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Raymond Chetti University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Urban Planning

Portfolio of Works

15 Emmett Court West Babylon, NY, 11704 direct: (631) 943 - 6208 e-mail: rjchetti@buffalo.edu


Introduction Dear Viewer,

The last section includes a couple of GIS maps I created for a couple of projects I did for two separate GIS classes. The first Thank you for taking the time out to view my portfolio! Following project is about identifying areas that are suitable for a commy resume, my portfolio is divided into four sections to reflect the munity development grant by finding the most distressed areas skills I have learned during my studies as an environmental design in the City of Buffalo. The other project is about whether or not undergrad at the University at Buffalo. These sections are: financial wellbeing affects whether one may attend a public or private university. 1. Data gathering,analysis, and illustration 2. Unique writing samples 3. Graphic design & digital media

Once again, thank you for reading and viewing my portfolio, if you happen to have any questions about any of the work you may see here, please do not hesitate to contact me.

4. Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The first section focuses on comparing two central cities and their MSA’s. We gathered United States Census data and compiled a database that contained socioeconomic information for both cities and their respective MSA’s. After gathering total population, demographic, median household income, and median housing unit values, we developed a series of graphs to visually communicate large quantities of data in an easy and legible format. For the purpose of this portfolio, only excerpts from the “Findings,” “Charts and Graphs,” and “Conclusions” were used. My unique writing samples include two works. The first work is about my definition of “urban planning,” while the other work includes excerpts from a term paper about a plan called the Coney Island Redevelopment Plan. My “urban planning” paper was one of the first times I questioned, “What is urban planning?” and to this day, I keep that definition close to my heart. For the other piece we had to pick any plan of our choosing and describe the justifications for each action that the plan called for. Similar to the first section, this version is also excerpted and does not contain the whole report.

Sincerely,

Raymond Chetti

After taking Environmental Design Workshop II, I learned how to utilize graphic design & digital media tools such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and Indesign to visually communicate urban planning and design concepts. The assignments include changing “Helvetica” font to change the mood of a photo, designing a poster, and designing a PowerPoint Presentation.

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Resume Education

College Experience

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Bachelor of Arts, Environmental Design. Minor, Architecture. Anticipated: May 2010. GPA: 3.48/4.0

Seoul

Korea University. Seoul, South Korea Exchange Student, Spring 2008. GPA: 3.55/4.0

Related Work Experience Intern–Green Map Systems, New York, NY–(Dec 2008–Jan 2009) •Created community portrait of Green sites for Manhat- tan’s East Village using Green Map System’s universal iconography to promote sustainable living options for community residents. •Analyzed importance of each Green site by performing individual site visits. •Performed additional research to enhance Open Green Map database (www.opengreenmap.org)

Design Olympiad Conference 2008 – (Oct 2008) •Participated in an international design conference in Seoul, S. Korea where designing a sustainable urban future was the main theme. •Created presentation based off of Seoul Design Olym- piad entitled “Designing for a Sustainable Urban Future.” •Presented presentation (“Designing for a Sustainable Urban Future”) about key speakers and topics back at home university.

Leadership Experience

External V.P, President, & Korean Culture Night Coordinator– Korean Student Association (KSA)–(2008-2009) •Strengthen relations with other clubs by attending their meetings and events. •Coordinate and schedule executive board and general board meetings. •Set agenda and facilitate meetings. •Help KSA executive board coordinate club events. •Collaborate with a number of individuals and organizations to Transportation Systems Intern-DMJM Harris, New York, NY–(Dec 2007–Feb 2008) coordinate KSA’s annual Korean Culture Night performance. •Reviewed plans and made comments for construction Resident Advisor - University Residence Halls and Apartments (URH&A) – (Fall 2007) plans for new train station at Yankee Stadium. •Enforced the rules and policies of the residence halls. •Analyzed and commented on bridge inspection reports •Developed floor community by organizing floor and residence hall for the MTA. wide events while collaborating with other RA’s and organizations. •Created new client folders, researched files for refer •Created monthly bulletin boards with information related to campus issues. ence and general filing. •Dealt with various clients and other professional orga- •Attended weekly meetings with hall director. nizations in the New York City area. Treasurer - Asian American Student Union (AASU)–(Fall 2007) •Attended budget hearings. Office Assistant–Bohler Engineering, Ronkonkoma, NY–(May 2007–Aug 2007) •Maintained and ensured that the organization stayed •Visited newly acquired work sites and photographed area within budget for all events. for engineers. •Completed expense and money request forms in order to use club funds. •Prepared and packaged approved plans ready for delivery. •Participated in campus-wide events: Relay for Life, Buf- •Delivered and picked up packages to clients and other falo Kids Day, Linda Yalem Run. organizations throughout the New York area.

