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{ book 2 }

INTRODUCTION + DESIGN SOLUTION


introduction + design solution { book 1 }

megan rieger

interior design class of 2013 . college of daap . university of cincinnati


4


F

rom the beginning, we have sent out roots. We do so seeking that which gives us life, to anchor us to the firmness of what we know. Roots give us strength, allowing us to grow and extend our reach; they sustain us and nurture us. Our roots, vast and intertwined, mimic those of the earth and all life it supports.

5


B

eer is the craft of tradition; the art of creating a legacy. The realization of exquisite technique, passed between generations, across oceans and expansive terrain, it is an expression of the perfection of simplicity, refined and given depth through diligent attention and commitment to perfection. Beer is a work of art, designed to bring satisfaction to its master, and enjoyment to those with whom it is shared. In the Over-the-Rhine Brewery District of Cincinnati, the rich brewing history is defined by eras of exuberant progress, refined technique and mastery of the craft, and punctuated with exhausting periods of economic frailty.

6


7


contents


10

Background

rooted in heritage rooted in community rooted in nature

22

Mission

26

Definition

42

Design Premise

62

Design solution

facility type client & users user logs

concept aesthetics context exisitng conditions visualization floor plans rcps sections elevations branding

Contact

9


{ Workers at the Herancourt Brewing Co. of Cincinnati, OH circa 1900. }

10


Background rooted in heritage + rooted in community + rooted in nature +

“There is nothing better than that a man should rejoice in his own works, for that is his heritage.� { Ecclesiastes 3:22 }

11


{ a vast network of underground tunnels exists under OTR’s Brewery District, used before Prohibition to transport beer to the location where it would be bottled. }

12 6


contents

rooted in heritage

O

ur heritage roots us to a place. A city steeped in German heritage, the Overthe-Rhine Brewery District was built around the traditions of those early settlers who settled in to the valley around the Ohio River, who brought with them their faith, families, and love of beer. Germans living in Over-the-Rhine began the brewing revolution, defining it as the third largest beer producing city in the US during the mid-1800s. The beer gardens of OTR, modeled after those of German tradition, became popular watering holes and social centers for community members.

13


{ Gentleman enjoying an afternoon brew under the shade of the chesnut trees at Tony Faust’s beer garden, 1881. }

14


beer gardens

B

eer Gardens originated in the German kingdom of Bavaria during the 19th Century. In order to keep their beer cool during fermentation, it was buried by the river in wooden kegs and trees were planted to provide shade and additional cooling. These cellars soon were popular places not only to store, but also to serve the beer. Simple wooden benches and tables were set up under the trees and hearty meals were served to the patrons. Live music and other forms of entertainment were not uncommon. Beer gardens are defined by their presence within a natural context. In an urban environment, such a place becomes an oasis, a watering hole where people find escape.

history 15


Our roots extend beyond the realm of humans and our histories. That which is fresh and vital renews us. Root will allow nature to reestablish roots within its walls, transforming an abandoned brick box into an urban oasis where we come seeking refreshment and discover this renewal.

16


rooted in nature

N

ature sleeps under the concrete jungle. As what we have made begins to decay, nature fluidly reclaims what is hers. What delight we take in discovering that the urban fabric has compromised its cold rigidity to the beauty of a small tree, peeking through an alley or a tuft of grass escaping the hold of the vast sea of pavement. As a tree’s roots grow around obstacles, so too will we coexist with those things that have been altered since we last occupied this place. A history has been recorded in its transformation; a rich story of human toil and excellence, subdued by the passing of time and reinvigorated by its reclamation. These many stories exist harmoniously together within the new construct.

17


Located on the future streetcar loop, Root will be within the area of major economic influence it will introduce to the area. Root will be a dynamic adaptive reuse that will simultaneously honor the history of the OTR Brewery District, support planting & beautification efforts, and create a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly destination.

{ Brewery tours give tourists and locals alike a unique taste of the vast network of underground brewery tunnels. }

18


otr brewery district master plan

T

he OTR Brewery District Master Plan is an urban revitalization effort to celebrate Cincinnati’s beermaking tradition and replace many abandoned spaces and connect isolated assets with pedestrianfriendly, sustanainale mixed-use spaces (specifically listed as residential, retail, office, institutional, entertainment & manufacturing. The target strategy is to focus on the blocks just north of Liberty St. (Root is within scope), to capitalize on the momentum of the revitalization efforts that have been so successful in Southern OTR. The strategists plan to create corridors that enable to creation of vibrant public places that connect catalytic businesses.

