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RMIT ARCHITECTURE DESIGN ELECTIVES POSTERS SEMESTER 1, 2013 Masters of Architecture ARCH 1338 ARCH 1339 ARCH 1340 Bachelors of Architecture ARCH 1040 ARCH 1041 Both Bachelors Electives and Masters Electives will be Balloted for via PAPER BALLOT. This means filling out and submitting a ballot paper into the elective ballot box on level 12, Building 8. The ballot Box for electives will be available from 1pm Tuesday 10th of July until midday the next day Wednesday, 11th July. Enquiries: Leanne Zilka lecturer in Architecture leanne.zilka@rmit.edu.au

IMAGE BY SARIT MELTZER


CONTENTS DAY

TIME

LOCATION

STAFF

MONDAY

1.30 ‐ 4.30

45D

Roland Snooks ‐ Fibrous Assemblages

TUESDAY

9.30‐12.30

8.11.58

John Cherrey ‐ Putting the Pieces Together

2.30 ‐ 5.30

B45C

Mauro Baracco /  Louise Wright ‐ All Change

9.30‐12.30

B45C

Leanne Zilka ‐ Occupying the Pattern

2.00 ‐ 5.00

9.1.36

Lawrence Harvery  Jeffrey Hannan ‐ Soundscape Studies

2.30‐5.30

B45C

Gretchen Wilkins ‐ Case studies in Urban Architecture

2.00 ‐ 5.00

8.7.153  Note: week 1 & 3 will be in 8.11.42 1.30‐4.30

Junghwo Park and Ming Yap  ‐ Revit ‐BIM

9.30 ‐ 12.30

B45C

Lindsay Holland ‐ Pavillion

10.30 ‐ 1.30

B45D

Paul Minifie

5.00 ‐ 8.00pm 

8.7.79

John Cherrey ‐ Transformations

GEELAB ‐DESIGN HUB 100.4.2

Tom Kovac/ Michael Mei  ‐ Wicked Mobilities

WEDNESDAY

Thursday

5.30‐8.30pm Intensives

Growing Smarter Material Systems 6th ‐ 10th of May

SIAL ‐ Nick Williams

Thermal Reticulations 

Wednesday and Thursday mornings, between 9am‐ 12pm

SIAL ‐ Mani Williams

TBA

Leanne Zilka ‐ Glow Space

Research elective


This elective has two components: A research component directed by Roland Snooks that runs for the whole semester and a week long intensive workshop directed by Matthias Kohler. The research component will develop design research and techniques in the fields of algorithmic design, robotic fabrication and composite materials. This research will explore highly intricate ornamental and tectonic architectural geometry created through emerging robotic and algorithmic tools, in particular RMIT’s newly acquired Kuka industrial robot. The research will be tested through design projects, and a composite fibre installation at the Design Hub. Students will work closely with Roland Snooks in small self-motivated research groups expanding on existing Kokkugia research and developing new experiments. Students will need to be available to work collaboratively 2 days a week, including a weekly review running on Monday 1:30pm - 4:30pm. Knowledge of either digital fabrication equipment, composite material, or scripting would be beneficial, however it is not necessary. The intensive robotics workshop will be run by Matthias Kohler at RMIT in late May. Gramazio Kohler, who are based in Zurich, are the world leading pioneers in the application of robotics to architecture.

MONDAY 1:30 PM - 4:30PM | BUILDING 45 + INTENSIVE MAY 20-24

ROLAND SNOOKS | KOKKUGIA + [DESIGN / ROBOTICS / MATERIAL RESEARCH COMPONENT]

MATTHIAS KOHLER | GRAMZIO KOHLER [ROBOTIC FABRICATION INTENSIVE WORKSHOP COMPONENT]

COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN + ROBOTIC FABRICATION RESEARCH ELECTIVE

FIBROUS ASSEMBLAGES


When: Tuesday 9.30 - 12.30 Where: bld. 8.11.58 Lecturer: John Cherrey contact: john.cherrey@rmit.edu.au

putting the pieces together

Carlo Scapa - detail Olivetti showroom , Venice

masters elective

In this course you will explore the world of architectural detailing. If you want to understand how buildings are assembled close up then this is the course for you. The approach in the class is hands-on. Following a couple of introductory classes where we look at the principles of detailing you will commence the first of three assignments. For each of the assignments you will be give a set of plans, sections and elevations and asked to complete some of the details. The work you will detail will be that of some award winning Melbourne architects. The class will be a bit like working in an office. You produce the work and then it will be marked up for you to improve and finalize. During each class you will be given the technical know-how to assist you in working through your set of detail problems. At the conclusion of the class you will be given the real solutions for you to compare with your designs. The final set of drawings will provide a valuable resource for you in the future.


all change Design Elective + Studio Architectural, urban and landscape projects of localized and networked systems in the Wimmera region ARCHITECTURAL THINKING AND CLIMATE CHANGE Architects are used to integrating complex systems, competing needs and seemingly polarised aims. Through the design process, they move towards the whole through research, case study, speculation, and testing. This dynamic process often leads to innovative and provocative combinations of program, siting, and built form where outcomes can be far reaching, addressing issues beyond the traditional domain of the building. It is just the type of process and thinking that is so critical to addressing complex issues of climate change. How and where people live, work, produce their food, share community activities, participate into the world from their specific places and how these solutions interact with the natural environment must be re-thought to combine sustainable social and environmental solutions. These issues land at the feet of traditional concerns of architecture: land use and urbanisation, big and small systems and relationships. What role can architecture play? THE STUDIO This studio will place architectural design in a leading position to develop design based solutions to climate change by considering the traditional concerns of land use and urbanisation anew. The studio will focus its investigations on some rural and urban contexts of the Wimmera region, located approximately 350 kilometres north-west of Melbourne. The urban, architectural and landscape projects developed through the studio will involve investigations into the conservation, rehabilitation, consolidation and expansion of the natural and rural, leftover, brownfield and green reserve areas; they will look at urban planning that focuses on open spaces and will offer solutions in response to the ecological significance and links to natural systems that are provided by these open spaces. These projects will also engage with the notions of distributed and networked systems, opportunistically taking advantage of spatial, cultural, geographical and urban conditions that exist in the investigated sites in order to propose productive landscapes and combinations/interactions of programs which might also accommodate new housing, civic amenities as well as working, commercial and community spaces. THE ELECTIVE This elective will support the all change design studio. Taking the case study method as an important part of an architect’s research process, students will study examples of how strategic and catalytic architecture is played out through program, siting, multi-use and lack of hierarchy between landscape, infrastructure, architecture, and more and more, ecology. Students will build a body of research unpacking a breadth of understanding of approaches to sustainability and, what role design can play. Students will be required to undertake the following tasks: 1. Collaboratively produce a single document that collates the research 2. Individually produce a text supported by drawings and images that demonstrates critical thinking on the role/s of architecture in climate change response 3. Participate in the maintenance and further editing of the existing website - www.rmitallchange.weebly.com - through the reworking and publishing of research material (both produced in previous All Change research and as new outcomes through this current All Change elective) 4. Work on the further editing and expansion of the existing All Change publication (edited by Mauro Baracco, published by School of Architecture and Design - RMIT University, 2012) into a book 5. Be actively involved in the organization, setting up, and curation of All Change exhibition, planned to take place through May 2013 in the Design Hub building as part of the forthcoming Convergence collective exhibition (produced under the direction of DRI - Future Fabric of Cities Flagship, and the curation of Fleur Watson) 6. Participate in the organization of a workshop/roundtable as a collateral event of the All Change exhibition in May 2013 - this event will focus on urban sustainability topics related to the elective + studio’s theoretical framework BOTH THE STUDIO AND ELECTIVE It is not compulsory that students undertake both the studio and elective, however IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to do so, as the studies and research undertaken in both the subjects will be closely interconnected and consistently shared. SITE VISIT In week 1, from Wednesday 6th to Saturday 9th March, there will be a study trip in the area. This is an essential moment in both the studio and elective research. It is compulsory to attend. We’ll camp and visit the towns and landscapes of the area, meeting with local communities and urban planners + collecting information and researching in general in preparation for the projects that will be developed throughout the semester. CONCLUSIVE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP This studio and elective are part of the European/Australian Joint Collaboration Project: DARC - Designing the New World: Developing Architectural Education in Response to Climate Change, involving exchanges and co-operation between the 6 following schools: RMIT University, UTS Sydney, QUT Brisbane, ETSAB Barcelona (Spain), ENSA Toulouse (France), Turin Polytechnic (Italy). From 11 to 14 June 2013 (week 14) an International Workshop will be organized by QUT Brisbane, in which the final outcomes of the studio will be publicly presented by tutors and students, with staff and students from all 6 schools involved with this Project. Students from both this studio and elective are strongly encouraged to attend. In light of the above workshop, it is likely that final presentation at RMIT may take place 1 or 2 weeks earlier than usual (possibly in week 12 or 13, instead of week 14)