•Made copies of site plan packages and various documents. •Created new client folders and pulled files for reference.

Awards

•Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society - Spring 2007 • Capital One Bank Foundation Scholarship – Fall 2006-present • Dean’s List for Academic Achievement – Spring 2007

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Data Gathering, Analysis, and Illustration Project 1: City vs MSA Comparison

Limitations

It was impossible to find census data for the year 2010. For-

Developed a comprehensive report with charts and tunately, it was possible to base the 2010 population off of the graphs to illustrate our findings based off United States United States Census estimate for the year 2007 and data from 2000. The formula to determine the 2010 population of SpringCensus Bureau data from 1950-2010, Research Methods

field, MA, San Jose, CA, and their MSAs are as follows:

Population

1. Census data was collected from the United States government website called American FactFinder. Since decennial census data had to be collected for total population, racial composition, Findings median household income, and median housing unit value from 1950 – 2007, American FactFinder was the perfect resource to Starting from 1950, the Springfield, MA & MSA Population City of Springfield startGrowth 1950-2010 locate data for 1990 and 2000. 900,000 ed off with a population 800,000 2. After collecting data for 1990 and 2000, data had to be then gain of 7%, but quickly 700,000 collected for 1950—1980. The only way to do this was to search lost 13% of its total pop600,000 500,000 through printed versions of the United States Census for the ulation within a period of 400,000 City of Springfield, MA 300,000 years 1950 – 1980. Springfield MSA 20 years between 1960 – 200,000 100,000 3. After researching all of the census data that was needed, the 1980 (Fig 1). During the 0 numbers were then compiled into an Excel document for easy eighties, Springfield ex1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007 2010 Year viewing. While monetary values for the years 1950—2000 were perienced a rather small Fig 1: Graph illustrating Springfield MA pop decline while its in their own value (not fixed for 2007 inflation values), these val- population increase of MSA’s pop increases. ues were then converted (median household income and median 3%, only to lose 5% of Source: U.S. Census Bureau housing unit value) into 2007 dollars (adjusted for inflation) by its total population be- Graph: Generated by author using the United States Department of Labor inflation calculator tween 1990-2010. The City of Springfield lost a total of 6% of (http://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm). population from 1950 - 2000 and is expected to lose a total of 4. Based off the modified census data, charts, graphs, and pie 10% of its population by the year 2010. graphs were then created that portrayed population change, de- Unlike the city’s population loss, Springfield’s MSA experienced a tremographic composition, median household income, and median mendous population gain between 1950 – 2000 and is expected to housing unit value for the years 1950—2007 (for projecting pop- substantially grow in population between 2000 – 2010 (Fig 1). Accordulation, projected population was calculated for 2010 by using a ing to the US Census, Springfield’s MSA grew by 33% between the fifformula noted below). ties and sixties and then experienced a small population loss of 2% in

the seventies. However, after a period of dormitory population growth in the eighties, the population grew by 11% during the nineties and is expected to grow by more than a 35% of its total population between 2000 – 2010. Between 1950 - 2000, Springfield’s MSA grew by 45% and is expected to grow by an additional 35% by the year 2010.

