Page 1

FRAMING THE FIELD Exploring the formation and sequencing of walking trails in the Dandenong Ranges through the investigation of field. Thomas Collins 3377283


A

B

C

D

E

F

H

G

I

J

K

L

M

N CONTENTS

1 1, I

1, I

Page 1 - The Dandenong Ranges Field Guide

3, J

Page 2 - Caring for the Region

4, H

Page 3 - Acessing the Dandenong Ranges

2

3, J 3

4

4, H 5

6

6, G Page 4 - Observing Conditions

6, G

7

8

8, L

8, L

Page 5 - How to walk the Dandenongs

9

10 10, H Page 6 - The Conservation Trail

10, H

11

11, F Page 7 - Kallista to Creeks Landing Walking Trail

11, F

12, G Page 8 - Creeks Landing

12, G

12

12, E

12, E Page 9 - Framing the Field

13

14

15

16

14, I

14, I

Page 10 - Bibliography


DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING 1:30000

The Dandenong Ranges Field Guide

This guide explores the generation of a connected and cohesive walking trail network in the Dandenong Ranges through the exploration of generating and identifying fields. Three key and distinct scales are investigated, each with an outcome contributing to the network the regional scale, local scale and field scale, the network aims to connect the region through a series of points incorporating new and existing trails and sites along its length. ‘Walking is simultaneously an act of perception and creativity, of reading and writing the territory’ Careri, F 2002, Walkscapes, Editorial Gustavo Gilli, Barcelona, pp. 50.

LEGEND

Dandenong Ranges location in Victoria

Roads

Existing Walking Trails

Towns

Train Line

Bus Stops

Carparks

Water

Forest

THREE SCALES OF EXPLORATION

REGIONAL SCALE Generating Fields To suggest the formation of the network

To surround

Layer LAYER

Join

JOIN

LAYER LAYER

LOCAL SCALE

JOIN JOIN Identifying Nodes LAYER To create the trail specific to its site

DIVIDE

To reveal

UNFOLD

OVERLAY

Layer LAYER LAYER

Divide DIVIDE DIVIDE

Intensify UNFOLD UNFOLD

Overlay OVERLAY OVERLAY

OVERLAY OVERLAY

SITE SCALE Framing Site

PUSH MERGE To form space capturing its unique and sometimes fleeting conditions

To frame

AMPLIFY

DISPLACE

Merge MERGE MERGE

Push

Amplify AMPLIFY AMPLIFY

Displace

PUSH PUSH

DISPLACE DISPLACE


Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: Sooty Owl, dandenong freshwater amphipod

Swampy Riparian complex Occurrence : common Endangered Species: painted honey-eater

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: Sooty Owl, dandenong freshwater amphipod

Swampy Riparian woodland Occurrence : common Endangered Species: powerful owl, dwarf galaxias

YARRA RANGES LANDCARE

Swampy Riparian woodland Occurrence : common Endangered Species: powerful owl, dwarf galaxias Cool temperate Grassy forest sheltered/high altitude Occurrence : common Endangered Species: White-throated needletail, eastern pygmy possum

Community Driven - Hosts multiple local landcare and 'friends of' groups

Swampy Riparian woodland Occurrence : common Endangered Species: powerful owl, dwarf galaxias

Cool temperate Grassy forest sheltered/high altitude Occurrence : common Endangered Species: Sooty owl, brown tree creeper, eastern pygmy possum

Southern Dandenongs Landcare YARRAMonbulk RANGES LANDCARE Landcare

The Patch Landcare

Cool temperate Grassy forest sheltered/high altitude Occurrence : common Endangered Species: White-throated needletail, eastern pygmy possum

Community Driven Olnda Creek Landcare - Hosts multiple local landcare and 'friends of' groups Thompsons Road Area Community (TRAC) YARRA RANGES LANDCARE Southern Dandenongs Landcare - Local group led maintenance and working bees Community Driven Monbulk Landcareand support for volunteers - Community based involvement - Hosts multiple local landcare and 'friends of' groups - Lobby for funding and the allocation of resources to the project The Patch Landcare

Cool temperate Grassy forest sheltered/high altitude Occurrence common Cool temperate rainforest:Species: White-throated needletail, Occurrence :Endangered rare pygmy eastern possum Endangered Species: Broad toothed rat, greater glider

Swampy Riparian complex Occurrence : common Endangered Species: painted honey-eater

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: Sooty Owl, dandenong freshwater amphipod

Olnda Creek Landcare Proposing the project to Yarra Ranges Southern Dandenongs LandcareCouncil and Parks Victoria for approval and funding(TRAC) Thompsons Road Area Community Monbulk Landcare

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: brown tree creeper, dwarf galaxias

The Patch Landcare Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Broad toothed rat, greater glider

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Chestnut-rumped heathwren, black wallaby, grey goshawk

- Local group ledRANGES maintenance and working bees YARRA COUNCIL Olnda Creek Landcare - Community based involvement and support for volunteers - Lobby for funding and the allocation resources to the project Thompsons Road AreaofCommunity (TRAC) Attracts State and Federal Funding Proposing the project to Yarra Ranges Council Owns group the existing proposed sites andland Parks Victoria forinfrastructure approval andfor funding -- Local ledand maintenance and working bees -- Community Maintains infrastructure including: roads, drainage and footpaths based involvement and support for volunteers Have an the growth of the tourism industry -- Lobby forinvested funding interest and the in allocation of resources to the project and the health of the local economy - Independent township groups generate interest for local issues YARRA RANGES COUNCIL - Promotes innovation, creativity and sustainability as key values Proposing the project to Yarra Ranges Council and principles and Parks Victoria for approval and funding

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Cool temperate rainforest Endangered Species: brown tree creeper, Occurrence : rare dwarf galaxias Endangered Species: Broad toothed rat, greater glider

