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STUDIO 5. PROJECT ARTICLE 31


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ABSTRACT What does it mean to design for social good? The best designs reveal intent in its most basic form. Its purpose is to address the necessities of the consumer. Studio 5 builds relationships with our clients and their end users. As designers and researchers, we empower citizens of the world to combat urgent international issues. Studio 5 is a collective of like-minded design humanitarians­—optimists­—intent on using ground-level methodologies to- achieve a better future.

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4 INTRODUCTION 6 about us 12 design process 20 branding

84 IDEATE 86 project statement 88 project branding 94 design criteria 96 experts

140 EVALUATE 94 project goals 144 the next step 146 the future

30 EXPLORE 32 studio 5 + project 34 brainstorm 40 filtered topics 42 the united nations 44 universal declaration of human rights 46 related articles 48 privacy laws and technologies 50 global case studies 52 china 58 iran 64 germany 70 the united states 76 existing solutions 78 american civil liberties union 80 national coalition against censorship 82 carter center

106 REFINE 108 ideation workshop 112 system map

114 DELIVER 116 campaign strategy 118 imagine:in 124 watched 130 track 136 proposition process 138 article 31

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VISION About Us

Real stories equal impact in design.

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MISSION About Us

Our mission is to create innovative design and research that reflects the spirit of our clients and that of our brand. We will build trusted relationships by maintaining the highest levels of quality and ethical standards and by delivering what we promise. We refure to compromise our attention to detail. We will preserve our high standards at any cost. We will accomplish this in a flexible, fun and suppor tive environment. Our mission is to create innovative design and research that reflects the spirit of our clients and that of our brand. We will build trusted relationships by maintaining the highest levels of quality and ethical standards and by delivering what we promise.

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We refure to compromise our attention to detail. We will preserve our high standards at any cost. We will accomplish this in a flexible, fun and suppor tive environment. Our mission is to create innovative design and research that reflects the spirit of our clients and that of our brand. We will build trusted relationships by maintaining the highest levels of quality and ethical standards and by delivering what we promise. We refure to compromise our attention to detail. We will preserve our high standards at any cost. We will accomplish this in a flexible, fun and suppor tive environment.


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THE TEAM About Us

Studio 5 is a highly diverse group of innovators, thinkers, designers, and researchers working together to move forward. We are a new york-based international team working to create a brighter tomorrow. By reflecting on the past and examining today we practice forward thinking in all aspects of our brand. Whether attempting to change to the world or more simply designing a campaign for a local company.

ABBAS JAMALI

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TRACEY LIN


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SAMANTHA MILETTI

GIANNA DO

ANEKA STEVENS

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INSPIRATION Design Process

SYPartners

“We help companies design their future. SYPar tners engages at times of significant change - a new leadership team, a competitive threat, a merger, a desire to set a new growth agenda, the launch of an innovation, an oppor tunity to vitalize the brand�

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Norwegian Design Council “Our purpose is to promote the use of design as a strategic tool for innovation to achieve greater competitiveness and profitability in Norwegian business and industry”

Design Gym

“The Design Gym’s mission is to build a community of skilled problem solvers through a workshop-driven design thinking curriculum. We par tner with organizations to help them approach their problems in a new way by connecting their challenges with our community”

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INITIAL PROCESS Design Process Inner Ring Inspired by Dream In’s core values, the process of Studio 5 will be driven by the same 3 forces: DREAM, REALIZE and BELIEVE. The 3, although are arranged in an order, does not neccesarily have to be. Similarily as the 5 process steps, the driving forces can act in anyway, accordingly to each individual’s interpretation. The act of believing then branched out into Dreaming and Realising. These three elements not only appeared very “human” but most impor tantly motivational. In our view motivation is a dynamic movement, hence the circular design of the beginning of our design process. In order to progress we must continuously DREAM, BELIEVE and REALIZE.

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STUDIO 5 PROCESS Design Process Outer Ring While STUDIO 5 stands for structural problem solving, we also think it is impor tant to keep spiritual elements as our driving force. Thus, we began to brainstorm the structural elements of our process: the outer ring. After carefully examining the design process proposed by the Norwegian Design Council, we have agreed that Explore and Deliver would be impor tant elements in our design process as well. The Norwegian Design Council places these two steps at the ends of their design process, due to our circular structure; we thought that there was a step that was missing in-between. We came to the conclusion that EVALUATE would be the tying knot of exploring and delivering ideas. While delivering proposed ideas may seem like the ultimate goal, it is impor tant to constantly evaluate them to keep them relevant.

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Finally, to fill the middle steps of our design process we found inspiration through The Design Gym. The main element that has caught our attention was the IDEATE step. We thought that it was appropriate to place it right after our EXPLORE stage; it is only natural to try to come up with solutions after exploring a problem. Before delivering the solution, it must be refined to its most relevant potential. That is why we came up with REFINE, our final knot connecting the rest of our design process ring.


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E R O L XP IL EVE

REFI N E

DREA

M BE

DELIVER

UATE L A EV

L I Z A E E R

TE

E

IDE A

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DESCRIPTION Design Process

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Explore

E R O L P X

E

E LIEV

M BE

DELIVER Deliver

Envision alternatives and identifying potential ways of solving the problem and realizing goals.

REF I N E

UATE L A EV

REALIZE DREA

Evaluate Comprehensive analysis of the project to gage its overall value. Making sure that the project goals and strategy still correspond to the issues on an ongoing basis as things evolve.

IDE A TE

Gathering Facts and Feelings - Immersion in the facts and feelings that surround the design problem. Gathering insights from within the “world of the problem� to define the main issues of the problem.

Ideate

Refine Select the most feasible options and improving upon them. Making sure that the proposed solutions are effective and valuable.

Bringing the selected solutions to fruition and realizing intentions.

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INITIAL LOGOS Branding

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STUDIO 5 LOGO Branding

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LOGO STRUCTURE Branding

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1.

2.

3.

Structure

Levels

S5

As a strategic design firm, STUDIO 5 is ultimately concerned with structural approaches to problem solving. The most common approach is reflected through the five-step design process that is implemented in most of our projects. Fur thermore, the three dimensional aspect of the frame illustrates the depth and the volume of our approach.

STRUCTURE functions as a wire frame to our approach, but it does not mean that we do not think “outside of the box”. Instead we propose multiple layers of problem solving within the wire frame. This way we demonstrate flexibility as well as organization.

The optical illusion of the letter “S” and the number “5” smoothly tie together our value proposition as described in STRUCTURE and LEVELS, as well as successfully expressing the name STUDIO 5 in it’s minimalistic form.

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COLOR REASONING Branding

As a company, to continue to be open minded and ever embracing of new ideas and projects we decided to be as impar tial as possible in every aspect. This also translates and is reflected in our branding. To accomplish this, we chose to be monochromatic and allow every project to bring its own unique color.

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Public Services

Food

Transportation

Environment


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Energy

Health

Education

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INTERNATIONAL BLUE Branding

We are a design firm that believes in change, growth, and individuality. With that in mind we decided from the beginning that every project, every design, and every current issue we work on will need its own unique color. As a company we adapt and grow based on our clients needs and in this situation blue is the color that spoke to us. With the concept of technology driving this project we immediately saw the color blue, as it is internationally associated with technology and information. Digging deeper into our color theory we decided on a par ticular color blue‌ international blue. We are an international team dealing with a international issue there seemed to be no better match for Ar ticle 31.

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EXPLORE

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STUDIO 5 AND PROJECT

Studio 5 began this human rights project by exploring the United Nations along with the campaigns that it has pursued. By looking at the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the team finds loops holes that need to be updated due to the speed and capacitiy that the world is forwarding at. We hope that though empowerment of those around us, we know that each day will do a little better than the last. The earth will return to a balance of all those that depend on it.