UPPER POOL STUDIO RUN BY MAURO BARACCO TUESDAY 9.30 - 1.30PM - BUILDING 45 C PLEASE NOTE: 1st STUDIO CLASS WILL BE ON: MONDAY 4th MARCH, 9.30-1.30, BUILDING 8, LEVEL 12, ROOM 1

UPPER POOL ELECTIVE RUN BY MAURO BARACCO AND LOUISE WRIGHT TUESDAY 2.30 - 5.30PM - BUILDING 45 C


Case Studies in Urban Architecture Gretchen Wilkins Urban Architecture Laboratory Wednesdays 2:30-5:30pm, B45, C RMIT Architecture, Semester 1, 2013 ARCH 1440-41 or ARCH 1338-39-40

Facade studies for the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Los Angeles. (Studioworks: Mary-Ann Ray and Robert Mangurian)

“The city is to be understood here as architecture. By architecture I mean not only the visible image of the city and the sum of its different architectures, but architecture as construction, the construction of the city over time. Architecture...is a permanent, universal, and necessary artifact.” -Aldo Rossi, The Architecture of the City “The Poverty of much urbanist thought can be reduced to a central fallacy: that the city, or Metropolis, expresses itself fully in its physical form, that as a finite concrete object alone its amenable to analysis and intervention. The city, however, is not this, but rather a perpetually organizing field of forces in movement...” -Sanford Kwinter, Mutations

DESCRIPTION: This course will study contemporary relationships between architecture and urbanism through a series of individually-structured case studies. The focus is twofold: to expose ideas, practices and outcomes of contemporary architectural and urban work, and to develop a specific response to that work through independent design research. A series of given themes will frame the first portion of the course and instigate research proposals in the second part, presented in class and through required readings and project reviews. Each case will identify a subject and project of interest (or choose from those given) and document a its conceptual, operational, and spatial intentions. This will provide a framework for a speculative project and/or practice proposal, the two presented together in the final work. In addition to weekly readings and on-going research, two formal presentations and a final publication will be required. This course is open to Bachelor or Masters students, and could work to establish a framework for Architecture Major Project studio.


There is a new typology emerging in the city - the tall, small floorplate residential tower. They are driven by new construction technologies, a shortage of large parcels of well located land and people prepared to pay a premium to live in well-located, smallish apartments with great views and amenity. These kind of buildings could be seen to represent Melbourne maturing into a Metropolis - a rich and diverse city full of new experiences and opportunities for its occupants. Such buildings can be challenging from a planning, structural, programmatic and sustainability perspective. But we are up for a challenge! This elective will examine some of the technical issues surrounding this building type. We will work in groups to research relevant technical issues, (planning, regulatory, greenstar, structural, services, facades etc) and produce a set of drawings and a report to sketch design standard for a tall, small plate residential tower in Melbourne’s CBD. The emphasis will not be on philosophical and aesthetic issues, but on acquiring the technical low-down on the skinny. title: The Skinny tutor: Paul Minifie and Guests time: 10:30 - 1:30 Thursday place: 45-B