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, chestnut-rumped heathwren

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: brown tree creeper, dwarf galaxias Swampy Riparian woodland Occurrence : common Cool temperate rainforest Endangered Occurrence : rare Species: powerful owl, dwarfSpecies: galaxiasChestnut-rumped heathwren, Endangered black wallaby, grey goshawk

Attracts State and Federal Funding - Owns the land VICTORIA and existing infrastructure for proposed sites PARKS YARRA RANGESincluding: COUNCILroads, drainage and footpaths - Maintains infrastructure - Have an invested interest in the growth of the tourism industry and the health of the local economy Funded by State Government andinterest CouncilforRates - Independent township groups generate local issues Attracts State and Federal Funding - Promotes innovation, creativity and sustainability as key values Accountable to and residents principles --and Owns the land existing infrastructure for proposed sites

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, chestnut-rumped heathwren Cool rainforest Cool temperate temperate rainforest Occurrence rare Occurrence ::Species: rare Endangered Chestnut-rumped heathwren, Endangered Species: Powerful Owl, black wallaby, grey goshawk greater glider, brown tree creeper, broad toothed rat, sherbrooke amphipod

Cool temperate rainforest Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, Endangered Powerful Cool Species: temperate Grassy owl, forest sheltered/high altitude chestnut-rumped heathwren white-throated needletail, greater glider, Occurrence : common eastern Endangered pygmy possum Species: White-throated needletail, eastern pygmy possum

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful Owl, greater glider, brown tree creeper, broad toothed rat, sherbrooke amphipod

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, white-throated needletail, greater glider, eastern pygmy possum Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful Owl, greater glider, brown tree creeper, broad toothed rat, sherbrooke amphipod

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, white-throated needletail, greater glider, Cool eastern temperate rainforest pygmy possum Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Broad toothed rat, greater glider

Cool temperate Grassy forest lowlands Occurrence : common Endangered Species: brown tree creeper, dwarf galaxias

- Maintains infrastructure including: roads, drainage and footpaths - Have an invested interest in the growth of the tourism industry Community Aims and Focuses and the health of the local economy -Yarra Independent generate interest forislocal issues Ranges Council - groups Learning for Sustainability a school based program PARKStownship VICTORIA Community Driven -encouraging Promotes innovation, creativity and sustainability as key values - Hosts multiple local landcare and 'friends of' groups and principles students to learn of their ecological footprint and the environmental health of their community Funded by State Government and Council Rates YARRA RANGES LANDCARE

Southern Dandenongs Landcare Monbulk Landcare

Parks Victoria - Healthy Parks Healthy People program promoting the health benefits of -the Accountable to residents communities connection with nature and Victoria's parks PARKS VICTORIA Community Aims and Focuses

The Patch Landcare

FundedCouncil by State Government and Council Rates Yarra Ranges - Learning for Sustainability is a school based program encouraging - Accountable to residents Thompsons Road Area Community (TRAC)students to learn of their ecological footprint and the environmental health of their community Community Aims and Focuses Parks Victoria - Healthy Parks Healthy People program promoting the health benefits of Areas of Conservation the communities connection with nature and Victoria's Yarra Ranges Council - Learning for Sustainability is a parks school based program - Local group led maintenance and working bees encouraging - Community based involvement and support for volunteers students to learn of their ecological footprint and the environmental health of their - Lobby for funding and the allocation of resources to the project community Olnda Creek Landcare

Proposing the project to Yarra Ranges Council and Parks Victoria for approval and funding

Parks Victoria - Healthy Parks Healthy People program promoting the health benefits of the communities connection with nature and Victoria's parks

Areas of Conservation

YARRA RANGES COUNCIL

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Chestnut-rumped heathwren, black wallaby, grey goshawk

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, chestnut-rumped heathwren

Attracts State and Federal Funding - Owns the land and existing infrastructure for proposed sites - Maintains infrastructure including: roads, drainage and footpaths - Have an invested interest in the growth of the tourism industry and the health of the local economy - Independent township groups generate interest for local issues - Promotes innovation, creativity and sustainability as key values and principles

Areas of Conservation

PARKS VICTORIA

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful Owl, greater glider, brown tree creeper, broad toothed rat, sherbrooke amphipod

Cool temperate rainforest Occurrence : rare Endangered Species: Powerful owl, white-throated needletail, greater glider, eastern pygmy possum

Funded by State Government and Council Rates - Accountable to residents Caring for the Region Community Aims and Focuses

1:25000

Given the regions health based relies on the preservation of its delicate surroundings the client will prioritise areas of Yarra Ranges Council - Learning for Sustainability is a school program DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP focus for its conservation. The research will be generated in order to indicate various ecological fields along the encouraging DRIVING AND WALKING networkand thatthe represent significant importance students to learn of their ecological footprint environmental health of their to the area. Yarra Ranges Landcare who are made up of several friends of and minor Landcare groups share the ambition to conserve and manage the local environment and its community sensitive ecosystems. They have extensive community links and participation and share a keen interest in the 1:30000 and future of their localthe environment. Parks Victoria - Healthy Parks Healthyhealth People program promoting health benefits of the communities connection with nature and Victoria's parks

Areas of Conservation

LEGEND


Mt Evelyn

Healesville

Yarra Glen

Melbourne Airport

Montrose

Lilydale Ringwood

4

Melbourne

3 Monbulk

2 1

Emerald Dandenong

Chosen spatial exploration route.