19


20


rooted in community

A

revival is beginning; an unearthing of this sleeping legacy. Independent brewers from the Cincinnati area have begun to rediscover the craft for which the Over-theRhine of old was once renowned. With a 14% increase in craft beer sales in 2012, It is expected that number will continue to rise (Watkins, 2012). Root is envisioned as a brewery that will celebrate this unearthing of the underground Cincinnati Brewery District. The Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corp. is...committed to making the OTR Brewery District a healthy, balanced and supportive neighborhood ...by preserving, restoring & redeveloping our unique brewing history & historic urbanfabric. - OTR Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corp.

21


22


mission

23


1 To adaptively reuse vacant & underutilized buildings to create an urban oasis, an environment which reconnects man to the natural world and reminds the soul of the joy in life & the delight in discovery.

exposure

24

renewal


mission

2

3

To reveal the brewing tradition of Cincinnati’s past and give exposure to local, independent craft brewers, while harmoniously integrating with Findlay Market in a new organic & natural consciousness.

To transform underused and abandoned buildings into a productive urban oasis that begins to reshape OTR as The Brewery District & acts as a knowledge-share for local independent brewers.

transformation

25


{ Brewing vessels at Toit, a small brewpub in Indira Nagar, Bangalore. }

26


Definition

facility type + client & users + user logs +

“ From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world. “ { St. Arnold of Metz, patron saint of brewers }

27


Beer and nature are inextricably linked. The ingredients used in the production of beer are pure & simple. The hops, wheat and barley require sunlight, soil & water to grow. Add fresh water and yeast, and what human hands create is as pure & good as the land from which it came.

28


so, what is it?

independent brewery & gardens

B

eer is best when it is shared. For that reason, Root will be considered a place for the sharing of finely crafted beer. Distilling this concept to its essence, it is natural to begin with the production of beer. Root will be a brewing workshop where local, independent brewers lacking proper equipment or space can come and produce their custom brews. The brewmasters will start a knowledge collective, which they will then share (in beer and spoken word) with the OTR community. Root will largely be described by the lush greenery complementing the built space. Expressing the beer garden tradition, they are a natural companion to beer, and will be a delightful gem in the urban canvas.

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30


why this is a great idea

R

oot will introduce new life & vibrancy to a space, a community, and an environment that has forgotten its roots. It will heal and repurpose an abandoned space, and allow it to once again support life on many levels. It will fill a market gap for craft brews that Findlay currently does not vend, and encourage increased business for the Market and its vendors. The brewery will assist in the reemergence of OTR as The Brewery District, and host independent brewers to produce their craft in a well-maintained facility with high-volume equipment. Root will serve as a source of inspiration for this & other communities, and will move us to begin reconciling our relationship with the earth & our history for future generations.

31


client

T

he owner of Root will be Greg Hardman, founder & president of the new Christian Moerlein Lager House. Hardman single handedly resurrected the Moerlein & Hudepohl beers, once Cincinnati legends, sadly laid to rest by the Prohibition in the 1920s. Though neither the gastropub nor the brewery will be associated with the Moerlein name, Hardman is an appropriate candidate because he is extremely familiar with Cincinnati’s brewing history, its beers, and is strongly supports the growing community of independent brewers. He would give these aspiring crafters a voice, and let it be heard loud & clear.

32

The Over-The-Rhine Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corp’s goals laid out in the Master Plan allign with those goals for celebration of the past with redevelopment for a sustainable history of the Over-the-Rhine community.


client + partners Findlay Market will supply Root with fresh ingredients and in return, Root will act as a craft brew merchant for the Market.

Cincinnati Parks and its Urban Forestry division plants, maintains and protects trees in downtown Cincinnati, and their Greenspace program is an urban landscaping initiative to beautify and impact the economy.

33


{ independent brewers }

We welcome impassioned beer-enthusiasts of any age, aspiring to make a name for themselves in the world of beer, but lacking the proper equipment, space, or funds to make it big. Here they will find the workspace & support to live the dream.