REVIT BIM (Building Information Modeling) Better Workflow, Better Insight, Better Buildings BIM (Building Information Modeling) is not just about representing a building in 3D. BIM is widely used for all professionals in the building and architecture industry and is likely to open up a new generation of building documentation detaching away from the planar drawing board. It involves communicating and sharing information across the team from designers to builders to suppliers and finally ochestrating its entire sequence onto a building site. In addition, we will demonstrate how REVIT can be coordinated with other design applications, such as Rhino, 3Ds-MAX, and Sketchup. Everything that goes into a BIM project can be done so in greater detail, accuracy and consistency than any other 2D drafting program. There will be lesser mistakes, building elements can be accountable and quantified and many problems can be highlighted much more effectively. BIM is not CAD. It’s not even 3D CAD. It’s something we’d dimly imagined as the next step, a way to understand a building before it is built, and more fundamentally than ever before. This elective will spend the semester exploring various range of REVIT Techiniques and teach students the principal theory of BIM (Building Information Modeling), basic 2D & 3D tools, as well as critical program interface and settings in REVIT.

Tutor: Junghwo Park + Beng Han Yap Time & Location: Wednesday Weeks 1 & 3 - 8.11.42 (Computer lab) From 1.30 - 3.30pm (Group A T.B.A.) From 3.30 - 5.30pm (Group B T.B.A.) All students to meetup on first week for details and briefing All other weeks - 8.7.153 (Computer lab) From 2 - 5pm (Group A + B) Lower and Upper pool elective


PAVILION ELECTIVE

PAVILIONS OFFER A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE 21C ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS THEY CAN BE A CAUSE FOR REFLECTION + EXPERIMENTATION INTO STRUCTURE, ENCLOSURE + MATERIALITY WITHOUT THE DISTRACTION OF COMPLEX PROGRAM THIS ELECTIVE WILL BE A CULTURAL + PERCEPTUAL INVESTIGATION INTO THE LANGUAGES OF ARCHITECTURE THRU MAKING, NOT JUST A PURSUIT OF TECHNOLOGY THIS ELECTIVE WILL CONSIDER THREE PAVILIONS NOT GREATER THAN 400 SQ.M EACH SITED WITHIN CONTEXT OF ROYAL PARK’S CIRCULAR PATHWAY STUDENTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO CONSIDER THREEE PAVILIONS, IN A LANDSCAPE, UTILISING ONLY TIMBER, GLASS, CONCRETE + EARTH THE OPTIONS ARE : PRECEDENT STUDY

I

ELEMENTAL SPECULATION

I BIOMORPHIC SPECULATION

STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP + ENHANCE THEIR SKILLS IN GRAPHICS I 2D AUTOCAD I 2D + 3D RHINO I REVIT (TO BE ENCOURAGED) I CAD CUT MODELLING FINAL STUDIO OUTPUT WILL CONSIST OF THREE MODELS @ 1 : 20

QUERIES : lindsay.holland@hau.net.au

I

I DETAILS @ 1:5

TIME + LOCATION :

I

ASSEMBLAGE HANDBOOK

Thursday 9.30-12.30 + BUILDING 45C


1. a. The act or an instance of transforming. b. The state of being transformed. 2. A marked change, as in appearance or character.

trans路for路ma路tion (trnsfr-mshn, -f么r-)

Transformation will use a single key design and experiment with the nature of materiality in architecture. Materials and techniques will include, card, resin, metals, timber, fabrication, casting, soldering, painting, vac forming, CNC maching, additive manaufacting, water and laser cutting. Making and models will be the vehicle of exploration. In addition to the central elective them, you will work through a range of techniques, which allow quality models to be made with relatively little equipment in your studio space, as well as working with the amazing range of conventional and digital equipment available in the school workshops. To gain the most from this elective, a good working knowledge of Rhino is benefical. This elective is open to Bachelor & Masters level students

Assessment will be based on completion of series of exercises and models produced over the course of the semester