Gembrook

Major roads

Major carparks

Rail link

Bus link

Kalorama Frankston

To Belgrave

Car Travel From Melbourne: 55 minutes Healesville: 51 minutes Geelong: 1 hour 50 minutes Frankston: 49 minutes

Silvan Reservoir Train Melbourne (express): 56 minutes Melbourne (stopping all stations): 1 hour 10 minutes

The Basin

Bus

Mt Dandenong

From Lilydale: 50 minutes Oakleigh: 1 hour 4 minutes Fountain Gate: 25 minutes Mt Dandenong: 26 minutes Gembrook: 37 minutes

Olinda

Sassafras

Ferny Creek

Sherbrooke Tremont

Existing walking trails

Kallista Accessing the Dandenong Ranges

DANDENONG 1:25000

RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING A conflict of program currently dictates the regions accessibility particularly favouring the driver, stemming from a friction DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP between a societal favour of convenience for private transport and a lack of walking infrastructure, stacked against a DRIVING AND WALKING 1:30000 growing population and an ever increasing flow of tourists to the region. Often it is incredibly difficult to walk from one

DRIVING AND WALKING township or site to another without having walk along the side of a narrow, DANDENONG RANGES DANDENONG ACCESS MAPtoRANGES ACCESS MAPwinding road. These moments are not only 1:30000and dangerous intimidating but detract from the experience of being surrounded by lush rainforest which is the major DRIVING AND AND WALKING 1:30000 appeal forWALKING most visitorsDRIVING travelling to the region.

Upper Ferntree Gully

1:30000

1:30000

Upwey

Tecoma

Belgrave Legend LEGEND LEGEND

Selby

Roads

Existing Walking Trails

Towns

Towns LEGEND

Train Line

Bus Stops Bus Stops Roads

Carparks Carparks

Roads LEGEND

LEGEND Spatial awareness of surroundings of no footpath, roadside footpath and secluded trail.

Roads

Water Water

Towns Bus Stops

Existing Walking Trails

Towns

Train Line

Roads

Towns Bus Stops

Water

Existing Walking Trails

Existing Walking Trails Existing Walking Trails Forest Forest Train Line Train Line

Bus StopsCarparks

Train Line Carparks

Forest

Carparks


633m

633m 250m

Prevailing Prevailing Winds Winds

250m

Wind Interaction Wind Interaction

NE 20-30 km/hNE 20-30 km/h

200m

Layer

Towns

250m

628m

628m

420m

420m

200m

495m

370m

495m

Hydrology

Towns

370m

Towns 300m

Hydrology

250m

300m

370m

495m

520m

520m

Towns

Hydrology

Topography Topography 633m

Hydrology

633m

Orographic Orographic Effect Effect

370m

495m

Prevailing Winds 235m

Wind Interaction NE 20-30 km/h

NE 20-30 km/h

Prevailing Winds

Wind Interaction

235m

Upper Dacite Upper Dacite

580m

Upper Devonian Upper Devonian

633m

580m

Prevailing Winds

628m

628m

420m

Lower Devonian Lower Devonian Silurian Silurian

420m

633m

590m

Lower Dacite Lower Dacite

Wind Interaction Palaeozoic Deposits Palaeozoic Deposits

NE 20-30 km/h

Prevailing Winds

590m

NE 20-30 km/h

Middle Dacite Middle Dacite

Mudstones Sandstones Mudstones Sandstones

INTRUSIVE ROCKS INTRUSIVE ROCKS

Wind Interaction

Post Upper Post Upper Devonian Devonian

GranodioriteGranodiorite Porphyrite Porphyrite

300m

510m

628m

300m

510m

Contact Metamorphism Contact Metamorphism

420m 520m

628m

520m

420m

Topography

Forest Clearings Forest Clearings

Orographic Effect

Topography

Orographic Effect

Geology Geology

300m

488m

300m

488m 235m 520m

235m

520m

Topography Topography 580m

450m 525m

OrographicOrographic Effect

580m

Palaeozoic Deposits

450m

525m

500m

580m

510m

Middle Dacite

510m

Upper Devonian Lower Devonian Silurian

Palaeozoic Deposits

Intensify Intensify

590m

560m 488m

Granodiorite Porphyrite Contact Metamorphism

Lower Dacite

INTRUSIVE ROCKS

Lower Devonian Reveal Reveal Silurian Granodiorite

Mudstones Sandstones

Porphyrite

Forest Clearings

510m

590m

Post Upper Devonian

INTRUSIVE ROCKS

Contact Metamorphism

Middle Dacite

Mudstones Sandstones

Mudstones Sandstones

Granodiorite Post Upper Devonian Porphyrite

Upper Dacite

Lower Dacite

Palaeozoic Deposits

Lower Dacite

Mudstones Sandstones Lower Devonian Silurian

Post Upper Devonian

Upper Dacite Upper Devonian

Middle Dacite

Palaeozoic Deposits

INTRUSIVE ROCKS

590m

Upper Dacite

Middle Dacite Upper Devonian Lower Dacite

Lower Devonian Silurian

235m

590m

580m

Geology

INTRUSIVE ROCKS

Post Upper Contact Metamorphism Devonian

Forest Clearings

Geology

Granodiorite Porphyrite

488m

Contact Metamorphism

510m

Forest Clearings 400m

Upper Devonian

235m

500m

560m

Upper Dacite

Effect

Geology

488m

400m

Forest Clearings 400m

502m

488m

502m

450m

488m

488m

525m

450m

525m

500m

450m

502m

Geology

500m

Layer

525m

m

Intensify

Reveal

500m

430m 560m 502m

560m

Intensify

Walking Walking Trails Network Trails Network Layer Intensify

430m

Intensify Fields Fields

Conservation Conservation

Reveal

Reveal Atmosphere Atmosphere

Reveal

Peaks Peaks

450m

560m

525m 500m

400m

400m

400m 560m

488m

488m

360m

488m

360m

250m

430m

430m 400m

Reveal

Intensify

200m

Walking Trails Network

Fields

Walking Trails Network Fields Walking Trails Network

430m

Peaks

Atmosphere

Conservation

Fields

Conservation

Atmosphere Conservation

Towns

Atmosphere

To Peaks

Peaks

150m

150m

400m150m400m

488m

Towns

360m

360m

360m

400m

150m 205m

Walking Trails Network

370m

495m

205m

Overall Network

360m

430m

Hydrology

Observing the Region

360m

Fields

Conservation fields

Fields

Conservation

230m

Peak Fields

Towns

1:25000

DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING

Allen, S 1999, Field Conditions, Points + Lines: Diagrams and Projects for the City, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, pp. 92.

