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RMIT Architecture Major Project Catalogue Semester 1 2018


Major Project Catalogue, Semester 1, 2018 Prof. Vivian Mitsogianni Ian Nazareth John Doyle Vicky Lam A/Prof Paul Minifie Designed and Produced by Ian Nazareth Isabelle Jooste Louis Nuccitelli

Copyright Š 2018 by RMIT University All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of RMIT University


RMIT Architecture Major Project Catalogue Semester 1 2018


Contents Introduction, Professor Vivian Mitsogianni...01 What is Major Project?...02 You Can’t Hide Where You are From, Georgia Eade...03 Emergent Genome, Maxwell Leegel Wight...04 The Ambassadors, Laura Bailey...05 Plan “C” For Chinatown, Yuanbo Zhang...06 Collide-A-Scope, Julius Egan...07 The City & The City, Dalong Li...08 New Rural, David Schwarzman...09 ROWVILLE. CITY. PARK, Nikita Bhopti...10 Pilgrimage To Mungo, Montgomery Balding...11 Rooms Of Routine, or A Space For Euthanasia , Toby Mcelwaine...12 The More Inefficient Apartment Guidelines, Elizabeth Acland...13 Addington, Matthew Pirrie...14 On Edge, Lauren Crockett...15 Orthodox Illusions, Christopher Krambias...16 The Hackable City , James Hall...17 The Book Of Intervention, Daniel Chilelli...18 Human Nature, Fiona Robertson...19 Forget Me Not, Mengyong Jiang...20 Plexus, Dookee Chung...21 Delirious Chinatown, Yang Ren...22


Hope Is Alive In Dandenong, Yousuf Karimi...23 The Rise Of The Middle, Katie White...24 The Mosaic Campus, Nicole Yee Ker Chew...25 The Government Vs The Governed, Hoyoung Kim..26 It’s Time To Reclaim The Carpark, Chenzi Yu...27 Shift Happens, Zoe Hughes...28 Symbiotic Decay, Edmund Er How Khoo...29 Pocket Full Of Sunshine, Andrea May Wen Lee...30 DonnyBrook Town Centre, Siu Ming Wong...31 Flexibility: Drawn To Scale, Raphael Freedman...32 Memorial Park Of Nusajaya, Jane Voon Teo..33 De-Limitation Of Place, Mary-Faith Cristoria...34 The Rejuvination Village, Zemin Yang...35 The OV, Harris Kwong...36 The Jumble, Christopher Crawford...37 Stroller Village, Gabrielle Dimech...38 The Union House, Ngoc Thuong Nguyen...39 Shining Light On Public Open Space, Jonghuan Park...40 UN-COMPACT US, Neda Moeni...41 Antibodies, Quinn Quyen Do...42 Residential Art Village, Linyu Cheng...43 Supervisors Semester 1, 2018...44 Students Semester 1, 2018...45


Introduction

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Architecture schools should be concerned with experimentation that challenges the apparent self-evident certainties and accepted orthodoxies of the discipline (in its expanded definition), the underlying assumptions about what architecture is and can contain, and what it should do next. Architecture schools need to ensure that their graduates have all the professional competencies that are required for professional practice and registration. But Architecture schools should also lead the struggle to challenge the default conventions of the discipline. The architecture school should strive to point towards possible futures not yet evident within existing understandings of the discipline and wider cultural/political terrains. Architecture is about ideas. It is part of a wider cultural sphere and a way of thinking about the world in a broader sense. Knowledge and learning in architecture do not finish in the academy but require continued learning and a level of receptive agility from the architect, throughout the architect’s life. The rapidly changing economic and cultural conditions in the extended fields that architects engage with necessitate this, requiring, but also opening up possibilities for, new types of knowledge, fields of engagement and practices.

The Major Project Medals The Anne Butler Memorial Medal, endowed in honour of an outstanding emerging practitioner, is awarded to a Major Project that exemplifies the goals of Major Project. The Peter Corrigan Medal celebrates the project that is most critical, political and culturally engaged. It is awarded to a student with a strong independent vision in honour of Professor Peter Corrigan who taught successive generations of architects at RMIT for over 40 years.

The architecture student’s graduating Major Project – a capstone for the formal design degree – should not merely demonstrate the competence and skill they acquired in the course. These are base expectations on entry into the graduating semester. The graduating project is an opportunity to speculate through the work and to develop ideas that will serve as catalysts for future, lifelong investigations.

The Antonia Bruns Medal, endowed to recall Antonia’s interest in the relation between film and architecture, is awarded to a Major Project that investigates the relationship between architectural representation, association and perception.

The project should lay bare considered attitudes, brave speculations and leaps of faith, pursuing these with rigour and depth. We would hope that the projects are ambitious, brave and contain propositions relevant to their time. We would hope that students experiment – in whatever form this might take – and engage with difficult questions, contributing not merely to areas that are well explored, but to what is yet to come. Experimentation though, in the graduating project, as well as in the design studio, comes with the risk of failure. But failure can be cathartic – it is an essential possibility tied to innovation.

The Leon van Schaik 25th Anniversary Peer Assessed Major Project Award celebrates Prof. Leon van Schaik’s arrival as Head of Architecture at RMIT 28 years ago. It is decided by all Major Project voting for what they view as the most adventurous and future-embracing project of the semester.

At RMIT Architecture we understand well the ethos and importance of experimentation and we have longstanding processes to reward it, importantly through our grading and moderation processes. In the RMIT architecture programs, we call this ‘venturous ideas-led design practice’.2 ‘To be ‘venturous’ is to be brave and take risks. What we hope is happening here is that students are learning to establish their own explorations which they can constantly reconsider and navigate through future conditions that may not resemble present understandings of practice. Competencies and experimentation can happily co-exist. We aim to educate students to engage with architecture’s specific characteristics unapologetically, and to not be afraid of its complex, uncertain and liquid nature. We aim to prepare our graduates to engage in and contribute to a broader world of ideas and to eventually challenge our ability to judge with new, challenging and meaningful propositions.

Professor Vivian Mitsogianni Deputy Dean and Head, Architecture & Urban Design RMIT University

01 For an expanded version of this text see Mitsogianni, V. (2015). Failure can be cathartic! The design studio - speculating on three themes In:

1

Studio Futures: Changing trajectories in architectural education, Uro Publications, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 25-31 ‘Venturous’ is a term also used by RMIT Professor Leon van Schaik and Professor Richard Blythe in relation to the RMIT Design Practice PhD

2

model, originated over 25 years ago by van Schaik, who states ‘Design Practice Research at RMIT is a longstanding program of research into what venturous designers actually do when they design’ .


What is Major Project? In Major Project, students are expected to formulate an architectural research question and develop an articulate and well-argued architectural position through the execution of a major architectural design project.

RMIT Architecture values ambitious, adventurous projects; those that demonstrate new and pertinent architectural ideas or show how established ideas can be developed or transformed to offer deeper understandings. The best major projects take risks and attempt to see architecture anew. Major Project should form the beginning of an exploration of architectural ideas that can set the agenda for the first ten years of your original and insightful architectural practice. The nature of the project is not set, and the scope of the brief and site is established by the student in consultation with their supervisor as the most appropriate and potentially fruitful vehicle for testing and developing their particular area of architectural investigation. Typically major projects proceed in a similar way to design studios – with the difference being that students themselves set their brief and topic of investigation in consultation with their tutor. The research question and architectural project will often develop in parallel and it is expected that the precise question and focus of the project will be discovered and articulated through the act of designing. This process is iterative and develops through weekly sessions with your supervisor. Projects are also formally reviewed at two public mid semester reviews (at week 5 and 10) before the final presentation (week 15). Students typically consult with their supervisor for half an hour a week, either individually or in small groups. Major Projects have ranged from strategic urban and landscape interventions with metropolitan implications, through to detailed explorations of building form, materiality, structure and inhabitation; to detailed experimentation in the processes and procedures of architectural production. It is expected that Major Projects will develop a particular and specific area of interest that has grown during your studies, rather than merely complete a generic and competent design. Often these specific interests will develop in relation to those of your supervisors – we encourage students to work closely with their supervisors to build on mutual areas of expertise and interest. It is understood that major projects will differ in scope, scale, kinds of representation produced and degree of resolution; with these factors depending on the nature of the architectural question and accompanying brief. Emphasis should be placed on producing a coherent and complete project, where proposition, brief, scale, degree of resolution and representation work together to provide a balanced, convincing and focused expression of your architectural thought. There is no expectation that Major Project be ‘comprehensive’ in scope. Rather, the aim of the subject is to establish, through the completion of a major design work in a rigorous manner, a well-argued architectural experiment that has the potential and richness to engender future explorations and that will sustain the student for the next ten years of their architectural practice. A high level of skill and a demonstrated knowledge of existing architectural ideas is an important component of a successful major project, however the goal should not be to demonstrate a ‘professional’ level of accepted ‘best practice’. Rather, the architectural knowledge and literacy developed throughout your studies forms a strong base for your major project to demonstrate new kinds of knowledge and ideas through architectural form. The best major projects have often been quite unlike buildings seen in journals or produced by established practitioners. _Excerpt from Major Project Briefing Notes 2018

02


You Can’t Hide Where You Are From Georgia Eade Supervisor: Dr. Michael Spooner

This project positions Tasmania in a state of crisis, it has become a museum with an island attached. Tasmania’s dark history breeds extremes and radicals and Mona is its latest manifestation. David Walsh has, without negotiation, transformed Hobart, which is no longer identifiable without reference to the museum. Sparking an economic and tourism boom, this crisis is prompting fears that Hobart will be lost. This project does not propose to solve this crisis, but examines this strange aggravated condition. It takes Tasmania, as an overloaded, sinking raft of refugees to the site of the new NGV Contemporary. It induces Tasmania and its strangeness through distance and a series of displacements, mimics, references and imposters. An incessant collector, the project persistently layers elements of its surroundings with quintessentially Tasmanian stories. The strange is not only identified in the project itself but is buried within the process, settling somewhere in the distance between Melbourne and Tasmania. Haunted by the landscape, it is the back of house, an island, a raft, a shed, an acropolis, a museum, a coffin, a trojan horse. As hard as this project may try to infiltrate its Melbourne context, you can’t hide where you are from.

03


Emergent Genome Addressing the architectural and ecological issues of Melbourne’s growth corridors in the age of biotechnology

Location:

Beveridge North West

Emergent Genome

Maxwell Leegel Wight Supervisor: A/Prof Roland Snooks

Location:

An analogy to a natural system and synergy of computation, nature and machine; Emergent Genome is a siteless and scalable systemic building process that focuses on the tight integration of the built and natural environments emerging in this century.

