In Canada, there’s been a 214% increase in year-over-year growth in sales. In Q2 alone, over 14,000 vehicles were sold alone, compared to 11,060 for all of 2016. That marks a cumulative sales total of about 70,000 EV sales—roughly split evenly between hybrids and battery electric models. While Ontario continues to be the country’s sales leader, inroads are being made throughout the rest of Canada as well. Nova Scotia EV sales jumped from a mere six in 2017 to 26 in 2018. The trend is being recognized everywhere with tiny PEI charting more vehicle purchases than neighbouring Newfoundland!

AUTONOMY, AUTONOMY AND MORE AUTONOMY Like it or not, the self-driving car ain’t going nowhere but forward. Yes, there have been glitches and some terrible mishaps, but with the US government’s heavily invested support in R & D, Ford, Toyota and others will probably be looking towards companies like Google for new partnerships. The pundits are telling us we can expect better traffic management, greater safety and increased rider comfort as a result of this inevitable change and maybe they’re right. Or maybe not.

CAR SHARING

This is anticipated to become a major element in the near future as people’s emotional attachment to their cars declines, especially in the last few years. The car as status symbol is slowly but surely giving way to the urban realities of less availability of parking spots and the ridicautoatlantic.com

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Carter’s Corner

both inside and outside of the car. A lot of folks are putting more emphasis on the experience of driving and this means interacting with the vehicle that you operate. This will ultimately make driving a lot more personalized . It will also enable car manufacturers to develop apps and services that are tailor-made for the user. On top of that, these smarter vehicles will further enhance the driving experience by being able to determine the best parking spots and self-report on accidents. There has been controversy over security and privacy but these bugs are currently being worked out. Car connectivity is possibly the single most exciting development to look forward to.

UPDATES Because technological change and innovations within the automotive industry cycles so rapidly, old methods are declining. So, model cycles which typically lasted from five-to-eight years, will gradually be replaced with annual updates so the latest hardware and software developments can be integrated. Pundits predict that shorter innovation cycles will access the market through upgrades of shared vehicles. All that, and we haven’t even touched on other changes like vehicle platooning, insurance-per-usage, blockchain technology or any of the plethora of evolutions currently underway. And that’s just the tip

of the proverbial iceberg. With more and more crossover models on the road and in development, an explosion of luxury brands, and the growth of pickup trucks, there’s something fascinating going on in virtually every corner of the market. The industry’s rapid self-reinvention is shifting to a more holistic perspective that takes into account everything from personal needs to the health of cities, which basically means that the thought leaders of tomorrow are looking closely at how vehicles are used, rather than produced. That means something a lot more personal, innovative and hopefully healthier for our future. We’re looking at the horizon with baited breath.

UNI-SELECT MEMBER SERVICE AWARD Keith Farrell (Uni-Select-Business Development Manager) Presents a 20 Year Service Award to Michel LeBlanc with Bay View Auto Parts in Digby Co. NS.

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Under The Hood

REPAIRING THE STRIPPED DODGE CV AXLE . . . FOR THE LAST TIME!

W

By Rick Roods Transmission.

INTER IS HERE, AND IT WON’T BE LONG BEFORE EVERY 4WD OWNER WILL BE REALIZING THEIR ONCE INVINCIBLE TRUCK IS STUCK IN 4 INCHES OF SNOW AND ONLY SPINNING THE REAR WHEELS. Although every make and model has their own fair share of issues, the issue of concern today is the Dodge Ram. More specifically 2002 and up IFS Dodge Rams, and the ever so common issue, of the inner CV shaft stripping and damaging the output shaft of the front differential. Until recently, it has been a pretty straight forward repair. Throw it on the hoist, make sure the front driveshaft is locking in 4wd, and then see which is stripped. Since 2002, the output and CV shafts have underwent multiple design changes however, the root cause of the issue, has yet to be addressed. The mating shafts are of good size, and plenty of spline, but as long as they are exposed to the weather, they will rust. And as soon as they rust, they begin to strip. So the real issue is that this 4WD drive system was flawed by poor design