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Data Gathering, Analysis, and Illustration (cont’d) Charts and Graphs Springfield, MA (MSA) Demographic Composition 1950-2007

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

White Black

Percent

Percent

Springfield, MA Demographic Composition 1950-2007

Asian, Native, Pacific Islander/Other

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007

White Black Asian, Native, Pacific Islander/Other 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007

Year

Year

Fig 3: Graph illustrating rapid increase in non-white population. Source: U.S. Census Bureau Graph: Generated by author

Fig 4: Graph illustrating minute increase in non-white population. Source: U.S. Census Bureau Graph: Generated by author

San Jose, CA Demographic Composition 1950-2007

San Jose, CA (MSA) Demographic Composition 1950-2007 100%

100%

90% 80%

80% White

60% 40%

Black

70%

Population

Population

Population

Unlike Springfield, there San Jose, CA & MSA Population Growth has been continual pop1950-2010 ulation growth in the City 2,500,000 of San Jose, since 1950. 2,000,000 The most rapid periods 1,500,000 of growth occurred in City of San Jose, CA 1,000,000 San Jose MSA the fifties and sixties. 500,000 During each decade, the 0 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007 2010 population grew by over Year 110% (Fig 2). The rate of growth has slowed, Fig 2: Rapid population increase in San Jose and its MSA U.S. Census Bureau but the city’s population Source: Graph: Generated by author continued to grow nonetheless. It grew by 41% in the seventies, 24% in the eighties, and and 14% in the nineties. The US Census predicts a 7% increase between 2000 and 2010. When compared with Springfield’s expected population loss of 11% from 1950 – 2010, San Jose’s population growth should be immense come 2010. It is expected to have gained a 910% increase in population since 1950. Following a similar population growth pattern to the City of San Jose, San Jose’s MSA continually grew since 1950. The most rapid periods of growth also occurred in the fifties and sixties where the population grew over 120% in the fifties and 65% in the sixties (Fig 2). Following the sixties, the population growth of San Jose’s MSA slowed down, but continued to grow. It grew by 21% in the seventies, 15% in the eighties, and 12% in the nineties. According to the 2010 population estimate formula and the population growth formula listed above, San Jose’s MSA is expected to grow by an additional 10% between 2000 – 2010. When compared to the city’s 910% increase in population from 1950, the MSA is expected to have gained a 580% increase in population since 1950.

White

60% 50%

Black

40% 30%

20%

Asian, Native, Pacific Islander/Other

0% 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007 Year

Fig 5: Rapid increase in non-black population Source: U.S. Census Bureau Graph: Generated by author

Asian, Native, Pacific Islander/Other

20% 10% 0% 1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2007

Year

Fig 6: Similar trend as Fig 5 Source: U.S. Census Bureau Graph: Generated by author

Conclusion According to data from the US Census Bureau, the following conclusions may be made: Both cities have become ethnically diverse over time, but San Jose and its MSA experienced a more rapid increase in non-black minorities. By 2000, San Jose’s non-black minority population surpassed the white population. Springfield saw steady and gradual increases in black population since 1950, while its MSA experienced a minute increase in both minority populations. While Springfield’s black population was gradually increasing, the city experienced a non-black inward migration during the seventies. In both cities, non-white populations grew faster than in their MSAs...

Sources Sited American Factfinder. (2008, October 7). US Census. Retrieved October 7, 2008, http://factfinder.census.gov United States, Bureau of Census. (1950). Census of population. California. United States, Bureau of Census. (1950). Census of population. Massachusetts.

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Unique Writing Samples Project 2: “Planning as a Concept” Defined “urban planning” and described what it means to us. "Planning" may be understood different ways by a number of various and diverse individuals. If you ask anyone walking around on the street, “What is your definition of “planning,” they will surely all give you different answers. However, when one thinks about what "planning" is, the most general definition is: thinking about a specific topic or event ahead of time. For example, your mother is turning fifty and you want to PLAN the best "half-a-century-old" surprise party ever. Of course when thinking about this surprise party, there are a number of factors one must account for: what venue, the guest list, the presents, what time people will get there, etc. Unfortunately, the concept of “urban planning” maybe a term that is unknown to some. Even though the addition of one term might create a whole new concept, the concept of "urban planning" bears a similar meaning to the previously noted definition of “planning.” While the thought of “planning” a surprise party, small get together, or date is clear to many, “urban planning” involves thinking about a particular project or action that will have an effect on the social environment of the affected surroundings (humans and environment included). When developing these projects or actions, the framework thinkers’ intention is to improve the welfare of not only human beings, but also the environment as well. By thinking about the physical and built environment and how it affects our social well being, we can better improve our everyday lives and those of future generations.