Thursdays 5.00pm - 8.00pm

Level 7 workshop

Lecturer - John Cherrey


Mobilizing Melbourne

Barcelona

Karlsruhe

Maribor

Tom Kovac & Steffen P Walz & Jose alfano Michael Mei & bianca vallentine

Description: In the future, our mobilities will not only be increasingly measurable (and measured), but also will we be facing tricky, extreme, unwelcoming, as well as most enjoyable, novel conditions under which we will be moving, and be moved, from the micro to the macro, from the body to the city, from the physical to virtual, alternate realities. Architects and game designers alike will be empowering routes for users, thus scripting systemic, environmental experiences. In this Semester I Elective, we will compare, analyze and represent wicked challenges in urban mobilities, such as congestion and sprawl, and start to conceptually design solutions. Our subjects will be the Cities of Melbourne (Australia), Barcelona (Spain), Karlsruhe (Germany) and Maribor (Slovenia), the latter three all of which are major RMIT partners in Europe. It is planned to carry the Elective over into a Semester II Studio, and to work with industry partners such as carmaker Audi. Wicked Mobilities is an ongoing collaboration between RMIT’s Games & Experimental Entertainment Laboratory–the GEElab–and 2112Ai [Architectural intelligence], to jointly explore the potentials of gameful architecture & urbanism. The visualization of information and data will be essential to this Elective. We will be using big printed matter at regular presentation sessions, to capture outcomes; project printing is being sponsored by Hewlett-Packard. In addition, projects will culminate in an interactive experiment, to be presented (and played) during GEElab’s Monthly Game Play on 22 May 2013. When: Where: Enquiries:

THURSDAYS / 17:30 - 20:30 GEELAB / THE DESIGN HUB / BUILDING 100 / LV4 / ROOM 2 bianca.vallentine@rmit.edu.au michael.mei@rmit.edu.au

2112Ai 2112A 2112 Ai 1O 1OO 1OOYC OYC


This research based course aims to explore the ways in which we can inform design through intrinsic material system properties and fabrication systems

GROWING SMARTER MATERIAL SYSTEMS developing research with industry

Coordinator: Jane Burry and Nicholas Williams Time: Intensive workshop week of 6th - 10th May with Kevin Klinger, Ball State and i.m.a.d.e times to be agreed, outside of that week Location: Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory, Bld 100, Lvl 4 Reviews SIAL Presentation Space, Bld 100 Location: Lvl 4, The Long room For more details, visit the project’s blog: http://thermalreticulations.wordpress.com/ or contact mani.williams@rmit.edu.au

Course Description The aim of this course is to invite students from diverse disciplines to take part in design research conducted in SIAL. The course will participate in the development and relatisation of a t e a m w o r k d e s i g n a n d f a b r i c a t i o n p r o j e c t in collaboration with Kevin Klinger, Ball State University and imade. The course will be delivered through skill-based instruction and hands on project based learning . It will serve students in areas of study including but not exclusive to architecture, industrial design and engineering, involve novel approaches to digital and physical prototyping, advanced building simulation, structural performance of material systems, fabrication and assembly at full scale. It introduces students to design research methods that can be applied in design studio, postgraduate project work and professional practice. The course is delivered on a negotiated schedule of collaborative workshops with ad hoc technical support. Places are limited, students are invited to submit an expression of interest listing interests and relevant experiences to nicholas.williams@rmit.edu.au


This research based course aims to explore the ways in which we can measure the gap between the prediction of performance and the measurement of reality for facade design.

THERMAL RETICULATIONS the development of a SmartGeometry Cluster

Course Description The aim of this course is to invite students from diverse disciplines to take part in design research conducted in SIAL. The course will participate in the development of the SmartGeometry 2013 Cluster: Thermal Reticulations.

Coordinator: Jane Burry and Mani Williams Time: Wednesday and Thursday mornings, between 9.00am-12.00pm, starting 6th March Location: Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory, Bld 100, Lvl 4 Reviews SIAL Presentation Space, Bld 100 Location: Lvl 4, The Long room For more details, visit the project’s blog: http://thermalreticulations.wordpress.com/ or contact mani.williams@rmit.edu.au

The course will be delivered through skill-based instruction and hands on project based learning with an option to conduct own research explorations. It will serve students in areas of study including but not exclusive to architecture, industrial design and engineering. The student will have the flexibility to select from a wide range of topics including but not limited to: digital and physical prototyping, advanced building simulation, thermal performance of building materials, electronic sensors and data visualisation. It introduces students to design research methods that can be applied in design studio, postgraduate project work and professional practice. The course is delivered via weekly collaborative workshops with ad hoc technical support. Places are limited, students are invited to submit an expression of interest listing interests and relevant experiences to mani.williams@rmit.edu.au


ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES POSTERS_Sem 1, 2013  

RMIT Architecture Elective offerings, semester 1 2013

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