for any winter climate that uses road salt and is prone to rust. In all fairness, an attempt was made to stop water intrusion from contaminating the splines with the use of an o ring right at the base of the male splines. The original design did not really last long, did a horrible job keeping weather out and an even worse job of keeping the grease on the splines. Although we have talked about coming up with a fix for a while now, the concern was to keep costs low, and in the middle of a storm everyone was always in a hurry to get back on the road. In 2012 Dodge changed the manufacturer of the front diffs and the passenger side output shaft was no longer a serviceable item, forcing customers to purchase complete differential assemblies costing anywhere from $1400 -$2700 (ratio dependent) and supply is expected to be a concern. Since we are problem solvers and try to give our customers cost effective and Rated more reliable solutions. We have now be-Rated lifting lifting gun assembling and selling just thecapacity rightcapacity (T) (lbs.) side housing. These come with a new USE 73CH05 0.5 1,100 aftermarket shaft, new bearings and seal and our new patented fix‌USEthe CV Sure73CH10 1.0 2,200 seal. A small rubber boot is designed USE 73CH20 2.0 4,400 to seal on both the Inner CV shaft and the base of the output shaft of the dif-

ferential, preventing road salt and weather from intruding, while retaining the lubricant and preventing them from stripping in the future. There are two different size boots. One small-shouldered boot that fits both right and left side from 2002-2011 as well as the 2012-present drivers side shaft. The Passenger side shaft has a larger exposed base and allows for a wider collar to seal on the output shaft. This is a value-added service to your customer and a must if you wish to prevent this issue from happening again. For the customers who want to prevent these expensive repairs from happening, they are an easy install as long as we get at it prior to damage. At this point these boots are will fit all Dodge Independent front suspensions from 2002 on, and are readily available from us at Rick Roods Transmission. We keep lots in stock and are just a phone call away. I think that it is up to us to show our customers that we have their Force bestreq.interests Standard Head Number Load chain to lift lift of fallsthe diameter at heart androom correct root cause this capacity ofPrice (lbs.) failure they just experienced. It is easy to 99 8' 2-13/32" 10-5/8" 1 6.0 mm 50.5 lbs. show them the value of these inexpensive boots, and10-5/8" if they 1can6.0prevent 99 8' 2-13/32" mm 69.5an lbs. expensive failure down the road I am sure they 99 8' 2-13/32" 17-1/2" 2 8.0 mm 70.5 lbs. will thank you for bringing this solution to their attention.

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Tires and Treads

EIGHT-IN-TEN WINTER TIRE OWNERS SAY WINTER TIRES HAVE SAVED THEM FROM LOSS OF CONTROL, COLLISION

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BIG MAJORITY OF WINTER TIRE OWNERS BELIEVE THAT DRIVING A VEHICLE EQUIPPED WITH WINTER TIRES HAS SAVED THEM FROM BEING INVOLVED IN A POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS DRIVING SITUATION.

Eighty per cent of winter tire owners believe driving a vehicle equipped with winter tires has saved them from being involved in a potentially hazardous driving situation such as loss of control or a colli-

sion, according to a new consumer survey commissioned by the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC). “Canadian drivers who have embraced winter tires have spoken and provided this very telling insight,” says Glenn Maidment, President of TRAC. “They confirmed what we already know—that the superior performance of winter tires has a place in Canada, and that their greater grip and significantly shorter stopping distances on all cold-weather road surfaces keep Canadians safer on winter roads.” TRAC’s 2018 Canadian Consumer Winter Tire Study also found that 76

per cent of Canadian motorists now use winter tires. In comparison, TRAC’s 2017 study found 66 per cent of drivers were using winter tires. Excluding Quebec, where winter tires are required by law, winter tire usage stands at 70 per cent. Last year’s study found 60 per cent of drivers were using winter tires outside Quebec. This surge in winter tire usage is reflected in winter tire shipments across Canada, which have grown at an annualized rate of four per cent over the past five years. The significant increase in winter tire use is great news because it means

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS

F

OR THE FIRST TIME, THE AUTOMOTIVE TRADES ASSOCIATION, ATA, HAS MADE AVAILABLE THE MEDAVIE BLUECROSS INSURANCE PROGRAM TO THE ENTIRE ATLANTIC CANADIAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY. The new brochure illustrates those sectors of the automotive industry now potentially eligible to benefit from this program as well as reasons to do so. This is a first ever regional insurance benefit program from the Automotive Trades Association. Interested employers should contact Mark Denholm at MacLellan and Moffatt Group Consultants for complete details. Mark Denholm MDenholm@mmgc.ca (902) 890-8200. 30

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our wintertime roadways are safer than ever as Canadians embrace the safety and performance advantages of winter tires. The top motivations for purchasing winter tires, include: winter tire laws (34 per cent); advice from family and friends (17 per cent); lower auto insurance premiums (11 per cent), and positive media coverage (seven per cent). “At 17 per cent, advice from family and friends represents a major driver when it comes to drivers switching to winter tires,” says Maidment. “So, we can effectively link the increases in winter tire utilisation directly with people sharing their positive experience with winter tires.”

