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CHRISTINE M. KIM DESIGN & MANAGEMENT PORTFOLIO


hello!

Tr a v e l i n g , f o o d , u n d e r s t a n d i n g p e o p l e , a n d p h o t o g r a p h y. I have always been incredibly curious and interested in people. Where they were going, what they were thinking, and what they w e r e d o i n g ? . G r o w i n g u p i n H o u s t o n , Te x a s , I a lway s k n e w t h e r e wa s s o m e t h i n g m o r e f o r m e . A t 1 8 I m o v e d t o N e w Yo r k , o n e o f t h e b e s t decisions of my life; here I was inspired, motivated, and became even more passionate about learning about people and different cultures. Wh e n I wa s 2 0 , I d e c i d e d t o m ove t o Pa r i s f o r a ye a r - u n d o u b t ly t h e b e s t d e c i s i o n o f my l i f e . I n Pa r i s , I d i s cove re d my l ove f o r l e a r n i n g languages, cultural understanding, seeing the world, being a global c i t i z e n , a n d p h o t o g r a p h y.

I spent the year studying , learning French,

and making connections around the world. I’m adventurous and love a challenge. Highly adaptable, improvise, self-reliant, and independent. Ve r y i n t e r e s t e d i n c u l t u r a l u n d e r s t a n d i n g . O v e r c a m e e t h n o c e n t r i c


TABLE of CON TE N TS

WORK EXPERIENCE

F O O D & C U LT U R E

8 R U E C A F FA R E L L I

SPREAD KNOWLEDGE


ILLUSTRATIONS

WORK EXPERIENCE THE JEWELS OF NEW YORK FRANK’S GRILL PARSONS FASHION SHOW PR CONSULTING

SPREAD KNOWLEDGE FOOD & CULTURE FRENCH STUDIES GRAPHIC DESIGN WORK EXPERIENCE


1

WO R K experience Through my internships in marketing, public relations, creative project management, event production, social m e d i a , a n d p h o t o g r a p h y, I h a v e g a i n e d experience in communication


The J E W E L S of N E W YO R K

T h e J e w e l s o f N e w Yo r k i s a f o o d s t y l i n g

cookbook,

studio that focuses on catering events,

and locations for photoshoots, recipe

recipe consultation for magazines, and

development and RESEARCH. Day to

food styling, with clients such as Bon

day projects as the studio assistant

Appetit , West Elm , MAC Cosmetics, and

and

Food

of

and Wine

cookbook

will

magazine. be

Their in

in-house

SPONSORSHIP

photographer

extensive

research

in

the

food

world,

interacting

A s i n t e r n a n d a s s i s t a n t t o t h e own e r,

social

media,

I have maintained their WEBSITE and

and schedules, creating web content,

BLOG,

photographing

PHOTOGRAPHY

and

all written content. My responsibilities i n c l u d e P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S a n d S O C I A L MEDIA ,

developing

R E L AT I O N S H I P S

GRAPHIC

with

consist

2013.

including

published

first

acquiring

clients

ORGANIZING recipes

DESIGN,

and

and

via

events events,

facilitating

the daily activities of the studio. Diana

Ye n ,

own e r,

describes

my

with clients and other businesses for

best assets as organization , project

collaboration,

management,

EVENT

PRODUCTION,

creating the BUDGET expenses for the

strong

attention

detail, and public relations.

to


http://www.flickr.com/photos/ mollyblock/6082702407/


FRANK’S GRILL

Lo c a t e d i n H o u s t o n , Te x a s , Fra n k ’s G r i l l i s a popular chain of six diners serving breakfast and lunch foods. Since 1994, they have done zero advertising, and instead are known primarily through word of mouth. Without any public relations or marketing intiatives in their 12 years of business, Frank’s Grill asked me to step

SOCIAL MEDIA, PUBLIC R E L AT I O N S, a n d c o n s u l t o n B R A N D I N G in. I manage their i d e n t i t y.

As

their

responsiblities menu, food

also

marketing include

m a n a g e r,

revamping

PHOTOGRAPHY.

my their

Cu r re n t ly we

are in the process of creating a website under my direction.