400m

DANDENONG DANDENONG RANGES REGION FIELD MAP FIELD MAP Through mapping at the regional scale overall fields can be identified from the atmospheric, environmental and locally significant sites. RANGES Allowing theREGION trail to be understood as generated as 1:30000 an emergence of the field itself rather than an object sitting against it. Walking is a program for which the field can be framed as a spatial condition whilst also generating an accessible, 1:300001:30000 connected network.

230m 360m

360m

360m

Grid at 1000m Grid at 1000m

DANDENONG RANGES REGION FIELD MAP 1:30000

230m

205m

633m

240m

Peaks

Stan Allen refers to the field as any ‘formal or spatial matrix capable of unifying diverse elements while still respecting the identity of each’ 360m

205m 400m

240m

Atmospheric Fields

Atmosphere

Grid at 1000m

Prevailing Winds

400m

NE 20-30 km/h

Wind Interaction

240m

230m

DANDENONG RANGES REGION FIELD MAP DANDENONG RANGES REGION FIELD MAP 1:30000 1:30000

230m 360m

Grid at 1000m

628m

240m

Grid at 1000m

420m

240m 230m 300m

DANDENONG RANGES REGION FIELD MAP 1:30000


Kalorama

16.9 km from Upper Ferntree Gully Link to Atmospheric Trail

Kalorama

16.4 km from Belgrave Link to Peaks Trail Upper Ferntree Gully

Mt Evelyn

18.7 km from Belgrave

Mt Evelyn

Kalorama

633m 628m

495m

370m 502m

520m

Olinda

400m

525m

Upper Ferntree Gully

560m

488m

Sassafras

590m

420m

580m

480m

510m

Silvan Reservoir

Kallista

400m

How to Walk the Dandenongs

500m

1:25000

DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP

Three mainDRIVING trail routes; eachWALKING with its own unique characteristics and destinations form the Dandenongs walking trail AND network. The peaks trail moves along the heighest points in the region, the atmospheric trail immerses the walker in the multiple and1:30000 varying conditions that form its many ecosystems whilst the conservation trail highlights the regions sensitive environments which host a diverse range of native flora and fauna.

Belgrave

360m

Atmospheric field

Conservation field

Town

Peak

View

Trail start

Camping

Toilets

Water

Picnic ground

Information

Trail intersection

Food

Shelter


Node Characteristics

-37.872107, 145.359476

Forest Clearing

Creek

-37.874800, 145.375419

-37.874631, 145.369958 -37.873742, 145.364304

-37.874640, 145.346643

-37.875691, 145.351101

-37.876199, 145.354888

-37.876596, 145.353590

-37.876596, 145.366557

-37.877215, 145.350028

-37.876621,

145.368767

-37.877710, 145.349427

-37.877854, 145.346654

Road

Habitat

Boundary/Property

View

-37.887214, 145.370217

-37.877951, 145.363253

-37.881470, 145.344562

-37.880454, 145.352244

-37.879675,

145.357329

-37.880818, 145.354786

-37.882277, 145.358857

-37.883886, 145.350864

-37.884047, 145.366945 -37.884087, 145.366879

-37.883091, 145.347155

-37.885774,

-37.885706, 145.366645

145.367868

-37.886969, 145.342681 -37.887325, 145.349065

-37.887214, 145.370217

The Conservation Trail

DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP

1:2500

Spatial conditions such as tree height, density, wind and light conditions, smell and sound are DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP only some elements which form the overall field but then start to suggest the intensities or DRIVING AND WALKING DRIVING AND WALKING abnormalities generating within it and allow the formation of the trail at the small scale.

1:30000

LEGEND

ECOLOGICAL VEGETATION CLASSES

DANDENONG RANGES FIELD STUDY 1:3000 at A0

100m

1km 500m

Grid at 100m intervals

LEGEND

Open point

Forest Area

Concentrated point

Property/boundary

Blockage/barrier

Roads

HABITATS

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Threatened Species (500m radius) ECOLOGICAL VEGETATION CLASSES

Open point

EVC 29 EVC 30

Concentrated point

EVC 31 Blockage/barrier

Clearing

Hydrology

Clearing

Town (Kallista)

Contours (10m)

Town (Kallista)

EVC 45 EVC 721

Powerful Owl

Damp Forest

Forest Area

Wet Forest

Property/boundary

CoolRoads Temperate Rainforest Hydrology Shrubby Foothill Forest Contours (10m)

Fern Swamp

EVC 29

Damp Forest White-throated Needletail (Oct-May)

EVC 30

Greater Glider

EVC 31 EVC 45 EVC 721

Wet Forest

Cool Temperate Rainforest

HABITATS Common Species Native to the Area Threatened Species (500m radius)

Superb Lyrebird

Powerful Owl

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Superb Lyrebird

Grey Headed Flying Fox

Crimson Rosella

Echidna

Wombat

White-throated Needletail (Oct-May)

