Women of Color Volume 17 Number 2

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PRESS FORPROGRESS: IT’S OUR TIME!

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DENISE GRAY SHARES HER EXPERIENCE AS A TOP WINNER TECH CAREERS! THE LATEST TRENDS IN THIS RAPIDLY CHANGING INDUSTRY

the

2018

technologist of the year Donna Bell Research Operations Director - Palo Alto Ford Motor Company - Research and Advanced Organization

23rd women of color STEM conference

award winners over 300 of the brightest stars in STEM

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contents FOR TODAY’S CAREER WOMEN IN BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

features

36| 2 018 Women of Color STEM Award Winners

VOLUME 17 NUMBER 2 FALL 2018

departments 06| People and Events

General Motors Names New CFO, Women of Color STEM Honoree Is Interim CEO of the Dallas Mavericks, Barbie Continues to Inspire Girls to Explore STEM, Six Women in 2018 Class of Hertz Fellowship—Highest in the Foundation’s 60-Year History.

The stories of the 2018 Women of Color award winners shed light on women in the workplace and their winning strategies for success.

55| 2 018 Women of Color Technology

All-Stars & Rising Stars

his group of emerging leaders is living proof that their progressive T organizations are succeeding and leading global innovation.

10| One on One 2017 Technologist of the Year Shares Her Past Year’s Experience as Top Award Winner.

14| First Steps STEM Internship Challenges and How to Overcome Them.

18| Education NASA’s Jessica Taylor Tells Us How She Encourages Girls in STEM #STEMIsaGirlThing.

22| Corporate Life

alling All Women: The C Cybersecurity Field Needs You!

26| Career Voices Developing the Next Level of Leaders.

30| cover story Donna Bell The 2018 Technologist of the Year, Donna Bell, sparks innovation at one of the most trusted mobility companies in the world.

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69| Career Outlook

Tech Careers in Demand   Industry Overview  Job Horizon  The Future Is Here: How Will the Digital Age Change My Career?

www.womenofcolor.online


chnology & Business

EDITORIAL PAGE

Change in the workplace demands a different type of training...

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fter their initial study was done nearly 20 years ago, two researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) have revisited workplace harassment issues.

James Campbell Quick, chair in UTA’s Goolsby Leadership Academy, and M. Ann McFadyen, a UTA associate professor of strategic management, conducted the review earlier this year. It comes at a time when harassment and assault have permeated American society. “Our current examination of the evidence suggests that sexual harassment is a continuing occupational problem,” Quick said. “Have we made progress? Yes, there has been on some fronts but not on others, and the problem has morphed, becoming more complicated for a variety of reasons found in the current data.” McFadyen said recent publicity regarding sexual harassment is a signal of the beginning of change in the workplace demanding a different type of training.

“Training not only for leaders and management but employees at all ranks, customers, suppliers, and other stakeholders,” McFadyen said. “Successful leaders and management of organizations cannot afford to simply maintain the status quo.” The two professors believe that if the workplace is equipped with this information, surveillance indicators and systems can be put in place to address this preventable occupational health problem. McFadyen and Quick initially published the report in a 1998 special section on sexual harassment in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

Tyrone D. Taborn CEO and Chief Content Officer

Career Communications Group’s

for today’s career women in business and technology

EXECUTIVE OFFICE Tyrone D. Taborn, CEO and Chief Content Officer Jean Hamilton, President and CFO Alex Venetta, Associate Publisher, Manager of Partner Services Eric Price, Vice President, Recruitment and Professional Training

EDITORIAL AND CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rayondon Kennedy, Managing Editor Lango Deen, Technology Editor Michael Fletcher, Contributing Editor Gale Horton Gay, Contributing Editor Garland L. Thompson, Contributing Editor Roger Witherspoon, Contributing Editor

GRAPHIC DESIGN Beverly Wladkowski, Art Director Bryan Davis, Digital Director Joe Weaver, Global Design Interactiv Markele Cullins, Intern Rachael DeVore, Intern

CORPORATE AND ALUMNI RELATIONS Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd, CCG Alumni Committee Chair and President Dr. Eugene DeLoatch, Chairman, BEYA Alumni Group Vice Admiral Walter J. Davis, USN (Ret) National Chair, BEYA Military Alumni Oliver “Bo” Leslie, Retired Program Manager, Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions, Boeing Monica E. Emerson, Women of Color STEM Conference National Chair

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CORPORATE AND ALUMNI RELATIONS (CONT.)

Matt Bowman, CCG Military Program Manager, Stars and Stripes Committee; Executive Director/Chief of Staff for VADM Walt Davis, USN (Ret.) Angela Wheeler, Manager, Foundation for Educational Development, Inc. Ty Taborn, Corporate Development Hayward Henderson, Executive Advisor to the CEO

SALES AND MARKETING Gwendolyn Bethea, Vice President, Corporate Development Sheri Hewson, Account Executive Devin Oten, Senior Account Manager Natalie Stuppard, Marketing Specialist Jay Albritton, Social Media

JOBMATCH AND STUDENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Ashley Turner, Recruitment Team Manager Courtney Taborn, Talent Management Specialist Rod Carter, Recruitment Specialist, College Relations Sheila Richburg, College Coordinator

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICE Career Communications Group, Inc. 729 E. Pratt Street, Suite 504 Baltimore, MD 21202 Phone: (410) 244-7101 / Fax: (410) 752-1834 Women of Color (ISSN 1937-0555) is a publication for today’s career women in business and technology. Women of Color magazine invites letters to the editor about any topics important to our readership. Article queries and letters should be sent to: CCG – Women of Color magazine, Editorial Department, 729 E. Pratt St., Suite 504, Baltimore, MD 21202. No manuscript will be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. Women of Color magazine cannot be responsible for unsolicited art or editorial material. Subscriptions are $13/year. Please write to: CCG – Women of Color magazine, Subscriptions, 729 E. Pratt St., Suite 504, Baltimore, MD 21202. Copyright © 2018 by Career Communications Group Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/WOCITC

CONFERENCE AND EVENTS Ana Bertrand, Conference Coordinator Jennifer Roberts, Customer Success Manager Brandon Newby, Administrative Assistant Toni Robinson, 360 MMG Rutherford & Associates

Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/woctechnology

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RAYTHEON PEOPLE

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PEOPLE AND EVENTS

women in the news General Motors Names Dhivya Suryadevara CFO

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eneral Motors announced the appointment of Dhivya Suryadevara as Chief Financial Officer, effective September 1, 2018. Suryadevara will report to Mary Barra, GM Chairman and CEO. Suryadevara succeeds Stevens, GM Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, who indicated his plans to retire after more than 40 years with the company, effective March 1, 2019. “Dhivya’s experience and leadership in several key roles throughout our financial operations positions her well to build on the strong business results we’ve delivered over the last several years,” said Barra. Suryadevara, 39, has been Vice President, Corporate Finance since July 2017 and has been responsible for corporate financial planning, investor relations, and special projects. Suryadevara played an integral role in the Opel divestiture, Cruise acquisition, Lyft investment, and, more recently, SoftBank’s investment in GM Cruise. From 2015 to 2017, Suryadevara served as Vice President, Finance and Treasurer. She helped achieve ratings upgrades from all three credit ratings agencies, completed $2B notes issuance to fund discretionary pension contributions and upsized and renewed GM’s $14.5B revolver. Suryadevara also served as CEO and Chief Investment Officer for GM Asset Management from 2013 to 2017. In this capacity, she was responsible for the management of business and investment activities of GM’s $85B pension operations.

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Suryadevara joined GM in 2005. She received a bachelor’s and master’s degree in commerce from the University of Madras in Chennai, India, and an MBA from Harvard Business School. She is a chartered financial analyst and a chartered accountant.

Women of Color STEM Honoree Is Interim CEO of the Dallas Mavericks Women of Color STEM honoree Cynthia “Cynt” Marshall is the new interim chief executive officer of the Dallas Mavericks. “In my wildest dreams— and I have had some pretty big dreams and some wild dreams in my life—I never saw this coming,” Marshall said at a press conference. “While I grew up playing sports, [have supported] my three children in their sports endeavors, and can often be down cheering for my favorite sports teams, all of that is very different from receiving a call from the owner of an NBA team with a passionate—and I can’t express that enough— with a passionate and heartfelt invitation to contribute to sports and the community in a unique way.” Marshall retired as Senior Vice President–Human Resources and Chief Diversity Officer at AT&T in 2016 and ran a consulting firm she founded that specializes in culture transformation. As President, AT&T North Carolina, Marshall was responsible for regulatory, legislative, and community affairs activities in the state while overseeing AT&T’s operations of 7,000 employees from January 2007 through late 2012. She also served on the board of the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology, and Science.

www.womenofcolor.online


By Lango Deen editors@ccgmag.com

Barbie Continues to Inspire Girls to Explore STEM Since 1959 Barbie has been an astronaut, a scientist, a game developer, and a computer engineer. This summer, Barbie added a new career to her resume. The brand launched Robotics Engineer Barbie in June, which joined a lineup of more than 200 STEM-related careers held by Barbie.

“For almost 60 years, Barbie has exposed girls to roles where women are underrepresented to show them that they can be anything.” - Lisa McKnight, General Manager and Senior VicePresident – Barbie

“For almost 60 years, Barbie has exposed girls to roles where women are underrepresented to show them that they can be anything,” said Lisa McKnight, General Manager and Senior Vice President – Barbie. “By playing with Robotics Engineer Barbie on- and offline, we are giving girls a new platform for play in their imaginary world and teaching them important skills for their real world.” As part of a multi-year partnership with Tynker, the number one game-based platform that has helped more than 60 million kids learn to code, Mattel is launching six free Barbie-inspired coding experiences

designed to teach logic, problem-solving, and the building blocks of coding while casting young learners in different roles alongside Barbie.

Six Women in 2018 Class of Hertz Fellowship,Highest in the Foundation’s 60-Year History The 2018 Class of the Hertz Fellowship includes six women, the highest proportion of women of any class in the foundation’s 60-year history, with Fellows’ research focusing on chemistry, electrical engineering, computer science, mathematics, and physics. Several of this year’s Fellows have already published papers in disciplines from biological chemistry to quantum computing. “The 2018 fellowship awardees are an outstanding group of students, with diverse talents and an extraordinary drive to reach new heights in scientific research and technological innovation,” said Robbee Baker Kosak, President, Fannie and John Hertz Foundation. “We are delighted to welcome these six women and four men to the Hertz Community. They join the hundreds of Hertz Fellows who are leading important breakthroughs and developing some of the most important scientific and engineering solutions to challenges in our world today. We look forward to seeing what these 10 women and men contribute to that goal in the coming years.” 

www.womenofcolor.online

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ONE ON ONE

passing the torch Digging Deep Pays Dividends for Denise Gray

Denise Gray, President, LG Chem Michigan Inc. Tech Center

Denise Gray was taken by surprise in 2017 when she was selected as Technologist of the Year by the Women of Color STEM Conference. “It’s been an honor and a privilege,” said Gray. “It’s been a bonus year for me.”

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he award has brought Gray recognition among colleagues in her industry as well as a plethora of speaking opportunities, including before the Society of Automotive Engineers, CTI Symposium, and a Korean trade organization. However, because she was unaware the Technologist of the Year honor was coming her way, Gray didn’t

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have a plan in place of how best to maximize its benefits for others. In particular, Gray said she wishes the award could have brought some positive publicity to the beleaguered Detroit public schools—the schools where the foundation of her education began. Gray, who attended Detroit’s Cass Technical High School, said it’s important for students, parents, and educators in her hometown to see that local schools can influence young people to reach their dreams. “I probably didn’t leverage it as much as I could have,” said Gray. She advises the 2018 Technologist of the Year— Donna Bell—to consider how the award can be used to have a ripple effect on other groups and educational institutions with which she is or has been associated. “Take some time to connect and develop programming, dialogue with the school

www.womenofcolor.online


By Gale Horton Gay editors@ccgmag.com

“Get a mentor, whether it’s official or unofficial, who can provide some

guidance and be a source to which you can turn.”

system you came from, colleges you came from,” she said. Gray is president of LG Chem Michigan Inc.’s Technology Center and serves on the board of directors of LG Chem Michigan Inc. Gray and her team of 150 employees design, develop, and manufacture battery packs that power electric, and autonomous vehicles such as Chrysler Pacifica hybrid, Chevrolet Bolt and Volt, Ford Focus electric, and Volvo XC90. Looking ahead, she sees a future full of potential. “The advances in battery technology are rapidly occurring, faster in the last 10 years than in the last 60 years,” she notes. “It’s allowing vehicles to have improved fuel economy. It’s also allowing for reduced pollution because you are not burning fossil fuel.” “In the past, because of the high cost, technology had limited applications. In the last 10 to 15 years companies like LG Chem have done a lot of work in the research and development arena, partnering with labs and universities around the world, and had breakthroughs, so the components are more affordable. “That’s a good development for millennials, who are increasingly reliant on technology and expect adequate power and connectivity in vehicles,” she added. Gray worked at General Motors for nearly 30 years in a range of positions, rising to director of Global Battery Systems Engineering. She also held positions as Vice President of Strategic Business Development for Atieva and Vice President of Electrification Powertrain Engineering for AVL List. She earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Kettering University and a master’s degree in engineering management of technology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

www.womenofcolor.online

She offers the following advice for those seeking to follow in her footsteps: • Those with a particular interest in science, math, and technology should “go extra strong” in those areas. “Put your head down and just go full steam ahead,” she said. Opportunities in science and technology are tremendous, and much of it is “uncharted water. You need to have courage to go headstrong in new areas of development. Seek those advanced technical areas. Greater risk equals higher reward.” • Seek out and volunteer for an array of different jobs, and work in a variety of industries. Gray points out that while she spent her career focusing on engineering in the automotive industry, she developed skills and expertise across the broad automotive spectrum: buses, trucks, cars, sports cars, and minivans. “If you work in a variety of industries, you get a well-rounded view,” she said, adding that it increases one’s exposure and learning opportunities. • “Internships and co-ops are amazing,” said Gray. “They are worth their weight in gold.” While a senior in high school, Gray spent her mornings at school then headed to General Motors, where she was involved in a co-op program. “It allowed me to get my foot in the door,” she shared. While in college at Kettering, she again went the co-op route, attending classes for three months followed by three months working at General Motor’s Technical Center for Chevrolet Engineering. She said when she compares students who have had industry experience to those who don’t have it, the ones with experience are “a bit more advanced.” She said these experiences are so beneficial to one’s career that it’s worth it even if it extends the time it will take to graduate. • Be willing to make the necessary sacrifices—whether it’s taking on a heavier course load, juggling work and school, or pushing one’s graduation date. • Get a mentor, whether it’s official or unofficial, who can provide some guidance and be a source to which you can turn. • Understand it takes patience. “There’s a tendency to skip steps or experiences. Have patience and dig deep in some areas so you have—after three or four years—things you have accomplished, seen through from beginning to end.” Gray adds, “Get deep early in your career so you can then be able to understand what happens at a deep level.” 

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FIRST STEPS

the challenges of a STEM intern and tips to overcome them Participating in a STEM internship is an invaluable step toward finding a career in the STEM fields. The Association of American Colleges and Universities identifies internships as high-value, impactful experiences that blend integrated learning and real-world experiences. Are you facing challenges in finding a STEM internship? You’re not alone.