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INITIAL SKETCHES Brainstorm Page 1

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INITIAL SKETCHES Brainstorm Page 2

After each producing over 40 sketches, the team clustered and narrowed down our topics. We find that many of our members have explored issues in developing countries such as Iran and Nor th Korea. However, after discussion, Studio 5 decides to work on a topic that will reflect in all countries and will affect every human being.

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COMBINED SKETCH Brainstorm

After the team’s clustering session, we combined all our brainstorming sessions into one sketch that summarized all. The team found that women’s rights, immigration rights and education rights were the 3 that we all focused on. We then integrated the 3 into 3 new topics: women’s right to travel, women’s education and amount of education received due to location and boarders.

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OVERVIEW Filtered Topics

Air Pollution

Education

Clean Water

Hunger

Women

Immigration Women’s Rights

Sex Trafficing

Travel

Prison

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Education


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Women’s Travel

Women’s Education

Information Access & Privacy

Education Abroad

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INTRODUCTION The United Nations

Information Access & Privacy

“The United Nations is an international organization founded in 1945 after the Second World War by 51 countries committed to maintaining international peace and security, developing friendly relations among nations and promoting social progress, better living standards and human rights. Today, it consists of 193 countries. The UN is made up of 4 depar tments dealing with the 4 main purposes. The United Nations four main purposes is: To keep peace throughout the world; To develop friendly relations among nations; To help nations work together to improve the lives of poor people, to conquer hunger, disease and illiteracy, and to encourage respect for each other’s rights and freedoms; To be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations to achieve these goals. The United Nation’s headquar ters are currently located in New York City.

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“All journalists, across all media, need to be able to do their jobs. When it is safe to speak, the whole world benefits.” - Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at World Press Freedom Day Event. New York, May 2 2013


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UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (UDHR) The United Nations

Information Access & Privacy The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948, par tly in response to the atrocities of World War II. Although it was a nonbinding solution, it is now considered to have acquired the force of international customary law which may be invoked in appropriate circumstances by national and other judiciaries. The UDHR urges member nations, including developing countries such as China and Iran, to promote a number of human, civil, economic and social rights, asser ting these rights as par t of the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.

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“Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home - so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world...� - Eleanor Roosevelt, first drafter of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights


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The Drafting Committee: Top row, from left: Dr. Charles Malik (Lebanon) Alexandre Bogomolov (USSR) Dr. Peng-chun Chang (China) Middle row, from left: RenĂŠ Cassin (France) Eleanor Roosevelt (US) Charles Dukes (United Kingdom) Bottom row, from left: William Hodgson (Australia) Hernan Santa Cruz (Chile) John P. Humphrey (Canada)

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UDHR RELATED ARTICLES The United Nations

Information Access & Privacy

After thoroughly revising all 30 ar ticles in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Studio 5 finds that only Ar ticle 12 and 26 can loosely tie to the issue of information censorship and privacy protection.

Ar ticle 1. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Ar ticle 2. Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set for th in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, proper ty, bir th or other status. Fur thermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty. Ar ticle 3. Everyone has the right to life, liber ty and security of person. Ar ticle 4. No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms. Ar ticle 5. No one shall be subjected to tor ture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Ar ticle 6. Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

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Ar ticle 7. All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination. Ar ticle 8. Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law. Ar ticle 9. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile. Ar ticle 10. Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impar tial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him. Ar ticle 11. (1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defense. (2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.


ARTICLE 31 Article 12. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honor and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks. Ar ticle 13. (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state. (2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country. Ar ticle 14. (1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution. (2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from nonpolitical crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations. Ar ticle 15. (1) Everyone has the right to a nationality. (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality. Ar ticle 16. (1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution. (2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses. (3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State. Ar ticle 17. (1) Everyone has the right to own proper ty alone as well as in association with others. (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his proper ty.

Ar ticle 18. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance. Ar ticle 19. Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impar t information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers. Ar ticle 20. (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association. (2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association. Ar ticle 21. (1) Everyone has the right to take par t in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives. (2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country. (3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections, which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures. Ar ticle 22. Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effor t and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality. Ar ticle 23. (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favorable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment. (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has

the right to equal pay for equal work. (3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favorable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection. (4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Ar ticle 27. (1) Everyone has the right freely to par ticipate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the ar ts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits. (2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or ar tistic production of which he is the author.

Ar ticle 24. Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Ar ticle 28. Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set for th in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Ar ticle 25. (1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and wellbeing of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control. (2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection. Article 26. (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. (3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Ar ticle 29. (1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible. (2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society. (3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations. Ar ticle 30. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set for th herein.

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PRIVACY LAWS & TECHNOLOGIES Information Access & Privacy

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1948

A timeline of evolution of privacy laws in the United States in accordance with emerging technologies.

Telephone

1890

1891 Radio

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Computer Networking

Computer

1897

1969

1927

Television


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Mobile 3G Networks

Internet

1983

2000

Social Media

2003

1978

1986

1994

2002

Law enforcement officials now must first obtain a warrant providing they have reason to believe a suspect is involved in terrorist activities.

It offers protection from unreasonable search and data transmission by emerging technologies such as e-mail, pagers and cell phones.

Requires telecommunications carriers design facilities to allow surveillance, if necessary by law enforcement.

President George Bush authorizes the National Security Agency to monitor international phone calls and e-mails without a warrant.

Landmark Surveillance Act

Eletronic Privacy Act

Assistance to Law Enforcement

Secret Wiretapping

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GLOBAL CASE STUDIES OVERVIEW Information Access & Privacy

Studio 5 found it necessary to research real case studies in countries in which these issues occur. Since problems regarding information accessibility can go both ways: excessive and unavailable, the team put together 2 case studies for each. We explored how citizens are denied information access in China and Iran, and found that many are even arrested for releasing cer tain types of comments over the Internet. Censorship and privacy invasion has been a ongoing and major issue in these two countries. On the other hand, developed countries such as the United States and Germany have “too much” access to the online world. Privacy over the web world seems almost impossible. Marketers often use personal information accessed through various sources to more accurately adver tise consumer goods to individuals. Moreover, there are many cases where people’s information is being monitored and released without their consent or awareness.

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China

The United States

Iran

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CHINA

Global Case Studies 1

Information Access & Privacy

“The authorities periodically detain and even jail Internet users for politically sensitive comments, such as calls for a multipar ty democracy or accusations of impropriety by local officials. Nowadays on the Internet there are very serious problems with citizens’ personal electronic information being recklessly collected, used without approval, illegally disclosed, and even traded and sold,” “China’s censors have begun blocking more foreign Web sites and, in recent weeks, have sharply stepped up the blocking of vir tual private networks, or VPNs. A VPN is a tool for encrypted computer communication that is widely used by businesses and individuals in China to protect against prying by the government and state-owned enterprises “Internet freedom means different things to different people. Given the expansion of Internet technology, it is understandable why a state like China, with the world’s largest population of Internet users, would resor t to censorship as a means to forestall the Internet’s harms. Instead of lavishing unrealistically high expectations for China, we should try to view the East through a broader framework than that of our own Western values.” Furthermore, it has encouraged entrepreneurship, creating the motive to problem-solve and find 54 | STUDIO 5.

alternatives for blocked websites such as Facebook and Google. The largest technology company in China, Tencent, was rated the 4th most innovative company in 2011 by Forbes. As a result, its CEO Ma Huateng has become the 4th richest man in China in just 10 years. Other examples follow such as Baidu, a search engine that was invented to replace Google.