Jan

Common Species Native to the Area

Wallaby

Greater Glider

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Fog Density Feb

Mar

Apr May Fog Density Jan

Feb

12am

2am

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Wallaby

Grey Headed Flying Fox

Crimson Rosella

Echidna

4pm

4pm

Chestnut-rumped Heathwren

Chestnut-rumped Heathwren

Australian King Parrot Wombat

Australian King Parrot

Brown Tree Creeper

Brushtail Possum Brown Tree Creeper

Speckled Warbler Brushtail Possum

Speckled Warbler

Broad Toothed Rat

Broad Toothed Rat Sooty Owl

Sooty Owl Quail Painted Button

Average Painted Button Quail Yearly Rainfall

Eastern Pygmy Possum

Eastern Pygmy Possum

Shrubby Foothill Forest

Fern Swamp

Kookaburra

Kookaburra

Dwarf Galaxias

Prevailing Wind 1100 - 1200 mm

1000 - 1100 mm

Jun

Jul

Mar

4am

Apr

Prevailing Wind

NE 20-30 km/h

900 - 1000 mm

6am

12am

Aug

Sep

May

Jun

2am

4am

Jul

10am

6am

Oct Aug

Nov Sep

12pm 10am

Dec Oct

Nov

2pm

12pm

Dec

2pm

NE 20-30 km/h

Average Yearly Rainfall 1100 - 1200 mm

800 - 900 mm

1000 - 1100 mm

900 - 1000 mm

800 - 900 mm

Dwarf Galaxias

LEGEND

1:30000


Grass Trail 500mm width Clearing node

Dirt Trail 1000mm width Forest setting

BURNHAM BEECHES

Organic Trail 800mm width Forest setting

Grass Trail 400mm width Forest setting

Organic Trail 500mm width Forest setting

The Club Med project by EMF frames a rugged but naturally rich coastline through a series of nodes generated through a slow and subtle revealing of the natural site uncovered through the deconstruction of its previous form. Multiple pathways are formed through the sequencing of these points which generate a spatially choreographed landscape.

Timber Deck Trail 600mm width Creek node

Point Trail Open Creek node

Gravel Trail 1500mm width Town node

Track Two

Trail Conditions

3.2 km

Trail Profile - Conservation Trail

Distance of 3.2 km

Track 2

Kallista to Creek’s Landing Walking Trail

Duration of 1 hour 30 minutes at average walking speed

1.2 to 1.5 hours at normal walking speed

Gravel trail Soft edge

Timber decking

Medium edge Nodes: Forest clearing, water, some habitats, view

Nodes: Forest clearing, water, some habitats, view

3.2 km

Track Two

‘Context has been described less as a neutral backdrop than as the very infrastructure of existing authority’

One of the difficulties of incorporating infrastructural or designed elements into the landscape is understanding the context and setting in its surroundings. Identifying the node interfaces throughout the area helps develeop and respond to them with specific trail conditions.

Track 2

1.2 to 1.5 hours at normal walking speed

Hard edge Nodes: Water, habitats, view

DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING 1:30000

Dirt trail

Metal grate board walk

Hard edge Nodes: Water, habitats

Elevation 360m

340mSoft edge

400m

Nodes: Forest clearing, water, some habitats, view

Organic groundcover

Soft edge

490m

Nodes: Forest clearing, water, some habitats, view

460m Elevation 360m

340m

400m

490m

470m 460m

Conservation Trail

DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING Isenstadt, S 2005, Contested Contexts, Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies, Taylor & Francis, Abingdon, pp.174. 1:30000

Grass Trail

1:2500

470m

LEGEND


Bird Watching Movement map

Regional heat map

White-throated Needletail Endangered

Powerful Owl Endangered

Crimson Rosella

Superb lyrebird

Ground Conditions dense scrub

thick tree fern

thick tree fern

thick dense treescrub fern

dense scrub ground cover

dense ground cover light ground cover

dense ground cover

thick tree fern light longground grass cover

light ground cover

long thick grass tree fern fern thick tree Thick tree

fern

short grass dense scrub long grass

short grass dense ground cover oragnic matter Organic Matter

short dense densegrass scrub scrub Dense Shrub

oragnic mud matter light ground cover Mud

oragnic dense denseGround ground ground matter cover cover Dense Cover

mud watergrass long Long Grass

4.1km from Belgrave

mud Light Ground Cover light light ground ground cover cover

water long long grass grass Water

short grass water Short Grass

oragnic matter Weed

short short grass grass

mud

18.4km from Mt Evelyn

Conservation Status: Moderate - Sensitive Area Services: Camping opportunity, rest stop, viewing platform, water access

Creeks Landing

1:150

Conservation Trail

DANDENONG RANGES ACC DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP DRIVING AND WALKING The sequencing of space intends to frame the Dandenong Ranges in moments which reflect the field it occupies. DRIVING AND WALKING

1:30000

Sequencing suggests that the events occur in succession so that the moments are more significant1:30000 the longer one walks or spends occupying the spaces including the approach to the space. Responding to its varying settings Creek’s Landing encourages native and social habitats, to encourage consideration for the local environment and frame its varying ecosystems in a more engaging way.

LEGEND

Roads Towns Bus Stops Water


J F M A M

J F

J

M A

J M

A J J

S A

O S

Section 1 - 1:100

N

O

D N D

Site Timeline

Plant palette Shrubs

Shrubs Shrubs Melaleuca squarrosa Scented Paperbark Melaleuca squarrosa Scented Paperbark Melaleuca squarrosa Scented Paperbark Sambucus gaudichaudiana White Elderberry Sambucus gaudichaudiana Elderberry Sambucus gaudichaudiana WhiteWhite Elderberry Coprosma quadrifida Prickly currant bush Coprosma quadrifida Prickly currant bush Coprosma quadrifida Prickly currant bush Hakea nodosa Yellow Hakea Hakea nodosa Yellow Hakea Hakea nodosa Yellow Hakea Allocasuarina paludosa Swamp Allocasuarina paludosa SwampSheoke Sheoke Allocasuarina paludosa Swamp Sheoke