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anding a coveted STEM internship takes diligence and resolve, and although there are a few challenges that might seem insurmountable, all obstacles can be overcome. STEM internships are highly competitive, with hundreds or thousands of applicants often applying within the first few days, so apply early and apply everywhere. Sometimes being one of the first applicants can make your polished resume and application stand out before it gets lost in the masses. Seek out and utilize any connections you have in a STEM company, or even any company with an IT or technology department. There are STEM jobs everywhere, and sometimes a nontraditional company can offer you a valuable STEM experience. Also consider a federal STEM internship or research opportunity. Finally, be positive and persistent. Reach out to companies that you have applied to after a few weeks, and politely ask if your application could be considered. So you’ve landed that illustrious STEM internship that you applied for—now what? Like most first-time interns, your mind might be racing with the endless possibilities that come with this exciting first step into the STEM field. What challenges might you face? It is common for interns to face some ups and downs as they navigate both a new experience and a new company. One of the most common challenges is feeling that you’re assigned low-level tasks that don’t take advantage of your knowledge. Be patient when

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you feel this way, and make sure you’ve done a great job with the tasks you’ve been assigned. After some time has passed, reach out to your supervisor. Let him or her know that you value your internship experience so far and would be excited to try some new and more advanced tasks. In this challenge, as with all communication, how you say something is just as important as what you say. Be polite and patient while still speaking plainly about your desire for more advanced work. The opposite challenge can also occur, where you feel overwhelmed with a lot of work (or too advanced work). Just as before, communication is the key to making things better. A reasonable first step in addressing your feelings of being overwhelmed is to reach out to a mentor or someone at the company you trust. Let them know you look up to how they work, and seek their advice. If, after some guidance and assistance, you are still feeling overwhelmed, speak with your supervisor. Let them know that you need some help in specific areas and want to improve. Lastly, what do you do when there’s a lot of negative competition with your fellow interns? First, realize your true purpose for being an intern in a STEM company: to learn and grow, not to compete. At this stage, your focus should be on learning the occupations available to you and making a good name for yourself, not worrying about the reputation of the other interns. Having a professional and drama-free

www.womenofcolor.online


By Gale Horton Gay editors@ccgmag.com

Ask the

professionals in your internship to tell you more about their job, how it operates, its challenges and rewards, and how

you can help them in their role.

approach to your internship will help you rise above the negativity and focus on the things that will move you forward. What about some tips to make the most of your STEM internship? Like all internships, there are some tried and true tips to help you maximize your experiences within a STEM internship as well as a few that are unique to STEM. When you engage in a STEM internship, be goal oriented. Take on a mindset of achieving a few important, simple goals that will improve you as a professional. While working toward these goals, periodically consider the progress you’ve made and make adjustments. Realize through this process that growth isn’t always linear; there may be some ups and downs, and that is natural. In the end, feel pride in your growth and accomplishments. Another great way to make the most of your internship is to make a genuine, honest effort to network across the company. Look for professionals,

www.womenofcolor.online

interns, and supervisors that help make you better. Seek out people that are professional and communicate well, and seek their advice. Ask the professionals in your internship to tell you more about their job, how it operates, its challenges and rewards, and how you can help them in their role. If these conversations are from a genuine desire to grow and contribute, they should be well received and fruitful for everyone. Finally, ensure that you receive formative and summative feedback on your performance. Consistently seek feedback on how you are doing and guidance on how to improve. Be polite and articulate in asking questions about what skills you could learn or which projects might be a great fit for you. Ask about what your “next steps” are in your growth as a professional. Showing that you are an intern who wants to improve and assist your employer is a sign of maturity and professionalism. 

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EMPOWERING

WOMEN

It takes a village to build the next generation of empowered women. As partners and advocates, DTE Energy and Women of Color in STEM are providing the tools and resources to improve women’s lives. We’re proud to support Women of Color in STEM and it’s positive, life-changing work in our communities.


National Aeronautics and Space Administration

NASA Congratulates 2018 Women of Color Award Winners Brenda Ellis Glenn Research Center

Maricela Lizcano Glenn Research Center

Ali Guarneros Luna Ames Research Center

Jasmine Keeton Johnson Space Center

Desiree Smith Johnson Space Center

Dawn Davis Stennis Space Center

Andrea Bynum Langley Research Center

Octavia Hicks Langley Research Center

Jessica Taylor Langley Research Center

Susan Gorton Langley Research Center

Gugu Rutherford Langley Research Center

Ranked the Best Place To Work in the Federal Government

2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 www.nasa.gov


EDUCATION

Jessica Taylor – NASA’s advocate for encouraging girls in STEM Growing up in a small town in Florida, Jessica Taylor became very familiar with the sounds of sonic booms echoing from nearby NASA launches. At the time, she had no idea she would one day grow up to be part of the NASA team.

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aylor said she always enjoyed science and mathematics in school, but with few female STEM role models, she didn’t receive any encouragement of the possibility of a career in STEM. When she entered Florida State University, she decided to pursue degrees in both meteorology and finance. At that point in her education, Taylor never even considered the idea of graduate school. Then, a classmate approached her about a graduate school opportunity with the Louis-Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Bridge Fellowship. She decided to continue her education and pursue a graduate degree in meteorology. Three semesters into the program, the funding for the fellowship program was pulled, and Taylor was left weighing her options. With no job or idea of how to finish school, she went to her meteorology professor for advice on what to do next.

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toward science education. “I felt like I had finally found myself a path for combining my love for science with my interest in education,” said Taylor. “It finally just seemed ‘right.’” Following the completion of her graduate degree, Taylor spent some time working at the Florida Department of Education in the federal program area for No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Under her supervision and leadership, the NCLB program worked directly with Title I low-income schools and districts to help underserved and underrepresented demographics. The programs included supplemental educational services, school choice with transportation, and parental involvement. This position opened her eyes to different aspects of education and helped prepare her for her future career with NASA. “Working with No Child Left Behind provided me with new insight into education,” Taylor said, reflecting on her experience. “I witnessed how schools could no longer hide their underserved and minority students with the numbers.” When asked how she wound up working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Taylor chalks it up to pure luck and a lot of networking.

“You ask a lot of questions about how people learn,” her professor answered. “Why don’t you try taking courses in education?”

“Networking has been a huge part of being able to obtain opportunity,” said Taylor. “I moved to the area when my husband got a job with NASA and began meeting people. Through a contact, I found out that NASA Langley was looking for someone with experience with the GLOBE program, and I realized… that’s me! I really was at the right place at the right time.”

That is exactly what Taylor did. The redirection of her graduate degree led her to shift her master’s work

The GLOBE program helps combine science and education through NASA and grants students with

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www.womenofcolor.online


By Jessica Rafaeil editors@ccgmag.com

“Working with No

Child Left Behind provided me with new insight into education. I

witnessed how schools could no longer hide their underserved and minority students with the numbers.” Jessica Taylor, Physical Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center

opportunities to work on real science projects and collect data for NASA to use. Taylor had been a part of the program through her participation at Florida State University. As she entered into this new opportunity, Taylor realized that all of her experiences with science and education had led her to this moment. Taylor currently serves as a physical scientist at NASA and as the lead for the Science Education Team. Her work with the Science Education Team is driven by her passion for bringing science opportunities to education, for both students and teachers. The program does tremendous work by taking all of the Earth science information and developing materials for students and teachers through age-appropriate lessons, connection with NASA scientists like Taylor herself, and professional development for teachers. Beyond the Science Education Team, Taylor has been working with her NASA colleagues on role model training programs. “It’s been our focus for the past three years,” Taylor said. “We work on effective strategies for engaging girls in STEM. I’ve worked with a number of groups in NASA. Sometimes they are coed groups, and sometimes the groups are all female.” Through this work, Taylor has found that her biggest challenge is helping her NASA colleagues realize that they are, in fact, role models. “I noticed that some of the employees didn’t selfidentify as a role model,” she said. “After a lot of

www.womenofcolor.online

reflection, I realized that the person looking up at you is the one to decide whether or not you are a role model. Wearing the NASA logo is a huge responsibility, and we should be proud of the opportunity to be seen as role models.” Taylor understands the true importance of leadership, especially for women and people of color, to make a difference in the lives of girls that want to pursue degrees in STEM. She believes that children need a role model, inspiration, and encouragement throughout their education to fully succeed. In fact, she recognizes the women leaders she saw when she first started at NASA. “The Director of Science and the Director of NASA Langley Center were both women,” she recalls. “Seeing women in leadership at NASA made a huge difference in my experience here.” As for her future work with NASA, Taylor hopes to continue working to provide STEM role models for the next generation. She hopes to be able to help develop a community where STEM role models can interact with one another in a safe space to discuss approaches that work or don’t work in reaching youth. “We do a great job at inspiring STEM, but there is always room for improvement in making sure we reach all students—all minority groups and students with disabilities,” said Taylor. “It’s always going to be a work in progress.” 

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CORPORATE LIFE

calling all women:

the cybersecurity field needs you!

Lt. Col. Maria Biank and Army Officer Felicia Jackson

Technology is making all of our lives increasingly easier. We’re able to communicate faster than ever before. We can stream entertainment with the click of a button. We can order our groceries straight from our smartphones. 22 ‹

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ut these luxuries don’t come without risk. As our lives integrate with technology in new and complex ways, the threats become greater. New cyber channels create new opportunities for hackers to access our information. As potential threats multiply, there’s an increased need for people to protect us from them. And there’s also a need for women, in particular, in the cybersecurity field. At a recent Women of Color STEM Conference, Lt. Col. Maria Biank and Army Officer Felicia Jackson held a seminar on this topic. The two discussed the growing needs of the cybersecurity industry and offered some advice to women trying to find a role in it. “Only 11% of the cybersecurity workforce is comprised

www.womenofcolor.online


By Christopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

of women,” says Biank, a 27-year veteran and the current Director of Operations for the U.S. Army Cyber Command. “Not only is this a growth area globally but it’s a growth area for women specifically.” Diversity, she explains, propels innovation by bringing in new perspectives. “We know from other industries that the more diverse a workforce is, the better they perform,” she says. “It’s very important that we recognize that.” As Jackson, a 24-year Air Force veteran and Senior IT Security Analyst for Raytheon points out, women are naturally predisposed to traits the industry needs. She cites flexibility, decisiveness, detail-orientation, and intuition among the qualities that make a strong security analyst. “Even if you’re not a mother, you still have those intuitive qualities,” she says to the women in the audience. “We can feel threats. We can feel when things are wrong.” It’s not difficult for women to get involved with cybersecurity either. After all, the majority of companies have data that needs protection, no matter which industry they’re in. “There are a lot of threats out there. People don’t think about them because they have their own jobs to do,” Jackson says. “If you’re in engineering and you’re trying to get to the next contract, you’re focused on getting done. Sometimes you don’t stop to think about the risks.” Biank points out that many of these risks are related to outdated technology. These technologies leave open holes for hackers to find their way through. “Some corporations use old operating systems to build things because they don’t have the money to upgrade,” she says, spelling out the need for innovation. “How do you go about hardening those to make sure that they’re functional, usable, and secure without getting rid of it?” With a bit of training, women can transition into security without even changing industries. Jackson suggests that women who are interested get certified and find a role in the field they already work in. That way, they’ll be

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“There are a lot of threats out there. People don’t think about them because they have their own jobs to do. If you’re in engineering and you’re trying to get to the next contract, you’re focused on getting done. Sometimes you don’t stop to think about the risks.” - Felicia Jackson

able to bring what they already know about the industry to their security approach. “Get familiarity with what’s going on in your area, whether it’s healthcare or something else,” Jackson suggests. “You touch cyber in every single workforce, so you’ll be able to fit in wherever you are.” Biank adds that industry expertise makes for strong leaders, something the cybersecurity field is constantly in search of. “We need smart people on the leadership side who understand the big picture, what we call the ‘strategic environment’ in the Army,” she says. “We need people who understand that environment and can apply what they know to the company they’re supporting.” Ultimately, cybersecurity presents a wide range of opportunities for women of all ages. “It’s a growing industry,” Col. Biank says. “Whatever your skillsets and aspirations are, you can’t go wrong in this area.” 

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CAREER VOICES

women leaders in technology Unleashing the Power Within It’s no secret that women of color are largely underrepresented in corporate leadership roles. When Ursula Burns stepped down from her role as CEO of Xerox in 2016, she was the only Black woman who had held that position in a Fortune 500 company.

“You can put your head down and work really hard, but if nobody knows it, you’re like a tree falling in the forest,” Evans says. “Do you carry yourself in a way that people know you’re ready for the next level?”

I

She also spoke about the decision to leave Lockheed, a company with more than 100,000 employees, for a smaller business. This decision helped her to gain more visibility, something the panelists agree is crucial to success.

t was fitting, therefore, for Denise Evans of IBM to quote Burns during a recent Women of Color STEM Conference. The event, entitled “Women Leaders: Unleashing the Power Within,” offered leadership advice to women working in a corporate environment. “I didn’t learn to be quiet when I had an opinion,” Evans said, citing the Xerox CEO as the author of the quote. “The reason they knew who I was is because I told them.” Evans, VP of Women and Diversity B2B Marketing for the tech giant, was joined by panelists Nicole Patton and Dr. Akilah Cadet. Together, the three speakers unpacked some of the most pressing challenges facing women that aspire to leadership roles and gave some tips on overcoming those challenges. Topics ranged from networking and mentorship to adversity in the workplace. As the group made clear from the beginning, strong performance alone isn’t going to help a woman land a C-suite role. In order to move up the corporate ladder, high-performing employees must also be willing to shape their image around the demands of the job.

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Patton, who worked for years in IT for Lockheed Martin before taking a job as Manager of Desktop Engineering at Proskauer Rose, spoke of her own experience in moving upward in a corporate environment. “I was just a help technician crawling under desks when they said, ‘Hey, we want you to lead,’” she explains. “Then I have to change my wardrobe. I’m no longer wearing khakis and polos. I have to be a person who can speak to engineers and managers at the same time.”

“At Lockheed Martin, you can be a number, so I decided to go to a smaller company to get more exposure,” she says. “Now I’m in charge of a group of three engineers who are migrating a global company, and I’m the face of it.” While a change in companies was fruitful for Patton, some women find that starting their own company is the best path. Dr. Cadet did just that. Her organizational development firm, Change Cadet, was born out of her experiences with workplace adversity. “I’m a woman, I’m of color, and I’m perceived as young, so a lot of people don’t want to hear what I have to say even though I have three degrees,” she says. “I’ve even had people tell me I was too smart,” she adds, laughing. “I didn’t know that was a problem.” The group’s consensus is that whether a woman is

www.womenofcolor.online


by Christopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

(Moderator) Denise Evans, Vice President, Women & Diverse B2B Marketing, IBM Corporation; Nicole Patton, Manager of Desktop Engineering, Proskauer Rose, LLP; Akilah Cadet, Founder, Change Cadet.

working for herself or under someone else, advocacy is the key to female success. Individuals need advocates and mentors to vouch for them when opportunities arise. “You want to get to a place where there’s someone who’s going to advocate for you to get assignments,” Patton says. “Anywhere there’s an opportunity to partner with someone who’s higher up than you opens so many doors.” She adds that taking on an advocate role can help women to establish themselves as leaders. “Bring other women with you,” she says. “Your job is to want to see other women succeed after you. If people see that you have a great team and inspire people, they’ll know that you’re a great leader.” Ultimately, advocacy and mentorship networks help women to thrive in the workplace. After touching on some of the adversity she’s faced in her career, Dr. Cadet expounds on the importance of strong support networks. “Unfortunately, as women of color, the system is not designed for us to be successful,” she says. “They don’t want to pay us for it. They don’t want us to have kids. It’s important that we support one another.” 

www.womenofcolor.online

“You can put your head down and work really hard, but if nobody knows it, you’re like a tree falling in the forest. Do you carry yourself in a way that people know you’re for the next level?” - Denise Evans

ready

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WE CONGRATULATE MARJAN SHIRANI AND THE 2018 TECHNOLOGY RISING STARS

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AWARD WINNERS

2 018 T E C H N O L O G I S T O F T H E Y E A R

AN

INNOVATOR

in Designing SMART Vehicles for a SMART World During her 25-year career at the Ford Motor Company, Donna Bell has made her mark in body module electronics design, electrical systems design analysis, and electrical and electronic systems engineering. Throughout her pioneering career in the auto industry, Bell has worked closely with product development communities, ensuring that electrical designs meet or exceed customer expectations. In her role as electrical program module team leader for the 2008 Ford Focus, she played a part in building one of Ford’s most notable brands in North America. “It was one of the most rewarding positions in my career,” Bell said. “It taught me how to collaborate with cross-functional teams and how to negotiate, something that you don’t learn naturally, all while delivering great products and technology.” Bell also grew to understand program financials and how they impact the company’s bottom line.