REGIONALLY, THE STUDY FOUND: 64 per cent of British Columbia drivers use winter tires In Manitoba and Saskatchewan usage stands at 60 per cent 69 per cent of Ontario drivers now use winter tires In Atlantic Canada, where winter tire usage is surpassed only by Quebec, winter tire usage stands at 94 per cent The most common reasons why threein-ten drivers still resist winter tires are the belief that all-season tires provide enough traction (53 per cent), cost (18 per cent) and reduced driving in winter (15 per cent). Full survey results are available at www.tracanada.ca. The superior performance of winter tires is the result of advanced tread designs and rubber compounds. Winter tires feature softer tread compounds that retain flexibility even in extremely cold conditions. At temperatures at or below 7 degrees Celsius, the traction capabilities of winter tires provide greater grip on all cold-weather road surfaces and significantly shorter stopping distances. In Quebec, provincial research shows universal winter tire use results in a five per cent reduction in road accident injuries and a three per cent reduction in deaths and serious injuries. (Source: Quebec Winter Tire Report, 2011)

SURVEY METHODOLOGY A survey of 1,524 Canadians was completed online during the period of October 12–15, 2018, using Leger’s online panel. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of +/-2.5%, 19 times out of 20. autoatlantic.com

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Truckers Corner

TRUCK DRIVER PAIN AND DISCOMFORT CAN BE ALLEVIATED

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LMOST 60 PER CENT OF TRUCK DRIVERS IN A RECENT CANADIAN STUDY REPORTED EXPERIENCING MUSCULOSKELETAL (MSD) PAIN AND DISCOMFORT ON THE JOB, EVEN THOUGH IT MAY BE PREVENTABLE.

“Given the fact that MSDs account for nearly one-half of all work-related illnesses and the transportation sector makes up a significant portion of that, understanding the risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders is important,” said lead author Sonja Senthanar, a doctoral candidate in the School of Public Health and Health Systems. “While the link between trucking and MSDs has been studied in other countries, there is a dearth of research in Canada.” According to the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, truck driving is the second most common occupation in Canada, employing nearly one in 35 males between the ages of 20 and 64 years. Public health researchers at the Uni-

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versity of Waterloo surveyed 107 male truck drivers passing through two popular highway stops in Southern Ontario and found that 57 per cent had experienced musculoskeletal pain and discomfort, especially low back pain. They found an association between this pain and discomfort and specific risk factors, including organizational safety climate, level of risk associated with the job, exhaustion from work tasks, being married and having higher education levels. Senthanar said that being married and more educated are presumably associated with pain and discomfort because the presence of a spouse and knowledge gained from education can increase awareness of musculoskeletal symptoms – and therefore rates of reporting. Co-author Philip Bigelow, a professor in the School of Public Health and Health Systems, said, “Physical exposures such as awkward postures, repetition, lifting, whole body vibration and prolonged sitting, as well as personal factors such as physical fitness and job satisfaction, are known to be associated with the development of MSDs. Since driving a truck involves a variety of these risk factors, pro-

grams that address these multiple factors are needed.” Bigelow said that a number of large Canadian carriers have adopted programs that take holistic approaches that include reducing vibration exposures through improved seating, modifying workloads and physical tasks, as well as promoting the overall wellness of drivers by encouraging physical activity and healthy eating. Researchers at the University of Waterloo are members of a Canadian team of researchers that is engaged with stakeholders in the industry to identify such wholistic programs and to evaluate their impacts. They hope that companies with successful programs can act as champions of driver health and wellness to improve working conditions for all truck drivers. The research paper, “Factors associated with musculoskeletal pain and discomfort among Canadian truck drivers: A cross-sectional study of worker perspectives,” was published in the Journal of Transport and Health by Senthanar and Bigelow, who also works at UWaterloo’s Centre of Research Expertise for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders (CRE-MSD).