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“The authorities periodically detain and even jail Internet users for politically sensitive comments, such as calls for a multipar ty democracy or accusations of impropriety by local officials. Nowadays on the Internet there are very serious problems with citizens’ personal electronic information being recklessly collected, used without approval, illegally disclosed, and even traded and sold.” - Li Fei, a deputy director of the committee’s legislative affairs panel

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CHINA VS. GOOGLE Global Case Studies 1 News Article Information Access & Privacy

Google has reluctantly conceded defeat in its latest effor t to combat online censorship in China, after a year of behind-the-scenes brinkmanship over sensitive search terms banned by authorities. The search company has quietly dropped a warning message shown to Chinese users when they search for politically sensitive phrases, after Beijing found new ways to cut them off from the web. Google and Chinese authorities have been involved in a tense game of catand-mouse over the issue since May last year, when the feature was unveiled by the US company in an attempt to improve search for Chinese citizens. The standoff came to a head in December, when Google finally decided to drop the feature because users were still being disconnected by Chinese authorities. A source in China said Google decided it was “counterproductive” to continue the technical dispute, despite several attempts to get around it. News that Google had dropped the warning message and an accompanying online help page emerged on Friday, when the censorship monitoring website 56 | STUDIO 5.

Great Fire published results of tests it had carried out on search in China. A Google spokesman confirmed it removed the notification features in December, but declined to comment further due to the sensitivity of the situation in China. Google explained in May last year, when it introduced the feature, that users in mainland China experienced connection issues when searching for phrases including “Yangtze River” and “Jiangsu Mobile”, a phone service. Within 24 hours of the feature being launched Chinese authorities disabled it. Days later, in June, Google modified how the notification would appear for users – but that too resulted in another block. In November, Google’s English-language and Chinese-language services were blocked for 24 hours as tensions stepped up. Google resolved to drop the notification features in early December after users continued to repor t problems for certain searches. Google has had a tense relationship with

China since 2006, when it first launched its search function in the country. The latest dispute comes amid a wider crackdown on Internet use in China. This includes fresh blockades on the use of “vir tual private networks”, which help people access the web anonymously. The ruling Communist par ty, led by Xi Jinping, last month announced moves to force internet users to fully identify themselves to service providers, raising fresh concerns about freedom of speech in the country. - Josh Halliday, theguardian, January 7 2013


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“If you have something you don’t want anybody to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it.” - Eric Schmidt

Google CEO December 15 2009

“The ruling Communist par ty, led by Xi Jinping, last month announced moves to force internet users to fully identify themselves to service providers, raising fresh concerns about freedom of speech in the country.” EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 57


SARAH ZHANG Global Case Studies 1 Persona Information Access & Privacy

Sarah a 22-year-old graduate student lives in the United States. She is going back to China to do some projects for school and also to visit her family. Before she leaves, she does some research on her topic for school so that she has enough information to work on when she gets to China. When Sarah arrives in China, she decides to and work on her homework, as she goes on the Google website, she cannot access the website at all. She realizes that the site is blocked. Sarah wonders why she can’t get on to Google or access any of her E-mails. She then remembers that the laws in America and the laws in China are very different. In America, Sarah is able to use the Internet to complete tasks whereas in China, she is very limited as to what she can do on the computer in general. Sara quickly learns that she has lost all access to information for the duration of her stay. Her situation doesn’t allow her to do anything remotely productive in regards to her schoolwork. Censorship in China is huge issue that Sarah has to deal with while she’s there, which creates a lot of frustrations and inactivity on her par t.

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“I had a major group project due while I was traveling but could not be in contact with my team over the internet because Gmail did not work. I was very frustrated and ended up costing me a lot of money to call them.”


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IRAN

Global Case Studies 2

Information Access & Privacy

Iranian government has monitored and censored the Internet for years, going as far as expressing its desire to create a “Halal Internet” for people inside the country. Iran monitors and censors the Internet out of fear, Abadpour said. The Iranian Internet, according to Reporters Without Borders (RSF), is not more political than in other countries, it’s just more closely watched. “Anything straying from the official line is automatically deemed to be ‘political’ and subject to filtering or surveillance,” RSF said. “Fashion, cuisine and music websites are often blocked just as opposition and independent news websites are. “Iran’s government censors and filters the Internet at least par tially out of fear of what the free spread of information could do to it, according to Arash Abadpour, an Iranian blogger currently based in Canada and a jury member for The Bobs. “The Iranian state is afraid of the Internet, and, therefore, they limit investment in the infrastructure,” he told DW. Abadpour called online censorship ‘a disease that needs to be operated on’ not rallied around. In a research repor t he released in March, Abadpour and co-author Collin Anderson wrote, “Journalists, social activists, political opponents and ordinary citizens are routinely arrested and tried under charges such as ‘undermining national 60 | STUDIO 5.

security’ and ‘disturbing the public order’ after speaking out against the status quo. “Tehran’s long history of pointing to the Internet as a source of crime and immorality could have associated it with evil activities in the minds of Iranian Internet users, Abadpour said, but added that a free Internet with no rules at all was also impossibility. “The point is to have reasonable control,” he said. “The discussion should be how reasonable a par ticular interpretation of ‘reasonable’ is.”


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“Journalists, social activists, political opponents and ordinary citizens are routinely arrested and tried under charges such as ‘undermining national security’ and ‘disturbing the public order’ after speaking out against the status quo.”

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JAFAR PANAHI’S ARREST Global Case Studies 2 News Article Information Access & Privacy

Jafar Panahi is an Iranian film director, screenwriter and film editor. He first achieved international recognition with his film The White Balloon that won the Caméra d’Or at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival. Panahi was quickly recognized as one of the most influential filmmakers in Iran and he continued to receive international acclaim from film theorists and critics and won numerous awards. His films often focus on the societal issues and hardships faced by children, the impoverished and women in Iran, and as such, the government often banned his films from being distributed in his own country. After a while the Iranian ministry of culture stopped approving permits for Panahi’s projects to bar him from making any more films. Panahi met this challenge by using a loophole in the strict Iranian guidelines which exempts films shot within the domicile of the creator from having to acquire permits and continued to work inside his apartment where he lived with his family. Despite the fact that he was technically abiding by the law, in the early morning hours of March 3rd 2009, plain-clothed security agents raided his home and arrested him along with his wife, daughter and 15 guests. Iranian authorities are notorious for keeping individuals under detention for 62 | STUDIO 5.

indefinite periods of time without and official charge or hearing date. Luckily in this case, Panahi’s son, Panah, who was not home at the time of the raid managed to evade the authorities and spread the word about his family’s situation by posting updates on social media and giving interviews for to online news outlets. He had to constantly change his location and use different computers to avoid being tracked by the government with his IP address. Awareness very rapidly built up and by the second day Panah’s posts constituted the entire front page of Balatarin (the Iranian version of Reddit). As a result, demonstrations were organized and pressured built up on the government for an answer. Consequently, the Iranian authorities were forced to release Panahi’s guests, wife, and daughter in little over 72 hours and clear them of all charges (though Jafar Panahi himself was officially charged with “assembly and colluding with the intention to commit crimes against the country’s national security and propaganda against the Islamic Republic” and kept at Evin prison). This is a great example of how Internet can positively impact and fur ther the cause of human rights, however incremental. Had Panah not had access to the internet to aler t the public about

the plight of his family, there is no way the authorities would have ever considered releasing Panahi’s family and guests after only 3 days and his case might very well be still in limbo like so many others’ in the past.