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“I’ve always been one to take on challenging assignments,” she said, “wanting to know what’s on the other side of that wall.” Was it difficult? “Yes, there were difficult times, but they helped toughen my skin,” she said.

The Other Side of the Wall

During her time at Ford, Bell has led the introduction of key technologies such as ambient lighting, and was instrumental in the electrical team’s effort for Ford’s implementation of the auto stop-start technology. Company sources say stop-start technology improves fuel economy during city driving and supports the solution to meet greenhouse gas emissions standards. Another highlight of Bell’s career was as Global Product Development Quality Manager for Electrical. “I was responsible for quality, around the globe, from the electrical systems perspective,” Bell told Women of Color magazine. “Modules, wiring, or power distribution, I was responsible for making sure quality issues were resolved from failure mode avoidance to launch quality.” To do that, Bell had to know and understand what customers wanted or didn’t want in China, Germany, South America, and the U.S. It was Bell’s job to deliver significant quality

improvement for electrical components and systems. Her team was responsible for teaching and implementing failure mode avoidance tools, quality function deployment, and other quality and robustness tools. Bell led Ford’s electrical organization in delivering a 26 percent improvement in quality, achieving “Best in Class Quality” three times for Lincoln vehicles. Improvements in the quality of Ford’s SYNC in-vehicle Infotainment system improved by 32 percent over 2016 and was acknowledged in the 2017 JD Power Initial Quality Study as having the biggest contribution to Ford’s overall quality improvement.

Technology in Silicon Valley

Since 2017, Bell has served as the director of research lab operations at Ford’s Greenfield Labs in California. “Greenfield Labs in Palo Alto, CA, is Ford’s sole Research and Innovation Center in Silicon Valley that serves 250+ employees,” Bell says. “We are a microcosm of Ford with many organizations represented here,” she explains. The role of the organizations is to interface with start-ups, universities, government and non-government organizations, venture capitalists, incubators, accelerators, and other companies in the Valley to create

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by Lango Deen ldeen@ccgmag.com

Mrs. Donna L. Bell Research Operations Director – Greenfield Labs – Palo Alto Ford Motor Company – Research and Advanced Engineering (R&A)

human-centered designs for smart vehicles for a smart world. “It’s allowed me to see how innovation and technology will continue to shape the world. Just being in the middle of change and working with amazing, brilliant people who come up with product ideas that puts Ford at the forefront of technology and innovation is inspiring,” Bell said. “One of my charters is to establish and implement innovative ways for integrating seamlessly into the Silicon Valley Ecosystem. Technology R&D www.womenofcolor.online

present in Ford’s Greenfield Labs includes artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain technology, V2X communications, and autonomous vehicle research.”

project she led in conjunction with Georgia Tech projected a 60% energy cost savings and CO2 improvements by incorporating energy-efficient solutions into an average U.S. home.

In a previous role as Electric Vehicle Infrastructure and Smart Grid Technology Manager in Ford’s Sustainability and Environmental organization, Bell ensured the launch of technologies that support improvements in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Bell is involved in acquiring key talent, managing the research operating budget, and creating a culture that encourages innovation.

For example, the MyEnergi Lifestyle

“It’s probably the best role I’ve had in my 25 years in the company career,” Bell said, “having the opportunity to shape and protect the future of Ford Motor Company.” WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

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AWARD WINNERS

Family and Motivators

As a modern-day innovator for Ford, Bell’s signature text in her email is a nod to the glorious past: “Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.” Henry Ford Like the founding innovator of the Ford Motor Company, Donna L. Bell was born in Michigan.

Donna was inspired by her father’s carpentry skills and chose to take woodshop over homemaking. She got so good at it she became well known as one of the first females at her school to excel in woodshop class. This class taught her the importance of discipline, attention to detail, passion, and quality and to always deliver well-thought-out products. When new computers arrived at her

high school, a world of possibilities opened up. “My mother suggested doing a degree in electrical engineering because it would allow me to work anywhere in the EE or the computer science space. So that’s what I did,” Bell said. Working with Mr. Stephens, a high school counselor at Cass Technical in Detroit, she applied to Lawrence

“I’VE ALWAYS BEEN ONE TO TAKE ON CHALLENGING ASSIGNMENTS,” BELL SAID, “WANTING TO KNOW WHAT’S ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THAT WALL.”

Technological University, formerly known as Lawrence Institute of Technology. Boosted by a partial scholarship from Dow Chemical, Bell signed up for a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering. Sadly, during her first semester, Bell’s mother passed away. “This was difficult. She had been the glue that held this entire puzzle together. After a year or so, I regrouped, buckled down, and refocused, always knowing she would be proud of me. She was, and continues to be, my true motivation in everything that I do.” Thankfully, Bell has always had people 32 ‹

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to turn to. Her father, siblings, and friends; her husband, Greg; and her mother-in-law have kept cheering her along the way. When Bell had to be at the Ford Wayne Stamping & Assembly plant at 2 a.m., her support system never failed when it came to picking up her mom duties. Bell’s adult daughters Eboni, and Patrice, are college graduates working in education and theater, respectively. At work, Bell has been supported and inspired by people like Ken Washington, Ford’s vice president of research and advanced engineering and CTO; Marcy Klevorn, Executive VP and President, Mobility; and Bennie Fowler,

Ford’s former group vice president of quality. There was also Rita LaFaive, one of Bell’s first managers. “She was the first to believe in my ability to be a great engineer and leader. I recall Rita giving me the reins with senior leaders and advocating for me when opportunities surfaced,” Bell said. And there were many other mentors and supporters who helped shape her career. In the wider community, Bell has admired the success of people such as the 2014 Technologist of the Year

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Alicia Boler-Davis, 2017 Technologist of the Year Denise Gray, and Joseph B. Anderson, Jr., chairman of the board and chief executive officer of TAG Holdings.

Pressing for Progress

Before moving to California, Bell served as the president of the Lawrence Tech Alumni Association Board of Directors for three years, where she was responsible for establishing scholarships and programs for LTU students and alumni and worked with Dr. Virinder Moudgil, president of Lawrence Technological University. “I’ve watched in awe as Dr. Moudgil has transformed and continues to transform LTU to be a university that students are excited to attend, strengthening student programs and increasing the school’s presence in athletics. He is a true visionary,” she said. Bell earned a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Lawrence Technological University. Bell makes it a point to give back to the community by participating in programs such as the NSBE’s Pre-College Initiative and the Society of Women Engineers Girls Engineering Exploration Day. Bell is also the champion for Ford’s Palo Alto Professional Women’s Network, an organization whose vision is to support and empower women, making Ford a great place to work and build a better world by significantly impacting their communities and customers. Donna’s passion for engineering and sharing her knowledge and experiences with others have been keys to her success. 

See the 2017 WOC Awards honoring Denise Gray

www.womenofcolor.online

DONNA BELL’S

TEN TIPS FOR SUCCESS 1. Define what success means to you. 2. Look inside and see what you want for yourself, and engage feedback. 3. Create a plan. 4. Take on challenging tasks. They help stretch you for the next step. 5. Bounce back quickly from setbacks. Don’t wallow in difficulties. 6. Be a lifelong student. Learn something new to strengthen your abilities. 7. Enter the room as an engineer, scientist, or expert. 8. Have a voice. You were hired for a reason. 9. Don’t be afraid to take risks. Live on that edge a little bit. 10. Create a vision board for your life. WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

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Technology Rising Star Winners: Sheyla Alfau Jimenez Astrid Barajas ReShonda Borel Christine A Brownlee Brianna Caceres Erica Carrillo Karla Castellanous Suzette M Croutch LaTasha C Dandy Antionette Davis Doris Gebelein Roslyn Handy Jennifer Hernandez Latosha Imani Angela D Ivery Britnee Jenkins Shalonda Johnson Vernecia Johnson

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AWARD WINNERS

2018 WOMEN OF COLOR

STEM

AWARD WINNERS Over the last decade, Women of Color magazine studies have shown the powerful connections between choices, chances, and the influential individuals that help to make a change in the lives of others. In 2007 half of the respondents to our magazine survey said they had decided on a science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) career between the ages of 12 and 18, and 76 percent said they had decided between ages 12 and 21. By contrast, 61 percent of non-technical professionals made their career choice after age 21. In addition, some 59 percent of the survey respondents took part in pre-college and conference events such as the annual Women of Color (WOC) STEM Conference. Many of the people that attend WOC are employed in STEM jobs or are pursuing STEM education and training. Some have attended the two-day STEM event for years, while others will be taking advantage of the experience for the first time in 2018. For more than two decades, WOC has created passion in STEM by exposing young people to the endless possibilities in the digital age through career-focused events, professional seminars, and interaction with real-life scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians who have achieved significant success in the world of STEM. As per tradition, WOC magazine’s conference edition has the pleasure of presenting the 2018 Women of Color STEM Award winners who are helping to create a vision of success for future STEM talent. 36 ‹

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Technologist of the Year Award Mrs. Donna L. Bell

Director, Research Operations Research & Advanced Engineering, Greenfield Labs, Palo Alto, CA Ford Motor Company

Career Achievement in Government Award Dr. Rekha Rao

Research & Development Science & Engineering Principal Chemical Engineer Sandia National Laboratories

Dr. Brenda L. Ellis Program Manager

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Career Achievement in Industry Award Ms. Jie Xue

Vice President of Technology & Quality, Supply Chain Operations

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Ms. Gena C. Lovett

Vice President, Manufacturing, Safety & Quality Boeing Defense, Space & Security

The Boeing Company

College-Level Promotion of Education Award Ms. Melanie Villatoro, P.E. Assistant Professor

New York City College of Technology

Dr. Kathleen Johnson Associate Professor

University of California, Irvine

Community Service in Government Award Ms. Gihan B. Oraby

Director, Weapons & Software Engineering Center U.S. ARMY–ARDEC

Community Service in Industry Award Ms. Tracey Hughes Manager, Cyber Risk

Deloitte & Touche, LLP

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Corporate Promotion of Education Award Mrs. Jessica Taylor

President’s Award Mrs. Monica Greenhalgh

Physical Scientist

Chief Information Officer GM South America

NASA Langley Research Center

General Motors

Managerial Leadership in Government Award Major Brittany Carter

Professional Achievement in Industry Award Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green

Director of Operations, 552 Air Control Networks Squadron U.S. Air Force

Founder, Ora Lee Smith Cancer Research Foundation Assistant Professor of Surgery

Special Recognition Honorees Ms. Mahathi Choudhry

Serial Interfaces Applications Engineer & Collateral Lead Customer Experience Engineer Intel Programmable Solutions Group Intel Corporation

Ms. Crystal R. Emery, Ph.D. Founder and CEO URU The Right To Be, Inc.

Mrs. Nicole Fontayne-Bárdowell Executive Vice President & Chief Administrative Officer

Mrs. Brenda M. Johnson-Turner

Morehouse School of Medicine

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Director, Apache Helicopter-International Programs

DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit)

The Boeing Company

Senior Risk Manager and Senior IT Security Engineer

Director of Real Estate

Managerial Leadership in Industry Award Dr. Miquel Antoine

Surveillance Systems Program Manager The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Delores Alexander

Lynn B. Fox

Professional Achievement in Government Award Dr. Tahirih C. Lackey

Research Hydraulic Engineer, Engineer Research and Development Center

Mrs. Laura A. Jones Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Mrs. Yogita Krishnamurthy

Director, Data Platform-Technology Amrock

Vice President, Indirect Supply Chain Manufacturing, Supply Chain and Operations

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The Boeing Company

NASA John C. Stennis Space Center

New Media Leadership Award Ms. Paris Forest

Student Leadership Award Ms. Alexandra Garr-Schultz

Miss Mimi Nguyen

The Boeing Company

Northwestern University Department of Psychology

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government Award Ms. Susan Althoff Gorton

Technical Innovation in Government Award Dr. Maricela Lizcano

Ms. Dawn Davis

Chief, Electrical Design & Software Branch

Mrs. Jackie Mason

Principal Member of Tech Staff AT&T Technology Development Automation Platforms Development AT&T

Information Technology Director-Product Systems

Project Manager for NASA’s Revolutionary Vertical Lift Technology Project NASA Langley Research Center

Ms. Ali Guarneros Luna Aerospace Engineer

Doctoral Candidate

Research Materials Engineer NASA Glenn Research Center

Ms. Kim Babcock

Research Physical Scientist United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center

NASA Ames Research Center

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Industry Award Ms. Gandhi Sivakumar Chief Architect - Cognitive Solutions IBM

Ms. Liza Resley

Technical Innovation in Industry Award Dr. Soroor Soltani

Service Delivery Manager General Motors

Ms. Nia Jetter

Radio Frequency Engineer Staff

Technical Fellow Spacecraft Autonomy, Flight and Controls

Lockheed Martin Corporation

The Boeing Company

www.womenofcolor.online

Powertrain Planning Manager and Powertrain Long-Range Plans Lead

Ms. Jennifer Onyi Oradiegwu Process Engineer Owens Corning

Ms. Jenney Shen Vice President Fannie Mae

Mrs. Regina Solomon Lead Systems Engineer

General Dynamics Land Systems

Mrs. Dawn Treece

Department Manager Raytheon Company

Ms. Teri VanSumeren Executive Director Clean Energy Products Consumers Energy

by Lauren Rosen & Jessica Rafaeil editors@ccgmag.com

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

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AWARD WINNERS

DR. REKHA RAO

DR. BRENDA L. ELLIS

MS. JIE XUE

Research & Development Science & Engineering Principal Chemical Engineer

Program Manager

Vice President of Technology & Quality, Supply Chain Operations

Career Achievement in Government Award

Sandia National Laboratories

Rekha Rao has worked at Sandia since receiving her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Washington in 1990. Dr. Rao is an expert in the mechanics of complex fluids, including theoretical development, numerical algorithms, and finite element implementation. She has excelled in a challenging field that is critical to addressing a variety of problems of national interest, especially in energy production-related processes, environmental issues, polymer processing, and manufacturing. Throughout her career, she has led projects in the development of finite element software and performing analysis for computational fluid dynamic and multi-physics applications. She is also one of the founding code developers of GOMA 6.0, a high-fidelity, multi-physics computational simulation code used at Sandia, several universities, and six U.S. companies. Dr. Rao’s success positions her as a role model in chemical and computer engineering. Dr. Rao has authored or co-authored over 95 peer-reviewed scientific papers, conference proceedings, and reports. In addition, she has been a guest editor for the International Journal of Numerical Methods in Fluids and Computers & Fluids and serves as the co-chair of the first Female Research Committee of the International Association of Computational Mechanics.