2

Herbs

1

1

Herbs

Almaleea subumbellata Wiry Bush-pea Herbs Dillwynia sericea Showy Parrot-pea Almaleea subumbellata WiryLeafless Bush-pea Almaleea subumbellata Wiry Bush-pea Sphaerolobium vimineum Globe-pea Dillwynia sericea Showy Parrot-pea Leucopogon virgatus Common Beard-heath Dillwynia sericea Showy Parrot-pea Tetratheca ciliata Pink bells Sphaerolobium vimineum Leafless Globe-pea Sphaerolobium vimineum Leafless Globe-pea Monotoca scoparia Prickly Broom-heath Leucopogon virgatus Common Beard-heath Leucopogon virgatus Common Beard-heath Tetratheca ciliata Pink bells Tetratheca ciliata Pink bells Ground covers Monotoca scoparia Prickly Broom-heath Chrysocephalum semipapposum Prickly Clustered Everlasting Monotoca scoparia Broom-heath Lobelia anceps

Ground Cover Persoonia chamaepeuce

2 Section Lines

Angled Lobelia Dwarf Geebung

Ground covers Chrysocephalum Everlasting Chrysocephalumsemipapposum semipapposum Clustered Clustered Everlasting Lobelia anceps Lobelia Lobelia anceps Angled Angled Lobelia Persoonia chamaepeuce Geebung Persoonia chamaepeuce DwarfDwarf Geebung

Framing the Field

Conservation Trail

‘Introduced artefacts and traces help to build the site’s experiential narrative’ Franch, M 2014, Marti Franch, Kerb 21: Uncharted Territories, Melbourne Books, Melbourne.

There is a spatial immensity to a forest which can be accounted for by the sheer size of its span and its impermeable nature aerially. The noise of a forest is also constant even on a calm day with its many programs occurring simultaneously. The design intervention at Creek’s Landing offers hikers an opportunity to camp in the Dandenong RANGES DANDENONG RANGES ACCESS MAP Ranges which is not currently possible. The form allows the user to view the programs taking placeDANDENONG in site through the ACCES DRIVING AND WALKING native planting which attracts bird life and sets the area apart from its surroundings through its colourful and fragrant DRIVING AND WALKING characteristics which change seasonally creating an altering spatial experience depending on the surrounding 1:30000 conditions. Moving up the stairs, the forest reveals itself in frame and sound. The surrounding forest is never out of 1:30000 view but the walk back up into its immensity reframes its significance.

LEGEND

Roads Towns

Section 2 - 1:100

Bus Stops Water

LEGEND


Framing the Field Exploring the formation and sequencing of walking trails in the Dandenong Ranges through the investigation of field. Page 3

The aim of the research is to investigate the formation of a cohesive walking trail network which connects the Dandenong Ranges through a series of points, or nodes. This will be undertaken through an exploration of the field as a malleable and multi scaled condition which can be redefined and framed through the interaction with these nodes. Walking is a program for which the field can be framed as a spatial condition whilst also generating an accessible, connected network. Examining unique environmental, spatial and social conditions through highlighting existing nodes and fields will suggest the formation of the trails and generate new points along the network. Walking is ‘simultaneously an act of perception and creativity, of reading and writing the territory’ making it a useful aesthetic tool, allowing humans to explore and redefine the meaning of a space by walking through it. It is the sequencing of a walk which ‘implies the transformation of the place and its meanings’ as its components or features are assembled through the progression of the walk. Choreographing the walk in such a way as to guide people away from areas which can never be accessed or into spaces that can change seasonally in one portion of the trail will offer a very different experience as to using markers to indicate a suggested direction, allowing an exploration of the space to reveal a particular path.

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Yarra Ranges Landcare who are made up of several friends of and minor Landcare groups share the ambition to conserve and manage the local environment and its sensitive ecosystems. They have extensive community links and participation and share a keen interest in the health and future of their local environment. Given the regions health relies on the preservation of its delicate surroundings the client will prioritise areas of focus for its conservation or regeneration. The research will be generated in order to indicate various ecological fields along the network that represent significant importance to the area which will require sensitive occupation or active engagement in order to highlight the importance of the unique systems working in its environment. These highlighted fields have an interesting interaction with Yarra Ranges Council and Parks Victoria who have an obligation to maintain existing infrastructure and parklands and outline facilitating tourism growth and the health of the local economy as key aims. By linking the existing trail network and providing a diverse and unique framing of the region through the various sites this proposal aims to suggest a viable option for the region. A conflict of program currently dictates the regions accessibility particularly favouring the driver, stemming from a friction between a societal favour of convenience for private transport and a lack of connected walking infrastructure, stacked against a growing population and an ever increasing flow of tourists to the region . This trending culture shift is significant for a region such as the Dandenong Ranges since major sites and towns are often only linked by roads. Furthermore, the region is only serviced by a single train line terminating in Belgrave, at the foot of the hills, and a sporadic bus line, that although services major towns, runs on an intermittent timetable. Often it is virtually impossible to walk from one township or site to another without having to walk along the side of a narrow, winding road. These moments are not only intimidating and dangerous but detract from the experience of being surrounded by lush rainforest which is the major appeal for most visitors travelling to the region.

Fig. 1 Stan Allen’s field conditions diagrams explored a series of fields in their unpredictable nature and their formation from a point or objects to fields.

Landscapes of Cohabitation - Doxiadis+ Generating a series of trails responding to a series of ecological and physical fields acting on site. The trails are designed for the conservation of the area and to frame its significant natural surroundings which was threatened by an increasing tourist influx and an outdated infrastructure which could not cope or restrict access or movement. Traditional techniques and methods of dry stone walls, terracing and the regeneration of native vegetation was able to form a trail network which still allows visitors to occupy the space and appreciate it whilst also doing so without destroying the landscape. Fig. 2 Simple interventions or small remaining features set up points which then dictate a trail throughout the Tudela-Culip project by EMF. The rusted rail frame divides the harsh environment but also suggests a route for someone to move through.