PR CONSULTING

M a n a g i n g cl i e n t s i n cl u d i n g Pro e n z a S ch o u l e r, D r i e s Va n N o t e n , Ve r s a c e , a n d N i n a R i c c i , P R Consulting

PUBLIC As

an

BRAND development and R E L AT I O N S f i r m i n N e w Yo r k . is

intern

a

in

the

fashion

closet,

I

was

responsible for sample trafficking and shipping, monitoring media placement, assembling press kits,

ORGANIZING

assisted

with

special

the fashion closet, and

EVENTS

and

general

administrative tasks. My time at PR Consulting

FA S T PAC E D , M U LT I TA S K I N G

gave me the ability to work in a stressful environment while

a n d m a n a g i n g m y t i m e e f f i c i e n t l y.


Don Brodie


“A n e x t r a s p e c i a l t h a n k s t o M a r y a n n e G r i s z ’ s A A S Fa s h i o n Marketing students for all of their work in planning and running t h e s h o w. ” - PA R S O N S

PA R S O N S FA S H I O N PRESENTATION

Wi t h a t e a m o f s t u d e n t s , I o rg a n i z e d Pa r s o n s Th e New School for Design fashion presentation, “Reuse, Recycle, Recontruct” -- an installation of ecologically and socially conscious designs created by fashion design students. The event was a success with a huge turnout, and due to o u r p re s s e f f o r t s , wa s cove re d by Tre e h u g g e r and

attended

by

prominent

people

in

the

f a s h i o n i n d u s t r y. My role as head of the

PRESS

committee was

to compile the guest list, maintain the RSVP list,

and

acquire

SPONSORSHIP

the

DESIGN and the O R G A N I Z AT I O N a n d E X E C U T I O N

event. I also aided in set overall

for

of the presentation.


March 2, 2010 To Whom It May Concern: I have known Christine Kim for two academic terms, when she was a student of mine in several classes I taught at Parsons school of design. I found Christine to contribute much to class discussion, and add thoughtful comments that were very constructive. She also turned in thoughtfully written assignments on ethnographic methods, and interpreted class reading assignments with much insight. She is very bright, capable, responsible, and enthusiastic in all her endeavors. I am sure she will succeed in whatever she sets her mind to, and for this reason, I am happy to recommend her. Please call me if you have any questions or wish for further information. Sincerely, Timothy Malefyt Vice President Director of Cultural Discoveries BBDO NY 1285 Avenue of the Americas NY, NY 10019 (212) 459-6214

BBDO New York, 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019 T. 212-459-5000 F. 212-459-6645


2

FOOD and CULTURE Inspired by my time spent living in France, my curiosity of other cultures, traveling, and love for food, I conducted an ethnography study on French expats l i v i n g i n N e w Yo r k . M y g o a l w a s t o d i s c o v e r h o w t h e i r lives and identities change through food and migration. Through interviews, fieldwork, and in depth research, I used food as an interpretive lens to understand the cultural and social aspects of migration, adaptation, and communication.


V I RT UAL ethnography phase 1: the online presence The first phase explores how the French discuss its traditional ingredients, dishes, and social occasions over the Internet: social networks, blogs, and recipe websites. In addition to the French, I was also interested in finding out how outsiders view French foods and ingredients.


“The class, ref inement, and exquisite taste found in Fr a n c e . . . a r e t h i n g s o n l y A m e r i c a c a n d r e a m a b o u t . I t ’ s c a l l e d c u l t u r e ! T h e c u l t u r e i s a n e x t e n s i o n o f t h a t .”

The first phase of my ethnography

food.

N e w Yo r k e r s

study was to see how French expats

with

guilt

discuss and represent their food and

the

culture through the Internet, from

p l e a s u r e o f f o o d . 2 ) To o u t s i d e r s ,

social network sites, to blogs, to

French food has an elitist, inclusive

recipe websites. I focused on blogs

image. 3) Outsiders and the French

and

hold the idea that French food is

restaurant

review

sites

like

French

and only

associate

obsession,

food while

experience

the

Ye l p . B e c a u s e I s p e a k F r e n c h , i t w a s

a

extremely helpful to read blogs and

4) Outsiders correlate French food

comments on blog posts written in

with a high social status and their

French and in English. I discovered

perceptions of French food parallel

three main points from my virtual

the

ethnography - 1) The French have a completely different outlook on

sensual,

full

stereotypes

body

of

culture.