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Career Achievement in Government Award

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Dr. Brenda Ellis has authored more than a dozen papers and reports and represented NASA by delivering presentations on satellite communications technology and securing communications and effective cybersecurity training for multiple generations. Dr. Ellis has mentored individuals in STEM-related fields in high school and through the East Tech Tutoring Program. She founded the advisory board for the Information Assurance Research, Education and Development Institute at Norfolk State University and is an associate professor at the University of Maryland University College. Now the agency program manager for the IT Security Awareness and Training Center, Dr. Ellis has led an effort to restructure cybersecurity training to address complex threats, resulting in a measurable risk reduction to NASA. These successes were recognized when she received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal. She is a member of the Federal Information System Security Education Association and a partner in the Department of Homeland Security’s “Stop. Think. Connect.” campaign. She has played a significant role in the space and aeronautical communications missions at the John H. Glenn Center at Lewis Field to support the agency and country.

Career Achievement in Industry Award Cisco Systems, Inc.

Ms. Jie Xue has published more than 90 technical papers and holds 15 patents. She leads Cisco’s Technology and Quality (T&Q) organization, a global team of 500 responsible for innovations to deliver a quality customer experience in support of Cisco’s supply chain. The team ensures excellence in manufacturing technology, test and component engineering, advanced technology, closed-loop quality management, and product compliance. Xue oversees development of industry-leading technologies for application-specific integrated circuits, printed circuit boards, optical devices, and memory modules. “Guided by her impressive technical acumen and leadership, Jie and her team have transformed component engineering and test engineering at Cisco,” says John Kern, SVP, Supply Chain Operations, Cisco Systems. Before leading T&Q, Xue was Senior Director, Component Quality and Technology. She is an IMAPS Fellow; IEEE Fellow; IEEE-Women in Engineering Board Member, 2016; IEEE Women in Engineering Leadership Conference Program Committee Session Chair, 2015–2016; President of IEEE-Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology Society, 2014–2015; and IEEE-CPMT Distinguished Lecturer. In 2015 she was honored at the YWCA Silicon Valley Tribute to Women Awards.

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MS. GENA C. LOVETT Career Achievement in Industry Award

Vice President, Manufacturing, Safety & Quality Boeing Defense, Space & Security The Boeing Company

Gena Lovett makes sure the people of Boeing are “always safe, with world-class production, differentiating products, and that we move through the 21st century as a competitor of choice,” she says. Lovett is VP of Operations for Boeing Defense, Space & Security, St. Louis, overseeing manufacturing, quality, and safety for this $21 billion business unit of The Boeing Company. She sets the strategic direction for operations and leads 7,000-plus employees who manufacture Boeing defense and space products. She streamlines and standardizes how Boeing Defense, Space & Security builds products and how Operations coordinates with divisions like Engineering; Supplier Management; and Environment, Health, and Safety. Lovett has a particular responsibility for safety, with nearly all production work for the business coming under her jurisdiction. She has 20-plus years of leadership experience in manufacturing and operations. Prior to Boeing, Lovett was the chief diversity officer for Alcoa, where she oversaw the emergence of a work environment that encouraged diversity companywide. Under her leadership, Alcoa won the 2013 Catalyst Award and the Human Rights Campaign’s 2014 Corporate Equality Award.

www.womenofcolor.online

MS. MELANIE VILLATORO, P.E.

DR. KATHLEEN JOHNSON

Assistant Professor

Associate Professor

New York City College of Technology

University of California, Irvine

Professor Melanie Villatoro currently serves as an assistant professor and as the first female, Hispanic, full-time faculty member in the Department of Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology (CMCE) at New York City College of Technology (City Tech). Through all of her efforts, Professor Villatoro has proven to be deeply committed to providing opportunities in engineering for the underrepresented groups that City Tech serves, and she actively promotes students’ pursuit of, and success in, STEM-related majors. She has instituted Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL), a pedagogical approach that has improved student performance, and has helped restructure the curriculum.

Dr. Kathleen Johnson, a paleoclimatologist at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), uses geochemical measurements on cave deposits, or speleothems, to reconstruct the past climate variations in order to test and improve climate models. An enrolled member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, she has contributed to the geosciences by both significant research and exceptional outreach to minority students. She received the Geological Society of America’s Bromery Award for Minorities for “tireless devotion towards opening the geoscience field to Native Americans, for bringing her passion for geoscience and field work to undergraduate and graduate students, and for profoundly influencing the future of so many young people.”

College-Level Promotion of Education Award

She also directs a Peer Advisement Program— a program that impacts around 150 students annually—in an effort to increase retention of women in engineering technology majors. Aside from focusing strictly on the students, Professor Villatoro understands the impact faculty members have on the students’ learning experience. She has facilitated a professional development seminar for faculty members across the City Tech campus. Her strong passion for increasing STEM exposure and opportunities for her students beyond graduation is what makes her a true leader in the college-level promotion of education.

College-Level Promotion of Education Award

Indeed, her mentorship and outreach are profound and far-reaching. She served as PI and director of the National Science Foundation-funded American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISIESS) from 2011–2017. The UCI residential summer program empowered participants to pursue higher education in the earth and environmental sciences and to bring their knowledge back to their communities. AISIESS has hosted 131 Indigenous high school students, representing 45+ Tribal Nations; the vast majority of high school grads go to college or university.

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AWARD WINNERS

MS. GIHAN B. ORABY

MS. TRACEY HUGHES

MRS. JESSICA TAYLOR

Director, Weapons & Software Engineering Center

Manager, Cyber Risk

Physical Scientist

Deloitte & Touche, LLP

NASA Langley Research Center

Tracey Hughes is committed to paving the way for the underrepresented and underserved. As a woman of color in IT and cybersecurity, Tracey understands the obstacles that stand in the way for young girls of color, but she is always eager to find a solution and new opportunities. In 2016 she founded TechyTen, a non-profit organization that aims to address the gap of STEM-related activities for younger children in the greater Charleston, SC, area. The children get to view the workshops as “parties,” but in actuality, the workshops are an innovative mechanism to encourage, inspire, and excite them about technology, coding, and cybersecurity through projects, problem-solving exercises, team activities, and games. She introduced her niece to coding at age eight through Black Girls Code, and she committed to extensive driving time to not only accompany her but to also volunteer as a technical instructor. She also has volunteered with Dallas, TX, and Raleigh/Durham, NC, chapters.

Since becoming a physical scientist in the Atmospheric Composition Branch, Science Directorate, at NASA Langley Research Center, Jessica Taylor has expressed her passion to support underserved communities, including girls and women as well as minority students underrepresented in STEM. As the coinvestigator of two large NASA Science Activation projects with a total budget of $1.1M+ per year and an annual reach of nearly 5,000 educators and more than 1,200 youths, she has impacted STEM education locally, regionally, nationally, and even internationally.

Community Service in Government Award U.S. ARMY–ARDEC

Rising to the position of Sciences Division Chief within the Quality Engineering and System Assurance (QE&SA) Directorate, Gihan Oraby doesn’t rest on this accomplishment alone but aims to educate younger generations about the appeal of STEM careers and to promote diversity. She serves on the Armament Research and Development Engineering Center (ARDEC) and QE&SA Diversity Advisory Councils, where she coordinates World Day for Cultural Diversity events and Executive Mentoring Panels. She prioritizes the development of leaders through mentoring across cultural and gender minority boundaries. She is currently the president of the Picatinny Arsenal Women In Defense chapter, where she advocates for academic achievement scholarships for future scientists and engineers. She has initiated multiple local outreach programs, including “Introduce a Girl to Engineering” and “Introduce a Teen to Engineering,” to encourage underrepresented communities to pursue STEM careers. She also has supported existing community programs, including Future Scientists. In an article that discussed encouraging girls to pursue engineering, Oraby, who coorganized the event, clarified her purpose: “It is important to develop a passion for science and math in the next generation of women. I believe every conversation, demonstration, interaction these young girls have about STEM is vital in their decision-making for their futures.” 40 ‹

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Community Service in Industry Award

Returning to her alma mater, Claflin University, Tracey serves as a mentor for the Palmetto Cyber Defense Competition and as a member of the university’s Computer Science Advisory Board. Where there is an opportunity to make an impact, Tracey is known for taking the lead.

Corporate Promotion of Education Award

Among her many noteworthy endeavors, Taylor has leveraged Langley’s participation with the Twin Cities Public Television’s SciGirls program to bring research-based role model training to NASA. She has held NASA workshops and was chosen for NASA’s Women in STEM Working Group. As NASA Langley’s representative, she liaises with the Employee Working Group for Women, NASA Langley’s Allies and Advocates for Women, the Equal Employment Opportunity office, and the Federal Women’s Program. By virtue of her participation, NASA’s White House liaison asked her to develop a Train-the-Trainer module for role model training. She also leads a discussion group on Serving Girls and Women in STEM within the two dozen NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Activation projects across Earth and space science. www.womenofcolor.online


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MAJOR BRITTANY CARTER

MRS. BRENDA M. JOHNSON-TURNER

Director of Operations, 552 Air Control Networks Squadron

Director of Real Estate

Managerial Leadership in Government Award U.S. Air Force

Cyberspace is key to enabling U.S. Air Force missions. Major Brittany Carter’s 552 Air Control Networks Squadron (ACNS) was named as a pathfinding unit two years ago when she was asked to direct and guide her squadron to stand up to an entity to protect the E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS), a reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft. The AWACS is an airborne radar system that detects aircraft, ships, and vehicles at long ranges and performs command and control of the battlespace by directing fighter and attack aircraft strikes. AWACS’s radar allows its operators to detect and track targets and to distinguish between friendly and hostile aircraft. Major Carter directs personnel that develop and test code used by AWACS radar that is unique to the 31 aircraft fleet (valued at $15 billion), and each aircraft’s software is distinctive. Her squadron also provides a simulation training environment for the individuals that operate the aircraft’s systems. The ACNS also hosts ground systems to enable operators to plan for missions and to capture the digital traffic of all involved parties to include audio transmissions during in-garrison and deployed flights. Indeed, the major’s ability to create innovative approaches to technological concerns has been apparent throughout her career.

www.womenofcolor.online

Managerial Leadership in Government Award

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

As the director of real estate for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Brenda Johnson-Turner is the senior Department of the Army civilian executive leader for program execution of the department’s real estate mission for Army land and improvements worldwide. She is charged with the technical oversight, credentialing, and training for the Army’s real estate community of 600+ professionals. She is said to have an “uncanny ability” to lead, execute, and provide sound strategic direction and has progressed to the highest level of civilian government service as a Senior Executive Service (SES) member—one of three African-American SES members in the Corps. In fact, she has been one of the youngest and few African Americans in various positions. Early on, she tackled tough assignments, and within a few years, she became the lead realty specialist and negotiator for the acquisition of thousands of acres in the Carolinas for the National Wildlife Refuge System. She is now responsible for overall policy and ensuring technical expertise to provide real estate acquisition, asset management, and disposal. She serves as the chief for the South Pacific Division and Great Lakes and Ohio River Division Regional Integration Team, for military missions and to manage Washington-level representation and support.

DR. MIQUEL ANTOINE Managerial Leadership in Industry Award

Surveillance Systems Program Managers The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Dr. Miquel Antoine has made significant contributions to our nation’s security through her work leading major business units within the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). She has authored more than 20 journal articles, won two APL publication awards, and been awarded two patents, with one of her awards winning the APL Invention of the Year Award. After many years of making breakthrough technical contributions at APL for Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Department of Defense, NASA, and Department of Homeland Security sponsors, Dr. Antoine moved into program and staff leadership positions at the laboratory. As the APL program manager for the $37 million surveillance systems program within the National Intelligence Community Program Area at APL, Dr. Antoine is responsible for overseeing and executing cutting-edge technological solutions to meet both immediate and emerging operational needs of U.S. warfighters. She also serves as Assistant Group Supervisor for the Signals Exploitation Systems Group and manages a 40-member team of highly skilled engineers, scientists, and support staff in addressing Department of Defense and intelligence community challenges. Dr. Antoine has worked diligently to enhance opportunities for others through APL initiatives, community outreach programs, and mentorship.

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Xueyan Li Senior Embedded Systems Engineer

“It’s lots of fun to make designs and solve problems by applying the knowledge and theories we learned from books to the real world.”

Jivitha Siddharthan Systems Engineer

“Every living species can be an engineer by altering the environment around them to better suit their needs. For instance, when you are rearranging your bedroom and place an alarm clock next to your bed you are altering your environment to better suit your needs. I wanted to take this concept further and that’s the reason I became an engineer.”

Nusrat Lubna Senior Materials Engineer

“The main factors that made me become an engineer were my profound love for math and science and my curiosity about how machines work and how to fix them.”

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AWARD WINNERS

DELORES ALEXANDER Managerial Leadership in Industry Award Vice President, Indirect Supply Chain Manufacturing, Supply Chain and Operations The Boeing Company

Delores Alexander reports directly to the senior VP for Boeing Supply Chain & Operations and is responsible for over $9 billion of indirect spend covering hundreds of suppliers that support the internal infrastructure for Boeing production systems, employee services, finance services, and IT. An expert in leading sourcing and supplier management teams, Alexander serves on the executive advisory board for the Center for Applied Procurement Studies, where she collaborates with chief indirect procurement officers from the Fortune 500. She also serves on the corporate executive board for the Council of Indirect Procurement Professionals, benchmarking with peers across automotive, biotech, manufacturing, and technology industries. In 2004 she became the advocate for the Supplier Diversity Program, where she manages initiatives for Boeing’s base of small businesses, disadvantaged businesses, women-owned small businesses, and historically Black colleges and universities/minority institutions as well as other diversity considerations. She is an active STEM volunteer supporting young women’s pursuits. She is also a member of the Links, which introduced the first National Society of Black Engineers Jr. program in Phoenix. The Greater Phoenix Urban League also benefits from her membership.

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MS. PARIS FOREST

New Media Leadership Award Information Technology Director-Product Systems The Boeing Company

As a woman of color in the field of information technology, Paris Forest is no stranger to adversity. Throughout her career, her leadership and determination have helped her and countless others create successful careers and projects in IT. Her journey began in 1999 as a programmer analyst with McDonnell Douglas Integrated Financial Management System, where there were only three other women of color in the organization. She remained in that group for the first 18 years of her career, eventually becoming the first woman of color to be a development lead and the second in management, followed by being the first to become a senior manager. In 2017 Forest became the first woman of color from that organization to achieve IT executive rank. Today she is one of three African-American women executives in Boeing IT. As a leader both in business and her community, Forest upholds the importance of servant leadership. She currently serves as a mentor for 20 people throughout the Boeing Company while also participating as an executive speaker and panelist for employee resource groups. While serving on the executive board of the Boeing Black Employees Association, Forest launched an inclusion group called Bridging the Gap. The group aims to connect employees with resources for moving their careers forward. Forest’s advocacy for the advancement and inclusion of people of color in IT has positioned her as a true leader in her industry.