Location:

Deep Creek

Aviators Field (Point Cook South)

(Pakenham East)

Morphodynamic Site & Surrounds Data

Negotiated Morphogenetic Program Data

Quantitative Feedback Analysis

Computational Summary

Program Allocation

Gravity & Structural Flow Analysed

Vector Catchment Inputs

Site & Program Connections

Shell Negotiation

Site Obstacles & Overlays

Initial Site Position

Negotiated Outcomes

Shell Encompassed, Openings To Site Lines

Solar Vectors Obtained

Wind Vectors Obtained

Material Framework

Responsive To Vector Catchment

Material Orientate To Structural Flow

Negotiate Structural Ridges

Deposit Along Ridges To Flow Direction

Tectonic Outcomes

Utilising current architectural trajectories of direct fabrication, design software and analysis simulations the process is sited and scaled in the testing grounds of the recently expanded growth corridors of Melbourne. It proposes an alternative model for a city’s expansion that addresses the diminishing effect of urban growth on the ecology it is a part of and the productive landscape that it occupies. Morphogenetic inputs from a client brief and morphodynamic inputs from the site are negotiated into a mass customisable memetic genome for the city’s periphery. Tuned to the surroundings and fabricated predominantly from the material of the site; negotiated outcomes of a simulated real world scenario grow the building to its surroundings and user inputs as a parallel to a living thing for living in.

Mass Customised Suburb Beveridge North West

CBD

Aviator’s Field Port Phillip Bay

Deep Creek

Urban Growth Corridor New Suburbs

Emergent Mass Customised Suburb

Initial Hub Starter Culture

Precinct Key Zones

Staged In Line With Growth

Site Ecology & Stormwater Mitigation

Plots Attract To Infrastructure

Plots Repel Inaccessible Infrastructure

Plot Size Diversity & Scale Towards Attractors

Emergent Zoning From Mass Customisation

Transport Via Shared Boundaries

Plot Water Retention & Collection

Productive Waste Water Irrigated Landscape

On site soil with binding additive

04

Insulation membrane Study, Library Lattice Interior Structure

Wall Section

Level 01

ETFE Cushion Windows

Living, Dining

External Shading Extruded composite mullion

Window Section

Ground Floor Mezz

Bed 01 Algae production membrane Waste Treatment membrane

Courtyard Bed 02

Master Bed Ensuite

Shell Housing

Energy Systems Section

Bath & L’dry Transport Hub Home Office

Ground Floor

Entry & Kitchen


Anne Butler Memorial Medal Semester 1, 2018 Supervisor Statement: A new building on the corner of Bourke and Queen street is the subject of Laura Bailey’s major project, though we access this through an entirely another project “METAFORMS’ who are notionally the architects for the building. This allows us to consider architect’s work as the subject of the project, so what we are looking at is not only architecture as an object - the building on the right – but – on the left – architecture as the subject, the disciplinary matrix, the tools mechanisms processes and procedures, a world of trade literature, of proprietary items, codes, and regulations. Laura invites us to see the building as a repository of objects appropriated by a common language, Anglo-Saxon verbs, Door Window, Walls, ceilings and floors as objects appropriated by language, and here the project takes a decidedly comic, or more correctly slapstick turn. Where doors go ‘off the rails’, we find ourselves on ‘the wrong side of tracks’ or have an elaborate time getting a ‘handle on things’. Obviously, there are walls to ‘bang our heads on’ and doors that open as others shut. As German writers redeployed the terminology of Renaissance Architecture “harmony,” “unity,” “synthesis,” “foundation,” and “orderliness” became states of consciousness, rather than terms used to describe the built world, which have clouded the way that we understand architecture since. Laura radically reverses the direction. As the objects are known not by language but through use, the object is reaffirmed rather than appropriated. The sense of her project then recasts the two figures as, what is common property (disciplinary practice), and personal property (real estate). _ Peter Brew

The Ambassadors

Laura Bailey Supervisor: Dr. Peter Brew

The Ambassadors by Laura Bailey is situated across two office towers located on the corner of Bourke and Queen Street. 160 Queen Street acts as a refurbished office space inside of Bates Smarts Sleigh House, for MetaForms technologies. An office that is concerned with where the metaphor holds a place in architecture. The office explores the confusion ingrained in language and that which we identify attempts to purge and restore architecture to purely the description of things – this conflation of the description provides a rich field of study. Meta-forms technologies have been formulating an office tower just across the road at 150 Queen Street. A seemingly ordinary tower by appearance, the tower acts a mnemonic repository of architectural metaphors literally constructed. Through accessing the building we gain an understanding of the objects situated within the tower, conflating the idea and object.

05


Plan “C” For Chinatown

Yuanbo Zhang Supervisors: Paul Dash & Jane Dash

The two blocks between Bourke Street and Lonsdale Street in the Melbourne CBD has been recognized as “Chinatown” for centuries, it is also one of the most popular commercial precincts, Asian community gathering place, and tourist attraction. It bears countless dreams, laughter, and hope. However, facing the pressure of an increasing population, aging infrastructure and emerging commercial shopping centres nearby, Chinatown is at risk of losing its glamor and prosperity. Additionally, the intimate and historical precinct may be replaced by skyscrapers like the rest of the CBD and lose its identity forever. This project is a planning proposal for the City Council and Asian community who live and work in Chinatown. The project suggests a new way to develop and “cure” the current problems by amplifying its cultural, economic and environmental attributes. In order to achieve this goal, a “Super Agency” will be selected by the City Council and Chinatown committee. The project will transform Chinatown into one big “Super Block” instead of discrete properties, while offering new centralised infrastructures, delivery systems, gateways, public space, and public programmes in sequential stages to help activate Chinatown. As a result, Chinatown will become a pedestrian friendly precinct, attract new investments, and give the new Chinatown back to Melbourne as a city pride.

06


Antonia Bruns Medal Semester 1, 2018 Supervisor Statement: Julius’s project imagines the radical future of the suburb. It is a master-plan for an abandoned suburb in a growing city. It is also a design process and a provocation that architectural ideas can come from architectural production - that you can think last and act first, find benefits, justifications, reasons and explanations for the outcome within the outcome itself. His project also acknowledges the enormous limitations of digital modelling, attempting to create an architectural imagination that contains ambiguities, indeterminate functions, and the unspecified uses of its occupants. _ Emma Jackson

Collide-a-Scope

Julius Egan Supervisor: Emma Jackson

This project could be many things, and could be read many ways. My intention was to act without logic - to consider everything a constantly shifting variable. The project was a masterplan for an abandoned suburb in a growing city. It was looking to the dominant and ubiquitous methods of suburb-building in cities like Melbourne, trying to imagine future variants or the alternative forms this generic suburbanism could take. This project was a design method. It suggested that architectural ideas could come from architectural production - that you could think last and act first, finding benefits, justifications, reasons and explanations for the outcome within the outcome itself - excluding from the work unrealised ambitions and describing only realised possibilities. This project was a consideration of what an architect might do in urban design. It engaged with the communication of ideas and of plans - seeking out a method by which the proposition and their implications could be both communicated and understood. It observed the enormous limitations of digital modelling, and attempted to create an architectural imagination that contained ambiguities, indeterminate functions, and the unspecified uses of its occupants. This project imagined the radical future of the suburb.

07


Peter Corrigan Medal Semester 1, 2018 Supervisor Statement: In Dalong’s project, two distinct urbanisms inhabit the same physical space. The project speculates about a future for China’s urban villages – dense transient typologies that are gateway cities for migrants from rural China. In doing so, Dalong navigates the complex socio-economic and political frameworks that catalyse this urban phenomenon, inviting us to evaluate the agency of architecture and urban design at every step. The proposition transcends a binary reading of the urban condition, through an engagement with thresholds and symbolism. The architecture forces an adjacency deriving an exaggerated hyper-urban form from the existing fabric – releasing new topologies for the city it emerges from. Like its namesake, (China Miéville’s fictional novel ‘The City and the City’), Dalong’s project compels us to a view a compound city not legible through a single drawing - two discrete cities, one carefully placed on top of the other, wholeheartedly embracing the multiplicity and contradictions of the metropolis. _ Ian Nazareth

The City & The City

Dalong Li Supervisor: Ian Nazareth

There are numerous urban villages existing in many cities across China. These urban villages play an important role in providing affordable houses for the poor and migrants. Overcrowding, lack of infrastructure and safety hazards are common problems associated with urban villages. This project aims to optimize the living conditions, mitigate the current problems and keep the basic functions of urban villages in city development, while minimizing the impact or the changes on villager’s lifestyle during the reform process. Four structural units are selected as the smallest unit of the new village system. For the existing buildings, all of the residential blocks are separated from factories and relocated to the top of the new architecture. Instead, agricultural industries are introduced to fill the space of those old residential blocks. The roofs of existing buildings are connected by corridors, which creates a new roof park. The new residential area is divided into private space for residents and shared space for services. A ramp system is created from vertically through the building and serves as a space for villagers to conduct small business and leisure activities.

08


1) C. Marchetti - Anthropological Invariants in Travel Behavior | Personal travel is under the control of basic instincts rather than economic drivers - with a fixed travel budget of around an hour a day therefore city size tends to correlate directly to the speed of transport allowing movement.

2) Disruptive technology in the form of a high speed infrastructure network is introduced into the city system | The city is introduced to a new high speed movement network and the system moves into a new way of functioning (as a complex system this could happen - we cannot predict due to its complexity how a city will react to a disruptive change). The spatial equilibrium of the city to concentrate is tipped. The individual economic and social incentives of the occupants to concentrate dissolve.

3) Spatial equilibrium | Without an economic equilibrium holding the fabric of the city together the city disperses in to the landscape.

4) Infrastructure network | The infrastructure network ties the region (Switzerland) together. At 1200km/h its viable for any inhabitant to commute to any location in the country and back to their settlement within a 1hour travel budget.

5) Infrastructure node | An infrastructure node is introduced into the landscape

6) Planning and economic vacuum | The settlement without an economic spatial equilibrium, and planning control (incentivising concentration and spatial rigidness) is in the right condition to allow for a vernacular morphology to evolve - one based on optimal human / site engagement born from, and informed by bottom up rules of occupation.

7) Proximity to node | The settlement now presented with the right conditions is enabled to self order according to basic human rules of interaction and optimal engagement with place. Above optimal morphology for a proximity to node.

New Rural

David Schwarzman Supervisor: A/Prof Paul Minifie

It’s 2050 in Switzerland and the introduction of a highspeed movement network into the city system has tipped it into dispersal.

8) Flatness | Self ordering morphology with optimal alignment with flatness of site + proximity to node.

9) Proximity to water | Self ordering morphology with optimal alignment with flatness of site + proximity to node + proximity to water.

The system change has allowed for a new type of urban morphology to evolve - a morphology which when removed from the economic and administrative forces of the city 10) Insolation | Self ordering morphology with optimal alignment with flatness of site + proximity to node + proximity to water + Insolation

has the capacity to engage with and express the localities of site and maintain a critical relevance to its inhabitants. While conventional urbanism is slow, hopelessly static and dependant (to its own detriment) on a specific time and place context - the informal urbanism in this system is emergent and self-organising. The relations between extreme topographies and highly constrained dimensions determine the location of buildings and flow of movement in a series of small local interactions which amalgamate to form a coherent whole. The resulting fabric is information rich -- a physical embodiment of the endogenous processes creating a legibility and semiology for its inhabitants. A layered and intricately organised fabric emerges with coherent and well defined spatial structures. A new model for human habitat is born.