experience.

the

French


Adam Goldberg


F R E NC H cuisine A m y T h o m a s , a N e w Yo r k e r a n d w r i t e r

with a hint of lemon) is “delightfully rich

living

post

yet delicate–and remarkably simple but

their

perfect when done right. All that I love

in

comparing

Pa r i s ,

wrote

American

a

blog

desserts

to

Fre n ch co u n t e r p a r t s f o r a Pa r i s ce n t r i c

about French pastr y!”

blog . Thomas describes a French moelleux

a l o n g w i t h t h e wr i t e r, p e rce ive s Fre n ch

a s a “ h a u t e d e s s e r t ,”

desserts

while an American

to

be

about

Th i s co m m e n t e r, subtlety, an d grace;

dessert is a “snack that can be dunked in

t h e r e i s b e a u t y i n s i m p l i c i t y, j u s t l i k e t h e

m i l k w i t h y o u r f i n g e r s .”

French culture.

French food can be seen as exclusive, only

Words

privy to certain classes who want “fancy”

and “class” are continuously used when

f o o d . I t i s not a we lcom ing cu isine o p e n t o

outsiders

everyone, mirroring the stereotype of the

Because food is representative of who you

F r e n c h , k n o w n a s s n o b b y, c l o s e d o f f , a n d

are, perhaps some enthusiasts of French

pretentious.

food are interested in being the image it

Christine,

a

re a d e r,

Madeleine

(a

light

exclaims

sponge

cake

that

a

cookie

like

“ r e f i n e m e n t ,”

speak

about

“dignified”

French

food.

portrays – a person who is cultured, and dignified with high social status.


AMERICAN c uis ine When Amy Thomas describes the American doughnut to her readers, it soundsbold, in your face, abrasive, and something that begs to be noticed, akin to the American culture. She says, “If you’re French and p r e f e r m o r n i n g s t o b e a l i t t l e l e s s o b s c e n e ,” a n d y o u would prefer a light, delicate brioche to a fried donut. In an article American food critic Alexander Lobrano wr i t e s a b o u t h i s f avo r i t e f o o d s i n Pa r i s , o n e re a d e r says that in the U.S., “equality is being able to dine without dressing up, no matter your social situation o r a t t i r e a n d n o t h a v i n g t o b e j u d g e d .” have

the

recurring

idea

that

eating

Again we

French

food

isn’t something anyone can participate in. American food on the other hand, is comforting, welcoming to anyone, and something you can happily eat with your fingers. French food is only for the cultured, more elite classes, so the average Joe will feel out of place.


THE OBSESSION WITH FOOD A French expat’s changing lifestyle

Garance Doré, a French fashion photographer

From my research I concluded that the New

w h o r e c e n t l y m o v e d t o N e w Yo r k , d e s c r i b e s

Yo r k

the changes in her lifestyle and eating habits

relationship with food because they want to go

on her blog post, “Changing Lifestyle, New

along with social norms, eat out like everyone

Yo r k

else,

Skinny

vs.

Pa r i s

S k i n n y.”

With

the

lifestyle

and

changes

enjoy

the

the

c i t y,

French

but

this

expat’s

in

turn

change in portion sizes (“BIG!” she exclaims),

inf luences them to change their eating habits

frequently eating out, the growth hormones

and obsess about everything that passes their

i n m e a t a n d d a i r y, a p o p u l a r a n o r e x i c b o d y

lips. When you know so much about your food,

s i z e s h e p e g s a s “ N e w Yo r k S k i n n y , ” a n d N e w

it takes away from the innate, simple, bodily

Yo r k e r s ’ o b s e s s i o n s w i t h e x e r c i s i n g a n d w h a t

pleasure

they eat, Doré describes her frustration and

intellectual act. both outsiders and the French

how her relationship with food has changed

think that eating French food is a sensual,

d r a m a t i c a l l y.