MS. SUSAN ALTHOFF GORTON

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government Award Project Manager for NASA’s Revolutionary Vertical Lift Technology Project The NASA Langley Research Center

Susan Gorton began her professional career as a research engineer in what is now the Army’s Aviation Development Directorate conducting research in aeromechanics, experimental methods, rotor wakes, and interactional aerodynamics before transferring to NASA to lead a team under the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program to enable boundary layer ingesting inlets. In 2005 Gorton became the first woman to manage the Flow Physics and Control Branch. The following year she led a research portfolio focused on developing technologies to overcome barriers for vertical lift and rotorcraft vehicles. In Gorton’s current role, she has developed roadmaps for NASA Vertical Lift work. She was recognized as a leader for her work in rotor inflow and rotor wake development as well as how these influenced unsteady loading on the helicopter’s fuselage. She has facilitated over 30 collaborative agreements with the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army and Navy, DARPA, Bell, Sikorsky, Boeing, GE, Pratt and Whitney, and Joby Aviation. Additionally, she has supported work at universities through the Vertical Lift Rotorcraft Centers of Excellence for over two decades.

www.womenofcolor.online


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MS. ALI GUARNEROS LUNA

MS. GANDHI SIVAKUMAR

Aerospace Engineer

Chief Architect - Cognitive Solutions

Lockheed Martin Corporation

NASA Ames Research Center

IBM

Born in Mexico City, Ali Guarneros Luna earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering from San Jose State University. Now, as the deputy project manager and co-investigator for the SOAREX 10 and Safety Mission and Assurance for TechEdSat 5 and 6, she is the only female and federal employee of color on the teams. Being a minority in these elite programs, led by the NASA Ames Research Center, has not diminished her passion for excellence, and she is the go-to person at Ames for issues related to International Space Station safety and design practices.

Gandhi Sivakumar holds the elite title of Master Inventor at IBM. She is the chief architect of the Centre of Competency, Watson Solutions, Asia Pacific, IBM Australia. Sivakumar’s thought leadership created significant impact worldwide as she has led transformations that were the first of their kind. Her innovations covered technologies like Cognitive Technology, such as AI, and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), analytics, and cloud. Sivakumar has filed 125+ patent applications besides co-authoring IEEE and IBM publications. She was recognized as an Australian woman of innovation, one of the highest nationwide recognitions in IT, and was noted as a Distinguished Alumna of N.I.T. and a Global Enterprise Architect for Innovation by Open Group. IBM recognized her with a stunning 105 awards for inventions and five times with Outstanding Technical Achievement awards. Sivakumar is Open Group Distinguished Certified in information architecture. She served as a board member of the Australian Computer Society and holds several honorary executive roles within IBM. She had been the chief architect for Open Group standards and the core member of the team that developed the Network Management Standards for the Telecom Commission of India.

Liza Resley is no stranger to the various challenges women in the engineering field face in the male-dominated industry. Those challenges, however, did not detour Resley from being an innovator in her field and contributing her knowledge and expertise through her professional career and volunteer opportunities. Liza graduated with an engineering degree in 2011 and obtained a position as a research assistant in the microwave and electromagnetics department of the University of Colorado, which led to four published papers. In this role, she developed several electronic devices, including microwave traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA), biocompatible patch antennas, end-fire antenna arrays for wireless applications, an S-band microwave power module (MPM), direction finding “SMART” antennas, a Ka-Band impedance transformer for radar applications, and microstrip filters. The following year, she began volunteering as a coach of the St. Mary Elementary School’s first robotic class. She led a team of third through eighth graders to finish as the top Santa Maria team. After beginning her career with Lockheed Martin in 2013, Resley was challenged to solve an incompatibility between a critical hardware and software for an aging 1998 vintage RF system. It took her three long weeks of studying the system topology and performing rootcause analyses to identify the problem at the firmware level, and she then resolved the issue within four days.

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government Award

Most noteworthy is Guarneros Luna’s international reach and impact. She was a principal contributor to a joint NASA– Mexican Space Agency project, and her international recognition includes the Ohtli Award, or Reconocimiento Ohtli, presented to her on May 3, 2018. The Mexican government reserves this honor for those who have assisted Mexican citizens or promoted their culture. She is globally recognized for her professional contributions to space and community outreach and has received the ISS Space Award for her role with the SPHERES, Modular Rapidly Manufactured Small Satellite, Nodes, and TechEdSat Series projects. She was also awarded the NASA Honor Award – Equal Employment Opportunity Medal.

www.womenofcolor.online

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Industry Award

MS. LIZA RESLEY

Outstanding Technical Contribution in Industry Award Radio Frequency Engineer Staff

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AWARD WINNERS

MRS. MONICA GREENHALGH President’s Award

Chief Information Officer, GM South America General Motors

Monica Greenhalgh currently holds the position of CIO for South America at General Motors and has held this position since 2015. Monica is responsible for leading a 400-person team focused on innovation delivery and running the IT business for the South American market. During her tenure in South America, she has increased innovation-focused project delivery to the region under the digital transformation strategy, overseeing business benefit increases from approximately $35 million to over $300 million in three years. In doing so, she has supported the SA business back to profitability in that region. Prior to this role, Monica held global roles in program delivery for sales and marketing IT, including managing the insourcing of GM’s IT assets as well as executive positions at HP. While working at HP, Monica was responsible for the transformation of their infrastructure and built six stateof-the-art data centers and ran a $1 billion budget in addition to running the Enterprise Infrastructure Architecture group. She has revamped the South America IT leadership team to include diverse candidates and has increased the participation of women by 25%. Additionally, she sponsored the Workplace of Choice team and was the executive sponsor of the GM Women SA employee resource group

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DR. HADIYAH-NICOLE GREEN Professional Achievement in Industry Award

Founder, Ora Lee Smith Cancer Research Foundation Assistant Professor of Surgery Morehouse School of Medicine

As the founder and CEO of the nonprofit Ora Lee Smith Cancer Research Foundation, Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green is also on the faculty at Morehouse School of Medicine in the Department of Surgery. She has more than 10 years of interdisciplinary research experience in optics and nanotechnology and subsequently in the applications of nanobiophotonics and biomedical research. She specializes in targeted cancer therapies using lasers and nanoparticles, and her expertise lies at the intersection of nanotechnology, immunotherapy, and precision medicine. She is recognized for several patent-pending cancer treatments that have had no observable side effects in laboratory mice, which is a preliminary study to testing on humans. Based on her groundbreaking research, the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs has awarded her a $1.1 million grant to research her 4-in-1 system for early detection, imaging, targeting, and selective treatment of head and neck cancers. It supports the development of a platform cancer therapy using laser-activated nanoparticles to eliminate tumors after one treatment. Her goal is to translate these treatments from the lab to humans to demonstrate efficacy in many cancers. In all, this $200 millionplus+ endeavor could lead to saving some of the 8.8 million people who die annually from cancer worldwide.

LYNN B. FOX

Professional Achievement in Industry Award Director, Apache Helicopter-International Programs The Boeing Company

Rosielynn Fox has broken through many barriers to achieve success. As the director of Apache International Programs for Boeing Defense, Space & Security, she manages the production development of the AH-64E Apache attack helicopter for the company’s international customers. Prior, as a mission system engineer team leader for Boeing Phantom Works, which explores new technology and markets, she managed a team of 33 people before her team was later deployed to Iraq to support the systems being used by the U.S. Army. From 2010 to 2012, she was a capture lead with a team of over 200 people for a $63 million initiative for contractor-owned and -operated intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft. In the following two years, she managed more than 100 employees as a senior manager for Network & Space Systems Business Development and as the lead for the Mission Systems Integrated Product team, executing the business case for capturing a potential domestic and international tactical aircraft market. In 2014 she took an opportunity to move from the Boeing Phantom Works business to Boeing Military Aircraft as a program manager for the V-22 Osprey, where she led a five-year program between Boeing and Japan valued at more than $2.7 billion. This was the program’s first international client.

www.womenofcolor.online


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DR. TAHIRIH C. LACKEY

Professional Achievement in Government Award Research Hydraulic Engineer, Engineer Research and Development Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Dr. Tahirih Lackey began her career at the ERDC in 2004 after receiving her doctorate from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She was quickly promoted to a principal investigator in the Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program. She has also become heavily involved with the Regional Sediment Management Program and the Monitoring of Completed Navigation Projects Program. Most recently, she has been involved with the development of the Dredging Models Data Integration Framework, which helps connect the field to specific dredging-related tools, models, and data. Under her leadership, the Particle Tracking Model was developed, which simulates particle transport processes within complex hydrodynamic systems like rivers, lakes, and coastal systems to better understand how currents and waves may impact the transport of sediment, contaminants, and biota. She has since applied this model to multiple sites in support of U.S. Army Engineer Districts’ projects and is further developing the capabilities of PTM to include nanoparticle tracking. Dr. Lackey not only has developed cutting-edge technology but has also communicated her research to the field through training workshops and professional technical conferences.

www.womenofcolor.online

MS. DAWN DAVIS

Professional Achievement in Government Award Chief, Electrical Design & Software Branch NASA John C. Stennis Space Center

Throughout her distinguished career, Dawn Davis has shown exceptional abilities and interpersonal skills as well as a work ethic that has propelled her into one of the top technical leadership positions at the John C. Stennis Space Center—NASA’s premier center for rocket propulsion testing. Davis, who joined NASA in 1999, is the chief of the Electrical Design and Software Branch of the Engineering & Test Directorate and is responsible for the electrical systems and software design activities in the center’s test complexes. Her most recent assignment included serving as the lead electrical design engineer for the Space Launch System (SLS) Core Stage Green Test Program. The SLS is NASA’s new deep space launch vehicle that will journey to Mars. Davis manages a diverse team of some 25 individuals and a budget of $20 million, and her efforts have resulted in numerous technical publications and many NASA awards. In fact, Davis is the first and only woman of color to reach the upper technical levels of NASA management in the Engineering & Test Directorate at the Stennis Space Center. She is a vigorous supporter of the NASA mission “to inspire the next generation of explorers” through extensive mentoring, education, and community outreach.

MS. ALEXANDRA GARR-SCHULTZ Student Leadership Award Doctoral Candidate Northwestern University Department of Psychology

This remarkably gifted and hard-working young woman is a National Science Foundation fellow pursuing her Ph.D. in social psychology at Northwestern University. Her work explores the unique identity challenges facing minority individuals—from examining the extra identity “burdens” of underrepresented individuals in STEM fields to exploring the impact of identity denial experiences on the mental well-being of sexual minorities to developing an entirely new framework to understand how individuals make sense of their multiple identities. She seeks to understand and encourage factors that lead diverse individuals to thrive, and she has demonstrated her leadership in research, mentoring, and service—within and outside the university setting. Garr-Schultz earned dual degrees in psychology and computer science student at Yale University before joining Cisco Systems, where she served as a software engineer and accessibility expert. She sought to increase the success of underrepresented individuals in STEM but eventually realized organizations needed more information to establish what would best serve the goals of increasing diversity within a community (technology-based communities) while allowing individuals to behave authentically and express the identities that contribute to diversity within these institutions, hence her decision to return to academia, where she is now excelling in research, service, and mentoring. WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

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AWARD WINNERS

DR. MARICELA LIZCANO

Technical Innovation in Government Award Research Materials Engineer NASA Glenn Research Center

Dr. Marciela Lizcano has been the lead on several important projects and has contributed to the research and development of advanced multifunctional materials. Dr. Lizcano leads research in fabricating high-temperature, lightweight ceramic fibers for strengthening aerospace materials and structures. She has also been actively participating in the agency’s development of patented technology in the strategic field of fabricating hightemperature-resistant, mechanically robust, multi-functional, high-temperature ceramic nanoparticles; these materials are increasingly used as engine materials in key aerospace applications, such as thermal management, power management, and space propulsion. Her work led her to develop several unique advanced testing capabilities that are currently unavailable in the industry, which has enabled many scientific and engineering breakthroughs. Dr. Lizcano collaborates with academic and industrial partners. She is a participant in STEM education outreach to underrepresented minority communities, including an established collaborative research and mentorship relationship with her alma mater, University of Texas Pan American. Her dedication to the advancement of technology both inside and outside of the agency can be seen in dozens of peer reviewed journal publications, technical memorandums, major conference presentations, patents, and awards. 50 ‹

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MS. KIM BABCOCK

DR. SOROOR SOLTANI

Research Physical Scientist

Service Delivery Manager

United States Coast Guard Research and Development Center

General Motors

Technical Innovation in Government Award

A research physical scientist at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RDC), New London, CT, Kim Babcock is filling a complex and critical role as the Operational Test Agent (OTA) for the Coast Guard’s Financial Management Service Improvement Initiative. This effort focuses on upgrading the security, efficiency, and auditability of Coast Guard core financial systems. Expected benefits include updated bookkeeping methods, reduced maintenance costs, consolidated financial auditing, reduced need for software development, and no need for extensive software installation or upgrades on Coast Guard computers, among other improvements. These benefits relate directly to the plan to acquire such improvements using a commercially based SaaS model. Acquisition in the Coast Guard is a highly prescriptive process. Operational testing is a key piece by which the effectiveness and suitability of a solution is tested. Operational test planning and execution functions are fairly well known for hardware acquisitions. However, operational testing, as applied to SaaS, is not well known and requires the OTA to impose a significantly different mindset on the planning and execution of the process. Babcock essentially created a roadmap for conducting the functions of an OTA for an acquisition that is nonstandard, and she devoted the last few years to doing so.

Technical Innovation in Government Award

At the Global Telecommunications Network at GM, Dr. Soroor Soltani is known for her ability to assess, analyze, conceptualize, innovate, and direct the delivery of new capabilities and technologies that significantly impact General Motors IT. She ensures that all services provided by Global Telecommunications to all of GM and its partners are continually improved on and automated to increase the quality and volume GM can deliver. In late 2016 Soltani saw a problem and came up with a solution that integrated multiple processes across multiple technology platforms to streamline and automate the delivery of application configurations on the network. She imagined, wrote the requirements for, designed, and drove a development team to deliver a tool that automated 95% of application configurations for Load Balancing and Global Traffic Management (DNS) at GM. The most influential part about this is that this type of automation that Soltani created is unique to GM and exists only within its IT department as a unique asset. Her achievements have empowered GM engineers to deliver more services and innovation in the same amount of time. Soltani is recognized for her influence and leadership throughout GM’s IT organization as well as being someone who takes responsibility, speaks toward solutions, and drives results.

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MS. NIA JETTER

Technical Innovation in Government Award Technical Fellow Spacecraft Autonomy, Flight and Controls The Boeing Company

Nia Jetter is a Technical Fellow for Spacecraft Autonomy, Flight, and Controls in Boeing Space and Missile Systems. She is an aerospace engineer and expert in autonomy and artificial intelligence. Throughout her career, she has supported 15 satellite missions from the Boeing El Segundo Mission Control Center. Jetter is a Boeing Technical Fellow, part of an elite community that represents fewer than the top two percent of The Boeing Company’s scientists and technologists. Her career started in 2000 at Hughes Space. She was at Hughes/Boeing from 2000–2002, then Raytheon from 2002–2004 and back to Boeing in 2004. She has been at Boeing ever since. Her expertise led to her assignment as the Space representative in Boeing Autonomy Technology Planning in 2013, where she maintains the company’s Spacecraft Autonomy Roadmap and collaborates across Boeing business units. She is also the co-founder of the Autonomy Community of Practice, a powerful knowledge-sharing network. “I decided on a career as an aerospace engineer while in college, “ Jetter says.

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MS. MAHATHI CHOUDHRY

CRYSTAL R. EMERY, PH.D.