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“Despite the fact that he was technically abiding by the law, in the early morning hours of March 3rd 2009, plain-clothed security agents raided his home and arrested him along with his wife, daughter and 15 guests.” EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 63


PASHA IRANI

Global Case Studies 2 Persona Information Access & Privacy

Pasha was a 28-year-old blogger who graduated from the University of Tehran with an engineering degree back in 2008. After graduation, he was not able to find a suitable job in his field despite the fact that he was educated at a prestigious institution because the Iranian economy was in total disarray as a result of government’s mismanagement and international sanctions imposed on the regime. Instead he was forced to become a day laborer and part time taxi driver in order to pay the bills and barely get by. In 2009 he star ted writing a blog to vent about daily his frustrations with living under a regime that he viewed as being responsible for all of his misfor tunes in life. Shor tly afterwards the contested 2009 presidential election the fall out of which gave bir th to the “Green Opposition Movement” which he became an advent suppor ter of and his blog posts reflected this. Although he was an active blogger, he never really became a major figure in the Iranian political world or even cyberspace – maintaining a monthly readership of less than fifty. This did not stop the Iranian Cyber Police (FATA) from harassing him and sending him threatening emails. He moved his activities to Facebook (which is only accessible in Iran by using proxies and “anti-filter” programs) where he 64 | STUDIO 5.

assumed his posts would only be visible to a select few. Shortly after midnight on November 5th 2012, FATA and Revolutionary Guard forces raided the tiny South Tehran apar tment where Pasha lived with his mother ; they broke down the door, entered, grabbed Pasha and his computer, and left without any explanation. In the days that followed Pasha’s mother and family tried worked tirelessly to get an answer and after 3 days of numerous visits to various Police and Judicial institutions they were finally told that he was taken because of “actions against national security on social networks and Facebook” to the notorious Evin prison and no fur ther detail was given. A week later Pasha’s mother received a call from the prison, the person on the other end of the line simply said: “Buy a grave today and come collect his corpse tomorrow.” Pasha’s body and head showed clear signs of beatings and tor ture. Calls from international organizations and human rights organizations for explanation regarding the circumstances of Pasha’s death have gone unanswered.

“Iran’s government censors and filters the Internet at least par tially out of fear of what the free spread of information could do to it, according to Arash Abadpour, an Iranian blogger currently based in Canada and a jury member for The Bobs. “


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EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 65


GERMANY Global Case Studies 3

Information Access & Privacy

Traditionally Germany has taken strict stance on protection of data privacy. Online privacy rules enacted by the European Union in 1998 far exceed any such regulations in the US. Still, Germany is considered to be a pioneer when it comes to individuals’ data protection even among the European community. Germans’ serious approach in this arena, as compared to the rest of the Western world, has been attributed to the countries history and experiences during communist East Germany and the Third Reich when data was collected and abused by the regimes in order to persecute individuals and suppress any opposition. In 1970, the German state of Hesse passed the first data protection law in the world and submitted the first draft bill for a federal data protection act, which came into force 8 years later. Meanwhile the position of Federal Commissioner for Data Protection, an independent overseeing entity which monitors and controls data protection in public federal government positions, corporations, telecommunications, as well as postal service, was formed under the supervision of German Federal Ministry of the Interior in 1978. And finally in 1983, the Federal Constitutional Cour t of Germany proclaimed the “right to informational self-determination” as a 66 | STUDIO 5.

fundamental, basic right. Despite having such comprehensive laws on the books, Germany has fought and uphill battle in the recent decade in its attempt to safeguard the privacy in its citizen due to the rapid pace of the technological development in the telecommunications arena and the international, highly interconnected nature of internet giants. On April 24th 2013, Mr. Peter Schaar the current Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information declared: “Internet companies with headquar ters in the United States continue to collect comprehensive data in Germany and Europe, par tially in violation of local data protection laws. The data protection authorities of several European Member States cooperate in a joint initiative for the punishment of Google’s violations against European data protection regulations. Although an inspection of the services of Facebook by the Irish data protection authority has led to some improvements (such as turning off the facial recognition for all users from the European Member States) - many data protection issues remain unanswered yet.”


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“Although an inspection of the services of Facebook by the Irish data protection authority has led to some improvements (such as turning off the facial recognition for all users from the European Member States) - many data protection issues remain unanswered yet.� - Peter Schaar the current Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 67


GERMANY VS. FACEBOOK Global Case Studies 3 News Article Information Access & Privacy

As mentioned before, Internet companies have often tried their best to maneuver around and circumvent Germany’s data protection laws, a practice which has been made possible by a lack of comprehensive and consistent international regulations. No better case can illustrate the need for such regulations as clearly as the interactions between Facebook and the German government in the recent years. Germany’s confrontation with Facebook heated up over the company’s decision to star t sharing users’ personal details with third-par ty organizations in order for them to “better personalize their services to people” back in 2010; under the German Telemedia Act, a website must get a user’s permission before passing personal data to a third par ty for other purposes. While Facebook maintained that they did not have to abide by the German law because they were not in the country, Ilse Aigner, the German Consumer Protection Minister countered: “Facebook has up to 7 million users in Germany, it publishes its guidelines in German, and it’s clearly operating in the German market…it has to respect German privacy laws because it is doing business in Germany.” Over the years, this back and for th battle has raged on. In 2011, Schleswig-Holstein banned local organizations and companies from using Facebook’s “like” button, saying it leads to profiling that violates German and European law; and the same year Hamburg’s data protection authority ruled that Facebook’s facial recognition feature violated German privacy laws and asked for Facebook to 68 | STUDIO 5.

delete biometric profiles of people stored without their explicit consent. In April of 2013, A German privacy watchdog failed in its bid to stop Facebook from forcing users to register with their real names (Under German law, media services must offer users the choice of using a pseudonym). But a state appeals cour t has confirmed a lower tribunal’s ruling that German privacy laws don’t apply to Facebook because the social networking site has its European headquar ters in Ireland, where privacy rules are less stringent. In a statement responding to the verdict, Data Protection Commissioner Thilo Weicher t urged lawmakers to consider changing legislation to harmonize privacy laws across the European Union.

“Germany’s confrontation with Facebook heated up over the company’s decision to star t sharing users’ personal details with third-par ty organizations in order for them to ‘better personalize their services to people’ back in 2010.”


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“Privacy is dead.” - Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder and CEO of Facebook January 16 2010

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 69


WILL PETERSEN Global Case Studies 3 Persona Information Access & Privacy

Will is a college graduate who recently lost his job. Being a single twenty-seven year old he isn’t immediately stressed out about paying bills and suppor ting a family. Will has a spring break trip coming up with some college friends and decided to apply for a handful of jobs just before leaving. While on the trip they got into a bit of trouble with law enforcement and had to delay his coming home for a week. Because he was in a foreign country without his usual electronics to keep him up to date his friends and family back home became worried and began writing on his social media pages. Will is worried that because of all that is being said on his Facebook that his potential employers will discover it and not hire him. Will gets back to his homeland and has several voicemails asking him to come in for interviews. In the following days Will follows up and interviews and is offered several different positions. He feels very lucky that in his country they have such strict laws and regulations against employers viewing ones personal information even social media because otherwise he knows he probably wouldn’t have gotten a single offer.

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“He feels very lucky that in his country they have such strict laws and regulations against employers viewing ones personal information even social media because otherwise he knows he probably wouldn’t have gotten a single offer.”


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EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 71


THE UNITED STATES Global Case Studies 4

Information Access & Privacy

The United States has been considered the land of the free for quite some time and with that being said people really feel that they have many rights that others don’t. One of those rights being the access to information. Most citizens feel that if they want it they can find it – all information included. With platforms like Google, Bing, Facebook, LinkedIn, Yellow Pages, and more it really does seem like there isn’t anything or anyone America’s can’t access and that is right to an extent. If you get a speeding ticket or any type of misdemeanor and/or felony any other citizen can view your criminal record online… there seems to be no barrier. There are a few “loopholes” though. Now you may be able to hop on Google and search whatever you want that doesn’t mean that someone else isn’t watching you. After September 11th when our homeland was brutally attacked by terrorists America has stepped up in order to protect its citizens and their safety although some believe that is an invasion of their privacy. Today if you search bomb making on a server in United States the government is instantly tracking you. This is a part of their steps to ensuring your safety and stopping attacks on the country. But the thing is the information is still there – you are still allowed to view and learn 72 | STUDIO 5.

whatever you want there just might be someone on the other end watching you. The United States is information heavy, everyone wants to know what’s going on and what you are thinking and most citizens make it very easy to figure out. Some companies within the United States even go as far as scanning your phone as soon as you walk through the door (without you knowing). They do this to gather information on how they should market their product to you. The U.S has found many ways to access personal information for the good of the country. For example, NCTC, which stands for National Counter terrorism Center, examined ways in which they could access the government’s profiles for possible U.S citizens that possess criminal behavior. These files include flight records, Americans hosting foreignexchange students, and etc. It is also said that this agency can keep data on innocent U.S citizens and monitor any suspicious behavior for up to 5 years. All this information can be given to foreign governments as well. Some say that this is a violation of privacy and many have concerns for the government doing this as well. However, the U.S government sees this as an effor t to take precaution for protecting their citizens from any harm or danger.