11) Vegetation | Self ordering morphology with optimal alignment with flatness of site + proximity to node + proximity to water + insolation + relationship to natural vegetation as determined by the inhabitants of this settlement and their relationship to site.

NEW RURAL | THE LEGIBILITY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL INVARIANTS IN THE FABRIC OF OUR SETTLEMENTS

12) Order without a plan | The morphology of the settlement contains a legibility. This legibility in its sense of order (without a plan) can be understood at the physical substrate of the inhabitants direct relationship to the landscape and their primary human dispositions.

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13) Variation, intricacy, morphology | The settlement contains multiple levels of fabric variation across material scales. Informed by multiple overlapping site potentials and the inhabitants relationship to them it contains a intricacy and subtle variation in morphology. The fabric, the settlement morphology therefore contains a communicative capacity, its an expressive literal representation of the most basic human conditions and in its adaptive capacity is in continual equilibrium with the natural environment which supports them.

(CONNECTED TO A SUPER HIGH SPEED MOVEMENT NETWORK)


ROWVILLE. CITY. PARK

Nikita Bhopti Supervisor: Dr. Jan Van Schaik

The site is located in Rowville; an established suburb on Melbourne’s rapidly expanding urban edge. It is a suburb that is not built by property developers, but on a rich history that links back to the early years of European Settlement. This story is important. With Melbourne’s growth being driven by population increase and hungry developers, the stories of its established suburbs must not be lost. This project is about developing an architectural language that allows these stories to be experienced and shared by the suburb’s citizens. The target audience is not the city folk. It is the people that have lived in and around this area. With high density development crawling its way into both new & established suburbs, this project aims to provide a model for the development of respite from high-density life, through creating a realm in which leisure and history can co-exist.

10


Pilgrimage to Mungo Towards a Redemptive Practice of Architecture Montgomery Balding Supervisors: Sam Hunter & Adam Pustola

Since time immemorial, people have looked for answers at places imbued with spiritual meanings. In desperation and celebration these places have become the material testimony of our human condition. Lake Mungo is a prehistoric natural and cultural wonder in the heart of Australia. It represents the ancient past and symbolic future for our country. It is here where deep time is experienced, an intrinsic link between scale and time that requires an arduous 4 day pilgrimage that will challenge the visitor’s personal and national psyche. As architecture assists in the repatriation of the Mungo man back to country, so too does it build an experience for those who visit, to share in the act of repatriation, and to learn what Lake Mungo means to us as a nation.

11


Rooms Of Routine, or A Space for Euthanasia Toby Mcelwaine Supervisors: Ben Milbourne

A Space for Euthanasia speculates on the future of assisted dying laws in Australia. With existing facilities to care for end of life patients as archaic as the current political contentions themselves, a reinterpretation of the institution held a particular disciplinary relevance for exploring the relationship between the personal and the generic in architecture. How can such a facility be procedural while maintaining the idiosyncrasies of the personal home, arguably the most peaceful and comfortable place to move on. The project sought to unpack these themes through an interrogation of residential and institutional architecture. This interrogation was made through a range of methodologies and scales including drawings and physical models. This interrogation formed the basis for iterations across three contrasting sites, which focused on a reconfiguration of the individual room to identify spatial and organisational qualities. The iteration as presented seeks to negotiate the themes I have been exploring throughout the semester, manifest through a linear mass in the landscape with a profound sense of interiority. The ritual of death is provided agency through a processional narrative of passage that guides guests through a series of rooms, culminating in the departure of patients and loved ones from the pier.

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CARLTON PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATE 1887

CARLTON PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATE 1960

CARLTON PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATE 2018

THE MORE INEFFICIENT APARTMENT

01 ENTRY THROUGH A SHARED GARDEN

GUIDELINES FOR VICTORIA

02 A SOCIAL STAIRCASE

03 A PASSAGE / A BALCONY

04 A CONNECTING KNUCKLE

05 SHARED PRIVATE

06 A HOUSE WITHOUT A CORRIDOR

07 ROOMS WITHOUT FUNCTION

The More Inefficient Apartment Guidelines

3.1 WAITING WINDOW SEAT

SOCIAL STAIRCASE (REF SECTION 02)

3.2 OPEN WINDOW

Elizabeth Acland Supervisors: Prof. Mark Jacques & Dean Boothroyd

This project is about the design of interstitial and shared spaces within public housing. Market housing developments and current affordable public housing models offer little more than the basic requirements of living, in highly defined and unadaptable spaces that are held prisoner to notions of efficiency and the open plan. This project contends that through the design of interstitial spaces required in these typologies, such as corridors, staircases, entry ways, stoops and outdoor rooms, a far more ‘charged’ social space can occur. It suggests that these ordinary and even inefficient spaces of daily life are key elements and contributors to the character and identity of a place. It is the ambiguous and the contested which allows people to inhabit space beyond functional means.

3.4 WORKING LEDGE / PLANTER

3.3 SEAT BETWEEN

Section 03 I Balcony / Passage

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WAITING WINDOW SEAT

WAITING WINDOW SEAT

OPEN WINDOW

OPEN WINDOW

Planter

Working Ledge

Detail 3.4

Detail 2.2

Communal Balcony Communal Balcony Window Seat

Built in Desk

Timber Bench Seat Private Dwelling

Staircase

Private Dwelling

Detail 2.2

A waiting seat is connected to private dwellings on insection with the staircase and balcony. The seat suggests private ownership through its placement, yet acts as a communal offering to those passing by.

A series of operable windows penetrate the balcony passage. Internally this space is defined by a built in desk and bench. Its close proximity to the communal balcony intends to create a dialogue between the permanent dweller and those who pass by.

0

The More Inefficient Apartment Design Guidelines

2

Detail 3.1 I Waiting Window Seat

SEAT BETWEEN

0

20

The More Inefficient Apartment Design Guidelines

SEAT BETWEEN

WORKING LEDGE / PLANTER

2

Detail 3.2 I Open Window

22

WORKING LEDGE / PLANTER

Working Ledge Detail 3.4 Conventional 1500mm wide thoroughfare

Communal Balcony

Bench Seat

Private Dwelling

Concrete Planter

Working Ledge

A seat between demarcates space within the balcony. It acts as a marker between what is inhabited / appropriated space and a space that is required to circulate. Its placement within the center of the thoroughfare intends to suggest communal use and encourage spontaneous encounters.

The balustrade is designed as an alternating ledge and planter. Its proportion is designed to accommodate various use for residents as well as those passing by. Its variation between a ledge and a planter intends to define a transitioning of space that breaks the continuous condition. 0

The More Inefficient Apartment Design Guidelines

01 ENTRY THROUGH A SHARED GARDEN

05

13

SHARED PRIVATE

Detail 3.3 I Seat Between

2

24

The More Inefficient Apartment Design Guidelines

03 A BALCONY / A PASSAGE

02 SOCIAL STAIRCASE

06 A HOUSE WITHOUT A CORRIDOR

07

ROOMS WITHOUT FUNCTION

Detail 3.3 I Working Ledge / Planter

04

A CONNECTING KNUCKLE

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The Shire of Addington’s Civic Centre Revisioning Sorrento Back Beach

Addington

Matt Pirrie Supervisor: Emma Jackson

1 Grid = 10 square kilometers (1000 hectares)

Seven Principles of the ‘Grand Modell’ Revisited

In 1803 David Collins entered Port Phillip Bay to establish a settlement at Sullivan’s Cove near Sorrento. It was abandoned a few months later due to the area’s sandy soil and lack of fresh water. But what if the fleet had discovered the peninsula’s natural springs and sustained the colony? If the town formally gets laid out in 1803 when Henry Addington was British Prime Minister, how does this scheme differ from the regulations actually adopted by Robert Hoddle in 1837 during The Viscount Melbourne’s ascendency? My project revisits the Grand Modell of town planning that underwrote the city’s birth and reimagines it in order to ‘complete the circle’ of urbanisation around Port Phillip Bay.

Scratchings: Statistical Anomalies in the Colonial Grid

Property boundaries are marked by salinity levels and preexisting fault lines rather than cardinal points, population density is doubled, and the state establishes the super shire of Addington on the Mornington and Bellarine Peninsulas, complete with new civic centre on Sorrento back beach. This scheme embraces Parkland town planning while acknowledging the City Beautiful movement that supplemented it at the turn of the twentieth century. The Peninsulas additionally gift the urban designer opportunities to connect boulevards to both bay and sea in the one pen stroke, and thus juxtapose elegant, orderly functions with wilder programming.

Sorrento Envelope Study

Warehouse Precinct

Commercial Precinct

Industrial Zone

Mixed Use

Porous Zone

5,000 years ago ‘the late tide’ Port Melbourne at +20m

Civic Quarter

Shadow Envelope Studies: 9am noon 3pm sun and shadow shards

9 October 1803: settlement Sorrento Settlement Study

Customs & Immigration House

General Post Office

Market

Government Reserve

Highest & Best Use

Noxious Trades

Commerce

Court Houses & Churches

Boarding Houses & Hotels

Remand Centre & Prison

Residential

Hospital & Benevolent Asylum

Retail

Parliament & Treasury

Stockyards

Government House

Additional Markets

Theatre District

14

9 May 1804: disbandment

Cemetary

1/2 acre

1/4

1/8

1/16

Bars & Brothels 2.5km

2.0km

1.5km

1.0km

0.5km

Survey Stakes & Horseways Melbourne CBD Grid Alignment

Magnetic North Alignment 1835

Magnetic North Alignment 2018

Subdivision Patterns: Darling 1929 / Bourke 1837 Hoddle 1838 - 1848 1/16th Acre Study 1/16th Acre Study with porosity Collective Induction Study

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Theatre of Self-correction

Bathhouse

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On Edge

Brothel

Honeymoon Suite

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Lauren Crockett Supervisor: Dr. Peter Brew

Faraday’s Cage

Black Spot Belt

5

There are things at play that sit outside our standard cognition of the city, but once illuminated are hard to overlook. These are spaces of deviation from expected or righteous pathways, of covert or ritualised interactions, where the architecture shapes its subjects outside of the space of the everyday, the domestic or the familiar.

Institute for Positive Sexuality

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Virtual Reality VPN (Virtual Private Network) Chapel

Using a 1967 lecture by Michel Foucalt as the figure by which to read Parkville, it was determined that these institutions are due for reconsideration. What happens to the cemetery when we run out of space for our deceased? Or to the library when all content is available at home? This project addresses the disjunct between societal attitudes, technological advances and our built environment, and how we could recast these institutions to better suit the subjectivity of our generation.

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Observatory

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LAUREN CROCKETT

d pool an Diving se bathhou

Boxing tory

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Identity Digital amber Ch Purge

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Netw Private Virtual Chapel (VPN)

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Parkville Youth Justice Centre

Centre for Prolonged Vitality

ON EDGE

Provocations for 15 existing institutions culminated in a new concourse from the Parkville Metro Station to the centre of the Melbourne University South Lawn. Housed within the concourse are descendants of the original institutions, evolved to now suit a post-technologicalrevolution world. Each of the programs attempt to bring a sense of communal ritual back to activities that have become increasingly network-based, with the hope of tempering some of the more negative effects of societal progress.