Serial Interfaces Applications Engineer & Collateral Lead Customer Experience Engineer Intel Programmable Solutions Group

Founder and CEO

Special Recognition Honoree

Intel Corporation

Mahathi Choudhry has led several initiatives to help drive the advancement of diversity and inclusion (D&I) in the company. She started with her own initiative to create real-life scenarios for Kenji Yoshino’s Covering and Inclusion workshop for PSG leadership and managers in an effort to create a strong awareness and understanding of covering—an important inclusion issue. She also led the Mother’s Room Improvement at PSG, which involved her gathering inputs through discussions with six working mothers within PSG as well as holding a few meetings with the company’s facilities manager. Her efforts led to the addition of a privacy screen in all four rooms at the San Jose campus, hand sanitizer and towel dispensers, table fans, couches, lead-free wall color and paintings, and other additions for the mothers at PSG. She was also involved in driving Managing at Intel (MAI) Culture Training as a member of the company’s Diversity and Inclusion Council. She was also a part of the development and implementation of the GetSET Program—a project that aims to encourage high school girls in the fields of STEM through hands-on workshops. Choudhry is a true role model for diversity and inclusion at Intel and in the fields of STEM.

Special Recognition Honoree URU The Right To Be, Inc.

Known and respected widely as a producer, author, and filmmaker, in 2015 Crystal Emery conceived, designed, and launched the innovative Changing the Face of STEM national educational and workforce development initiative, which most recently held its national tour kickoff at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., June 12, 2018, in conjunction with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Emery is recognized as a dynamic producer, author, and filmmaker known for producing narratives aimed at creating a more equitable society on a variety of platforms. She is also the founder and CEO of URU The Right To Be, Inc., a non-profit content production company that tackles the intersection of humanities, arts, science, and technology. Emery is a sought-after author and motivational speaker. In October, Emery will be the keynote speaker for the National Security Agency in Washington. She was hailed as “inspiring” by the Los Angeles Times and as a “leader in science and technology” in Good Housekeeping’s “50 over 50: Women Who Are Changing the World.” Emery’s writing has appeared in Time magazine, Variety magazine, Ms. magazine, The Huffington Post, and elsewhere.

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AWARD WINNERS

MRS. NICOLE FONTAYNEBÁRDOWELL

MRS. LAURA A. JONES Special Recognition Honoree

MRS. YOGITA KRISHNAMURTH

Special Recognition Honoree

Senior Risk Manager and Senior IT Security Engineer

Director, Data Platform-Technology

Executive Vice President & Chief Administrative Officer

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Amrock

Laura Jones is professionally known as a risk strategist but on a grander scale is recognized as a trailblazer in her industry. Throughout her professional/post-military career, all the roles she has taken on are “first-ever” roles for each organization. Her position as a management consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton positioned her to lead a number of roles to support client engagemen, from the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Treasury and Internal Revenue Service to a Corporate Sponsored Investment Initiative where only five consultants were selected from a global population of more than 20,000, the Pentagon and U.S. Army Information Technology Agency, the Army Warrior Transition Command, KimberlyClark Corporation.

Yogita Krishnamurthy’s formal education was in engineering, but she did not expect to develop a career in IT. When joining Quicken Loans/Amrock, she was challenged with the opportunity to grow and learn in the field of data and information technology. She was able to learn quickly and excelled toward a position as a developer within the business intelligence team.

DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit)

Nicole Fontayne-Bárdowell’s career accomplishments have proven her as innovative and forward-thinking, but she is also known as a leader committed to continuous growth and learning. In her current role, Fontayne-Bárdowell brings over twenty years of diversified industry experience. As DART’s CIO, she was responsible for developing innovative technology strategies and delivering information as well as approving contracts and projects for the agency. Under her leadership, DART has delivered solutions to improve customer experience with the introduction of interactive kiosks and a new mobile app; seen a $1 million reduction in ERP five-year contract spending; avoided almost $2 million in increases in email and productivity tools; and navigated the company through two major crises. Prior to her role at DART, Fontayne-Bárdowell served in executive positions for large corporations and jurisdictions, including Broward County, Florida; City of Detroit, Michigan; and Amerisure/Michigan, Mutual Insurance Company. Additionally, she has provided consulting to a number of Fortune 500 organizations. Lastly, she served as the engagement manager with Everest Group, a boutique global management consulting firm based in Dallas that focuses on strategy and transformation for highly complex projects.

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WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

Laura’s current responsibilities include developing and deploying a Global IT Risk Management Program supporting a geographically dispersed footprint of more than 40,000 staff members. In 2018, under Jones’s leadership, Kimberly-Clark’s Global IT Risk Management Program received external, industry-level recognition and was honored as a CSO50 Award recipient. As of May 2018, she has assumed a new role as the Floor & Decor Outlets of America’s first-ever Senior Manager of Governance, Risk and Compliance, helping to risk and compliance capabilities to support this now publicly traded company.

Special Recognition Honoree

In 2010 Amrock started its own business intelligence team. Krishnamurthy was asked to join as the first data warehouse engineer, a role that required more specialized technical knowledge. She rose to the occasion and helped build a platform that is performant, scalable, and the foundation of the advanced analytics and data science work the company does today. It is through her dynamic leadership that the company has been able to expand and grow teams of specialized employees that work effectively and efficiently and that are a reflection of her own work ethic and personality. Her will and determination to excel in a new field and career have brought about her well-earned achievements.

www.womenofcolor.online


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PROGRESS: IT’S OUR TIME!

MRS. JACKIE MASON

MISS MIMI NGUYEN Special Recognition Honoree

MS. JENNIFER ONYI ORADIEGWU

Principal Member of Tech Staff, AT&T Technology Development Automation Platforms Development

Powertrain Planning Manager and Powertrain Long-Range Plans Lead

Process Engineer

Special Recognition Honoree

AT&T

Jackie Mason is now a principal member of technical staff who serves as a team lead managing many of AT&T’s most critical and highly visible projects. Most recently, she led her team to deliver a new operating support system architecture for designing, managing, and maintaining an Optical White Box (OWB) network. OWB uses technology to create 100-gigabit wavelength trunking between metropolitan areas and is designed to operate in a 21-state environment. Mason’s leadership was instrumental in delivering a software-defined, networkingenabled, ultra-long-haul program. This critical program supports AT&T’s 2020 goal to virtualize and control over 75% of the target long-distance network. It also supports the network planning, network inventory, and equipment ordering functions in this exponentially complex solution with extreme dependencies on third-party-provided systems and other services. Her strategic and forward thinking ensures that projects under her direction are on schedule, to specification, and within budget. She led her team to receive AT&T’s prestigious 2017 Technology Development President’s Award, among others.

www.womenofcolor.online

Special Recognition Honoree

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Owens Corning

Mimi Nguyen has more than 10 years’ experience in the automotive industry. After completing three co-ops with DaimlerChrysler Corporation, she joined Chrysler LLC in 2008. She currently works as the Powertrain Planning Lead in FCA’s Propulsion Strategy and Planning, Engine, Transmission, and Electrified Structures group.

Jennifer Oradiegwu, a process engineer and area team leader at Owens Corning in Starr, SC, leads the Forming Area, which is crucial to facility success and anchored by the contributions of 75-plus technicians. She is responsible for the reliability of the forming process as well as process stability, which affords the operations team the ability to run at high levels of net efficiency.

Under Nguyen’s leadership, her team analyzes powertrain competitive landscapes and trends and collaborates with cross-functional teams to develop powertrain market requirements for all new and renewal FCA vehicles. She leads the development of powertrain strategic targets and processes and recommends powertrain lineups for FCA vehicles. In addition, Nguyen has demonstrated leadership skills through her position at FCA by taking on two powertrain strategy papers: electrification and engine. She has risen to every occasion by applying an excellent level of detail to her work and delivering projects with integrity and speed.

Through Oradiegwu’s technical leadership, Starr is aiming to eliminate process downtime in the forming area. Her major focus has been on main idler downtime across 16 systems of critical equipment. She is on the leading edge for deployment of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM), which is geared at finding and eradicating all waste in the facility. She has been using specific Focus Improvement tools to collect and analyze data to better predict main idler failure. She has worked with operations and maintenance to lengthen the part life and become more predictive in planned downtime to change the part. Oradiegwu has accomplished all this and risen to high levels of leadership in the Starr Technical Group after having been at the plant for less than one year. She is a graduate of the esteemed Owens Corning Manufacturing Leadership Program.

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

› 53


AWARD WINNERS

MS. JENNEY SHEN

Special Recognition Honoree

MRS. REGINA SOLOMON

MRS. DAWN TREECE Special Recognition Honoree

Vice President

Special Recognition Honoree

Fannie Mae

Lead Systems Engineer

Raytheon Company

Jenney Shen has held officer positions in various areas in the company: Capital Markets Credit Risk, Single Family Risk, and Customer Delivery. As Vice President, Customer Delivery Team, Jenney leads a team that provides end-to-end customer service to many of Fannie Mae’s top customers—some of the largest lenders and financial services companies in the mortgage industry. Jenney’s success leading a customer delivery team demonstrates her ability to leverage a unique skillset. Her work in this role over this past year and a half has had a dramatic impact on the quality of service Fannie Mae provides and has inspired her colleagues to embrace new ways of thinking to reach even greater achievements. Jenney’s customers report saving millions of dollars in expenses and loss reserves while expanding their business footprint. Her customer accounts have also reported significant increases in overall satisfaction and service, which is a highly valued indicator of long-term success with customers. She is an influential leader in the company’s AsianAmerican community; besides mentoring younger colleagues, she is the executive sponsor for the Asian Employee Resource Group (ERG) DC Metropolitan Region. This ERG promotes the professional development of its 450 members, organizes community outreach, and is a vital talent resource for the business.

General Dynamics Land Systems

Dawn Treece is an accomplished and highly recognized department manager in Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems’ Hardware Engineering Center. She has directly had an impact on the capture of more than $300 million in new business. Treece leads 110 electrical engineers, who are responsible for developing and verifying specified performance for airborne electro optical (EO) products, including firmware and subsystem architecture development, firmware and circuit card assembly development, Integrated Product Team leadership, and engineering excellence for EO and radar product production and mission support. A key driver behind Treece’s success is her ability to strategically and tactically identify what’s needed to consistently yield winning results and robust quality solutions in environments of mutual respect and collaboration.

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WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

Regina Solomon started at General Dynamics Land Systems as an entrylevel engineer after earning an electrical and computer engineering degree from Wayne State University. Through hard work, diligence, and gained experience and respect throughout the organization, Solomon worked her way up into a leadership role. She currently serves as the lead systems engineer and is a part of a team that is responsible for all systemlevel requirements and system-level tasks, some of which include human factors, safety, architecture requirements, and coordination of key customer milestone reviews. She has worked on a number of Land Systems’ critical projects. While serving her rotational assignments with SCM, she was first tasked with leveraging her knowledge to navigate Land Systems’ product knowledge and TDP structures to reconcile billing and invoice requests out of program finance, leading to an overall reduction of outstanding cash payments from GDLS customers. She was then entrusted to lead SCM activities associated with the design, build, and live fire gunner demonstration of GDLS’s Medium Weight Tracked Vehicle, a live fire gunnery demonstration that created customer appetite and confidence that led to an acceleration of the Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) acquisition schedule by the U.S. Army.

Department Manager

Her passion to inspire, motivate, and encourage expands beyond work. In 2017 she began using her leadership and motivational skills to pen inspirational writings, and she has authored several inspirational writings, aptly titled “Good – ‘New-s’ Inspirations.” A children’s inspirational series is in the works and will teach life and STEM concepts to preschoolers and kindergarteners.

www.womenofcolor.online


MS. TERI VANSUMEREN

Special Recognition Honoree Executive Director Clean Energy Products Consumers Energy

Teri VanSumeren is the executive director of Clean Energy Products, where she has dedicated her career to the company. She began her career with Consumers Energy in 1983 as a graduate research analyst before progressing to a senior research analyst and eventually a supervisory role. She later went on to become the director of market research and oversaw customer research activities for the gas and electric divisions while launching and creating new products. In her current role, VanSumeren is responsible for energy efficiency programs, renewable energy programs, residential demand response, and electric vehicle programs. Throughout her time as the executive director, she has managed to transform each program she leads into a best-in-class business. Her experience and leadership in the utility and clean energy space have made her a leader in the sector and an asset to Consumers Energy. It was under her leadership that the energy efficiency team was recognized as an Energy Star Partner of the Year by the Department of Energy for five years in a row, beginning in 2014.

SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 7-9, 2019 Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel • Washington, DC

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AWARD WINNERS

IT’S OUR TIME!

2018 WOMEN OF COLOR

TECHNOLOGY ALL-STARS RISING STARS

*

The TECHNOLOGY ALL-STAR award honors mid-career professionals with demonstrated excellence at work and in their communities. They are innovators who have shown leadership as role models and mentors and commitment to recruiting and retaining minorities in STEM careers. The TECHNOLOGY RISING STAR award recognizes early career professionals who are helping to shape technology for the future in a range of programs, including information systems, research, development, integration of signals intelligence systems, shipbuilding, test equipment, asset management and metrology systems, software development projects, satellite communications systems, and more.

TECHNOLOGY ALL-STARS Maya Achen, D.V.M.

Agnes Kim

Research Scientist

Area Manager RAN Engineering

Abbott

AT&T

Ursula Christian, Ph.D.

Phuc Nguyen

Senior Process Development Engineer

Associate Director - Technology

Abbott

AT&T

Ellen Goodman

Julia Orr

Senior Process Development Engineer

Field Sales Consultant

Abbott

AT&T

Angela Jeffries-Munn

Diana Woo

Documentation Specialist

Manager, Technical Sales

Abbott

AT&T

Jennifer Jones-McMeans, Ph.D.

Julie Koerkel

Director, Clinical Affairs

Manager

Abbott

Consumers Energy

Yolanda Lambert

Lee Bissonnette

Senior Quality Professional

Senior Program Engineer

Abbott

Cooper Standard

Suelee Austin

Annette Henry

Principal-Product Development Engineer

Chief, Program Budget Data Management Division

AT&T

Alisa Benjamin

Department of the Army

Specialist-Client Technology Administrator

Pilar O’Hara

AT&T

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Denise Carmicheal

Guadalupe Pineda, Ph.D.

Associate Director, Technology Transformation

Project Responsible – RAM Trucks

Project Chief – Body Electromechanical

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

AT&T

Sonia Green-Sanders Director of Sales Operations-Retail Execution *Last updated 7/27/18 www.womenofcolor.online

AT&T

continued on the next page

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

› 57


AWARD WINNERS TECHNOLOGY ALL-STARS continued Annaliza Sollestre

Nicole Denson

Ireena Erteza, Ph.D.

Martha Graham

Design Release Engineer – EE Components

Executive Director, Home Lending Portfolio & Demand Agile Transformation Lead

Research & Development Science and Electronics Engineer

Lead Systems Engineer

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Lolita Ward Project Chief – EE Components/Switches

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Celeste Worsham Organic Materials Development Engineer

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Karen Allen Senior Design Release Engineer Advanced Technology Work

General Motors

Tamara Christion-Marable Senior Manager, Quality Assurance

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.