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“NCTC, which stands for National Counterterrorism Center, examined ways in which they could access the government’s profiles for possible U.S citizens that possess criminal behavior.” EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 73


THE US VS. BAKED BY MELISSA Global Case Studies 4 News Article Information Access & Privacy

“You walk into a store and not only does the retailer know you’re there, it’s tracking the time you spent, which depar tments you browsed and what displays caused you to stop and linger. That’s the promise of retail-tracking star tup Nomi, which has scored $3 million in seed funding as it develops technology to monitor the activity of shoppers through their mobile phones. Nomi’s technology gathers mobiledevice IDs as people enter merchant locations through the merchant’s WiFi network or via small sensors that track a mobile device’s radio signals down to a one- to three-meter proximity. Nomi then uses machine learning to identify spatial relationships by crunching data on consumer footpaths. The system is already tracking such information at stores in New York City, such as teensy cupcake purveyor Baked By Melissa or modern-furniture merchant BoConcept. Baked By Melissa uses Nomi data to run A/B tests on its window displays, where it promotes bite-size cupcake flavors such as Chocolate Graham and Pink Velvet. The idea is to determine which displays result in higher windowconversion rates. Quick-serve salad restaurant Sweetgreen is using Nomi to track how long it takes customers’ orders to arrive. “Time spent 74 | STUDIO 5.

in-store vs. the number of seats is a very interesting metric,” said Jonathan Neman, founder and CEO of Sweetgreen, which has been using Nomi for nearly five months and has begun implementing it in all 16 of its Mid-Atlantic stores. New York-based Nomi is still small— its team numbers 15—but it’s focused on attracting large national chains and building staff to develop an upcoming offering that will tie consumer interactions in bricks-and-mor tar locations to e-commerce, loyalty-card information and other data. And the privacy implications? While the company stresses the unique device IDs it tracks are never tied to personally identifiable information, the system operates with little—if any—notification to consumers. There’s no notification on consumers’ phones that the tracking is occurring; rather, they are automatically opted in to being tracked. Stores can post notice, which Mr. Neman is considering for Sweetgreen. Nomi competes with a handful of firms using a variety of technologies to track people in-store, including RetailNext, which tracks consumer movement via data derived through video cameras, WiFi devices and other sources. Another mobile device tracking firm, Path Intelligence, attracted the ire of

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York when it was deployed at malls in 2011. Mr. Schumer sent a letter to the tracking firm suggesting it should require consent from device owners before tracking them. Malls in the U.S. that had tried the technology repor tedly ceased using it as a result. Whether mobile device ID data are considered personally-identifiable is subject to debate. However, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act does require that mobile application providers obtain parental consent when mobile apps aimed at kids under 13 track persistent device identifiers such as IP addresses and mobile device IDs. Nomi’s founders come with customerrelationship management and socialmedia marketing backgrounds. CEO Marc Ferrentino served as chief technical architect for Salesforce. Chief Revenue Officer Wesley Barrow and President Corey Capasso both hail from socialmarketing-analytics firm Buddy Media, which was acquired by Salesforce last year. The company is working on an optin only system called Engage that will allow consumers to identify themselves in exchange for deals. “It will give you the entire closed-loop experience,” said Mr. Ferrentino, connecting digital

interactions “with the footpath in the physical world.” The company is exploring how to help clients measure the impact of daily deals offerings through services such as Groupon and Living Social. It would track upticks in store traffic from new mobile devices and, more impor tant, whether the same device is tracked in the location again. In other words, did the offer merely bring an influx of new customers once or create potentially loyal repeat customers? The star tup’s seed round was provided by First Round Capital, Greycroft, and a variety of other VC firms and angels.”


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“You walk into a store and not only does the retailer know you’re there, it’s tracking the time you spent, which departments you browsed and what displays caused you to stop and linger.” EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 75


RACHEL SMITH Global Case Studies 4 Persona Information Access & Privacy

Rachel, a 19-year-old college student, likes to go to a bakery and get pastries every week. She goes to a small store on 14th street near Union Square called Baked by Melissa. This store has been getting great reviews from her friends. Rachel has been to this bakery a couple times before and likes the way they make their pastries. Whenever she goes into the store and waits for her order, she always ends up seeing ads on her phone later that week about things per taining to bakeries and related subjects. Rachel then begins to realize that maybe going to Baked by Melissa has something to do with this. Rachael does some research and finds that Baked by Melissa scans their customer’s phones to track their activities and see what they look at. They then market their findings to appeal to their customers. This angers Rachel because she feels as if her personal rights to her private information has been violated. Since Baked by Melissa scans their customer’s phones, this shows that it is a clear violation of a person’s right to personal information. This shows that they ignore their customer’s rights and monitor their information without their full knowledge. Rachel no longer feels safe going into Baked by Melissa and finds another bakery to go to that doesn’t violate her personal rights.

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“Whenever she goes into the store and waits for her order, she always ends up seeing ads on her phone later that week about things per taining to bakeries and related subjects. “


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EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 77


EXISTING SOLUTIONS OVERVIEW Information Access & Privacy

Having found evidence that the issue of censorship as well as privacy is severe is multiple countries, the team decided to find existing organizations or campaigns that dealt with these problems. Unfor tunately, we find that many cases were either inefficient or did not directly deal with information access and protection.

1. American Civil Liberties Union

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2. National Coalition Against Censorship

3. The Carter Center


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EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 79


AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION Existing Solution 1

Information Access & Privacy

ACLU stands for American Civil Liber ties Union. This union is striving to protect humans and enforce their basic rights. Such rights include the first amendment rights like freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and more. The rights we are focusing on are human’s right to privacy meaning the “freedom of unwarranted government intrusion into personal and private affairs.” As our team is trying to make Ar ticle 31 as accurate as possible, the presence of ACLU puts into perspective what Ar ticle 31 is trying to do. What the ACLU really does that stands out to us the most is the fact that they work to extend the basic rights to humans in other par ts of the world that have traditionally be denied their rights from the star t. The ACLU focuses on fair treatment for all humans.

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PROS

Focused on basic human rights. Believes in equality. Educates on basic human rights. Focuses on personal wrongs done against individuals. Keeps up with digital advancements in technology.

CONS

Too focused on one main aspect, which are human rights. Too focused on laws. Main focuses are too narrow. Focused on protecting human rights rather than focusing on making a change for the future. Needs to create more public awareness.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 81


NATIONAL COALITION AGAINST CENSORSHIP Existing Solution 2

Information Access & Privacy

NCAC stands for the National Coalition Against Censorship. This alliance of a 52 organization that is also dedicated to providing and protecting the freedom and rights to humans. In addition they provide services such as: Providing advocacy support to people and organizations dealing with incidents of censorship. Education and encouraging the public to fight such issues as censorship Repor ting and documenting censorship issues Creating public awareness Aiming to influence government opinions about censorship issues

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PROS

Consists of various organizations pertaining to problems. Active in their suppor t on censorship. Very public oriented on creating awareness. A very driven organization. Is targeting/influencing the government.