from a distant source to their city via the aqueduct system. After developing this physical infrastructure of the aqueduct, the Romans were able to use fresh water comfortably to live better lives. It took hard work and determination by a diverse range of individuals to complete the task of building this aqueduct system. During the planning process, scholars, early urban planners, architects, engineers, government officials and even the community had to work together. While focusing on finding solutions to the problem, gaining a mutual consensus of certain individuals and the cooperation of all those involved in the project are key to the project’s success. It would not have been possible otherwise. The concept of “urban planning” was and will be an important factor that will help improve the lives of all living things and their environment.

Since the early days of human civilization, urban planning has played a critical role in the evolution of the human society in which we know today. For example, the complex aqueduct system that was developed by the ancient Romans helped bring fresh water to their thriving cities. Before the aqueduct system could be built, scholars, engineers, and early urban planners of Rome identified the problem of a lack of fresh water to be a problematic issue to the city’s growth and survival. After discovering the problem, they developed the theory of bringing fresh water

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Unique Writing Samples (cont’d) Since the closing of Steeplechase Park in 1964, the amusement area has kept shrinking year by year. Only a few landmark icons Analyzed, critiqued, and commented on the justifica- of the historic Coney Island remain. While developing a master tions in the Coney Island Redevelopment Plan (2007). plan to promote economic growth and development in this area, the Coney Island Development Corporation calls for the historic Background and Introduction to Coney Island preservation of existing landmarks in an effort to respect Coney During the early to mid-20th century, Coney Island was con- Island’s rich history (Fig 3). sidered the premier urban getaway destination. Devoid of the stresses associated with urban living, people of all ages, races, and backgrounds came to gather at Coney Island for its exciting and vibrant entertainment district that was once defined by its three prominent amusement parks: 1. Steeplechase Park (1897 – 1964) 2. Luna Park (1903 – 1946) 3. Dreamland (1904 – 1911) Fig 3: Historic landmarks marked for preservation Fig 2: Existing C7 zoning and rezoning

Project 3: Coney Island Redevelopment Plan

By 1970, these amusement parks went out of business and Coney Island was beginning to show signs of decline and disinvestment. According to the Coney Island Development Corporation(CIDC), the size of the amusement area shrunk by more than half its original size during its transition from one of New York’s most exciting areas to one of New York’s fastest declining areas (Fig 1). While losing a considerable portion of its amusement park area to poor investment and restrictive zoning codes, Coney Island’s once historic district is presently defined by vacant areas, empty parking lots, limited employment opportunities, and limited signs of street life.

Image Source: New York City Department of City Planning

Image Source: New York City Department of City Planning

Proposed Rezoning Plan

Coney Island amusement area—pre park closures.

While the current C7 zone restriction limits development only to large, open amusement uses, the new rezoning plan seeks to create three distinct districts that have varying land uses.

As illustrated in Figure 5, the plan uses Stillwell Avenue, Surf Avenue, 4: Creation of separate districts within and Keyspan Park as edge bound- Fig rezoning boundary Image New York City Departaries to distinguish three separate ment of Source: City Planning districts referred to as Coney West, Coney North, and Coney East. As noted by the illustration, Fig 1: Coney Island amusement area Coney West and North will be zoned for mixed-use properties shrinking since the closing of its three that integrate both residential and retail land uses. Coney East prominent amusement parks, post 1965 Image Source: Coney Island Develop- is specifically designated to build upon and further develop Coney ment Corporation Island’s open amusements while also adding enclosed amuseExisting Conditions ments, entertainment retail and hotels to create an environment According to the New York City Department of City Plan- that would develop year-round businesses. ning, the area that is to be rezoned is currently C7, a While each of these three districts are defined by specific land commercial district limited to large open amusement uses (Fig 2). uses, the City of New York also determined that each district will be required to abide by certain urban design guidelines. In an Residential housing is not permitted here.