Around the Atlantic

NAPA NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK LIKE MANY BUSINESSES IN TOWNS, BIG AND SMALL, SPRINKLED ACROSS CANADA’S MARITIME PROVINCES, NAPA DEALERSHIPS ARE OFTEN THE RESULT OF AN ENTIRE FAMILY’S COMMITMENT By Susan Bradley

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T’S THAT WAY AT DALHOUSIE AUTO SUPPLIES AND ITS SISTER STORE NAPA AUTO PARTS IN CAMPBELLTON. Kevin Mallet, who began the businesses in 1995 with his father, now works with his sister, Brenda Lagacé, bringing in his teenage son into help these days as well. Mallet, 49, hadn’t planned on entering the automotive business when he graduated from the University of New Brunwick with his bachelor of science degree. But when the opportunity to buy into the industry arose, he and his dad snapped it up. Being a NAPA auto parts dealer comes with a reputation for quality and service.

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“They (NAPA) offer you a lot of programs, you have to pair that with good, personal customer service to be successful,” he said in a recent interview. The stores in Campbellton and Dalhousie supply NAPA’s top-quality vehicle parts from air conditioning systems and engine kits to steering and suspension parts and ignition filters. Tools and equipment, such as power tools; drilling, cutting and grinding equipment and lighting and electrical, also play a big role in NAPA’s extensive product line. About 15 people work at the two locations. Two are sales representatives, one who deals with garages and the other who services contractors. “They travel to customers on a weekly basis, checking in on them,” Mallet said, as well as delivering the family company’s very personal brand of customer attention. Cementing those client relationships is especially important in this area of the

province, where only the best survive in rugged economic conditions. The area has been hit hard over the years by mill shutdowns, a shrinking forest industry and the closure of a customer service call centre. However, Mallet said he recently did some business with a new industry, and one relatively new to the area. “Last year, a cannabis business opened, we sold them some supplies when they set up,” he said. He said he’s not sure what future opportunities lie with that sector. The stores also supply the regional hospital in the area. Mallet is appreciative that NAPA operates a warehouse in Moncton, N.B., to supply consistent flow of NAPA automotive supplies, parts, tools and other equipment. “If I order by 4:30 p.m., I can get delivery between 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. “ He said the swift availability of items is another key to great customer service.



Atlantic Racing News

RACING INTO THE 2019 SEASON

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By Tim Terry

the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour kicking off their 2018 season at Petty International Raceway or Speedway 660 dropping their Series appearance wasn’t announced until their schedule was unveiled last February. In fact, for the 2019 season, only one paved oval track, Lake Doucette Motor Speedway outside of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, has released their complete 2019 dates. Those dates currently have no promotional or divisional (past their regular four classes) information attached to them, but at least race fans know that the track will be racing on those eight Sunday afternoons. The dominos for scheduling tend to fall in line after the aforementioned Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour schedule falls into line. The first date of that schedule, the IWK 250 Super Weekend, has been announced for July 17th to 20th. The event is anchored by the IWK 250 for the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour, which was won in 2018 by Kenny Wallace, a veteran of 900

T’S HAR D TO BELIEVE ANOTHER 12 MONTHS AND ANOTHER RACI N G S E ASO N I N ATLANTIC CANADA HAVE PASSED! The 2018 racing season can be considered a success for most within the industry in this region. The weather treated most tracks and series quite well on a season long scale with fans being treated to some memorable short track racing. So, the question always remains when the curtain falls on a season, where do we go from here? For a season that starts in May, it is tremendously difficult to pinpoint where we will be when that first race rolls around. For example, the big announcement of

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plus NASCAR top tier division starts. With Riverside Speedway celebrating 50 years in 2019, you can expect a big year from the James River, Nova Scotia based track. While we are on the subject, the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour will be the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour for the next two seasons. As announced at their annual Awards Banquet in November at The Westin Nova Scotian, Parts for Trucks will remain on as title sponsor for the Maritime touring series in both 2019 and 2020. Both years are major milestones. In 2019, Parts for Trucks will celebrate 100 years in business while 2020 will mark the 20th Anniversary Season of the Maritime Pro Stock Tour. If 2018 is any indication, the car counts on the Series should continue to grow or at the least stay stable. The Series is coming off a year where 18 teams competed in at least 80% of the events, up by two from 2017. While those same teams did not compete from year to year, the Series


did have two rookies compete full time in Waylon Farrell and Braden Langille. It is too early to tell who will compete for the Exide Batteries Rookie of the Year Award in 2019 but there are no indications, at least at this point, that any full time teams from 2018 are scaling back in the upcoming season. With the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour enjoying great car counts and success on the promotion side with sponsors, the ebb and flow can be seen region wide when it comes to field sizes. Scotia Speedworld in Halifax and Lake Doucette Motor Speedway saw increased car count in their Late Model Sportsman divisions. The new teams coming for a majority of the races at each track can be partially attributed to rookie drivers moving up the ranks into the top tier division. At Scotia Speedworld, Megan Parrott and Deven Smith made the move to the division while the likes of Dominque Hanna and Isaac Comeau made the jump from the Four Cylinder ranks in Southwest Nova to the high powered Late Model class. In total, 15 drivers showed up full time to the Sportsman races held at Scotia Speedworld, which was three cars higher