34

{ market goers }

Inevitably, community members making the weekly trek to Findlay Market will stumble upon Root and peek inside. We can expect to see stay-at-home moms, perusing couples and the lovely elderly couple down the street pop in for a brew.


{ grungy hipsters }

user groups

{ by the people, for the people }

Nothing against hipsters; we just know this is where you’ll want to be on the weekend. With the perfect mix of urban grit & modern flare, if the awesome selection of high-gravity beers and small plates to share with your squadron don’t attract, the vibes will.

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36


timelog { noah fettig } independent brewer

9

:30 am Noah arrives at Root to prepare brewing his first batch.

1

:00 pm The first batch of lager is sent through the heat plate exchanger to the fermenting vats where it will ferment for 3 weeks.

2

:30 pm After cleaning the equipment, Noah leads a tour and introductory workshop for home brewers.

5

:30 pm Noah attends a tasting & discussion hosted by his friend & co-brewer, Nate.

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38


timelog { the lauriens } market goers

5

:30 pm Hearing of Root from their daughter & her fiance, the Lauriens stop in to Root on their way home from Findlay Market.

5

:45 pm The lovely couple decides to do a beer tasting, at the suggestion of the brewmaster on staff. He brings them pairings to complement each beer.

6

:30 pm The brewmaster gives the Lauriens a tour of the brew workshops & gardens.

6

:45 pm Mr. Laurien purchases a Root growler & fills it with their new favorite beer.

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40


timelog { evelin & ian } grungy hipsters

8

:30 pm Evelin & Ian journey on the rad new streetcar to the Root lounge with a flock of their best mates.

8

:45 pm Having each procured their beer of choice, they totally score the best lounge seating in the elevated loft.

9

:30 pm Intrigued by the music drifting into the lounge from the garden, Eveline & Ian embark on a mission check it out.

9

:45 pm Music, brew & good company is enjoyed from the canopy beer garden.

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42


Design Premise

scope + spatial programming + independent brewery + marketing strategy + spatial definitions +

43


envir

on

m mu

a l e c on

nity

c lo

y om 44

t

m

en

co

F

irst and foremost, Root is intended as a project of urban renewal. By awakening the sleeping earth below the concrete jungle of the urban fabric, Root will create an oasis for the OTR community which will supplement the impact and relative success of the gastropub and the social and economic realms that exist therein.


a balanced hierarchy gardens

T

independent brewery brewpub

workshop

lounge

retail

ranslated into the built environment, Root will be initially perceived as a garden space, which upon further exploration, becomes infused with the spirit of the beer garden, and eventually, the actual production of the beer. This progression from natural to mechanical mimics the progression during the brewing process from natural ingredients through the machinery that creates the brew.

Within the larger context of Gardens & Brewery, Root is distinguished by sub-spaces, including the workshop, where actual production occurs, the brewpub, where the beer is consumed, the lounge, an interior beer garden in the complex, and retail, where tasting & sale of merchandise and beer occurs.

45


{ 3 roots }

{ heritage }

46

1

{ brewing tradition }

2


design metaphor The potential for growth manifest in a root symbolizes that potential for the space to take root in the community and influence its invigoration.

T

{ nature }

3

he root anchors to the site, the history and the people of the OTR Brewery District, allowing it to begin the process of physical and figurative ecological transformation. The space will be imbued with life, as revisiting the concept of root will be a constant reassessment of the interrelationship & interconnectedness between part & whole, as it is the roots that give these arrayed “parts� life, it is this vital connection tying the two together that retains and continually exchanges living energy.

47


exposing the underground { brewing history & underground brewers }

exposing

the

brewing

traditions of the otr brewery district & the new generation of independent brewers.

{ decomposing the built environment }

will

expose

beer

production

nature, &

the

underground level. Exposing the underground level with cutouts allows multiplicity of

view,

invites

intrigue,

{ translucent materials }

accommodates functional needs & filters in natural light.

clear & reflective glass, transparent concrete

panels,

perforated

materials, grates & slatted wood will create a dramatic exploration of exposing the underground level.

48


glass

enclosures

brewing,

on

fermenting

cooling

rooms

and

kitchens

will

expose

the & open

spatial translation

the

production of food & drink, and its ingredients to patrons.

{ beer production }

Exposing the underground

T

o express this concept of root in the interior space, a little digging needs to be done. For this reason, the parti of exposing the underground was developed. In a physical and metaphorical expression of this idea, the formal language, aesthetics, interior and exterior space and theoretical business model were taken into consideration.