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Unique Writing Samples (cont’d) effort to preserve Coney Island’s historic character and landscape, these guidelines would establish each district with their own set of special zoning codes that would define building densities and maximum heights. In an effort to preserve the historical character that Coney Island is known for, these guidelines would also help create appropriate transitions into surrounding neighborhoods.

Justifications Coney North & West - Residential & Retail District According to the New York City Department of City Planning, together, both of these mixed use development districts would create approximately an additional 450,000 new housing units (900 of them being affordable housing units) while also adding 460,000 square feet in retail. As illustrated in Fig 5: Detailed Coney Island North, West, Figure 6, the rezoning plan calls for and East rezoning plan Image Source: New York City Departthe creation of mixed-use residen- ment of City Planning tial neighborhoods with ground floor retail within Coney North and West. It would also designate the parcels along Surf Avenue to be mixed-use residential with ground floor retail. 1. As stated in New York City’s comprehensive document , “PlaNYC 2030,” New York City will need an additional 265,000 housing units to accommodate their rapidly growing population by 2030. As estimated in their document “New York City Population Projections by Age/Sex and Borough 2000 - 2030,” New York City is expected to grow by over 1 million people while Brooklyn alone is expected to grow by about 250,000 people by that year. In preparation for this rapid population increase, this rezoning plan intends to create a bulk of additional housing units to sustain the anticipated needs of New York City and the borough of Brooklyn. 2. According to the New York City Department of City Planning, “the proposed demapping of the existing park area requires the replacement of an equal amount of parkland and approval of New York State legislation.” While obeying these specific guidelines outlined by New York State, the area east of Keyspan

Park and west of the Cyclone would be mapped as newly created parkland. As illustrated in Figure 6, the remapped parkland area will create a continuous outdoor amusement park area along Coney Island’s historic Boardwalk, and will also create a newly mapped park that will embrace the area’s unique beachfront location. Through the creation of a continuous outdoor amusement park area and a boardwalk park, the plan hopes to improve the visibility and walk ability for pedestrians from surrounding neighborhoods to the beach and historic Boardwalk.

Fig 6: Remapping of existing parkland area (currently used as parking lots) from light green areas to dark green areas in effort to: 1) create continuous outdoor amusement park area, 2) create vibrant mixed use residential neighborhood in Coney West, 3) create new boardwalk park to enhance pedestrian connections between surrounding neighborhoods and boardwalk. Image Source: New York City Department of City Planning

3. Despite the lack of space designated for parking in the rezoning plan, the Coney Island Development Corporation’s Strategic Plan encourages private developers to create public parking spaces within their own private lots and parcels. The lack of parking areas in the rezoning plan could be an initiative led by New York City to create pedes- Fig 7: Gwanghwamun Plaza project—cut of trian-friendly environments where the focus traffic lanes and creation of public plaza. Image Source: Seoul Metropolitan Government of the design is the human being, not the automobile. In a case study based in Seoul, S. Korea, the current mayor is attempting to transform their “hard city,” a city revolving around the automobile, into a “soft city,” a city that is human and pedestrian-orientated. In Seoul’s Gwanghwamun Plaza project, a major traffic artery located in downtown Seoul will be transformed from a 16 lane road into a 10 lane road. With the extra space from the removal of these six traffic lanes, the Seoul Metropolitan Government intends on creating a public plaza that will enhance and enrich the neighborhood’s cultural atmosphere (Fig 8). Similar to Seoul’s Gwanghwamun Plaza project, the lack of space designated for parking and automobiles is a step for New York City in becoming a pedestrian-oriented society where the focus of the design is the pedestrian, not the automobile.