CONS

Approach to problems seems aggressive. Focused mainly on censorship Has a lot of organizations to track. Not research oriented. With 52 organizations, helping people can become less personal.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 83


CARTER CENTER Existing Solution 3

Information Access & Privacy

The Car ter Center is an organization set on alleviating human suffering by committing to the enforcement of human rights. They are a peaceful organization that strive to prevent and resolve conflicts as well as enhance the freedom of people. Unlike other organizations, this one is determined to provide information to people. They are also neutral which helps them to be amiable in cer tain situations as an organization. Other services for this organization include: Focusing on actions and creating results. Researching problematic areas and aimin g to fix them. Striving to come up with unique solutions instead of working off of existing ones. Tackles problems with the goal to change the future while still accepting possible failure. Aiming to provide the necessary skills, knowledge, and resources to people to better improve their lives and help in suppor ting human rights.

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PROS

Focused on results. Information/research driven. Non-aggressive. Suppor ting organizations rather than an “action” organization. More focused human rights/results than creating awareness.

CONS

Focused more on long-term goals rather than shor t-term goals. Doesn’t create much awareness. Neutral and doesn’t stick to a specific side. A lot of research, not enough action. Not focused enough on human rights.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 85


IDEATE

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ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 87


OPPORTUNITY Project Statement Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

The fact that the governments control access to information around the world is problematic when we consider the fact that there are less than 40 truly free countries around the world. The first and perhaps more obvious problem is censorship by repressive regimes that seek to keep any information they consider to be damaging from their citizens and deny them any real transparency. But the second, more insidious facet of the problem is the global citizenry’s loss of privacy due to antiquated laws that have consistently lagged behind the technological development. This has happened across the globe including what we consider to be the “free world”. To illustrate the depth of the problem when these issues are combined we can look at countries such as Iran. Iran has mixed high-technology techniques such as Web blocking with brute-force tactics such as mass imprisonment of journalists to control the flow of information. Organizations such as UNESCO and the Car ter foundation have tried to address some areas of this complex issue (mostly as it per tains to government transparency) for years. However the proposed conventions have received very limited suppor t by nations – only 12 countries have enacted modern “freedom of information” laws so far. Moreover, there are no universal charters or articles of human rights as of yet to outline basic principles and rights when it comes to information access/protection. Studio 5 seeks the oppor tunity to propose Ar ticle 31, that will address rights regarding access to information as well as one’s privacy, to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in order for the document to represent the progress of humanity.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 89


LOGO INSPIRATION Project Branding Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 91


INITIAL LOGOS Project Branding Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 93


FINAL LOGO Project Branding Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 95


PROJECT GOAL Design Criteria Article 31

Our ultimate goal is to accomplish getting Ar ticle 31 approved by the United Nations. We feel that there is a huge gap and that it is extremely necessary for this ar ticle to be put into play. We understand that this is a big goal and is going to take some time to be completed but we wont stop until we have accomplished what we are here to do. Through branding and extensive research and planning we feel this a goal that is within our reach its just a matter of time before Ar ticle 31 is a par t of not only our lives but the lives of everyone.

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ARTICLE 31

Reaching out to those who need to hear about how and why their information is being accessed. Spread awareness on how harmful it is to have personal information accessed. Spread awareness on how other countries are dealing with censorship. Create an avenue for government engagement in censorship and access to personal information. Provoke human emotion towards Article 31. Create solutions to improve privacy laws. Create more self involved community programs that encourage participation. Have Article 31 approved.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 97


OVERVIEW Expert

Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

Chen GuangCheng

Shahla Shafigh

Johannes Caspar

Shirin Ebadi EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 99


SHAHLA SHAFIGH Expert 1 Article 31

Shahla Shafiq is a researcher and author. Her publications are on intercultural issues, racism, political Islam and immigrants in France. Her doctoral disser tation in sociology is on political Islam, Sex, Gender and Society. Ms. Shafiq has written number of books and ar ticles in both Farsi and French. She is one of the founders of “International Network of Solidarity with Iranian Women”. We decided to contact Ms. Shafigh because we came across a very interesting profile of hers that had appeared in Irandokht Magazine and in which she had stressed the positive aspects of globalization, for instance the possibilities of world-wide networking for global issues over the internet. Around twenty years ago, Shahla Shafigh had to flee her native country: the guardians of the Iranian revolution had included her on their list of people to be arrested. Since then, the 49-yearold has been living in Paris, but she still feels as close to home as ever. Not because she lives in a world of nostalgia, but simply because her relationship to her homeland is no longer primarily dependent on where she happens to be located. In the age of electronic media, she can 100 | STUDIO 5.

achieve an imaginary presence in Iran whenever she wants to, visiting chat rooms to discuss the development of the Iranian student movement with her compatriots, or communicating with colleagues by email about Islamic feminism. Shahla Shafigh, who has a degree in sociology from the Sorbonne, describes her situation: Globalization makes it possible for these liberal and humane communities in any one country to communicate with similar groups in every country in the world, with those who are working towards a world of diversity and who are fighting against abuses of human rights. Shafigh remarks: “For such people, freedom means more than the freedom to consume. And when I write, I’m par ticipating very actively in the creation of this new world.” Shahla Shafigh’s writings include not just scholarly and academic works but two published collections of shor t stories, originally written in Persian. In her books, Shafigh attempts to put individual and national concerns into perspective by relating them to global themes. An awareness of belonging to one world permeates all her writings; and this awareness is what’s new about the current phase of globalization.


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“By engaging in discussion with my colleagues and my readers, I try to find solutions that lead neither to ethnocentrism nor to alienation from one’s roots,” Shafigh says. “It’s a process that’s subject to constant change. And in this process of global communication, change is the only thing you can rely on.”

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 101


CHEN GUANGCHENG Expert 2 Article 31

Blind at a young age, Chen is a selftaught lawyer. He is frequently referred to as the “barefoot lawyer”, advocating women’s rights, land rights, and the welfare of the poor. He is best known for exposing alleged abuses in official family-planning practices, often involving claims of violence and forced abor tions. Chen gained international recognition when he arranged a landmark classaction lawsuit against authorities in 2005. He was placed under house arrest in addition to multiple threats to his family by the government. After constant battle and being detained, Chen fled to the US embassy in 2012 and after negotiations with the Chinese government, he was granted visas to the US along with his wife and two children. However, “almost a year after the Chinese human rights advocate Chen Guangcheng made an audacious escape from detention in his home village, his family there remains under surveillance and his jailed nephew has said he was beaten and warned by officials not to challenge his conviction, Mr. Chen and his older brother say.” – Chris Buckley, The New York Times

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“The Chinese government has not been performing its obligation to maintain the fairness and justice of Chinese society. The power is basically in the hands of the elite, and it has been manipulated by them. The least the international society could be doing is to exer t more pressure on the Chinese government to make them deliver on whatever promises they have made to their people. The fundamental principles of fairness and justice- they don't have boundaries. They should be universal.� - Chen GuangCheng, during an interview with James Fallow, the Atlantic, October 26 2012

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 103


SHIRIN EBADI Expert 3 Article 31

Dr. Shirin Ebadi is an Iranian lawyer and human rights activist. She is the founder of Defenders of Human Rights Center in Iran, and in 2003 she became the first ever Iranian to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her relentless pioneering work for human rights and democracy. She has since been awarded a JPM Interfaith Award (2004), Légion d’honneur of the French Republic (2006), Rafto Prize (2011), and Friedmann Award (2012). She has also been given honorary doctorates by numerous universities from around the world, including one from The New School University in 2007. Before the Islamic revolution of 1979, Ebadi had been the first woman ever to become the president of the Tehran city cour t, and the first female judge in Iran. However, the conservative clerics who gained influence following the revolution insisted that Islam prohibits women from becoming judges and consequently Ebadi was demoted to a secretarial position at the branch where she had been previously presided over. She chose to leave her post and start a pro bono legal practice. Over the years, Ebadi and her practice became known for taking up cases of dissident figures who have fallen foul of the judiciary -the Nobel committee praised her for being “courageous person” who “has never heeded the threat to her own safety” in her quest for justice. She was 104 | STUDIO 5.

forced to leave the country following a series of threats and attacks that were made against her and her family in 2008 (following her declaration that she was going to defend the Baha’i religious community) and currently resides in London. Because of her extensive legal and scholarly work, not to mention her own personal narrative, we would be privilege to hear about her experiences both as a human rights activist as well as defender of other activists. Learning about the various cases Ebadi was involved in as a lawyer will help us gain a better understanding of the actual conditions and consequences on the ground for those who live under oppressive regimes. Moreover, her extensive insight into the workings of various human rights organizations, the UN, and the European Parliament will help us gage what would be realistic and achievable and aid in strategizing the game plan for our final solution.