{ natural world }

allowing nature to reclaim exterior space and adjacent vacant building.

49


50


tone nature & grunge

G

leaning inspiraton from the beermaking process, the space will integrate both pure natural elements and industrial materials and machinery in a harmonious blend of aging & fresh, rugged & sleek, earthen & metallic, dark & light, heavy & weightless. These juxtapositions will create a dynamic spatial quality that exists beautifully within the existing shell.

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52


materials nature & grunge

T

he materials used will complement the existing brick, which has a beautiful patinaed effect from the worn plaster. The original wood floors will be largely maintained, and portions that are removed will be reused for furniture pieces within the space. Transparency and view corridors will be acheived with floor and wall grates, slatted wood panels, glazing in different opacities, and sheer fabrics. The hard sufaces will be softened by the presence of exterior vegetation and interior leathers and fabric treatments. Both materials and tone vary slightly from space to space; see design solution book for more detailed information.

53


creation

54

cons


sumption materials 2 tones

S

pace will be defined either as consumption or creation and distinguished as such by their materials palate and subsequent tonal qualities. Creation rooms are defined as those in which beer or food is created. The open kitchen, brewing room, bottling room and fermentation, cooling, and lagering chambers are included in this category, and are defined by a predominantly cool palate of concrete, whitewash brick, stainless appliances, and glass. Consumption rooms are defined as those in which beer is consumed. The central bar, taproom, beer gardens, retail, loft, etc. are within this category and are defined by a palate of warm brick, dark woods, slate, blackened steel and copper.

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56


context elder & elm { findlay neighborhood } Located directly across from Findlay Market in Cinicinnati’s Over-the-Rhine Brewery District, portions of buildings 1739, 1737 & 1735 Elm Street will be home to Root Brewery & Gardens. The buildings have entrances from both Elm St. and Campbell St. at the rear. Root will be located directly between one of the primary parking lots for Findlay and the Market itself. For this reason, Root will have immediate exposure to patrons using this lot, as well as the other 800,000 who visit the market annually. The urban context, proximity to the Market and the future streetcar will draw a diverse demographic to this location.

57


{ exterior conditions from campbell st. } 58


existing conditions elder & elm { findlay neighborhood } Built in the Italiante architectural style around 1890, 1735, 1737 & 1739 are characterized by heavy cornices and narrow brick facades. 1735 & 1739 have 4 stories, while 1737 only has 3 & range in height from 30’-43’. What appears to be single long buildings are actually two separate, with an interior courtyard (in reference to 35 & 37). 1739 has an existing vacant lot which will serve as a primary garden space. The buildings are standard brick and mortar construction with solid hardwood joists and iron posts & beams (39). 1737 & 1735 are currently abandoned and 1739 has been recently renovated.

{ exterior conditions from elm st. } 59


[ Exterior ]

{ The upper two floors of the Crown Building (1739 Elm) have been programmed for apartments and office space. The lower levels are intended to be leased for a restaurant. }

60

.1 conce


ept

existing conditions interiors

T

he space boasts brick walls, partially exposed by beautifully worn plaster that has taken on a very edgy, almost watercolor, grunge-effect. There is hand-painted stenciling near the Campbell entrance. The molding speaks to the Italianate style in which the building was created, and the floors are beautiful original hardwoods with a lot of character. Exposed steel structural systems reveal soaring ceilings and generously-sized of the windows. The basement has exposed bluestone foundation walls.

the big idea 61


60


Design Solution visualization + floor plans + rcps + sections + elevations + branding +

63


{ cambell 56

st. }


street views

{ elm st. }

65


66


67


{ main entrance }


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70


{ central bar }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Neutral threshold; a dark opening reveals laser cut roots that extend as its counter form in solid-void at the termination of the portal, expressing compression + release.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 175 sq ft & 10’-12’

{ spatial quality } The homogenous material + low ceilings of the portal release the patrons into a warm, semi-industrial atmosphere which gives immediate visual + physical access to central bar + lounge. Within the airlock is a landscaped bed opposite an opening to below.