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Ring


REVERSE PERSPECTIVE

HEIRACHICAL

ISOMETRY DIRECTIONAL GESTURE

MULTI-VIEW PERSPECTIVE

VANISHING POINT PERSPECTIVE

FLATNESS

HARTINGTON ST

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APARTMENT TOWER

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APARTMENT TOWER

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APARTMENT TOWER

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1 FUNCTION CENTRE

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HAWTHORN RD

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18 15 LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR ELDERLY HOME

RETAIL STRIP

TOWN-HOUSES

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5 ST GEORGES RD

SECTION AA

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SECTION CC

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Orthodox Illusions

Christopher Krambias Supervisors: Helen Duong & Tim Pyke

THEOPHANY

THE LAST SUPPER

EASTERN CHURCH

ANNUNCIATION

ST GEORGE

FOOT

THE LAST SUPPER

PENTECOST

PERSPECTIVE DIRECTIONAL GESTURES

VANISHING POINT PERSPECTIVE

MULTI-VIEW PERSPECTIVE

HEIRACHICAL

ISOMETRY

REVERSE PERSPECTIVE

FLATNESS

PLAN D

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TRIPLE ARCH

EXTRUDED

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PERSPECTIVE FIELD

STREET

PERSPECTIVE FIELD

TYPICAL STREET

ELEVATIONS

CORNER

PERSPECTIVE FIELD

STREET

PERSPECTIVE FIELD

MOVE VANISHING

RAISE

EXTRUDE AWAY

TRIM PROFILE

SHIFT FORWARD

TRIM PROFILE

SHIFT VANISHING

EXTRUDE

EXTRUDE AWAY

TRIM PROFILE

EXTRUDE AWAY

TRIM PROFILE

FINAL

PROJECT TRIPLE FRONTED

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PROJECT FEDERATION BUNGALOW

NEW

CORNER

PERSPECTIVE FIELD

EXTRUDE AWAY

TRIM PROFILE

PROJECT

KITCH

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NOSTALGIC

GENERIC

VERNACULAR

AGORA

BUSY STREET

FRAMED VIEW

VISTA

EXTRUDE ENTRY/ WINDOWS

PROJECT DOUBLE FRONTED WORKERS

PROJECT DOUBLE FRONTED WORKERS

This project employs the mysticism used in Orthodox paintings and tests how they can be applied as buildings and the spaces between them, to evoke the divine for church going Greeks, the familiar for Greek non-believers and create a cultural playground for non-Greeks. Greek-Australian migrants yearn to recreate the spaces they know from their birthplace, yet this has only materialised in a few ceramic pots on the ceiling in a George Calombaris restaurant or the concrete mall in Oakleigh. The infinite layering of incidental moments found in ancient European cities such as the Plaka district in Athens is missing. Through a millennia of occupation and manipulation, serendipitous moments are the most exciting qualities that should be translated to Australian cities and these are the ones you cannot plan for. Greek Icon Illusion techniques have been examined, pulled apart and applied to generic Northcote suburban housing types in an attempt to find architecture that possesses these types of spatial qualities. The perspective illusions translated from these paintings result in an architectural language of mute suburban facade at the boundary to reveal a glossy, decorative and vibrant interior. Views framed in the distance, narrow streets which billow out into plazas, idiosyncratic intersections between the old, new and generic, terraces which sit up and perch over the plaza are the result of this method. The illusions have been a way to design beyond nostalgia and appropriation and bypass millennia of occupation, to find the same spatial outcomes which Greeks are yearning for but can only find in their motherland.

16


The Hackable City

James Hall Supervisor: Dr. Peter Brew

The Hackable City is an exploration into setting up a platform and framework for cities to adopt a scenario driven model for future growth. It suggests that the complexities of the city network can be captured with data, thus giving rise to a demand driven architecture that can accommodate the growing population. These complexities are often referred to as ‘space syntax’, ‘infrastructure space’ or ‘network space’, and have perhaps up until recently seemed too complex to tackle as a whole. Through this project it is put forward that data might give us access to these operating systems and almost like clues, allow us to break down these complexities, perhaps leading to different ways of dealing with Architectural and urban problems of the future. The advantages of scenario mapping become useful as a tool by creating and identifying the possible alternative routes of future urban development. The scenarios are based on the future projections of population and floor area per industry 2016-2036, tested out over the MID Melbourne Innovation District. Scenario mapping overcomes the limitations of thinking what outcomes might occur and projects how we might reach a certain desired outcome to set up the domains in which we design.

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The Book of Intervention

Daniel Chilelli Supervisor: Ian Nazareth

The project is interested in testing the ideas of how architecture is experienced through inhabiting different spaces, subjective interventions and cataloguing of spaces. There will be a focus on investigating the interstices between the formal and the informal overlaps of urban and architectural outcomes, subsequently looking at the impacts the informal has on the formal suburb. The project hones in on Footscray as the case study and through the means of observing and leveraging the informalities of Footscray and the way they can affect the formal aspects of the suburb to better create a new civic building that works within the framework of an existing network. Can architecture appropriately intervene and propose a project that doesn’t entirely limit itself to one of ‘renovation’? This approach to architecture highlights the ingrained interconnectivity of built environments The result is a library with an architectural language that takes cues not only from Footscray but also from past libraries and re-applying them to the site as a series of tactical insertions. The proposition reads as a complete and coherent project which is dispersed to explore a series of propositions acting as one. This not only creates space to house knowledge and books but to facilitate the use of space in order to exchange culture and pass on traditions learned.

18


Human Nature

Fiona Robertson Supervisor: Simone Koch

This project seeks to examine how the experience of the nature might be brought into the context of the urban environment, whilst adapting to human desires and requirements and attempting to realise a fourth nature. The site is the former Royal Women’s Hospital in Carlton, and the brief is taken from the proposed Carlton Connect Initiative, 6,000sqm of innovative programs. In working with an existing building, I explored scales of time; geological, scientific and objective in the context of the Anthropocene, the new geological epoch proposed to reflect the fact that humankind is affecting the earth like a force of nature. The city is a producer of new geological typologies, and layers of geological and cultural history are often removed to make way for new and instantaneous terrains and development. It was my intention to work alongside the existing terrain in all of its forms, not against it. This project seeks to shift away from the grid, as it speaks to the control and power of man over this planet and begin to re-establish a connection to the new nature through the experience of geological and environmental conditions in an attempt to commence the process of urban regeneration.

19


Forget Me Not

Mengyong Jiang Supervisor: Ian Nazareth

‘Forget me not’ is about dementia and its relation to the architecture of care environments and the city, concerning both mental and physical aspects. The world’s elderly people are increasing and with this comes an increase in the proportion of degenerative diseases and mental illness. The question of how to accommodate the elderly and frail has become increasingly crucial in all societies. This project explores the nature of the disease and the way in which occupational therapy and treatment theory has influenced the design of dementia facilities. The process of exploration considers some ways in which elements of theory can be integrated into design to create an environment that mitigates disorientations in time and place, and that reduces the personal impacts of dementia. The selection of suitable sites has influenced by the idea of a type of therapy known as Reality Orientation(RO), and by the importance in current theory of maintaining a relationship between dementia sufferers and real-life context. Consequently, the architectural focus of this project has become engaged with a design program that proposes the integration of a care facility for dementia patients in urban locations.

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Plexus

DooKee Chung Supervisor: Prof. Tom Kovac

noun | plex•us | plek-ses | ‘An interwoven combination of parts or elements in a structure or system’ ‘Plexus’ is a speculation on the future city that attempts to redefine and disrupt the rational static grid of the existing urban fabric. The project is an intertwine of an existing highway infrastructure that enables a new network system that promotes the collaboration and cross-pollination of different fields to respond to the innovation culture and economy.

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Delirious Chinatown

Yang Ren Supervisor: Simon Drysdale

As the terms ‘retail experience’ and ‘experience economy’ are used by cities aiming to market their once difference on the global stage, many cities have now cocooned their identities into the familiar and franchised. This project starts with an early example known generically as ‘Chinatown’. These global familiars signal often convergent economies. I`m seeking to learn from these seed franchises as I explore what constitutes the next city suburb. I am exploring the urban frontiers edges of a china town to yield an understanding as to what the next CHINABURB or next CHINA-CITY could be. It revisises the position of Chinatown in future as a key infrastructure of Melbourne's global city agenda, and offer a new possibility of balance to provide a new intersectional identity of Chinatown as a diverse Asian public. This project explores a new architecture spatial possibility across the urban city in a future Uberfication context by the ideas of convergence and immersion. A ‘merging -program’ thinking steps forward from ‘cross program’ offering a pitch to build a new image of next city image.

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Hope is Alive in Dandenong - Afgan Community Centre Yousuf Karami Supervisors: Peter Bickle

The site is located in Dandenong - close to the Dandenong Railway Station and the Afghan Bazaar where most of the Afghan shops and restaurants are located. Afghans in Australia increasingly seek to preserve their culture and make sure that their children, while enjoying life in Australia, do not forget their culture. The purpose of this centre is to provide these people with a place that can satisfy their cultural needs. Through this centre they can participate in recreational and cultural activities; learn English in an environment which also allows them to integrate with other community members and with the Australian community in general. Additionally, the design elements of the centre will be importing and remembering some of the iconic and historical architectures of Afghanistan such as Darul Aman Palace and Buddhas of Bamiyan (which was destroyed by the Taliban regime). The main entrance (gateway) of the centre is designed according to the Budhas’ figure. The ramps and screen balustrades which circulate throughout the entire building is decorated with Hazaragi cloth patterns and colours which are unique and very beautiful. Not only this, but the elevator shaft in the centre is symbolic of minarets from Afghanistan.

23


The rise of the middle: A new suburban paradise Katie White Supervisor: Simone Koch

As the population of Melbourne grows there is a large focus on the effect that this rapid growth will have on the city. Suburbs are changing dramatically in demographic and household structure as well as form however the typical model for new development still remains as high density inner city living or free standing suburban family homes on the outer fringes. The way that we address and approach rapid population growth and development in our city needs to shift. Our suburbs need to be considered with positive eyes and a new perspective that considers opportunities for improvement and enhancement as opposed to casting it aside as a lost cause and looking towards something new. This project uses Altona as an example and with a sequence of small interventions both architectural and landscape increases density whilst simultaneously creates diversity and a seamless connection of spaces forms a cohesive development that ultimately betters social connection and liveability for the residents. This scheme establishes a sense of place using buildings and integrated landscaped open space as a major characteristic as it aspires to provide an environment or neighbourhood different and more beneficial than what already exists - one where the outcome becomes very specific to the people as the suburb adapts and changes over time, and one of a rich shared experience. It forms a new attitude, system and framework of ideas that as a whole creates a new form of suburban paradise.