than any other Sportsman division in the Maritimes. Car counts rise and fall for many reasons. Track operations is a big reason, some are fans of what a certain race track is doing and some are not. The cost of racing is a big factor, which can be determined by the United States dollar. Some decisions on how much a driver or team races is based off personal decisions. A number of NASCAR drivers are retiring in the upper echelons of the sport because they want to spend more time with their family or they want to enjoy other hobbies. Some, as in all sports, retire because it is that time. The MJS and Prime Lift East Coast Mini Stock Tour saw a successful year in 2018 with five race tracks hosting a race in the most recent season. The Series had seen an average car count of 17 cars per race in their second year with their champion Matthew Warren receiving a Revolution RMR6 car lift from series sponsor MJS and Prime Lift. The racing tends to be clean but the drivers race hard, putting on some great races within the Provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. While one Honda based series flour-

ishes, one is losing car count. Scotia Speedworld’s Thunder division car count continues to dwindle. From a field of over 30 cars per week back in 2007, it is a good night if the class can produce double digit car counts on a Friday show. Some teams point the finger towards the rulebook not progressing along with time and driver input, which is what has helped the East Coast Mini Stock Tour grow. Either way, something will have to be done sooner rather than later or a division that has been a mainstay at Scotia Speedworld for two decades could be seeing the checkered flag sooner than later. Scotia Speedworld isn’t the only track that has seen a dip in their four cylinder divisions though. A number of tracks have seen their Four Cylinder car count drop because of the introduction of head and neck restraints being mandatory. These devices, like a HANS, Zamp, Hybrid or the like, prevent head movement in an accident. While the introductory division may be seen as a cost effective division for some, they are still moving at a quick speed and can stop just as quick with the wrong hit into another car or a concrete wall. Some deem this safety feature,

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Atlantic Racing News

something that is becoming as common sense to use as a helmet or roll cage, as something that is going to make or break their budget and they bow out of racing. As mentioned already, and can be seen here, there are a number of reasons car counts will rise and fall. Let’s swing into a positive. The Atlantic Modified Tour was a pleasant surprise in 2018 and the trend looks to be continuing into 2019. The Series saw a number of drivers return to the track this previous year. Yves McCray and

Tour looks to continue into the new year with “The Racing Ranger from Renous” Kim Hallihan acquiring a car formerly campaigned by champions Ryan Messer and Justin Beers. Miramichi fan favourite Travis Conroy made the announcement that he is moving to the Series in 2019 after two successful seasons in a Mini Stock. With healthy relationships with partner tracks, good management and the recent addition of Tony Leonard as lead technical inspector, the Series appears to be trending in the right direction for the first time

with no tracks to race on we do not have a sport. It is something that is ever evolving, something that has changed over the last four to six months on some fronts and something that is bound to continue in 2019. Petty International Raceway made the announcement mid-November that Craig McFetridge, who had been a part of the track’s ownership group since 2011 when the facility re-opened, had sold his shares in the business. Ellen Smith, wife of Wayne Smith, has joined her husband in

Zean Dutcher are prime examples. Both are standouts in New Brunswick stock car racing, specifically in the Miramichi area. Both acquired Modified cars and each raced several events in 2018. For Yves, he returned to the top of the field, capped off with a season finale win at Speedway Miramichi, a track that he raced to the win at many times in a Sportsman car. Former Atlantic Modified Tour champion Brandon Skidmore returned to the class in 2018 after a Late Model stint and was a winner at Speedway Miramichi and Petty International Raceway. James Matchett, a former Eastern Super Mini Cup Series champion, bought a car at the end of the year and will be a force in 2019. That trend for the Atlantic Modified

in many years. The returning drivers trend is something that will always present itself, it is just a matter of who will be making that return from year to year. Malcolm Suley took a few years off from the Speedway 660 Sharp Shooter class and returned in 2018, not missing the beat. The same can be said about David Hibbs at Scotia Speedworld in the Thunder class. Hibby drove his No. 56 Hibby’s Garage Civic to a second place finish in his first race in over ten years and scored a victory later on in the year. We spoke in this space a year ago about track ownership and how that part of our landscape has changed over the last decade, and it is a big one because