After

seeing

how

strict

of

eating

it

and

turns

it

into

an

New

full body experience that can be compared

Yo r k e r s a r e w i t h t h e i r b o d i e s , e x e r c i s i n g , a n d

to a religious experience. both outsiders and

judging every single thing that entered their

the French think that eating French food is

lips, she too “developed a horrible thing…self

a sensual, full body experience that can be

l o a t h i n g .” D o r é d e c i d e s t o s t o p t h i s “ g a m e ,”

compared to a religious experience.

t o b e h a p p y w i t h h e r “ m u f f i n t o p ,” a n d e n j o y eating again.


t h e BAGUETTE phase 2: tracing the history of an ingredient

In the second phase, I selected a traditional ingredient in French culture and cuisine - the baguette. I researched its origin, its trade f lows, and its distribution, and explored how baguettes are marketed, packaged, and sold in the US. This research led me to further understand the perception of French food in the US, and why the baguette is such an essential part of French


A SOCIAL BIOGRAPHY OF FRENCH BREAD

The

baguette

of

French

is

complete

is

an

culture

and to a

were

everything

grains, their

from

life,

no

part meal

bread.

to below 150 grams. Because of the loss

of

quality

in

French

bread,

In

artisan bakers come together to try

food

to save their French tradition. In

extremely

scarce,

1993, the government enacted a law

revolved

around

stating that baguettes de tradition

organization

“must be mixed, kneaded, leavened

France,

social

i d e o l o g y,

n e c e s s i t y.

and

without

Pre-Revolutionary supplies

integral

Since

so

bread

then,

industrialization,

was

modern and

the

and

baked

on

premises,

without

ever being frozen. They must also be

additive-free

and

can

contain

American inf luence on France have

o n l y… w h e a t f l o u r, w a t e r, s a l t a n d

contributed to the loss of quality

y e a s t .” T h o u g h b r e a d c o n s u m p t i o n

in French bread, followed by the

is just a fraction of what it used to

general lack of interest, and reduced

be, it is still a part of daily French

consumption. In Pre-Revolutionary

life, stemming from France’s crucial

France people ate around 900 grams

reliance on bread to survive in Pre-

o f b r e a d p e r d a y, b u t a t t h e e n d o f

Revolutionary times.

the 1990s, consumption was down


CAROL GILLOTT


HOW IS FRENCH FOOD MARKETED?

To c o u n t e r t h e Fr e n c h p e o p l e s ’ l a c k

h o n e s t y, v i r t u e , p e r f o r m a n c e ,” a n d

of interest and distrust in the quality

comforts us.

o f Fre n ch b re a d s i n ce Wo rl d Wa r I ,

French bread is a way for the French

baguettes

to connect with their heritage and

are

marketed

similarly

in the U.S. and France, focusing on

reaffirm

“tradition” and “authenticity” and

good, “traditionally made” French

“ancient methods” of bread making

bread

can

to invoke feelings of nostalgia and

back

to

the happiness and simplicity of the

childhood.

“ g o o d o l d d a y s .” I n F r a n c e , b a g u e t t e s

bakers

de

giant, industrialized bakeries and

tradition

are

sold

in

paper

their

i d e n t i t y.

bring the

French

comfort

Even

have

a

to

Eating person

of

their

though

artisan

compete

against

sleeves that have information about

supermarkets,

the traditional methods they use,

to

market

the region they base their methods

as

an

on,

“ a r t i s a n a l ,”

s t r u g g l e t o s t a y a l i v e ( K a p l a n ) .” A

“ Fr e n c h t ra d i t i o n ,” a n d “ i n t h e o l d

prime example of marketing to the

s t y l e .” T h e f o n t i s u s u a l l y a c h a r m i n g

nostalgic customer can be seen

using

words

like

they

this

“effective

continue

traditional weapon

their

For

sleeves

These

also marketed to the consumer who

positive

wants to show they are privileged

words images

bucolic

make like

us

q u a l i t y.

think

“ s o l i d i t y,

of

r e l i a b i l i t y,

French

in

image

cursive font that gives the paper a

Americans,

can

and cultured.

bread

is


COBBLE HILL, B R O O K LY N


C O B B LE hill phase 3: the neighborhood

Cobble Hill, a charming neighborhood in Brooklyn, is home to over 3000 French expats t h e l a r g e s t F r e n c h p o p u l a t i o n i n N e w Yo r k . I n t h e final phase of my project, I wanted to understand what brought the French to Cobble Hill, what food is available to them, and how they are able to recreate traditions and social occasions surrounding food in their new home. Combining m y l o v e f o r p h o t o g r a p h y w i t h m y c u r i o s i t y, I decided to use my camera to discover Cobble Hill, k n o w n a s t h e L i t t l e P a r i s o f N e w Yo r k .