24


The Mosaic Campus

Nicole Yee Ker Chew Supervisor: Patrick Macasaet

This project explores how the study of superimposition and overlaying of specific typological behaviours can result in an on-going generation of formal and spatial quality. The progression of process experiments demonstrates how hybridisation and massing of complex typological behaviour are able to create nascent typologies and new functionalities from existing ingredients. My vision is to create a campus that emphasizes learning for all ages with a particular focus on social interactions as the key aspect of the project to allow the community to not only embrace the campus environment, but also to share and connect with each other individually. A place that speculates on, and offers both conventional and unconventional interrelated spaces that allows the community and the larger urban agenda to grow and collaborate.

25


THE GOVERNED VS GOVERNMENT

VIEW 01

VIEW 02

VIEW 03

200m (a)

300m (b) VIEW 8

VIEW 12

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VIEW 5

1.83km (g)

1.7km (f)

1.58km (e)

1.53km (d)

1.37km (c)

VIEW 7

A

VIEW 4

VIEW 9

VIEW 14

VIEW 6

The Government vs the Governed

VIEW 10 VIEW 11

VIEW 20

VIEW 3

Joseon dynasty (1392~1910) KING

VIEW 15 VIEW 21 VIEW 18

Public Approx. 315m

VIEW 17

Japanese colonial period (1910~1945) VIEW 19

Governor

VIEW 1

Public

B

Approx. 90m

B VIEW 16

President

VIEW 13

Japanese colonial period (1945~Current)

VIEW 2

Public

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:400

EXPLODED AXO DIAGRAM (THE BLUE HOUSE)

EXPLODED AXO DIAGRAM (THE PRESIDENTIAL ARCHIVE OF KOREA)

Hoyoung Kim Supervisors: Simon Whibley

Approx. 1.25 km

g a

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i Major events and the Plaza a. March of the king in Joseon dynasty b. Introduction of Korean language by King Sejong c. Introduction of Korean language by King Sejong d. Joseon Governor General e. Ceremony of independence of South Korea f. Soccer cheering event in 2002 Worldcup g. Death ceremony of former president h. Protesting in regards to sinking of Sewol ferry i. Candlelight rally claiming for impeachment of the president.

d

VIEW 04

VIEW 05

VIEW 06

+23.7

+16.0 ARCHIVE

+12.5 ARCHIVE

VIEW 07

VIEW 08

VIEW 09

+9.6

ARCHIVE

EXISTING SITE

+6.4 ARCHIVE

+3.2

LIBRARY ARCHIVE

+/-0.00

+/-0.00 SEMINAR ROOM

SEMINAR ROOM

-4.20

-4.2

VIEW 10

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EXTEND CENTRAL PLAZA & RE-ROUTING TRAFFIC

PRESIDENT’S RESIDENCE

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CHIEF OF STAFF

PRESIDENT

PROTOCOL SECRETARY

SECRETARY OF GENERAL AFFAIRS

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As a result of extensive research, it became clear that the relocation of the Blue house, the current Presidential residence, is inevitable. The new location of the Blue house will be in the plaza of Gwanghwa gate, where the candle protest occurred. Positioning the new Blue house in this plaza will not only allow the active engagement of the public in political issues, but will also apply pressure on those in power, due to the fact that the president is being watched by public. In order to achieve this, two new buildings will be required. One is the ‘new Blue house’ in the plaza and the other is ‘The presidential archive of Korea’.

PRESIDENT’S RESIDENCE

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sid Pre

2.5 million Koreans gathered together to protest against the corrupt regime of the previous presidency. This project aims to address how the future government should communicate with its citizens and also provide an appropriate form of architecture for the public to be able to actively engage in political issues in South Korea.

+9.60

+6.40 NATIONAL FINANCIAL PLANNER

NATIONAL RECORD SECRETARY

THE CHIEF OF SOCIAL INNOVATION

THE CHIEF OF HUMAN RESOURCE

THE CHIEF OF POLICY

SECRETARY OF POLICY PLANNING

THE CHIEF OF SOCIETY

SECRETARY OF EDUCATION & CULTURE

SENIOR PRESIDENTIAL SECRETARY FOR POLITICAL AFFAIRS

THE CHIEF OF JOB

ASSISTANTS OF HUMAN RESOURCE

THE CHIEF OF ECONOMY

SECRETARY OF TRADE

SECRETARY OF SOCIAL POLICY

SECRETARY OF RESIDENCE

NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER

SPEECH SECRETARY

1ST & 2ND SENIOR ADVISER

SECRET SERVICE

SECRET SERVICE

SECURITY DEPARMENT

+6.40

+3.20

+3.20 CHIEF OF STAFF

SITUATION ROOM

+/-0.00

+/-0.00

SECTION AA 1:150

INTERSECTING DIFFERENT PROGRAMS

LOW PROFILE BUILDING MASS

VIEW 13

VIEW 14

VIEW 15

VIEW 16

VIEW 17

VIEW 18

OPTIMISING TO THE SITE

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SHAPE THE BUILDNG TO ACCOMODATE REQUIRED PROGRAMS 01

VIEW 19

VIEW 20

VIEW 21 +23.7

SHAPE THE BUILDNG TO ACCOMODATE REQUIRED PROGRAMS 02

+16.0 ARCHIVE

+12.5 ARCHIVE

+9.6

ARCHIVE

+6.4 ARCHIVE

+3.2

LIBRARY ARCHIVE

+/-0.00

+/-0.00 SEMINAR ROOM

-4.20

CONNECTING

SEMINAR ROOM

-4.2

SECTION BB 1:150


WELCOME TO THE COLECTIVE GROUND! OUR MISSION: PROMOTING OPEN CONVERSATIONS, RELEASE OF IDEAS AND EMOTIONS, CREATING AN AFFORDABLE ECONOMICAL MODEL THAT HELPS NONFOR-PROFIT, FOR PROFIT AND OTHER PARTIES OF INTEREST TO ADVOCATE AND PUBLICLY ADVERTISE A JUST AND SUSTAINABLE SOCIETY, CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE OF TALENT TO HAVE PUBLIC EXPOSURE, CREATING A FACILITY OF RELIEF IN MELBOURNE THAT IS LIKE NO OTHER.

Welcome ride share cars and food trucks on the ground floor.

SPACE: REUSING CITY CAR PARKS THAT ARE FLAGGED AS REDUNDANT BUILDING THAT NO LONGER IS IN DEMAND DUE TO THE UPRISE OF SELF DRIVING CARS AND RIDE SHARE APPS. PROVIDING OPEN TO ALL HYPER FLEXIBLE, HYPER ADAPTIVE BOOKABLE MEETING ROOMS, PERFORMANCE SPACE, EXHIBITION, SHORT TERM RENTABLE SHOPS, COMMUNAL KITCHEN, ROOFTOP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE MELBOURNE CBD.

Welcome hidden talents and public speakers to hold small or large events in our public perfomance space.

It’s Time To Reclaim The Carpark

existing carpark

voids cut, added access between shifted slabs, opening up laneway access

existing ramps retained. laneways activated.

Welcome professional and hobby artists to hang their artwork to sale and exhibit in Level 1 gallery spaces.

Chenzi Yu Supervisor: Vicky Lam

The project identifies city carpark as an increasingly redundant typology with the rise of ride share apps and self-driving cars. The proposal retains the car park temporarily and readapts the building to house bookable meeting rooms, exhibition, short term rental shops, communal kitchen, public rooftop and more in the middle of Melbourne CBD. By looking at a building typology that is not usually identified as an asset to retain, I looked at the opportunities that arises from the typology and added small architectural interventions and detailings to create hyper adaptive and active spaces.

Welcome all general public to place a plant pot, confession statements, love locks on the building facade to make this building their own. We encourage our temporary tenants to advertise their logo and missions on their allocated window.

short term stay Lift

This readapted publicly owned building named The Collective Ground will promote open conversations, self-expression and will publicly advertise through architecture an engaging, just and sustainable society. The façade of the carpark is facelifted with a new mesh façade and will be a shelf for public to place their pot plants and a hanger for public to accessorise the building with confession cards or love locks. The ambition of the project is to create a relief space, a place to foster activism and is a temporal reclamation of an abandoned building. Regardless of how long this facility can stand on this site, the ambition of this project is to make the public fight for its permanency. The Collective Ground will be a place people remember Melbourne of: an open, inviting and engaging city.

Stairs

8 EXPIRES

8.00PM

sun lounge

GARAGE SALE!!!

EVERYTHING

UNDER 5

playground Stairs BBQ area

rooftop cinema

rentable carwash rooms

Welcome garage sale and exchange of goods to take in place on Level 2.

open forum atrium

communal kitchen

rentable garages storage

public art sale

Welcome all activist, non-for-profit, for profit and hobby groups to hold a meeting/meet up at the L2 carwash room.

play

catering space exhibition space

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Welcome to have yell opinions and have open conversations in the forum atrium.

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The proposition is a method of cyclic rezoning in Preston. There are three different conditions within this project that follow the same timeline and undergo a series of operations of rezoning.

EDUCATION

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This project uses time as an element in planning that has a direct impact on the proximity and scale of functions, consideration of people’s life patterns (requirements through aging), consideration of buildings life cycles, as well as an associated architectural language and culture of a city conscious of limited use – and that impermanence, may actually be more productive than permanence. It is about creating deliberate and manageable flux.

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DESIGN EXPIRIES

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The project takes its principles from ecological succession, which is the process of change of an ecological community over time. For example, bushfires or landslides disturb ecosystems, but they can restructure an environment, and provide new conditions for growth. The disturbance to zoning this case, supposes that you might repeatedly disrupt the regulatory environment with a view to creating a process of revitalisation and growth to an architectural environment, and in turn a social ecology.

HOMEMAKING

CONTINUITY + ANCILLARY MOVEMENT

-870M

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BUILDING 4.4 AVERAGE COMMERCIAL RENT-

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STAGNANT

This project is in response to current planning being not specific enough, yet still too restrictive. It does not currently advocate for a particular quality of architectural outcome – yet still tends to produce predictable typological outcomes. There is architecture in zoning that requires higher calibration, and this project attempts to bring into better alignment, a regulatory environment, and a human one.

A

-230M

TYPOLOGICAL CONFLICTS + OPERATIONAL INTERCHANGE

In a sense, the technique allows for the turning over of the earth, without loss of habitable or productive territory.