Stan Allen refers to the field as any ‘formal or spatial matrix capable of unifying diverse elements while still respecting the identity of each’ it is a material condition which arises from the link between the operations of its construction and generation. Its shape and overall form is insignificant, rather it is the ‘internal relationships of parts which determine the behaviour of the field’ which is the field condition . Through mapping at the regional scale overall fields can be identified from the atmospheric, environmental and locally significant sites. Mapping at the large scale; specificity of the figurative can be lost generating the field however a ‘pointed’ field ‘an abstract system [able] to carry meaning’ allows the trail to be understood as generated as an emergence of the field itself rather than an object sitting against it. Layering the many conditions and programs or ‘field operations’ taking place throughout the Dandenong Ranges can highlight intensities, and generate the trail through the interrogation of them. The network at a regional scale is generated by remapping the regions dynamic and constantly shifting fields formed by the overall forces. This is mainly an atmospheric study since these pressures influence the climate, vegetation concentration type and general occupation. Identified moments of conservation and significance outlined by the client Yarra Ranges Landcare and the can also be determined at this scale in relation to its respective setting and population centres. These conditions, or fields, can then begin to suggest where the trail system forms and joins. Two major field conditions arose from the mapping moments of sensitive ecology, and a shifting wind condition which can be link by forming a series of trails that move through the fields. Some of the specificity in the regions composition and spatial formation is lost at the regional scale, zooming in to a field scale a more specific understanding of EVC’s, fog and rain occurrences, habitats and their interaction with towns and property can be understood. Clearings can also identified at this scale and form a significant but unique existence in a forest setting. Intensities in the identified field, or nodes form from the overlaps seen in the study. These nodes then form the specific portions of the trail identified at the regional scale. Varying trail conditions respond to the node and immediate surroundings it is being formed in to best respond and harness the sites conditions. Nodes are not generated from the study of the field itself but by looking at the forces working between it and the figure. Spatial conditions such as tree height, density, wind and light conditions, smell and sound are only some of these elements which form the overall field but then start to suggest the intensities or abnormalities generating within it and allow for a refinement in the trails condition. Framing the field in a spatial capacity can be explored by revealing the unique conditions forming site. The Club Med project by EMF Landscape Architecture framed a rugged but naturally rich coastline through a series of processes which deconstructed and reclaimed the area . Nodes are generated through a slow and subtle revealing of the real site and its natural conditions forming a series of pathways. Introduced ‘artefacts and traces to help build the site’s experiential narrative’ may be formed from foreign material but these moments are not self-framing rather they enhance the features of site. The field is framed in various points throughout the site such as a portion of rusted fence is a node in its particular space. Formally it is a remnant of its deconstruction which will continue as the site surrounding revives ecologically whilst also generating a choreographed landscape through the thoughtful use of indicators or moments such as this . Being constantly surrounded by the same environment, such as a forest can reduce the significance of walking through it. A sudden change or alteration in the field can be significant in its reframing. Donald Judd uses physical form to displace meaning from the object onto the spatial field between the viewer and the artwork . The relationship is formed through an individual’s interaction when approaching artwork in the field which often then frames it retrospectively. However the work is primarily focused on the object instead of the field as the figure ground. The objects form can still be generated through the process of identifying intensities but these can be exaggerated formally diversifying the space physically. A specific forest clearing in Sherbrooke supporting a diverse range of habitats, would influence the generation of form by setting up an opportunity to view these programs taking place. Mapping this site, specific species movements and habitats can be recorded along with plant type and its reaction to wind and fog. The site is habitat to three endangered species and a creek runs nearby so the site has a significant conservational importance. The form is generated through the matrix using the techniques rise and divide. The approach to site is a walk along a narrow timber boardwalk which directly guides people through the space by creating a physical edge between the trail and the site. This leads to the platform which sits inset into the sloping topography and provides an opportunity for walkers to camp in the site, a unique opportunity since it there are no facilities in the region for people to currently camp and a lack of affordable accommodation . The form rises back into the clearing via a narrowing staircase which brings you back into the full view of the immensity that the rainforest possesses. A considered plating plan of native herbs and coloured shrubs incorporated into the longer grass species breaks the constant green surroundings and provides an attraction to the native birdlife. Exploring the sequencing of events and fields through the study of the Dandenong Ranges varying environments at multiple scales will indicate where the walking trail may form. The unfolding and framing of the region will occur through techniques of testing the field conditions at play throughout the region and where nodes could begin to link the diverse and multi-scaled fields working in the area. Walking will highlight areas of conservation; spaces which explore the unique conditions of site and link existing places of significance.

Fig. 7 OMA’s competition entry Ville Nouvelle Melun Senart investigated the remapping of a proposed development on the edge of Paris. A layering of ecological and social functions to suggests where new programs could take place.

Fig. 3 Donald Judd’s installation at the Chinati Centre of Contemporary Art,15 Untitled Works in Concrete, becomes part of a progressive journey across the property. The object frames the surrounding region of mountains and vast grasslands, but also frames the field it is generating around itself.

Initial site exploration INTERACTION MATRIX of five sites throughout the region exploring site typologies and influencing conditions. CUT

PUSH

Trail and Road

DIG

ONE POINT

SLICE

TWO POINTS

DISPLACE

LINEAR

TUNNEL

DOWN

SCULPT

OVER

DISECT

Trail and Water

UNLAYER

Fig. 9 James Corner used compositional drawing techniques to construct Windmill Topography, which was representing geographical conditions and processes as well as suggesting the foundations of future work.

Fig. 4 The contrast of the black peat and the white snowy field forms a node which draws people into its field. Fig. 10 Perry Kulper also uses a compositional mapping technique which layers multiple layers of site conditions and conditions. He further adds speculative programs that accompany his design intent.

Trail and Boundary

Trail and Forest

Fig. 8 Arakawa and Gins use this diagram to explore how visual fields can affect your perception of a space. I am interested in exploring how to draw the spatial conditions of a field, this technique uses precise surfaces and lines of vision to speculate.