the ownership of the track and the team has already begun planning for the 2019 season. Down the road, Facebook has been ablaze with a user named “Force Maxx” claiming that he had struck a deal with Tim Wile and the CENTRE For Speed to operate stock car events out of the GrandBarachois, New Brunswick track in 2019. When I reached out to Tim Wile he had told me there was nothing to report at the time. What comes of this and the future of the Atlantic Stock Car Championships will be something to watch over the coming months. The track produced one event in 2018, the Atlantic Stock Car Championships, successfully with two big days of racing this past October.

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At the midway point of the 2018 season, Barry Richard had listed Speedway Miramichi for sale via a local real estate agent. While a number of folks have tirekicked at owning the facility, no pun intended, nobody has purchased the track and Richard is full steam ahead for 2019 after holding the track’s first awards banquet in nearly 20 years on November 24th. The plan is to hold six stock car events in 2019 and the introduction of snowmobile drags this winter. The rumor mill was on fire in Sydney this year with at least two groups interested in purchasing what was most recently known as Cape Breton Miners Memorial Speedway. While both groups had been rumored to be “close to a deal” with current owner Bill Vasil, no official announcement had been made about a new owner or the future of the track. The tough bullring on Grand Lake Road has sat idle since the season finale for 2016 in October of that year. As of press time, no other tracks had officially changed management or ownership and all other ovals remain full steam ahead for 2019.

South of the Border, the new Five Star Racecars Late Model body continues to be a big topic of conversation. Announced but not approved by the ABC Body Committee for 2018, the company has begun the process to roll out the bodies for 2019. The ultimate goal of the body is to update the look of a body that has been the same for well over a decade without any new aerodynamic advantage or price increase for teams. New Hampshire’s Dale Shaw Racecars recently rolled one out their shop on a customer’s car for the new year. Regardless of the ABC decision, a number of major racing sanctioning bodies, series and tracks have approved the body for 2019 but no decisions have been made about its immediate future at Atlantic Canada tracks at this writing. That’s a lot to digest, I know. So, what can we expect for 2019? We will ultimately find out in January and February when the powers that be set rules, procedures and schedules for the new year. Track managements are busy planning their summer, some will chat with others and work together on scheduling but at the end of the day, a race track is a business

and owners will do what they believe will let them meet their financial goals to keep the doors open. As fans, we patiently wait for those decisions to be made so we can fill our planners with events this summer. Most teams now have a vision, whether it be clear or not, on what their 2019 season looks like, where they will be running and how many races they will run. With most companies starting their fiscal year in January, budgets are set so teams are out now searching for sponsorships to help meet their goals for the new season. Most teams will tell you while the racing season runs with on track action from May to October, it is a year round process preparing race cars in the shop and preparing outside the four wheels to get to the track. Here’s hoping you enjoy your Holiday celebrations and safely ring in 2019. Sooner than later, we will have a clearer idea of what we can expect out of this coming year. I can feel those warm temperatures now and smell the race fuel and burning rubber now just thinking about it! Until then, keep the hammer down and we’ll see you at the track!


Industry News

EARLY RUST PROTECTION PAYS OFF AS CARS GET OLDER

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T’S NO SECRET THAT THE OLDER A CAR GETS, THE MORE RUST IT WILL HAVE. BUT A NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT THE SEVERITY OF CORROSION CAN BE CONTROLLED BY APPLYING REGULAR RUST PROTECTION TO A VEHICLE, ESPECIALLY IF APPLIED EARLY IN A CAR’S LIFE. The University of Windsor engineering faculty compared vehicles protected with Krown rust protection to unprotected vehicles. They found a statistically significant increase in the amount of rust on unprotected vehicles that were between seven and 15 years old. The study concluded that unprotected vehicles had 6.8 times more visible corrosion on body panels than protected vehicles. On underbody parts subjected to greater exposure of dirt, gravel, water and chemicals, unprotected cars had 3.6 times more corrosion than those that benefited from rust protection. “Considering that the average age of a car in North America is 11 years old, our rust protection treatments have the potential to improve and extend the experience and utility you de-

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rive from your vehicle,” says Craig Shuttleworth, marketing director at Krown. “What’s even more important is to start the rust protection program early because you don’t want to give rust a head start. It can be years before corrosion becomes visible, but by then it could be too late.” While the study didn’t find any difference in visible rust between newer treated and untreated cars, other research shows that rust first appears on the inside of body panels and at spot welds where moisture can collect and not drain, often taking years before it appears on the surface as paint blisters or perforations.