Helena Lee Software Engineer

Leidos

Sandia National Laboratories

Rosa Cassidy

Shingchi Hsu

Deputy Director, Distributed Energy Solutions

Product Development Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Tracy Cuington Project Management and Planning Ops Rep Senior Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Karen Darthard

Sigal Cordeiro

Application Software Development Manager

General Motors

Margaret (Molly) Peck Chief Marketing Officer, Middle East Operations

General Motors

Nicole Righter Engineering Manager

General Motors

Sharon Callahan Engineering Manufacturing 4

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Cathrine Huckleby Financial Analyst 3

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Tania Johnson

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Tena Bouma Supervisor (C4I ISEA Logistics Support)

SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific

Erin Bayles Lead Structures Design Engineer

The Boeing Company

Yolanda Berry

Design Engineering Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

The Boeing Company

Mary Garcia

Carole Bianquis

Diversity Outreach Consultant

Digital Twin Functional Engagement Lead

Lockheed Martin Corporation

The Boeing Company

Sai Kale

Jacqueline Crowder

Systems Architect

Executive Video Teleconferencing (VTC) Support Specialist

Angela Donnell

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Sarah Waldon Software Engineer Senior Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Chantay White-Taylor Mentor Protege Program Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Carol Wong

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Mei-Ting Hsu

Amanda DuRant

Manager, z Systems Circuit / Physical Design

Deputy Program Manager

Paridhi Verma

Siemens

Information Technology BDS Business Partner/Information Technology & Data Analytics Site Lead

Manager 3, Technical Electrical Engineering

IBM Corporation

Patricia Carol Jones Chief Information Officer & Director of Information Technology Services

General Motors Global Product Marketing Executive Director

Sandia National Laboratories

Engineer and Science Senior Manager

Navy Cyber Warfare Development Group

The Boeing Company

Ulrica Fontenot Process Engineer

The Boeing Company

Sherry Foreman Versatile Technologist

The Boeing Company

Gretchen Gaylor Database Administrator

The Boeing Company

Elaine Gero IT Product System’s Production Operations Manager

The Boeing Company

Madhu Bindiganavalae Manjunath

Amardeep Gill

Director, Software Engineering

IT Business Partner

IBM Corporation

NetApp

The Boeing Company

Vickie Bradley

Leslie Stoneham

Maria Good

Executive Director, Program Execution Consumer, Business Banking & Auto Technology

Software Lead

Systems Data Analyst, Product Development Enterprise

Communications & Marketing Program Director

Raytheon Company

The Boeing Company

Eleanor Hampton Executive Office Administrator

The Boeing Company

Denise Holiman Senior IT Manager

The Boeing Company

Alyce Jacobs Information Technology Manager

The Boeing Company

Michelle Keck Information Technology Manager

The Boeing Company

Yen La Information Technology Manager

The Boeing Company

Satrina Robinson Procurement Agent / Supply Chain Analyst

The Boeing Company

Sudha Sama IT Manager

The Boeing Company

Deborah Sims Senior Systems Administrator/Systems Integrator

The Boeing Company

Yvette Whitfield Information Technology Manager, Southeast Site Operations

The Boeing Company

Carlota Wilhite Program Manager

The Boeing Company

Michele Lezama Former Executive Director and CEO

The National GEM Consortium

Angela Coleman Chief of Staff

USDA Forest Service

Patti Hirami Acting Deputy Chief for State and Private Forestry

USDA Forest Service

The Boeing Company

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.

58 ‹

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

www.womenofcolor.online


PRESS FOR

PROGRESS: IT’S OUR TIME!

TECHNOLOGY RISING-STARS Sheila Adams

Riddhi Patel

Jenny Oh

Sheng-Min (Doris) Lin

Quality Systems Analyst Lead

Director Benefits- Labor Support

Associate

Abbott

AT&T

Booz Allen Hamilton

Technology Leader - System Level Performance & Reliability

Ganga Beligere, Ph.D.

Priya Singh

Maria Rodriguez

Principal Scientist

Sr. System Engineer

Associate

Abbott

AT&T

Booz Allen Hamilton

Amy Huebner

Jae (Jocquice) Spikes

Monica Serafico

Senior Manager, Development Quality

Lead Labor Relations Manager

Senior Consultant

Abbott

AT&T

Booz Allen Hamilton

Arwa Kassamali

Atiya Suhail

Ebony Thomas

Program Manager, Operations

Principal Member of Technical Staff

Senior Associate

Abbott

AT&T

Booz Allen Hamilton

Florence Lieu

Lisa Truppa

Dr. Changfang Zhu

Quality Principal Engineer

Assistant Vice President-Technology

Principal Research Scientist

Abbott

AT&T

Boston Scientific Corporation

Rebecca Palbicki

Maria Van Deman

Sheronda Jeffries

Director, Global Information Technology

Professional- Technical Consulting Engineer

Technical Leader

Abbott

Carol Pritchett Manager, Capital Planning & CAD Engineering

Abbott

Helen Ramsay Operations Engineering Manager

Abbott

Michelle Smith Finishing Operations Supervisor

Abbott

Erika Wilson Director, Technology

Amrock

Rhoda M. Wilson Industrial Engineer

Army Research Laboratory

Angela Christian Lead Consultant HR Technology

AT&T

Natasha Clark Director- Network Ops Center

AT&T

Dorice Knutson-Hill Lead Consultant HR Technology

AT&T

Anantha Kondaparthi Principal-Product Development Engineer Tech Solutions Management & Realization

AT&T

Tanesa Lee Lead Training Manager, Design

AT&T

Desiree Smith Increment Payload Engineer for International Space Station

Barrios Technology

Shawnte Bernstein Senior Consultant

Booz Allen Hamilton

Carole Brown Associate

Booz Allen Hamilton

Sarahzin Chowdhury Associate

Corning Incorporated

Shivani Polasani Senior Design Engineer

Corning Incorporated

Shunda Wilson Process Project Leader

Corning Incorporated

Juley Bates Program Analyst

Department of the Army

Sophia Williams NH-03 Project Management Specialist, PM DCATS PdM WESS

Department of the Army

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Mayra Carranza-Ornelas

Alicia Morris

Design and Release Engineer – Electrical and Electronic Modules

Consultant, Human Resources

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Jean Kang Manager Gas & Elec Scheduling

Consumers Energy

Victoria Moore General Engineer II

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Jeanne Dang Durability Engineer, Rear Suspension and Powertrain Mounts

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Marlo Eisley-Holloway

Consumers Energy

Technical Program Manager – Cybersecurity Integration

Alyse Way

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Engineer II

Daquanda Flowers

Consumers Energy

NAFTA World Class Technology Lead

Adair Gutierrez

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Financial Controller, Continental Engineering Services, North America

Jingjing Li, Ph.D.

Booz Allen Hamilton

Continental Automotive Systems, Inc.

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Jennifer Gladney

Megan Spielbusch

Associate

Senior Project Management Specialist, Continental Engineering Services, North America

Booz Allen Hamilton

Courtney Davis Associate

Booz Allen Hamilton

Ann Holdren-Kong Senior Consultant

Booz Allen Hamilton

Ambreen Khalil Senior Associate

Booz Allen Hamilton

Preethi Moorthy Associate

Booz Allen Hamilton

Sarah Murtaza

Continental Automotive Systems, Inc.

Jennifer Shupp Director of Business Development

Cooper Standard

Huiqing Wu Research Manager and Research Associate

Corning China (Shanghai)

Technical Lead - Virtual Engineering

Sarika Marfatia Technical Manager - Automatic Transmissions Shifting System

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Kirthika Meenakshi Sundaram Raju Vehicle Cost Engineer

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Dulce Munoz Body Dimensional Tolerance Engineer

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Januari Nelson Shift Operations Manager

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Senior Consultant

Booz Allen Hamilton

AT&T www.womenofcolor.online

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

› 59


NOAA

SCIENCE. SERVICE. STEWARDSHIP.

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AWARD WINNERS TECHNOLOGY RISING STARS continued Xiaolan Peng

Michele Williams

Sheyla Alfau Jimenez

Jennifer Hernandez

NVH Advanced Senior Engineer

Planner and Scheduler I

F-235 Sustainment Program Manager

Operations Analyst

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Virginia Teeple

Tanya Buchanan

Tarnesha Allen

LaTosha Imani

Project Chief – Uconnect

Advisory Software Engineer

QA Engineering Associate Manager

Capture Management Manager

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

IBM Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Ria Williams

Bilquees Kawoosa

Astrid Barajas

Angela Ivery

Project Manager

Sr. Delivery Manager/Sr. Architect

Senior Project Engineer

FCA - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

IBM Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Project Management & Planning Operations Staff

Angela Ingram-Smith

Michelle Lam

ReShonda Borel

Acquisition Program Specialist

Senior Supply Chain Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Fleet Readiness Center Southwest Naval Air Station

IBM Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Maggie Lin

Christine Brownlee Subcontract Management Sr.

Research Engineer

Senior Software Engineer and Technical Lead for IBM Machine Learning

Ford Motor Company

IBM Corporation

Vera Simms

Jamie Barbour

Lahiruka Winter

Sr Manager Chevrolet Digital and CRM

Hardware Development Engineer

General Motors

IBM Corporation

Christina Choe

Kathelena Belcher

Data Analysis Lead

NERC Utility Planning/Compliance Engineer II

General Motors

Monee Bronson Material Planning Coordinator IV

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Kenya Cowan Administration Generalist II

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Natasha Diaz Foreman

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Arlene Easley Project Manager 4

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Tenille Farmer Contract Administrator II

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Anicia Freeman IT Systems Engineer 2

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Elzater Moffett Engineer 3

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Anecia Moore Manager 2 Subcontracts

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Marilyn Williams Accountant IV

Leidos

Kavitha Daggu Database Architect

Leidos

Sandreka Gilchrist

Kasey Buggs QA Engineering Asc. Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Briana Caceres Project Management & Plng Opns Rep Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Erica Carrillo Enterprise Resource Planning Site Lead

Brittnee Jenkins Field Sales Support Systems Engineer Senior

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Ashley Johnson Quality Assurance Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Shalonda Johnson Systems Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Vernecia Johnson Senior Manager, Human Resources Operational Excellence

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Alicia Jones

Karla Castellanous

Supplier Integration Control Account Manager

Distribution Designer

Project Lead Engineering Workforce Strategy

Leidos

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Letitia Jones

Suzette Croutch

Systems Engineering Manager

HR Administrative Specialist

Leidos

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Cheryl Limas

Saria Perro

LaTasha Dandy

Software Engineer

Project Management & Plng Opns Rep Staff

Software Engineer (Engineering Leadership Development Program)

Leidos

Sheila Pharris Intelligence Analyst Instructor Team Lead

Leidos

Xueyan Li, Ph.D. Senior Battery Management - Embedded Systems Engineer

LG Chem Michigan Inc.

Nusrat Lubna, Ph.D. Senior Materials Engineer

LG Chem Michigan Inc.

Jivitha Siddharthan Systems Engineer

LG Chem Michigan Inc.

Huntington Ingalls Industries

62 ‚

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

WOMENOFCOLOR | FALL 2018

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Antionette Davis Multi-Functional Manufacturing Supervisor

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Nicole Demandante Systems Engineer Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Doris Gebelein Systems Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Roslyn Handy Sr. Project Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Jessica Li Software Engineer Senior

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Silvia Lugo Project Engineer Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Edelmayra Lugo-Delanoy QA Engineering Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Loan Luong Senior Software Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Suzanne Madrid Systems Engineer Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Maslyn Mayers Software Quality Engineer Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

www.womenofcolor.online


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PROGRESS: IT’S OUR TIME!

TECHNOLOGY RISING STARS continued Sydney McFall

Dr. Reshma Shanku

Matia M. Green

Tania Bawa

Operations Leadership Development Program

Chief Engineer, Black Hawk Military Sales Programs

Instructional Systems Specialist

Regional Manager

Oracle Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Shante’ Mercer

Tramy Simpson

Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD)

Systems Integration Test Engineer

Multi Function Manufacturing Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

LaSandra Mitchell

Tonesha Smith

Staff Systems Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

System Engineering Manager Lockheed Martin Corporation

Brittany Perry

Dazzree Thomas

Program Manager

Diversity Program Integrator

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Claudine Phaire

Victoria Van Conant

Sr Staff Program Management/System Engineering

Senior Configuration Analyst

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Denisse Pineda Materials Engineer Staff

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Rosa Puga Applications Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Dinesha Ramie Systems Engineer Associate Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Dayatra Rivette Information Security Officer and Privacy Senior Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Erica Rojas

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Project Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Juanita Winfrey Software Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Kasmi Zaman Project Management and Planning Operations Rep

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Gugu Rutherford

Equal Employment Manager

Kena Searcy IT Resource Analyst

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Taja Sellers Test Engineering Asc Manager

Lockheed Martin Corporation

www.womenofcolor.online

Kavita Vigneau Director, Servicing Technology

Erica Mitchell

Quicken Loans

Engineer

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona

Tiara Bosuku

Thayna Marrero-Colon

Raytheon Company

Senior Systems Engineer

Adanne Nduaka

Manager of Configuration and Data Management

Lockheed Martin Corporation

PEO Carriers

Danisha Williams

Andrea Bynum

Computers System Architect Sr.

Activity Chief Information Officer

Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD)

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Gissel Sawyer

Rebecca Scragg

Nickita Davis

Raytheon Company

NASA

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Contracting Officer and Sr. Contract Specialist

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division

Operations Analyst

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Software Engineering Manager

Oracle Corporation

Kristina Gilliard

Administrative Assistant Specialist

Tashana Scott

Sales Representative, Oracle Digital

Alana Nunez-Bennett

Systems Engineer, Program Manager and Fleet Support

Hemali Virani

Contamination Control and Planetary Protection Engineer

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Christina Luu

NASA, Johnson Space Center Flight Operations Directorate

Jamaya Dunn Lead Logistician

Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD)

Raytheon Company

Dwanetta Reed Section Manager, Integrated Logistics Support

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division

Raytheon Company

Ashley Holloway Senior System Engineer/Project Manager

Nipun Aggarwal Electrical Engineer

Kristen Giles

Flight Operations Safety Engineer

IT Program Services Section Manager

Project Manager

Octavia Hicks

Jasmine Keeton

Shayla Paulding

Brandy-Mickel Rambus

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport

NASA Langley Research Center Office of Procurement

CIO Project Manager

Raytheon Company

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division

NASA Langley Research Center Assistant Branch Head and Lead Contracting Officer

Rukiya Higgins

DDG MOD Machinery Control System Project Manager

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division (NSWC PHD)

Mechanical Engineer

IT Regional Site Manager

Apache Sanders SW CM Section Manager

Raytheon Company

Nithya Annamaneni Digital Exchange Scrum Master

Siemens

Ying-Hua Qian Senior Software Quality Engineer Manager

Siemens

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport

Shana Collins

Karin Kaplan

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic

Systems Engineer; Head, Surface and Aviation Test, Evaluation, and Analysis Branch

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport

Tamara Helms Senior Engineering Program Manager

NetApp

Engineer

Brianeisha Eure Scientist

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic

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Sterling Capital Brokers

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AWARD WINNERS TECHNOLOGY RISING STARS continued Lisa Chambers

Michelle Galvez

Kayla McKenna

Emily Wright

National Executive Director

IT Project Management Specialist

Versatile Technologist

TECH CORPS

The Boeing Company

Ping Jiang

Rachel George

Chief of Staff, 2nd Century Enterprise Systems Manufacturing Operations Management