Fig. 5 James Turrell’s Stone Sky creates a field between the wall and the person approaching it which is then framing the conditions making up the site through the reflective surface of the water.

VERB / TECHNIQUE

Fig. 11

Interaction with trail

CUT / DIG

Peter Zumthor and Piet Oudolf - Serpentine Pavilion

ACCUMULATE TRAIL

THROUGH

DISJOIN

PUSH / LINEAR

AMPLIFY SPACE

WITH

SHAVE

SCULPT / OVER

RISE PASSAGE

MERGE

DIVIDE

DIESCT / UNLAYER

IMMERSE SITE CONDITIONS

Full technique and action matrix looking at trail interfaces and node interactions.

Fig. 6 The wall which does not rise higher than eye level never blocks the walker from the spaces setting. The object intends to address the scale and materiality of the bog choerographing the walk and perception of the space.

Supplementary References

Bibliography

Image References

Cosgrove, DE 1984, Social Formation and Symbolic Landscape, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Wisconsin. Corner, J & Maclean, AS 1996, Taking Measures Across the American Landscape, Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut. Corner, J 1999, Eidetic Operations and New Landscapes, Recovering Landscape, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, pp. 153-167. Eisenman, P 1999, Diagram: An Original Scene of Writing, The Diagrams of Architecture, Thames & Hudson, London, pp. 92-103. Nassauer, JI 1995, Culture and Changing Landscape Structure, Landscape Ecology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 229-237. Parks Victoria 2014, Dandenong Ranges Gardens, Strategic Management Plan, pp. 1-39. Wall, A 1999, Programming the Urban Surface, Recovering Landscape, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, pp. 234-239.

Yarra Ranges Council 2012, Infrastructure and Business Development in Outer Suburban Melbourne, Inquiry into Growing the Suburbs, pp. 1-16. Wilson, A 1991, The Culture of Nature: North American Landscape from Disney to the EXXON Valdez, Between the Lines, Toronto. Allen, S 1999, Field Conditions, Points + Lines: Diagrams and Projects for the City, Princeton Architectural Press, New York. Corner, J 1999, The Agency of Mapping: Speculation, Critique and Invention, Mappings, Reaktion, London. Careri, F 2002, Walkscapes, Editorial Gustavo Gilli, Barcelona. Carlson, D 2013, The Humanity of Infrastructure: Landscape as Operative Ground, Scenario Journal, vol.3, no.1, viewed 22 April 2016, < http:// scenariojournal.com/article/humanity-of-infrastructure>. American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) 2012, Tudela-Culip (Club Med) Restoration Project in ‘Cap de Creus’ Cape, viewed 22 April 2016, < https://www.asla.org/2012awards/365.html>. Franch, M 2014, Marti Franch, Kerb 21: Uncharted Territories, Melbourne Books, Melbourne. Isenstadt, S 2005, Contested Contexts, Site Matters: Design Concepts, Histories and Strategies, Taylor & Francis, Abingdon. Borasi, G, Clement, G, Rahm, P 2007, Between Nature and Environment, environ(ne)ment, Skira, New York. Corner James, 1999, Recovering Landscape, Eidetic Operations and New Landscapes, Princeton Architectural Press, New York. Yarra Ranges Council 2013, Response to Environment & Natural Resources Committee, Inquiry On Heritage Tourism In Victoria, Lilydale, Melbourne.

Fig. 1 – Stan Allen, 1985, Field Conditions Diagrams, viewed 26 April 2016, <https://archispeaking.net/2015/09/17/diagram-engaging-the-complexity-of-the-real/stan-allen-diagrams-of-field-conditions-1996-illustrator-interesting-way-todemonstrate-field-conditions/> Fig. 2 – EMF, 2010, Site photo Tudela-Culip (Club Med) restoration project, viewed 28 April 2016, <http://www.archdaily.com/375876/tudela-culip-restoration-project-emf/519a3b21b3fc4b5cf4000007-tudela-culip-restoration-project-emfimage> Fig. 3 - Donald Judd, 1980, 15 Untitled Works in Concrete, viewed 28 April 2016, < http://www.jhk1m.com/precedence.html> Fig. 4 – Andy Goldsworthy, 1980, Hole About Four Feet Across One Foot Deep Lined With Peat, viewed 28 April 2016, <http://www.goldsworthy.cc.gla.ac.uk/image/?tid=1980_037> Fig. 5 – James Turrell, 2007, Stone Sky, viewed 28 April 2016, <http://jamesturrell.com/work/stonesky/> Fig. 6 - Richard Serra, 1972, Land Shift, Viewed 31 May 2016, < http://www.eraarch.ca/2013/serras-shift-to-be-designated-under-heritage-act/> – Arakawa and Madeline Gins, 1991, Open Containing, viewed 28 April 2016, <http://rndrd.com/i/608> Fig. 7 – OMA, 1987, Ville Nouvelle Melun Senart competition entry, viewed 26 April 2016, <http://oma.eu/projects/ville-nouvelle-melun-senart> Fig. 8 – Arakawa and Madeline Gins, 1991, Open Containing, viewed 28 April 2016, <http://rndrd.com/i/608> Fig. 9 – James Corner, 1994, Windmill Topography, viewed 27 April 2016, <http://rndrd.com/i/864> Fig. 10 – Perry Kulper, 2011, Fast Twitch Section Study, Viewed 26 April 2016, <http://www.krobarch.com/images/winners/2011/entry2310.jpg> Fig. 11 - Peter Zumthor and Piet Oudolf, 2011, Serpentine Pavilion, Viewed 26 April 2016, < http://www.dezeen.com/2011/06/27/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2011-by-peter-zumthor-2/>

Thomas Collins - Project Proposal  
Thomas Collins - Project Proposal  
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