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"Angrily, I am trying to write on the cement wall with the bottom of my spoon that we are born to suffer because we are born in the Third World," she wrote while in confinement.�

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 105


JOHANNES CASPAR Expert 4 Article 31

Professor Doctor Johannes Caspar was born in 1962 in Salzgitter, Germany. After his military service he star ted to study jurisprudence at the University of Göttingen where he received his doctor‘s degree in 1992. From 1995 to 1999 he was a research fellow at the University of Hamburg in environmental law. In 1999 he habilitated in constitutional and administrative law as well as in legal philosophy. Afterwards he worked for a while as a lawyer in Hamburg and Berlin until he took office at the German Institute for International Educational Research in Frankfur t am Main. There he worked from 2000 to 2002. From 2002 to 2009 he was deputy head of the research section of the state parliament of Schleswig-Holstein, a nor thern German state. In 2009 he was appointed as the Hamburg Comissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information. Caspar was the regulator who fined Google Inc. (GOOG), operator of the world’s largest Internet search engine, 145,000 euros ($189,230) for collecting wireless-network data by its cars taking photos for the Street View service. Google’s cars from 2008 to 2010 captured the data, including contents of e-mails, passwords, photos and chat protocols, Johannes Caspar said in an e- mailed statement. He had reopened 106 | STUDIO 5.

the probe after prosecutors dropped a related criminal case in 2013. “In my view, this is one of the biggest data protection rules violations known,” said Caspar. Google’s “internal control mechanisms must have severely failed.”


ARTICLE 31

“In my view, this is one of the biggest data protection rules violations known,” said Caspar. Google’s “internal control mechanisms must have severely failed.”

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REFINE

108 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 109


LAB OUTLINE Ideation Workshop Article 31

Studio 5 designs workshops that are specifically tailored towards each project that we take on. We believe that through the agency teamwork & discussion will we come up with the most sophisticated and thought-out campaigns. Tools such as ideation sheets, post-its and maps are often used to support our process.

1min 30sec

Where does information flow happen?

1min 30sec

Campaign channels.

1min 30sec

Who is involved.

To the left is the timeline of the workshop. Using I min 30 sec each to extract information from our designers in regards to where information flow happens, through what channels are campaigns communicated to the public and who can be involved in the final plan.

5min

Cluster and theme.

60min

Combine and ideate.

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ARTICLE 31

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LAB OUTCOME Ideation Workshop Article 31

After the workshop, Studio 5 came up with 3 plans through surveys, an exhibition and a phone app. We then fur ther developed the details and expanded to more platforms within each idea.

Online survey 112 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

Exhibition

Phone app EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 113


SYSTEM MAP Article 31

114 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

Name: Imagine In SIMULATION

Type: Online Tools: Computer Location: The New School

CAMPAIGN

Name: WATCHED EXPOSURE

Type: Exhibition Tools: Space/Scanners Location: The New Museum Name: TRACK

REINFORCE

Type: App Tools: Phone Location: Anywhere

STUDIO 5

EMPATHY

ARTICLE 31

PROPOSITION

THE UNITED NATIONS

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 115


DELIVER

116 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 117


CAMPAIGN STRATEGY Article 31

Our campaign will first simulate scenarios and create empathy for those who are denied their access to information. Studio 5 will then hold an exhibition that exposes the situation in developing countries where people’s information are being secretly collected and then used as marketing tool. Finally, our third platform will launch an app that ties the two cases together, reinforcing the impor tance of this issue, and recognizing it as a human right.

118 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

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IMAGINE IN ONLINE OUTREACH Campaign - Simulation Article 31

Function 1: Imposed Use Website Blockers without the user knowing, as they log on, they will realize that the usual sites (Facebook, Youtube, Google, Twitter, etc) will all be blocked or take forever to load. This will cause frustration. Team will observe from distance and approach when appropriate to education on the “impossible” access to information in other countries. Constellation is offered. Petition is offered. Awareness raised.

Function II: Voluntary Pop up survey when browser is opened: “Would you like surf the internet as if you were in XXX country?” List countries and then stimulate how information is censored in those areas. Let par ticipants surf as usual for as long as they want. Then ask if user would like to “Return to the US?” Close survey, educate, ask to sign petition.

Platforms: 1. Access App - “Where can I access what?” 2. Online - Facebook 3. Event/Installation: Set up computers/Pop ups 4. QR Code 5. University promotion using results

Context:

Field research with lab surveys and scenario simulation.

Goal:

Educate and raise awareness through empathy.

Channel:

Computer

Location:

The New School Lab

120 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

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IMAGINE IN INITIAL PROTOTYPE Campaign - Simulation Article 31

122 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

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IMAGINE IN RENDERED PROTOTYPE Campaign - Simulation Article 31

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ARTICLE 31

List of some prompts: try connecting with your friends read an online magazine browse a blog watch a video listen to music read the news play a game shop online

Access History: Access history displays the user’s attempts to access cer tain sites and doing cer tain activities to then reveal how much one is limited in cer tain countries due to government censorship.

Imagine: In Browser This specific browser looks like a regular internet brower, with the exception that it has been tweaked to simulate an activity that of the chosen country.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 125


WATCHED EXHIBITION Campaign - Exposure Article 31

A disclaimer will be signed before entering the space, indicating that no information will be released from this event. The viewer’s phone will then be unknowingly scanned. The space will first show of a store space and then change items accordingly to their preference. The maze will then show information more personal as the viewer walks deeper into the space. Finally, a curtain will fall that says “YOU’VE BEEN SCANNED.” and leading them to the finally exhibition room that introduces how marketers get information and how they use it to sell their products.

Platforms: 1. Vir tual App, similar to exhibition experience 2. Promotional video 3. Magazine/Websites (Event) 4. Graffiti 5. Bumper Stickers - “We’re watching you...” 6. Print 7. QR

Context:

Event that show how much information marketers can get through scanning your phone amongst other platforms..

Goal:

Educate that this issue happens everyday and everywhere without people knowing

Channel: Location:

126 | STUDIO 5.

Event/Exhibition The New Museum


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 127


WATCHED INITIAL PROTOTYPE Campaign - Exposure Article 31

128 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 129


WATCHED RENDERED PROTOTYPE Campaign - Exposure Article 31

1. Entrance & Hall

4. Distribution Room

Guest comes in and signs a consent form, meanwhile the scanners in the room extract information out of the guest’s mobile device. The guest then proceeds into the INFORMATION HALL. The hall is made up of white walls and projector screens. The screens will display the information that has been extracted from the guest’s mobile device.

After the REVEAL DOME the exhibit splits into three fur ther rooms that simulate what would happen to the information extracted in different situations. Such situations being Corporate, Political, Social.