WHAT ATTRACTS THE FRENCH TO COBBBLE HILL?

With

a

public

a

Italian butcher shop. Just because

French and English dual language

they ’re not in France doesn’t mean

program, French expats are naturally

they’ll miss the long awaited arrival

drawn

of the new Beaujolais when there

to

school

this

offering

neighborhood.

Furthermore, Cobble Hill offers the

are crates at every wine store.

ability to feel at home in a foreign

To

city

French bistro experience, they can

with

easy

access

to

familiar

enjoy

lively

and socializing with other French

transporting

expats. They might not even miss

home with walls covered in antique

food

French

when

they

are

French

signs,

the

expats aromatic

back waft

of

s i p p i n g Pa s t i s n e x t t o yo u a t t h e

diverse,

high

quality food, and perhaps even the

b a r.

discovery

restaurants

of

American

processed

Bar

Ta b a c in

and

Street,

of

h e a l t h y,

frits,

Smith

happily distracted by the abundance fresh,

steak

on

convivial

visit

home

Ta b a c

and

French food, shopping experiences,

back

Bar

a

Francophones

and

other

French

the

neighborhood

foods lining the walls of every deli.

ser ve as meeting points for French

French expats have access to almost

e x p a t s t o s o c i a l i z e - i n t h e s u m m e r,

everything

thousands gather on Smith Street

home,

that

from

reminds

the

them

of

quintessential

to

celebrate

France’s

Independence

pain

pétanque, a beloved national game.

au

chocolats

at

the

French

b a ke r y B i e n Cu i t , t o s a u c i s s o n a t t h e

day

National

Bonne Maman jam at the deli, to

and

play


t h e interview phase 4: Marie Christine Masse

Marie Christine is a French teacher who has been l i v i n g i n N e w Yo r k f o r 1 7 y e a r s . A f t e r g r o w i n g u p i n a s m a l l v i l l a g e n e a r To u l o u s e , s h e m o v e d t o N e w Yo r k . T h r o u g h a n i n d e p t h i n t e r v i e w , I d i s c o v e r e d that her lifestyle has changed drastically because she moved from a peaceful, idyllic village in the south of France, to a huge, cosmopolitan, fast paced city in the U.S. This busy lifestyle has c h a n g e d h e r l e i s u r e l y, f r e s h m e a l s t o q u i c k , o n the go meals. From her food maps she drew of her h o m e i n F r a n c e , a n d N e w Yo r k , I f o u n d t h a t e v e n though Marie has lived in the U.S. for 17 years, she still has more memories and feelings connected to h e r h o m e i n F r a n c e . I n N e w Yo r k s h e r a r e l y c o o k s French food because exact substitutes are difficult to find, the taste and quality of products in the U.S. are poor compared to those in France, and the F r e n c h m e a l s s h e m a k e s “ n e v e r h a v e t h e s a m e t a s t e .” Most of what Marie cooks revolves around her daughter who grew up in the U.S., refuses to speak French, and feels completely American and wants to eat what her friends eat. Now when Marie cooks French food, it’s an event and a way to connect her t o h e r f a m i l y, m e m o r i e s , a n d r e a f f i r m s h e r i d e n t i t y as a French woman.


2

8 rue caffarelli Trave l i s a h u g e p a r t o f my l i f e a n d I d o cu m e n t my travels on my photography blog, 8 rue caffarelli, my f o r m e r a d d re s s i n Pa r i s . I c re a t e d t h e b ra n d i n g , l o g o, and postcard handouts for my blog. My work has been featured on various design blogs, including Design For M a n k i n d a n d T h e J e w e l s o f N e w Yo r k .


1

S P R E A D knowledge After the devastating earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010, our Design Development class was eager to help. With support of the Red Cross and our Professor Robert Rabinovitz, our team created a system that enables the children of Haiti to receive a solid education making it easier for them to enter back into a regulated lifestyle. This section illustrates our design process, and explains our concept of connecting students in private high schools with the Intertnational Baccaleuareate program to children in Haiti.