OPERATIONAL ADJACENCIES

ACCESS

150M

MERGE

28

MYER

CINEMA

TARGET


MAIN ENTRANCE

RECREATIONAL AREA

OFFICE SPACES

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VOLUMETRIC BREAKDOWN

1 7

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Symbiotic Decay

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CAVE SECTION

CAVE SECTION

collapsed sink hole moment of collapse chamber columns stalactites stalagmites drip curtain moment of erosion

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collapsed sink hole moment of collapse chamber columns stalactites stalagmites drip curtain moment of erosion

BASKETBALL COURT 9500M

VOLUME

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

3

Edmund Er How Khoo Supervisor: Ben Milbourne 5000

2500

1000

500

SKYLIGHT

SKYLIGHT

CIRCULATION

PROGRAM MODULE

SWIMMING POOL + LOUNGE

SUPERMARKET 2300M

SWIMMING POOL 1500M

OUTCOME

SUBTRACTION

INVERSE

BASKETBALL COURT + NOMADIC WORKSPACE

COMBINED

Symbiotic decay questions the fate of buildings which have reached the end of its service life, looking for a method to prolong occupancy through the study of cave formation. Using the ICI house as a testing ground as it stands as a symbol of progress, modernity, efficiency and corporate power in post-war Melbourne. This project looks at preservation not through the rejection of material aging and maintaining the object as the artifact, but rather as an operative device through appropriation of work spaces which are better suited for contemporary life and work styles.

FUTSAL COURT 4700M

BOWLING ALLEY 1200M

SHIFT IN PROGRAMMATIC USE

SKATEPARK 1000M

THEATRE 900M

PAST Companies used to occupy majority of the building. Utilising the stacked floor plates to maximise floor area for offices on each floor. At times using this as a way of dividing different departments in the company

Using the process of erosion as a device to create a series of new spaces with a perspective for the future. To fabricate a perspective that can eventually be free from the influence exerted by a number of issues that tend to limit thinking of space and using space within a specific area. Taking advantage of the qualities extrapolated from cave formation and using it as a method to negotiate an array of diverse working spaces and communal areas. The overall process and outcome has a poetic gesture of giving life through a series of decaying and erosion thus resulting in a symbiotic decay.

THEATRE + WORKSHOP SPACE

AMPHITEATRE 600M

WORKSHOP 254M

APARTMENTS 165M (average)

RETAIL 154M

PRESENT SKIN AS SPATIAL NEGOTIATOR

Shift in the way we work, having multiple companies occupy the whole building, sometimes the floor itself. Requires a more diverse programmatic distribution to suit the needs of current day and age

Using the skin as a way of introducing spatial difference through various thicknesses for privacy, sun shading properties and circulatory oppurtunities 1

1

TYPICAL OFFICE LAYOUT

2

2

2

2

3

3

DISTRIBUTION OF PRIVACY 2

3 2

3

3

COMMUNAL

1 2 3

3

1

Slides

Amphitheatre

sink hole moment of collapse moment of erosion

Steps

2

Lounge Setting

NIC

HO

Bar Type Workspace

Shared Workspace

Communal Table

LS

ON

ST

RE

ET

AL

T

EE

TR

TS

R BE

1. Private Meeting Room 2. Nomadic Workspace 3. Communal Meeting Area

RETAIL + COMMUNAL MEETING GROUNDS

Booths

2 Terrace Meeting Area

Mezzanine Workspace

3

PRIVATE

1 Enclosed Meeting Area

Discussion Booth

Personal Workspace

Shared Quiet Workspace

1. Communal Work Table 2. Amphitheatre 3. Intergrated Stairs

29

SECTION // 1:200


Pocket Full Of Sunshine

Andrea May Wen Lee Supervisor: Vicky Lam

‘Pocket Full of Sunshine’ represents aspirations for a vibrant, inclusive Sunshine. Through presenting the inherent value of the community, the project suggests an alternative method for dealing with urban renewal. A disused site containing the former John Darling and Son Flour Mill, 9 storey silos and existing sheds is chosen. Given its proximity to Albion station, the site is used as an anchor to activate the area. This proposal calls for something that is self-contained, and seeks not to catalyze a sprawling development but to utilize different cultural institutions found in Sunshine to create a large urban plaza. The architecture produced was generated from a series of models combining primitive forms found on site to suggest a new language that is endemic to Sunshine. The result is a celebration of the suburb’s vernacular typology, bringing together the robust attributes of culture and leisure. The multicultural hub allows different demographic groups to congregate and express themselves culturally without attracting discrimination. Existing buildings were carefully carved out to insert program, creating verticality throughout the project.

30


Flexibility. Drawn to scale Raphael Freedman Supervisor: Dr. Peter Brew

Architecture is one of those terms that can mean different things to different people. Ambiguity in architectural language extends to the way in which architects describe the performance, success and effect of their work. In some ways this vagueness plays out in accounting the achievements of architecture itself. For example, words like “Enhance,” “Value” and “Significance” are broad ways to describe apparently virtuous things, without themselves being things, and are typically used without any requirement of evidence that shows a link between what is caused by their work and their evaluation of it. In this project I take an instance. Architects invariably posit that designed spatial environments can enhance the experience of learning. That designing for schools is in fact designing the pedagogy. In some respects, the architecture of education has become synonymous with flexibility and yet perhaps it is worth understanding that flexibility for architects and for the people that use architecture can mean very different things. This project hypothesizes a scale expressed architecturally; with which one is able quantifiably assess the performance of flexibility in architecture. It endeavours to expand the use of architecture as a means for research and exploration of ideas that would conventionally dwell outside the bounds of the profession.

31


DONNYBROOK TOWN CENTRE

DONNYBROOK MAP

MODEL OF TOWN CENTRE

BUNNINGS WAREHOUSE

SURROUNDING BUILDING

COLLINGWOOD WAREHOUSE

WAREHOUSE STRUCTURE

SITE

BUNNINGS WAREHOUSE

DONNYBROOK SITE

BUNNINGS WAREHOUSE

PORTABLE SCHOOL

PUBLIC LIBRARY

SUPERMARKET

CAR VIEW

SWIMMING POOL CHANGE ROOM

SWIMMING POOL GRANDSTAND

CAR VIEW

48 CAR PARKING

BASKETBALL COURT MEDICAL CENTER VOID

Donnybrook Town Centre

RUNNING TRACK

Wong Siu Ming Supervisor: Dean Boothroyd

Roof

PORTAL FRAME STRUCTURE

INTERSECTION VIEW GROUND LEVEL

CLADDING

The project investigates a new strategy of regenerating Melbourne suburb town centres. The research began by analysing typical suburb town centres. Site visits resulted in a discovery in a lot of issues about existing town centres. For example, all suburb centres are supermarket orientated and lacks architectural character. The chosen site is the Donnybrook suburb. Although it is currently an undeveloped area, the Victorian Government has announced that will be unlocked as a new suburb in Melbourne by rezoning ten thousand lots in next ten years. This design will address existing issues as well as fulfilling the needs of the future needs of residents.

SITE & LANSCAPE

AXONOMETRIC VIEW

LIBRARY VIEW

SWIMMING POOL VIEW

SCHOOL VIEW

CAR PARK VIEW

INTERNAL VIEW

The strategy is to utilise Bunnings sheds, which is the most characteristic sheds in Melbourne suburbs, and unboxing the Bunnings architecture quality and injecting it into the Donnybrook town centre. The other strategy is to affect the land value of Donnybrook through architecture. The existing larger sheds can be rejuvenated and create space which operates in different scales. The portal frame can also be utilised in the future to accommodate different programs.

32


MEMORIAL PARK OF NUSAJAYA Pavillions A

B

C

D

E

F

G

GERBANG NUSAJAYA FUTURE DEVELOPMENT AFTER 25 YEARS CURRENT DEVELOPMENT

PROPERTY SPREAD ACROSS THE LANDSCAPE FLAGSHIP = ZONE/DISTRICT

SENAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

ISKANDAR MALAYSIA JOHOR BAHRU

SECOND LINK EXPRESSWAY

GERBANG NUSAJAYA

ISKANDAR PUTERI PORT OF TANJUNG LANGSAT PORT OF PASIR GUDANG SULTAN ABU BAKAR COMPLEX

PORT OF TANJUNG PELEPAS CHANGI AIRPORT

TUAS CHECKPOINT

CENTRAL OF BUSINESS DISTRICT

PORT OF SINGAPORE

mosque + grave

Distributed across landscape Area= Graveplot

Self-smillar pattern spread across each area and growth

passion pavillion flower place

spider lily pavillion place to grieve

Ganges Temple hindu columbarium

mosque + grave

Lotus Hall Chinese/ Buddhist Columbarium

Roots connects and forms networks in between each area as road system

Playground and Auditorium

Broardwalk

Integrated Cemetery

Integrated Cemetery

Memorial Park Gateway

613372 mm 612372.00

316227 mm 316227

273861 mm 273861.00

100000 sqm 613372

3 x intergrated

75000 sqm

1 non- integrated

program area

06

Integrated cemetery and park = more than 200k ppl, Area:more than 100k sqm Non-integrated = less than 10k ppl, Area: less than 30k sqm

township populations=200k ppl = 1 intergrated cemetery size for intergrated cemetery = 375000 sqm= 300k ppl If 375k sqm distributed in 784 plot 1 plot could accomodate 383 ppl

07

Memorial Park of Nusajaya Voon Jane Teo Supervisor: Dr Jan Van Schaik

01 Bridge 02 Spider Lily pavillion 03 Pod 04 Skatepark 05 Ceremony Room 06 Meditation Pod 07 Urn 08 Indoor car space 09 Cold Room 10 Cremation Room 11 Hall of Receiving coffin 12 Garage 13 Serivce and Accumulator 14 Maintenance Room 15 Front courtyard 16 Waiting Hall 17 Atrium and lily Pond 18 Reception+ wc 19 Staff Office + wc 20 Courtyard 21Passion Hall (Hall to Hang Flowers) 22 Ganges Hall ( hall to spread ashes) 23 Tearoom and Cafe 24 Buddhist Prayer 25 YingYang Courtyard 26 Muslim Prayer 27 Muslim Grave 28 Christian and Catholic Graves 29 Chinese Graves

07 Dir to Mekkah N

03 27

05 28 26

03

Dir to Mekkah N

22 26

21

23

01

16

15

06

02

05

00 Botanical Garden

25

20

19 18

17

02

24

04

01

Dir to Mekkah N

07 08

11 12

09

10 14

05

13

Dir to Mekkah N

03 03

Memorial Park of Nusajaya investigates and challenges how the cemetery can be transformed into a series of public programs not only for the deceased but also for the living. The place brings families and friends together for grieving. The site is open and exposed to the public community and provides communal support for each other. The reason that I want to challenge the notion of a cemetery is because the majority of Johor people view cemeteries as a taboo or suffocating space. Secondly, there has been an excessive number of developments happening around the area and this has not brought any benefits to the local communities.

Site Boundary Tram Line

LEGENDS 00 Gerbang Nusajaya 01 Memorial Entrance 02 Integrated Cemetery Muslim + Taoist 03 Buddhist Prayer and Columbarium 04 Passion Prayer 05 Mangrove Reserved+Broadwalk 06 Simpang Arang Village 07 Memorial Puzzle Playground 08 Forest City Golf Resort

04

29 29

Road Pedestrian

To achieve the goal, my project experimented with the dispersion of cemetery and relevant programs across the proposed site. This can prevent further interference of developments by the property developers because the cemetery will occupy the landscape and will repel the housing or development projects built within the precinct. This will also attract not only the locals but also Singaporeans who will come to visit the site. Additionally, the green space would be preserved for the local communities for next generations. The size of the memorial park is about 70.1 hectares, proposed to be located on the empty landscape, adjacent to the new development township of Gerbang Nusajaya, Malaysia. Gerbang Nusajaya is the second phase development of Iskandar Puteri which features various catalytic developments. It connects to the local airport and Singapore via Tuas second link and a high-speed train rail. This project will consist of mixed programs from a variety of religions such as Islam, Buddhism, Taoism, Hinduism and Christianity with leisure, memorial, parks, columbarium, crematorium and cemeteries.