DRIVERS BEWARE - FOLLOW THIS KEY TIP TO KEEP YOUR FAMILY SAFE Between daily shuttling to school and work, family road trips, and our harsh Canadian weather, your vehicle works hard to power your lifestyle. That’s why it’s so important to make sure it’s running smoothly and safely by protecting it from rust. Keeping a car rust-free not only keeps it looking good, but also makes it safer to operate, especially if you keep rust away from the rarely seen under-surfaces of the car. “Corrosion on your vehicle’s under-

body may not matter cosmetically, but it can represent a safety issue,” explains Craig Shuttleworth, marketing director at Krown. “Specifically, the vehicle frame which when compromised by corrosion can cause life-threatening failure in the event of a vehicle accident is a real concern.”.” The underbody of your car is subjected to a greater exposure of dirt, gravel, water and harsh road chemicals than its upper body panels, so it’s where corrosion is greatest. A recent study by engineering researchers at the University of Windsor found that unprotected cars had 3.6 times more corrosion on their underbodies than those that were protected with Krown Rust Protection. The findings back up other research that found that rust starts on the inside of body panels and at spot welds and joints where moisture collects and doesn’t drain. Corrosion does its damage invisibly over many years before making its way to the surface, where it makes its presence known as blisters or perforations. The likelihood of spotting corrosion on underbody surfaces is lower because most car owners never see them. That’s why automotive experts say that when

anyone works on the underside of your car, whether it be to change the tires or the oil, you should ask them to inspect for signs of corrosion. For additional peace of mind, they add that you should apply regular rust protection to those areas to delay any corrosion.

BOOST THE RESALE VALUE OF YOUR CAR WITH THESE PROVEN STRATEGIES Vehicles begin depreciating in value the minute you drive them off the dealer’s lot. To get top dollar when you do sell or trade in your vehicle, be sure that you follow these strategies while you own it. Follow the recommended maintenance schedule. Your car’s manufacturer provides a maintenance schedule that is designed to keep your vehicle running at peak efficiency. It might seem expensive and you may be tempted to skip some appointments, but if you are diligent with maintenance, the cost will repay itself when you have a finely tuned automobile to sell. Rustproofing. Many car deficiencies need a mechanic to spot them, but everyone sees rust, which is why it’s one of the most negative factors when selling a car. autoatlantic.com

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Regular rustproofing will keep corrosion away and pay off when you are negotiating a sale price for your used vehicle. A University of Windsor study found that untreated vehicles had 6.8 times more visible corrosion on body panels than cars that benefitted from Krown Rust Control treatment, while underbody parts had 3.6 times more corrosion. Keep the mileage down. The more mileage you put on your vehicle, the lower its resale value will be. It’s not easy to minimize the use of your car, but some trips are avoidable so if you don’t need to use your car, don’t. Walk, bike or take a bus when you can. It’s good for your health, your wallet and lets you keep your car longer. Keep on top of minor repairs. Tiny dents and scratches have a way of getting bigger and uglier over time, so be sure to deal with them as soon as they appear. Keeping the surface in top shape preserves its aesthetic appeal for longer. Park defensively. Collisions can happen anywhere, but parking lots can be an especially dangerous place for your car. If you can, park in a way that minimizes the odds of someone bumping into it or banging it with their door. It’s nice to be close to the store entrance, but if you can 42

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park away from the crowd or in a way that gives you lots of space from other vehicles, it might save you a trip to the body shop.

SAVVY CAR OWNERS DO THIS BEFORE WINTER Winter will be here before you know it, so if you plan on driving in the cold weather, here are some basic things you need to do to get your car ready for the frigid months ahead. Check the battery. Do you know how old your battery is? If it’s more than three years old, it may be losing its ability to hold a charge and you don’t want to find that out when the first cold snap hits and you can’t start your car. Get it checked by your mechanic and be sure to have booster cables in your trunk and know how to use them. Replace your wipers. During the sunny days of summer, we don’t use our windshield wipers much, but when the snow and sleet are flying, shabby wipers won’t cut it. Not being able to see properly is a safety hazard, so replace your old wipers with heavy-duty ones designed to handle the ice of winter. Inspect your snow tires. No matter what anyone tells you, all-season tires