Te a m m e m b e r s - R a s h i Tu l s h y a n a n d A n n e Sophie Goetz


AC C E PTI N G the situation phase 1

In the first phase of the design process our goal is to accept the situation. This involves intensive research skills in order to find all the facts surrounding the earthquake and how the Haitians were affected.


ANALYSIS We worked to analyze the situation through images, facts, statistics, research, and the latest news. Using our research skills, we were able to develop a deep understanding of Haiti and their cu l t u re a n d t h e cu r re n t s i t u a t i o n i n Po r t - a u Prince.


http://theminaretonline.com/2010/02/04/article9153/ haiti-quake-hunger-13


D E FINI N G the situation To c r e a t e a s o l u t i o n , w e f i r s t h a d t o d e f i n e t h e problem. After our research, we brainstormed together and discovered three crucial problem areas Haitians were facing after the earthquake - F O O D A N D A G R I C U LT U R E , S E L F R E S I L I E N C Y, A N D E D U C AT I O N . I n t h i s p h a s e , w e e x p l o r e d e a c h of our three problem areas and brainstormed to come up with possible solutions.


I D E ATE : education What we have seen is the total collapse of the Haitian education system...The priority now is to s o m e h o w g e t c l a s s e s g o i n g a g a i n .� - Joel Jean-Pierre, Minister of Education After several brainstorming sessions, our team decided to further develop our ideas focusing on rebuilding education. With a poor education system already in place before the earthquake, and half of the nation’s primar y and secondar y schools closed, we saw there was a serious need. And as students, we felt a strong connection to students in Haiti who have lost everything. After selecting the issue of education, we began to ideate by researching existing solutions and weighing the advantages and disadvantages of these programs. In this phase we started to develop our own concepts and branding for our foundation.


spread knowledge rebuilding haiti


B R A N DI N G IDENTITY After careful consideration, we chose this logo because we wanted a hopeful, optimistic image that ref lected our foundation’s mission statement.The light color of the blue invokes a peaceful, feeling, while the orange offers a w h i m s i c a l a n d u p l i f t i n g q u a l i t y.

Our clean,

simple logo harmonizes with the rest of our visual language. The bird represented is the B l a ck - c a p p e d Pe t re l , a n e n d a n g e re d s p e c i e s n a t ive to Haiti. Birds have long been symbols of power and freedom, and Spread Knowledge was created based on the idea that spreading education distributes power and freedom. Birds have also been symbols of birth, and we believe that Spread Knowledge can help Haitian children start a new life by building a foundation for their education.

CHRISTINE M. KIM PORTFOLIO


I f w e s p r e a d k n o w l e d g e , w e d i s t r i b u t e p o w e r.

S P R EAD knowledge Spread profit to

Knowledge

is

organization

rebuilding

Haiti’s

a

non

that can share their experiences.

dedicated

Spread

Knowledge

education

international

promotes

c o m m u n i t y.

IB

system by bringing International

students who already learn in an

Baccalaureate* students to fulfill

international

their CAS hours** where they can

it easy to adapt to new cultures.

make a difference - in Haiti. We

Spread

strive to inspire Hatian children’s

solution that will continue years

desire

past the media attention after the

with help the

to a

learn,

stable build

a

future. We

provide

them

environment,

and

foundation

for

believe

children

Knowledge

earthquake, “spread Haiti.

This

students

way

program

between

students of different backgrounds

and

to

finish

a

constantly

and

program

quickly

find

provides

will

knowledge”

helping children enables a twocommunication

environment

rebuild

allows their

while

IB CAS

gaining

life long experiences.

*The International Baccalaureate program works with 2, 858 schools in 138 countries with approximately 791,000 students aged 16 to 18 years old. This distinguished program aims to develop inquiring, knowledgable, caring

young

adults,

emphasizing

intercultural

understanding

and

respect.

* * E a c h I B s t u d e n t m u s t f u l f i l l 1 5 0 C r e a t i v i t y, A c t i o n a n d S e r v i c e ( C A S ) hours. CAS requires that students actively learn from the experience of doing real tasks beyond the classroom.


CHRISTINE M. KIM CHRISTINE.MI.KIM@GMAIL.COM 832.922.0938 w w w. 8 r u e c a f f a r e l l i . c o m


Christine Kim Portfolio