21Passion Hall (Hall to Hang Flowers) 22 Ganges Hall ( hall to spread Urns)

16 Waiting Hall

23 Tearoom and Cafe

02 Spider Lily pavillion 06 Meditation Pod 17 Atrium and lily Pond

26 Muslim Prayer

33

04 Skatepark

03 Pod 28 Christian and Catholic Graves

25 YingYang Courtyard

07 Urn

Roof path

02 Spider Lily pavillion

4 Maintenance Room

10 Cremation Room

05 Ceremony Room

15 Front Courtyard

CREMATARIUM

Lily Pond

23 Tearoom and Cafe

26 Muslim Prayer 22 Ganges Hall ( hall to spread ashes)

Lily Pond

Muslim Prayer Shelter


De-Limitation of Place

Mary-Faith Cristoria Supervisor: Simone Koch

Delimitation of place means to draw and establish the boundaries of a place. Rather than a line indicating the extents and limits of a space, the boundaries of a place is a line that is blurred and influenced by topographical, environmental, cultural and heritage value. My thesis is about defining this notion by using it as the exposure of place and an armature of development for the City of Melton. By reimagining Melton to be a Botanical Garden is to shift the perception towards a stronger identity. Through four projects that has been thoughtfully selected to test the idea, architecture becomes the curation, preservation and medium to a landscape hidden and neglected by the centralized pressure of a suburb.

34


The Rejuvenation Village

Medical

Medical

Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Void

Void

Void

Assisted Living

Community Centre

Medical

Garden

Assisted Living

Medical

Void

Assisted Living

Void

Medical

Medical

Void

Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Medical

Medical

Void

Void

Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Garden

Medical Medical Void Assisted Living

Community Centre

Medical

The Rejuvenation Village

Assisted Living

Medical

Void Garden

Void

Void

Void

Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Garden Assisted Living

Assisted Living

Medical

Medical

Medical

Zemin Yang Supervisor: Dr. Jan van Schaik

This project is an extension of the work of Arakawa and Gins’in which design is used to stimulate the senses through kinetic, tactile and visual connection with the spaces and objects around us. In doing so, the project questions the conventional calm and relaxing retirement model and instead proposes a dynamic and challenging living environment.

Upper Floor

Ground Floor N

A 3.

1.

2.

Shop

2.

Shop

B

16.

3. 5.

Shop

6.

Chess Room

Medical Lobby Residents Lobby

1. Study room .........................................no table

18.

2. Bedroom ..................................only 3 x 3 m

Over the next 20 years, it is predicted that China’s population will become hyper-aged. As a response, this project proposes to celebrate the last third of a person’s life as a period of dynamism, adventure and personal empowerment. This is achieved through the implementation of a dynamic and playful symbolic architectural language and some physically challenging environments.

3. Kitchen .................for sharing or caring

Shop

7.

C

Shop 18.

20.

Study Rooms Dancing Room

4. Living room ..........................only for walking 5. Bathroom ............showcase of silhouette

8.

12.

10.

6. Laundry & washing .............for showcase & gossip

9.

15.

Library Lobby

Cafe

7. 2.

7.

7. Balcony .........................a kind of danger

3.

Children Playground

2. 4.

Car Parking Entrance

Gym

5.

8. Computer room ..................a kind of auditorium

13.

1.

14.

9. Pavilion ........... a stage for pretty ladies 10. Square ..for practicing retirees' dance

Kiosk

11. Stage .......... champion for the public

13. Kiosk .....................to exhibit nostalgia

Greenhouse

11.

19.

3.

14. Pool ........................SPA after dancing 15. Green house ................the emerald of village 16. Clinic .........the neighbor of residents 17. Patient room .....for feeling the surrounding 18. Library ...........to interact with children 19. Office ........teaching new generation 20. Grassland ..the entrance of rejuvenation

The project includes several retirement residences and a community centre which services the needs of the residents and the ageing communities in surrounding areas.

Residents Lobby

Kiosk 18.

12. Billboard ............for propogating forever

16.

3.

19.

3.

17.

16. 17.

1. Study room .........................................no table

Kiosk 17.

Kiosk

Kiosk

Kiosk

Residents Lobby

16.

Library

2. Bedroom ..................................only 3 x 3 m Medical Lobby

3. Kitchen .................for sharing or caring

6. Laundry & washing .............for showcase & gossip

4. Living room ..........................only for walking

7. Balcony .........................a kind of danger

11. Stage .......... champion for the public

5. Bathroom ............showcase of silhouette

8. Computer room ..................a kind of auditorium

12. Billboard ............for propogating forever

16. Clinic .........the neighbor of residents

9. Pavilion ........... a stage for pretty ladies

13. Kiosk .....................to exhibit nostalgia

17. Patient room .....for feeling the surrounding

10. Square ..for practicing retirees’ dance

14. Pool ........................SPA after dancing

18. Library ...........to interact with children

C

Administration Offices

TV

Meeting Room

Cafe

Residents Lobby

Children Playground

Cooking

Retirement Apartment

Chess Room

Children Leisure

Medical

Clinic Paitient Room

Shop Majhong

15. Green house ................the emerald of village

19. Office ........teaching new generation

Community Centre

Reading

Medical Lobby

Shop

Medical Shop

20. Grassland ..the entrance of rejuvenation

Medical Reading

Public Space

A

Clinic

Medical Teaching

B

Enquiry

Retirement Apartment

Cafe & Shop Office

Commercial

Program Colorcode :

Ground Floor

Upper Floor

35

Top Floor

Section B-B

Section C-C

Public Space

Teaching

Section A-A

Administration


The OV

Harris Kwong Supervisor: Simon Drysdale

The OV (Ordered Variety) is a social housing project situated in Ascot Social Housing Estate. OV was an estate planning set of principles, established by the Housing Commission of Victoria, with inter- war flats designed by architect Best Overend. Over the 17.2 Hectares of the estate, five acres of green space was dedicated to be developed for sports and recreational purposes which never went forward. The consequence was a master plan with a series of unused paddocks, and the site therefore became an agrarian master plan, without the cultivation. The consequence of this consequence ultimately had vast green spaces that were not used, resulting in drug and criminal activity within the estate. Can these green pockets be in filled to inject social intervention and community bonding programs to purge neighbourhood negativity? The OV looks at implementing existing estate planning principles of the ordered variety to produce a community bonding outcome as an alternative to the current State Government’s proposal to erode the existing urban cultural interface in favour of new.

36


The Jumble

Christopher Crawford Supervisor: Patrick Macasaet

Welcome to the Jumble; an alternative model of a mixed-use development prioritising the variety and mixture of spatial relationships. The Jumble challenges the normative ‘barcode’ of spatial and programmatic relationships within existing buildings where retail, office and residences are stacked into a tower in favour of a community jumbled within itself. New spatial relationships were investigated through a procedural methodology which took the residential and employment requirements outlined in the Arden Macaulay Structure Plan as well space allocations generated through the City of Melbourne’s CLUE data and jumbled the resulting spaces throughout the Arden Street site. The two domains of life and work were integrated to create a new spectrum of social and spatial relationships, facilitating the rise of the new age worker who may work from home, or who may live at work. What was achieved is a dense, socially vibrant and diverse arrangement of spaces; living quarters within office space, living rooms within book shops, apartments within day care centres, the list goes on. A new type of community where one may not leave for days on end and speculates on what these new spatial and programmatic relationships may be.

37


Stroller Village

Gabrielle Dimech Supervisors: Ian Nazareth

The suburbs were hinged on the notion of dichotomous spheres. A private sphere involving; consumption, reproduction, home, family and domesticity being the domain of a woman and an active sphere of production, waged work and political activity being associated with men. The suburban ideal was a post war cultural construction of the Australian dream – a single family detached house, surrounded by a yard. The societal ideal was a nuclear middle-class heterosexual household celebrating the bread winning father and traditional mother. It was this notion which laid out the ground work for post war suburbanization. Society however is dynamic, approximately 60% of households no longer fit into the category of the nuclear family. Western attitudes towards the ideal have shifted so far that radical is the new normal. This project is concerned with how the social production of the suburbs are outdated and has resulted in spatial barriers for certain household types, one of which is families headed by single mothers and that while the suburbs are in a state of transition, new housing typologies do not reflect diverse identities. Ultimately, the ambition of the Stroller Village was to interrogate the housing model which resulted in a hybridized typology intended to reflect identity. It follows a day in the life of a single mother, bringing an amalgamation of home, work, childcare and commercial space in model focussed on communal living, safety and a transition between provider and mother. By being concerned with understanding the daily tasks that define people, architecture has the potential to change the way we live. Furthermore, with the shift in both the suburban and societal ideal this project hopes to create discussion around how one might use exclusion to ensure inclusion. By designing housing for specific household types, we can develop a deep understanding of their needs and what it takes for radical families to truly thrive in the suburbs.

38


ROOFTOP GARDEN

LIBRARY

STREET VIEW 50 cm 0

ST ALBANS - CIVIC CENTRE THE UNION HOUSE

10

20

MARKET PLACE

EXTERNAL PERSPECTIVE

ST ALBANS - CIVIC CENTRE THE UNION HOUSE

St Albans’ Civic Centre The Union House Thuong Ngoc Nguyen Supervisor: Simon Whibley

SITE PLAN

The backbones of the center is the unique vibrant street life of St Albans by gradually flipping it to vertical “street life” in 3 dimensions. The circulation (or vertical street) through large staircases and elevators promotes the local horizontal movement within the main program areas and flows into squares which provide an informal setting for chance encounters and gathering exchange, whilst remaining as the backbones for the civic center. The massive/dominant diamond structure is where every single program is tied together.

VERTICAL STREET INTERNALLY

VERTICAL THEATRE / CONFERENCE ROOM

VERTICAL LIBRARY

VERTICAL CULTURAL CENTRE

MARKET PLACE

CULTURAL CENTRE THEATRE

CITY INTEGRATION

CONFERENCE ROOM

The proposal is to host a place that all the public facilities for St Albans is uniquely discovered. Not only reflecting the background of St Albans in a flipped way, but uniting people, soothe the nostalgia, as well as a place where everyone is able to help each other for future achievements.

SITE IDENTIFICATION - MAXIMIZE EFFICIENCY MIDDLE SCALE DEVELOPMENT - 13 LEVELS

CITY BALCONY

1650 Sqm

Recently the influx of Vietnamese immigrants transformed St Albans from a place no one knows into a city of hopes and opportunities and attract a numerous of people coming in day after day. The public facilities for the site is in poor quality and do not meet the requirements for a new city of hopes and opportunities for the local citizen. The low safety/security feeling somehow turns St Albans into one of the hot spots in Victoria with high criminal rates.