2. End of Information Hall The deeper the guest walks into the hall the more personal the information displayed becomes. At the end of the INFORMATION HALL the guest will encounter a cur tain that will dramatically drop to expose the REVEAL DOME.

5. Talk To Exper ts The guest will have an oppor tunity to speak to some exper ts on the subject of extraction and security of information.

3. Reveal Dome

6. Safe Zone

Touching upon the idea of information transparency, REVEAL DOME is made out of glass that will project the words “YOU ARE BEING WATCHED”. The room inside the dome will display technology that is being used to extract information.

SAFE ZONE is an area where guests are reassured that their information is safe. The screen shows that the exhibits hard drive is empty. Drinks and treats are also available in this room, before exiting the exhibit.

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ARTICLE 31

2.

1.

5.

4.

6.

3.

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TRACK

Campaign - Reinforce Article 31

Part I: Information Graph Through choosing a category (Location, Service, Online, etc), user enters how often and which/what they use. The app will then show graphically how much of your private information is out in the public. A tab will also be offered to show how and where marketers use this information to sell.

Par t II: Global Web Surfing Choose from a list of informationcensored countries. Then with a list of questions, the game guides the user to the situation they would be in accordingly: in jail, house arrest, abused, threats to his/her family etc. At the end, there will be information about activist that have fun into these issues due to their cause. Petition: help them.

Platform: 1. All electronic devices (iPad/iPhone/android) 2. CNN - “Your Information, Their Profit� 3. Print - Posters/Brochures 4. Board game

Context:

App that educates invasion of privacy unknowingly and exposure of imprisoned activists in information-censored countries.

Goal:

Educate and raise awareness through fun and shock factor.

Channel:

Mobile Devices

Location:

Anywhere

132 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 133


TRACK INITIAL PROTOTYPE Campaign - Reinforce Article 31

134 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 135


TRACK RENDERED PROTOTYPE Campaign - Reinforce Article 31

TRACK mobile application has 3 main functions. 1. Is to inform the user about the problem of lack of information protection by means of an interactive game 2. Is to educate the user by means of providing specific information on the subject matter 3. Is to engage the user to take action regarding the problem.

Taking into account that TRACK is targeting the idea of privacy, the interactive aspect of the game is meant to trigger emotional feedback. The game has the capacity to be customized in terms of what applications each specific user utilizes on a daily basis.

136 | STUDIO 5.

These applications can be chosen from a BANK found on the top left corner that slides out as a sidebar. Up to 25 applications can be selected. The user furthermore is able to toggle the slide bar on the bottom to customize the duration of the activity of each app selected. With each selection TRACK calculates how much information is released and translates it into a situation that is likely to happen if an outside par ty accesses this information.


ARTICLE 31

Clicking LEARN will take the user to a list of real life ar ticles related to the situations computed by TRACK in the PLAY section based on the user’s unique experience.

TAKE ACTION! Section identifies specific activists that work with the specific situations related to earlier game play by the user. Everything in the end ties in with the problem of online privacy.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 137


PROPOSITION PROCESS The United Nations Article 31

Sukehiro Hasegawa who is a member of the United Nations, later became the humanitarian coordinator in Rwanda. He was also was appointed as the Director of Policy and Planning of the United Nations peacekeeping operation in Somalia. Another member of the United Nations is Mar tin Scheinin who has been working on human rights issues since 1997. He was a member of the United Nations Human Rights Committee, and was an special rappor teur on human rights and counter-terrorism as well. We believe that reaching out to these par ticular people would be beneficial to our company because these people are the ones who have seen the hardships of delivering equality for humanity. Each is familiar with international issues surrounding people in other par ts of the world as well as here in the United States. This makes it easier for us to differentiate and pin point specific

138 | STUDIO 5.

problems that Ar ticle 31 will eventually solve. With their help and advice, our company can get the recognition it needs to complete Ar ticle 31.


ARTICLE 31

Name: Imagine In SIMULATION

Type: Online Tools: Computer Location: The New School

CAMPAIGN

Name: WATCHED EXPOSURE

Type: Exhibition Tools: Space/Scanners Location: The New Museum Name: TRACK

REINFORCE

Type: App Tools: Phone Location: Anywhere

STUDIO 5

EMPATHY

ARTICLE 31

PROPOSITION

THE UNITED NATIONS

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ARTICLE 31

The Right to Digital Privacy and Information Access

140 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

(1) Everyone has the right to access information that is transparent and true to facts; this right includes freedom to access the Internet and to seek, receive and impar t information and ideas through the web regardless of frontiers. (2) All individuals are entitled to the privacy of their own information, which shall not be subjected to undue interference and collection by any individual, organization, or government; this right includes the data generated by their activity on the Internet

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 141


EVALUATE

142 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 143


PROJECT GOALS Evaluation Article 31

144 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

Reaching out to those who need to hear about how and why their information is being accessed. Spread awareness on how harmful it is to have personal information accessed. Spread awareness on how other countries are dealing with censorship. Create an avenue for government engagement in censorship and access to personal information. Provoke human emotion towards Article 31. Create solutions to improve privacy laws. Create more self involved community programs that encourage participation. Have Article 31 approved.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 145


THE NEXT STEP Evaluation Article 31

Ai Weiwei is an internationally renowned artist and activist. As a child, he witnessed his father being exiled under counterrevolutionary charges during the Cultural Revolution. Ai moved to New York City in 1981 and was highly inspired by the political activities happening there. As Beijing became an intensely productive activity in ar t in the early 90s, Ai returned to China. As his ar t practices took off, so did his political actions. Since then, Ai WeiWei has been arrested on multiple occasions due to his activities and publicly speaking his opinions about the government. In October 2011, a UK art magazine named Ai number one in their annual Power 100 list. The decision was criticized by the Chinese authorities stating that, “China had many ar tists who had sufficient ability. We feel that a selection that is based purely on a political bias and perspective has violated the objectives of the magazine.�

146 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

Studio 5 aims to collaborate with Ai Weiwei on an exhibition together in the future. As a result, the team hopes to exercise his ar tistic skills and public figure to fur ther promote the impor tance of Ar ticle 31 to the public.

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 147


THE FUTURE Article 31

148 | STUDIO 5.


ARTICLE 31

EXPLORE | IDEATE | REFINE | DELIVER | EVALUATE | 149


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ages/carousel/UDHR60symbol_b.gif

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https://www.aclunc.org/news/press_releases/aclu_named_sf_pride_2012_community_organization_grand_ marshal.shtml http://www.cartercenter.org/news/features/p/democracy/south-sudan-democratic-foundations.html http://blog.cartercenter.org/2011/05/16/liberian-students-making-history-and-making-a-difference-in-mentalhealth/ http://www.slj.com/2012/11/events/ellen-hopkins-phyllis-reynolds-naylor-and-chris-finan-are-honored-fortheir-roles-battling-literary-censorship/ http://www.aclu.org/about-aclu-0 http://www.ncac.org/what-we-do http://www.thefileroom.org/documents/AntiC.html http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324478304578171623040640006.html http://epic.org/privacy/terrorism/usapatriot/ http://www.cartercenter.org/about/index.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:United_Nations_Human_Rights_Committee_members http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/bl_history_of_communication.htm http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/communications-technology-timeline http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=114250943 http://www.onlineprivacyconference.eu/johannes-caspar/ http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/04/technology/germany-investigates-facebook-tagging.html?_r=0 http://www.dw.de/facebook-violates-german-law-hamburg-data-protection-official-says/a-15290120 http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/technology/germany-stands-firm-on-internet-privacy-59985.html http://s1.djyimg.com/i6/1205021701381657.jpg http://soundofhope.org/news_images/2012/5/3/355.jpg http://www.isunaffairs.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2005cgc1.jpg



Studio5: Article 31, International Human Rights