Manager, Analog Technology Development

Senior Lead Design and Integration Specialist

Texas Instruments

The Boeing Company

Huang-Chun Wen

Kirsten Hawk

Process Integration Engineer

Programmer/Analyst

Texas Instruments

The Boeing Company

Gulshan Amlani

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Software Engineer

Programmer Analyst

The Boeing Company

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Alyssa Belisle

Kristina Horita

Project Manager

Product Review Engineer

The Boeing Company

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Mariana Bertocchi

Felicia Jaggers

Product Manager/Specialist

Industrial Engineer

The Boeing Company

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Dolly Bhaskara

Morgan Jones

Technical Product Owner

Packaging Engineering Specialist

The Boeing Company

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Quantasia Caldwell

Portia Jones

IT Implementation Planner

Versatile Technologist - Data Center Management

The Boeing Company

Tiffany Cameron IT Project Management Specialist

The Boeing Company

Barbara Chan Application Information Administration Systems Application Management

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Deanna Cunningham Enterprise Auditor

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Tiffany Davis Aerospace Engineer

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Naja Edwards Propulsion Engineer

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Antoinette Evans 737 Customer Introduction Reduction PIM; 737 Emergency & Miscellaneous Equipment – Lead Interiors

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The Boeing Company

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The Boeing Company Network Designer – Network Infrastructures Services

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The Boeing Company

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Pankti Patel Programmer Analyst

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SaToya Pettiford Project Manager Specialist

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Seidah Sabir System Design & Integration Specialist

The Boeing Company

Katherine Sanders Database Administrator

The Boeing Company

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Rosalinde Joyner

June Soh

IT Process Analyst

IT International Operations Process Lead

The Boeing Company

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Sunita Kaur

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Systems and Data Analyst

Airline Support Engineer / Account Manager

Systems Engineer

The Boeing Company

Supplier Quality Special Process Field Rep

Ashley Thompson

The Boeing Company

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Kristin Leek

Jasmine Trass

Talent Pipeline Portfolio Manager

Additive Manufacturing Engineer

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Sierra Makepeace

Kiera Valnes

Program Lead, Information Technology Career Foundation

Chief of Staff, IT Product Systems & Business Operations

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Patrice Mazyck

Olivier Villegas

Occupational Safety Health Specialist

Procurement Agent

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Sexual Assault Response Coordinator

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Crystal Sellers

Marky Kidd

Alicia Case

Tamara Ortega

Chief of Staff, 2nd Century Enterprise Systems Product Support & Services

The Boeing Company

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Diversity and Outreach Manager

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Catherine Warren Native American Consultation Specialist

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Toni Lowe, Ph.D. Talent Acquisition Manager

U.S. Army Research and Development Center

Zahur Musalli Deputy Director (A) Armament Software Engineering Center

U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center

Torrye Hairston Career Development Specialist

U.S. Army Research Development and Engineering Command

Barbara Robinson Deputy Logistics Support Officer

U.S. Navy

Alexandra Swan Senior Program Analyst/Strategic Planner

United States Coast Guard

Marjan Shirani Staff Engineer - Systems Integration

United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Electric Systems

IT&DA External Technical Affiliation Lead

See the 2017 WOC Technology Luncheon

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CAREER

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Survey Results! Confused about courses, programming languages, and certifications for the digital economy? How can you prepare for the ever-evolving digital landscape? Which majors are best for entering the technical workforce? What do employment options look like for those seeking to join a technical field? What’s a great way to get connected to potential employers? This issue of Career Outlook gives you answers to all those questions and more. www.womenofcolor.online

The Digital Revolution

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CAREEROUTLOOK | INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

What Are the Most In-Demand

Technical Careers

NOW and in the FUTURE? By Alfred Lewis editors@ccgmag.com

If you’re an upcoming or recent college graduate, you’re undoubtedly looking toward your future career. For technical majors of any variety, a common question is “What are the most in-demand technical careers now and in the future?” With technology that changes so rapidly, companies that come and go quickly, and a myriad of competitive fields, it is beneficial to observe the current trends in technical careers and to try to look into what the future holds for these exciting areas!

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ENGINEERS, DEVELOPERS, AND DATA SECURITY According to Forbes magazine, the most in-demand technical careers focus on two main areas: engineers/developers and data security. Neither of these fields should come as a shock to any tech undergrad; jobs in both of these areas take a skilled candidate with an attention to detail. Business Insider lists of the most in-demand jobs for 2018 included many technical positions, such as full stack developer, computer vision engineer, machine learning engineer, data scientist, and development operation engineer. When considering which jobs are in demand across all industries, technical careers are among the highest in the nation. For engineers and developers, companies are constantly seeking skilled candidates to design IT systems, perform backend and front-end work, rigorously test new products, and work with a variety of platforms that have become essential to business function. With regard to data security, one only needs to look around at any number of recent

data security breaches in the news to quickly realize the massive importance that companies are putting on keeping client and customer data security locked tightly. These technical jobs require wellprepared candidates that are passionate about their fields. WHAT DO EMPLOYMENT OPTIONS LOOKS LIKE FOR THOSE SEEKING TO JOIN A TECHNICAL FIELD? US News lists the top five jobs in technology as software developer, information security analyst, IT manager, computer systems analyst, and computer network architect. These employment options all benefit from average salaries around $100,000 and very low unemployment rates (all less than 4%). As noted before, these types of jobs are migrating away from Silicon Valley and into many different areas, such as medical, retail, etc. Employment options for recent and future grads will be plentiful and varied. If you’re thinking of entering an undergrad program with a major in technology or another technical focus, now is the time!

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| MOST IN-DEMAND TECH CAREERS

Thinking of entering an undergrad program with a major in technology or another technical focus? NOW is the time! You might be thinking about what potential challenges exist when attempting to enter these technical fields. You are not alone. According to Harvard Business Review, two-thirds of recent grads report struggling to launch their careers. New graduates may encounter issues arising from paying off student loans to finding a solid full-time first employment opportunity. However, they also note that students that majored in technical areas often see these challenges with much less frequency. Additionally, noted as a challenge, students and recent grads should make sure to focus on “soft skills,” especially interpersonal skills. www.womenofcolor.online

These skills enable new employees to powerfully communicate with their peers and to begin successful partnerships that enable job advancement and satisfaction. WHAT ARE THE CURRENT TRENDS IN TECHNICAL CAREERS? According to a report by Glassdoor, there are some major trends that were observed looking beyond 2018. Of most pressing note, tech jobs are spreading, both geographically and across fields. Second, AI and automation are increasingly replacing jobs, which opens up new employment opportunities in designing and maintaining the infrastructure of the automation. Their final note of mention? Glassdoor stated, “A second hiring trend we expect to see continue in 2018 is growing tech hiring in ’non-tech‘ industries. According to BLS projections, software developer is projected to be among the fastest growing jobs in the next decade, adding an estimated 253,400 new jobs by 2026” (Glassdoor, 2017). If these trends continue, we can reasonably predict the next five to 10

years for these industries. As qualified candidates enter their fields, they will be able to find good-paying positions that rely on the progress and job creation of automation and data security. More and more businesses are automating jobs and, in turn, creating more technical job openings that tomorrow’s candidates will be well-prepared to fill. As technologies continue to advance, more and more businesses will adopt this approach of becoming leaner and more efficient through technology. These technical positions will become more ubiquitous with all industries, leading to sustained job growth and competitive salaries. For future and recent college graduates looking to join a technical field such as software engineering, data security, or AI development, the future is bright. Technical jobs are spreading across the world and across industries, leading to exciting new opportunities. With low unemployment rates and strong compensation, these job opportunities are a worthwhile goal for college students and graduates. 

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CAREEROUTLOOK | JOB HORIZON

Widening Scope of

Digital Careers

There are wide varieties of technical careers that are in high demand. Countless reports and articles discuss the increased need for qualified candidates in a widening scope of technical careers. According to Forbes magazine, the most in-demand technical careers focus on two main areas: data security and engineers/ developers. These are hot careers at the moment—both areas of blossoming in the face of technical advancements in traditional and nontraditional sectors. Additionally, Business Insider’s list of the most in-demand jobs for 2018 included many technical positions, such as full stack developer, computer vision engineer, machine learning engineer, data scientist, and development operation engineer. When considering which jobs

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are in demand across all industries, technical careers are among the highest in the nation. These jobs are also frequently listed as the fastest growing in compensation as well. A Business Insider article on fastest growing pay for 2018 lists technical jobs as four of the top five!

spilling out into nontraditional markets, which broaden their availability even more. One of the most prevalent new careers in the technical fields is data security as companies quickly realize the massive importance of keeping client and customer data secure.

For engineers and developers, companies are constantly seeking skilled candidates to design IT systems, perform back-end and front-end work, rigorously test new products, and work with a variety of platforms that have become essential to business function. These roles are

Where are these exciting types of jobs growing and spreading? The Computing Technology Industry Association’s 2018 report on technical job health in the United States listed the following key findings:

www.womenofcolor.online


| DIGITAL CAREERS By Alfred Lewis editors@ccgmag.com

Top 10 States for Tech Positions

Total Workforce

State

2017 Est.

Job Gains 2016-2017

California

1,749,400

43,600

Texas

963,400

13,390

Michigan

404,300

13,160

Florida

539,100

12,020

New York

639,500

10,370

Washington

363,500

10,250

North Carolina

335,500

10,100

California

9.1%

Massachusetts

416,300

8,130

New Hampshire

8.8%

Georgia

349,700

7,290

Michigan

8.7%

Colorado

285,300

6,530

Utah

8.6%

These exciting jobs are growing more in some states than others, as seen above. The right most column shows the total number of tech positions that were created for that year.

• In the United States, there are 11.5 million people employed in tech positions.

• There were 194,000 new jobs added in tech in the past year.

• In the United States, there are currently 1.4 million software and web developers—the largest and fasting growing category of tech jobs.

• The number of posted tech occupation jobs during 2017 reached 2.8 million, with more than 200,000 postings occurring in emerging tech areas.

• The average annual wage of U.S. tech industry workers is $112,890. This is more than double the average national wage.

• There are 503,000 tech business establishments in the U.S.

• Over 34,000 tech startups or new businesses were launched in this year alone.

How can you prepare to enter this field as a new or current college student? According to a 2016 article in Business Insider, employers in these fields are looking for students that acquire a unique blend of hard and soft skills. While www.womenofcolor.online

employers need tech employees that understand such areas as SAP software and SQL databases, they also need candidates that are savvy with sales, business development, and social media. Additionally, candidates that are strong in essential soft skills are valuable members of a workforce. Candidates should plan on developing and documenting their strengths in collaborating with a variety of stakeholders, exercising wise decision making, and being a good mentee or mentor. What majors are best suited for entering the technical workforce? The most indemand majors for tech employers are information technology management, software engineering, database administration, video-game programming, web development, computer programming, network engineering, game design, system administration, and network management. Consider one of these majors if you’re planning on entering a tech field, and consider what minor degrees or additional endorsements could help bolster your resume. Are you gifted in a STEM content area? Consider a minor in math or science

Massachusetts

10.6%

Washington

9.9%

Virginia

9.9%

District of Columbia

9.7%

Colorado

9.7%

Maryland

9.5%

Additionally, some states have a higher concentration of tech jobs in relation to their overall employment. The top ten states for percentage of their total workforce being tech positions are above. to set you apart from the rest of the crowd. A great way to get connected to a potential employer is through internships and other learn-to-work programs. Internships offer potential employers a chance to screen and train potential employees and become strong additions to your resume for future openings. Forbes magazine suggests some key pieces of advice for landing a coveted (and highly competitive) tech internship: apply for every tech internship you find, seek referrals from people you know who are connected to a tech employer, be persistent with recruiters and applications, and be hopeful and optimistic through the lengthy process. If you are a current or future college student seeking to enter the tech industry, you’ll find strong wages, plentiful employment opportunities, and broad job growth. As a student, look for a solid tech major, and develop your soft skills to attract employers. Seriously consider an internship at a tech employer, and confidently build your resume. The rewards match the challenges ahead! 

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CAREEROUTLOOK | JOB HORIZON

THE FUTUR How to Thrive in the Digital Revolution THERE’S A LOT OF TREPIDATION AROUND AUTOMATION AND WHAT THE DIGITAL AGE REPRESENTS TO THE GLOBAL WORKFORCE. WHILE WE ALL ENJOY HAVING THE ABILITY TO VIDEO CHAT WITH FAMILY ACROSS THE COUNTRY AND WATCH FEATURE FILMS ON OUR PHONES, THOSE OF US WHO WORK IN CERTAIN FIELDS ARE WAITING FOR THE DAY WHEN TECHNOLOGY RENDERS OUR JOBS OBSOLETE.

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www.womenofcolor.online


| THRIVING IN THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION

RE IS HERE “Everyone has the opportunity to race toward the digital age,” Jem says. “There are no barriers of entry outside of access to talent. Talent is the differentiator in the race toward being number one.”

Machines don’t need to sleep, after all, which means that we could easily be replaced by an automated gadget that’s capable of working much harder (and for much longer) than we ever could. For those of us who work in STEM, however, automation is nothing but an opportunity. At a recent BEYA seminar, Jem Pagán, Partner and Director of Tech Strategy for JNK Securities, offered some young scientists and engineers advice on thriving in a world of increased innovation.

www.womenofcolor.online

EMBRACING AUTOMATION

“There’s no part of our world, personal or professional, that won’t have some sort of digital impact,” Pagán says. “It means that there’s going to be a huge need for STEM professionals to fill those gaps that exist in the market and that there’s going to be an opportunity for entrepreneurial ideas to come to the forefront.” While the self-checkout machines at grocery stores, for example, are already commonplace, industries as diverse as air pollution control and electromagnetic level detection are also likely to be automated in the near future. Automatic devices are not only capable of performing these jobs much more efficiently than humans but also provide their manufacturer with important data around the product’s performance. Usergenerated data is analyzed to understand how the product can be improved and whether or not its costs can be decreased.

are no barriers of entry outside of access to talent. Talent is the differentiator in the race toward being number one.” In order to stand out in an increasingly competitive field, Pagán suggests, STEM professionals must be both versatile and patient. In a world of rapid innovation, after all, both employees and entrepreneurs must be willing to adjust as their jobs change. “If you’re a person who wants to meet at the water cooler and talk about ‘Why can’t we do it the way we’ve always done it?’ it could be a challenge,” he says. “In the digital world, everything is moving faster, so change is inevitable. The only thing that won’t happen is things will stay the same.”

“This is really about revenue and market growth,” he says. “If I understand how a product is performing in the market, I can influence my R&D investment so that I’m not overspending.”

At the same time, however, it’s important that professionals avoid the temptation to move too quickly along their career path. Even in the age of increased speed and constant distractions, virtues like empathy, attentiveness, skill-building, and self-awareness are valuable characteristics in an employee. Today’s STEM professionals need to remember that social skills are equally as important as technical skills.

He also explains that while we may fear certain aspects of technology, like the loss of privacy or the risk of security breaches, these also present potentially lucrative openings for people with STEM skills. “As you think about those concerns,” he says, “you begin to realize that they are being discussed throughout the world, but they haven’t been solved.”

“I’ve seen it happen in plenty of people’s careers where they went on the fasttrack [from a] celebrated program to management,” Pagan says. “They get to a high level, and all of a sudden, they’re like, ‘I can’t feel the ground anymore. I moved too fast and didn’t acquire the skills that others picked up along the way because I was fast-tracked.’” 

BEING A HIGH-PERFORMING PROFESSIONAL

By Chtistopher Zacher editors@ccgmag.com

Pagán points out that the natural resource that’s fueling the digital revolution is not fuel or coal—it’s people. “Everyone has the opportunity to race toward the digital age,” he says. “There

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