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Unique Writing Samples (cont’d) Coney East - Open & Enclosed Amusements, Entertainment Retail, and Hotel Coney Island Rezoning Plan According to the New York City Department of City Planning and the Coney Island Development Corporation, it is possible to revitalize the historic amusement park and entertainment district by preserving and building upon Coney Island’s iconic landmarks and open amusements while adding enclosed amusements, entertainment retail, and hotels. While the amusement park would be anchored by the Wonder Wheel, Parachute Jump, and the Cyclone, the addition of modern and traditional rides, enclosed amusements, restaurants, hotels, and entertainment retail (bowling alleys, movie theatres, and performance venues) would complement the open amusement area by creating a vibrant, year-round entertainment district that would embrace a broader range of entertainment goods and services than the previous C7 zoning plan allowed for.

Visions and Goals of Coney Island Development Comprehensive Rezoning Plan

New York City Department of City Planning. 2008. Coney Island Comprehensive Rezoning Plan. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/coney_island/index. shtml (accessed November 10, 2008). Coney Island Development Corporation. 2008. Coney Island Development Corporation. http://www.thecidc. org/ (accessed November 10, 2008). Sources Cited Coney Island Development Corporation. 2008. Coney Island Through the Ages. http://www.thecidc.org/News/ PressKit.html (accessed November 19, 2008).

New York City Department of City Planning. 2008. New York City Population projects by Age/Sex and Borough, According to the Coney Island Development Corporation, their 2000 - 2030. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/ four primary goals are: census/popproj.shtml (accessed November 21, 2008). 1. Create and foster an environment that would develop year PlaNYC 2030. 2008. Land, Housing. round businesses to strengthen the Coney Island economy. http://www.nyc.gov/html/planyc2030/html/plan/land_ housing.shtml (accessed November 21, 2008). 2. Improve neighborhood conditions and quality of life, parks and other community facilities. Seoul Metropolitan Government. 2006. Traffic artery to make way for public plaza. http://english.seoul.go.kr/today/ 3. Facilitate the development of vacant and underutilized properties. news/newsclip/1239894_3675.html (accessed November 21, 2008). 4. Encourage the development of new housing to create a stable consumer base in the neighborhood. With these goals in mind, the Coney Island Rezoning Plan and the Coney Island Strategic Plan successfully create conditions and possibilities for these visions to become a reality; a reality where Coney Island is born once again as America’s Playground.

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Graphic Design & Digital Media Project 4: “Finding Helvetica” Found examples of “Helvetica” font in the urban environment and digitally altered the originals to change the “mood.” Original Photographs

Altered Images

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Graphic Design & Digital Media (cont’d) Project 5: M&T Bank Poster Designed maps and poster for M&T Plaza using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

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Graphic Design & Digital Media (cont’d) Project 6: NFTA Metro Rail Presentation Designed a PowerPoint Presentation promoting NFTA Metro Rail. Created several graphics for PowerPoint. 1

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Graphic Design & Digital Media (cont’d) Project 6: NFTA Metro Rail Presentation (cont’d) Designed a PowerPoint Presentation promoting NFTA Metro Rail. Created several graphics for PowerPoint. 7

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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Project 7: Targeting Community Development Funds Identified distressed areas in the City of Buffalo that would be suitable for a community development grant by identified Census Block Groups who experienced a high level of Intrametropolitan and Intercity Hardship Index (IIHI). The IIHI is measured by: unemployment, dependency, education, crowded housing, poverty, vacancy, and housing built before 1939. Grouped together common land use types (ex: 210, 311, etc) by parcel to see which groups of parcels whose total assessed value is less than $100,000 and whose area is greater than 1/3 of an acre.

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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Project 8: Money, Education, and Race Identified where wealthy and financially depressed college students lived and analyzed whether or not their financial wellbeing (measured by median household income) restricted a person’s ability to attend a public or private college. Lighter parcels represent lower incomes. Red dots represent private college attendees while blue represent public college attendees

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Raymond Chetti University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Urban Planning

Portfolio of Works

15 Emmett Court West Babylon, NY, 11704 direct: (631) 943 - 6208 e-mail: rjchetti@buffalo.edu



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