are not as good as winter ones during the coldest months of the year. If you’re not currently using them, upgrade to winter tires and if you are, check them well before your installation appointment so that you have more time to shop for sales if they need replacing. Create an emergency kit. Emergencies don’t only happen to other people. Create an emergency kit for your car in case you get stranded by bad weather. Pack blankets, energy bars, a hat, gloves and a flashlight to keep you safe until help arrives. Make sure to have something that lets you charge your mobile phone so you can call for assistance. Rustproofing. Researchers at the University of Windsor studied hundreds of cars and found that untreated vehicles had 6.8 times more visible corrosion on body panels than cars that benefitted from Krown Rust Control treatments. Underbody parts had 3.6 times more corrosion than treated cars. Winter is the time your car is most likely to be bombarded with salt and road-de-icing chemicals which can greatly accelerate corrosion. Protecting your vehicle against rust will help your vehicle last longer, look better and will even make it safer to drive by protecting important components from rusting.



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Qué-mont

1-800-361-1932

quemont.com

39

Rick Rood’s

1-902-538-1052

rickroodstransmission.com

Rotary Lifts

1-866-461-1045

rotarylift.com

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

13

Shell

1-800-661-1600

shell.ca

37

Stark Auto Sales

1-416-654-7222

starkautosales.com

18

Traction Truck Parts

1-506-857-8840

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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WORKSAFE NB HITS HARD AGAIN WITH A WHOPPING 72% INCREASE

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IEPPE, NB – WORKSAFE NB ANNOUNCED THE NEW ASSESSMENT RATE FOR 2019 YESTERDAY, AND FOR THE THIRD YEAR IN A ROW, NEW BRUNSWICKERS WILL SEE A RATE INCREASE TO THEIR RATES – THIS TIME, A WHOPPING 72% INCREASE.

The Workers’ Compensation program is supposed to be a balanced and fair system for both employers and employees but this is obviously not the case in New Brunswick. “This increase will cost the trucking industry millions, every trucking business will be impacted severely.” said Jean-Marc Picard, executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association. “This is ridiculous and it’s gone on long enough, the new government needs to step in and make legislative changes because the bleeding won’t stop. It’s a joke and nobody wants to make any tough decisions. The Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association advised the government three years ago on what needed to happen to make this a more balanced system and nothing was done. Now look at us . . . another massive rate increase.” The trucking industry is one of the largest employers in New Brunswick and is faced with a critical driver shortage. This rate increase is yet another barrier that will not help our industry bring drivers to this province. Companies can barely stay afloat as is therefore this increase will make the cost of goods go up dramatically. The trucking industry has created more jobs than any other industry in the last couple of years but they cannot continue to sustain these increases and continue to grow as an industry. “Most trucking companies have terminals in other provinces and moveable assets therefore they can move things around including jobs. Some already advised me that they would do so immediately” said Picard.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

NOVEMBER 2018 WINNER!

Lloyd MacDonald, of Sydney, NS, is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is January 15th, 2019

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE:

ACROSS

DOWN

1. Put the pedal to the metal (7,2) 6. Pre-metric speedometer letters (1,1,1) 8. PT Cruiser & ‘02-’05 T-Bird styling 9. Lobster location, often (2,1,4) 10. Buzz-causing ‘71 Charger variant (5,3) 11. ‘11-debut Nissan electric model 13. Summer windshield critter 14. Mothers or Turtle product (3,3) 17. Octagonal sign command 19. 5-Down mug contents (4,4) 22. NS single malt distillery 23. Radar gun display 24. Dodge Viper cylinder count 25. Refreshing road trip pauses (4,5)

1. Country road decision points 2. Eight-armed Atlantic critter 3. Canoe carrying convenience (4,4) 4. Big rig pilot 5. ‘60s A&W window attachment 6. Supersized road hazard beast 7. Auto & Trucking Atlantic HQ city 12. Auto magazine features, often (3,5) 13. ‘00-debut Honda hybrid 15. Cabbie’s query (5,2) 16. Really wrecks a ride 18. NS plates word 20. Cars, slangily 21. Bricklin gullwing component

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ovie fans, We think you’ll love this! Maybe you can name what it is, or anything more about this famous on-screen film car. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is January 15th, 2018.

Congratulations to Matt Somers of Amherst, NS who correctly answered that the vehicle in the photo is the provincial government’s Emergency Health Services (EHS) division, Emergency Medical Care Inc. (EMC) is a privately-owned company that manages and operates ground ambulance in Nova Scotia. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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