LIBRARY

ROOFTOP GARDEN OFFICE

OFFICE

VERTICAL OFFICES

MARKET PLACE GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:100

ROOFTOP PUBLIC PARK

UPPER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN 1:100

1ST LEVEL FLOOR PLAN 1:100

ROOFTOP FLOOR PLAN 1:100

PAGODA ROOFTOP PARK LIBRARY CULTURAL CENTRE CONFERENCE ROOM THEATRE ST ALBANS TRAIN STATION MARKET PLACE

FLIP STREET DIAGRAM EXISTING SHOP

39

ST ALBANS - CIVIC CENTRE THE UNION HOUSE

EXISTING SHOP

EXISTING SHOP

EXISTING SHOP

COFFEE SHOPS

SIGNATURE BRIDGE

EXISTING SHOP


SHINING LIGHT ON PUBLIC SPACE

D i s t r i but i n g h o us i n g to th e pla c e us i n g publi c o pe n s pa c e w h i ch is n o t o n l y a co n n e ct io n to li n k s ur ro un d i n g s , but a s a n a m e n i ty to v i ta li ze lo c a l a t m o s ph e re .

HOUSING & COMMUNITY SPACE

+ DISTRIBUTOR

+ PARK & GARDEN

S trate g y 01 : I n c re as e p u bl i c s pac e n ot losin g by c re ati n g d i s tr i b u to r to lin k each oth er S trate g y 02 : M ake e x i s ti n g p u bl i c s pac e m ore vib ran t c re ati n g m o re p ro g ram s/am en it ies as n am e d ac tivato r S trate g y 03 : l i n k p u bl i c an d p r ivate - P ublic life in th e pr ivate b uildin g an d P r ivate l i fe i n the p ublic b uildin g ( d u al / b i n ar y i d e n ti ty )

_P U BLI C V EGETAT I O N GARDEN

_STADI UM STAND

_HO U SI NG _ GR EEN HO U SE

_HO U SI NG

_ H OUS IN G

_LI BR ARY _ HO U SI NG

_SUNK EN GARDEN _PAVI LI O N _CAR PARK

_ S T R E ET MA RKET _MU T I -F UNCT I O N RO O M _CO RRI DO R EXHI BI T I O N

_ A MPH IT H E AT RE _ S QUA RE _ACCESS WAY

Shining Light on Public Open Space _ H O U SI N G

Jonghwan Park Supervisor: Simon Whibley

Melbourne’s population growth is expected to be 8 million in 2050 whilst housing affordability is decreasing. It is well known that the current methods of a high-density centre with a sprawling low- density perimeter reduces liveability at both ends and decrease housing diversity. This project sees the inner and middle suburbs as places where the increased population can be accommodated, especially when Melbourne’s population has doubled. This project’s central theme is providing housing and public amenities such that more housing can create more public spaces. Existing public open spaces are treated as sites of potential growth, future network distribution of housing and public space. Rather than living in a dense city, it can be looked at living in the suburbs as something where one might require only a few short trips within the neighbourhood to access services, recreation and entertainment. This integration of housing and public space once designed, the finished concept serves as a success story that remains and services the existing public whilst creating and developing more public spaces.

_BUFFER ZONE 1. TR ANSITION AREA FROM OUTS IDE INTO TH E HOU SING : USE IT AS SEMI PUBLIC AREA FOR THE TENANTS TO HANG OUT AND WATCH SPORTS FIELD FROM BUFFER ZONE TER R ACE W H IC H IS CORRIDOR , ACCESSWAY AND SMALL TERR ACE .

2.CO NNECT I O N SPACE / CO MMO N SPACE BET W EEN HO U SI NG : FO R T HE I N CASE O F EXT ENSI O N O P EN DI NI NG AREA TO LI NK W I T H DI F F ERENT HO U SEHO LD BU T I N FAMI LY MEMBERS ALSO TO K EEP P RI VACY W HEN UNNECESSARY.

_ S TA D I UM S TA N D

_ S TA D I U M : IT

S TA N D

I S O N E O F T H E A C T I v AT O R S T O B R I N G M O R E v I B R A N T AT M O S P H I E R O N C I v I C C E N T R E W H I C H I S A S P I N E O F T H E T O W N .

B Y P U S H I N G S TA N D A S A P R O G R A M I N T O T H E B U I L D I N G C R E AT E D A L O N G T H E B O U N D A R Y O F S P O R T S F I E L D , M O R E P E O P L E E N j O Y S P O R T S G A M E W I T H B E T T E R vIEW.

40


Un- Compact Us

Neda Moeini Supervisor: Peter Knight

Are today’s archives yesterday’s libraries? This project questions the ability of an introverted architectural typology like an archive, to be turned inside out in order to instigate and invigorate an urban Arts Precinct? Can it ultimately become a public hub despite the usual density archives tend to take in from? Media is a double-edged sword which can make us or break us. It can help us tremendously or it can distract us to the point of destroying everything. I believe that this distraction could be employed to our advantage in architecture. We can create a space that benefits from the excessive level of absorption we have into the Media. Upon digitalising all the physical records, the ABC network is disposing the majority of authentic materials and relocating the remaining to an offline location. My project imagines an independent building where all these materials can collectively coexist and partially or completely be open to the public. My project will be a place that you can interact with this media and content in a new way and from a new angle. It is a hybrid between a traditional archive and a modernized library. It is a celebration of an absence. It provides a protective shell for a collection of memories which dare to live on! It is ABC’s memorabilia.

41


STEPS TO FLINDERS STREET

ANTIBODIES

FROM FLINDERS STREET TO FEDERATION SQUARE

AR SHOWROOM

TECHNOLOGY AND NEW MEDIA GALLERY

Antibodies

Quinn Quyen Do Supervisor: Peter Knight

Based on the controversy of replacing the Yarra Building by a proposed Apple flagship store, this project is about a new technology and media based gallery which will enhance the relationship between Federation Square’s architecture and the Yarra River’s landscape. It is a response to the threat of identity stealing as if the civic place is dominated by an unpredictable success of a commercial program, the Apple store on Federation square. The fear caused from the issue is necessary to adapt a new change, especially for an innovation. It is beneficial to provoke a recognition that Federation Square is imperfect as its condition should be enhanced to let the public engage more with the architecture and landscape.

GATEWAY TO BIRRARUNG MARR AND MCG

Ian Potter Art Center

Atrium

ACMI Deakin Edge

Antibodies is the project in which the commercial program, Apple store, is accepted to be the starting point of a civic program, technology and new media gallery, supporting the identity of the Federation Square complex and multicultural community. From this, the public and private could have different perspectives and experiences about how to adapt and adopt a strange to achieve an innovative condition.

Staff Cloak Reception

Federation Square Plaza

Apple Store

HOVERING SQUARE

RIVER ACCESS

Technology Gallery

Green Square

FEDERATION SQUARE’S PLAZA TO YARRA RIVER

RIVERSIDE FROM BIRRARUNG MARR

Green Square

GROUND 1:1000

STEPS TO FEDERATION SQUARE’S PLAZA

ON THE DOCK

Technology Gallery LEVEL 2 1:1000

Lab Office

LEVEL 3 1:1000 ders Flin

SECTION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY GALLERY 1:2000

St

FEDERATION SQUARE extruded object

ve in Mo

ve out Mo

Cafe

RIVER water

n sto

an Sw

Technology Gallery

St

Technology Gallery

DESIGN STRATEGY

LOWER GROUND LEVEL 1:1000

Technology Gallery SITE PLAN 1:5000 AR Showroom

SECTION THROUGH 2 BUILDINGS 1:1000

Permanent Gallery Temporary Gallery Commercial Staff Storage

Circulation Green Square

AR Showroom

Showroom Rest room

SUBMERGED PLAN 1:1000

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XI'AN

Residential Art Village

Residence entrance

Residence entrance

Residence entrance

Residential Art Village

Residence entrance

Gallery entrance

Linyu Cheng Supervisors: Dr. Jan van Schaik

This project tests a new model which combines the residential type with art village type set in Xian, China.

1 KM

In the last two decades, the Chinese population has become wealthier, which has led to a greater demand for, and practice of, the arts. In response to this, art districts like 798 in Beijing have begun to appear. These districts are typically enclosed, and are restricted in use to the production and sale of art. This project speculates as to the benefits that residential areas might derive from being combined with the production and consumption of art. To test this speculation, this project combines artists’ studios, an art museum, production workshops, residences for artists, and residents for those who do not identify as artists. The project seeks to connect these varied types together by providing views from the museum into the art production spaces, and even into the artists’ residences, to create an urban environment where the production and consumption of art, at both high and low levels, becomes integrated with the tasks and habits of everyday life.

Ground level

Level 3

Level 6

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Level 1

Level 2

Level 4

Level 5

Level 7

Level 8

Public gallery

Residential

Staircase residential display area

Home connecting gallery

Retail & art zone

Public area for residential


Supervisors Semester 1, 2018 Major Project Coordinators A/Prof. Paul Minifie Vicky Lam Major Project Moderation Panel Prof. Leon van Schaik Prof. Vivian Mitsogianni A/Prof.Paul Minifie A/Prof. Richard Black Suzannah Waldron (Director, Searle x Waldron Architecture) Major Project Supervisors Peter Bickle

A/Prof. Roland Snooks

Dean Boothroyd

Dr. Michael Spooner

Dr. Peter Brew

Dr. Jan van Schaik

Emma Jackson

Simon Whibley

Prof. Mark Jacques

Tom Kovac

Peter Knight

Patrick Macasaet

Simone Koch

Paul Dash

Vicky Lam

Jane Dash

Ben Milbourne

Simon Drysdale

Ian Nazareth Sam Hunter Adam Pustola Tim Pyke Helen Duong

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Students Semester 1, 2018 Chenzi Yu

May Wen Andrea Lee

Christopher Crawford

Mengyong Jiang

Christopher Krambias

Monty Balding

Dalong Li

Neda Moeini

Daniel Chilelli

Ngoc Thuong Nguyen

David Schwarzman

Nikita Bhopti

Doo-Kee Chung

Quyen Le Do

Edmund Er How Khoo

Raphael Freedman

Elizabeth Acland

Siu Ming Wong

Fiona Robertson

Toby McElwaine

Gabrielle Dimech

Voon Jane Teo

Georgia Eade

Yang Ren

Harris Kwong

Yee Ker Nicole Chew

Hoyoung Kim

Yuanbo Zhang

James Hall

Zemin Yang

Jonghwan PARK

Zoe Hughes

Julius Egan Karimi Yousuf Katie White Laura Bailey Lauren Crockett Linyu Cheng Mary-Faith Cristoria Matthew Pirrie Maxwell Leegel Wight

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Profile for RMIT Architecture

RMIT Architecture & Urban Design Major Project Catalogue Semester 1 2018  

RMIT Architecture & Urban Design Major Project Catalogue Semester 1 2018