{ material quality } Existing brick + wood floors, darkened glass with metal screens or wood slats, onyx-stained lasercut plywood, blackened steel

{ furniture + lighting } Solid wood beam waiting bench, reception desk of board-formed concrete; industrial pendants

{ spatial adjacencies } Central bar + lounge, taproom, walkway + beer garden

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76


77


{ central bar }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } clean, minimalistic materials characterize sanitary roomsin which food is created. Open kitchens service both interior & exterior dining areas.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 450 sq ft; 13’ ceilings

{ spatial quality } Bright, clean contemporary; simple back-of-house functional layout for cooking facilities, prep stations, cool storage, dry-store shelving, trash & receiving & washing station.

{ material quality } Sealed whitewash brick, new concrete slabs, stainless steel appliances, white corian countertops, slate shelving, dry store, metal wire shelving in cool store, white acrylic insulated paneling

{ furniture & lighting } Industrial pendants, counters for prep service, cooking appliances

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to winter garden, beer garden, reception

81


{ reception + taproom from bar }


{ taproom }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Consumption - the taproom is intended to showcase independent brewers. It can be rented out for private tastings, or informal tastings can be arranged.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 100 sq ft; 13’ ceilings

{ spatial quality } A small corner space, the taproom’s glass walls face the walkway, making it seem larger. A perforated metal root motif installation against the (e) brick wall hosts copper pipes which tap featured brews. Darkened glass panes define beers with window paint.

{ material quality } Angled wooden slats anchored to opposite (e) brick wall with metal cables mimic language employed in central bar area while perforated metal “roots” mirror bar back. Laser cut wooden root screen occupies glazed wall, and board-formed concrete creates bar with slate slab countertops.

{ furniture & lighting } barstools, countertops

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to walkway, reception, central bar

87


88


89


{ beer locker }


92


93


{ root retail }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Connectivity + exposure. Floor-to-ceiling beer lockers & a metal grate used as a flooring material creates visual connectivity and physical connection to the fermentation room located beneath.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 200 sq ft & 15’

{ spatial quality } Storefront presence (facing Findlay market). The wares sold will be displayed sparingly along wall shelves, while local artists’ work depicts featured brewers in window. Brewing room is visible beyond, and tapwall leads patron to beer locker beyond.

{ material quality } Existing wood floor in retail, replaced with industrial metal grate & dense, clear polymer in beer locker; wooden shelves or drawers compose walls, hold bottles; slatted wood, laser-cut wood screen

{ furniture & lighting } Library-style ladder & reception desk

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to brewing room, centrak bar, walkway & bottling room

97


{ brewing room }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Creation - beer production room created as a gallery/ performance space. Intended to serve as a workshop in which independent brewers engage in crafting fine brews; dual intent to educate Root patrons and OTR public in art of beer production.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 250 sq ft; 15’ ceilings

{ spatial quality } Functional space with only necessary brewing appliances is enclosed in glass box so as to act as exhibit for adjacent spaces. Floor is new poured concrete and metal grate through which is visible the cooling chamber (thermally-sealed beneath grate).

{ material quality } Poured concrete floor, glass enclosure with blackened steel mullion

framework, sealed whitewash brick, copper kettles &

stainless appliances, when necessary.

{ facilities & accessibility } Lift & stairs, brew kettle, hot liquor tank, mash tun, heat exchanger

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to retail, central bar + lounge, winter garden, Elm St.

101


102


103


{ winter garden }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Urban garden, oasis, watering hole. The beer garden will be set within the context of an actual garden, to create an intimate environment that speaks of the beer garden tradition.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 1275 sq ft & 13’-15’

{ spatial quality } Trees and garden will define the perimeter of the space. Guests will enter the gastropub through the beer garden, descending down a set of stairs into the garden, and then up another set to the beer platform. The canopy will be covered in hop vines.

{ material quality } Laser-cut onyx plywood, board-formed concrete, blackened steel accents, wood slats, wrought-iron screens, poured concrete floor + existing wood (in lounge).

{ furniture & lighting } Built-in lounge seating, barstools, side tables, bartop

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to reception, beer garden sunken dining

107


{ loft lounge }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Sky lounge; the building being essentially gutted leaves full advantage to be taken of the roof structure, which will be in large part converted to operable skylights. Canopy structures & exisiting joists define a ceiling plane, giving the sense of enclosure while maintaining a connection to the sky.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 400 sq ft; 18’ ceiling

{ spatial quality } Warm, inviting; wood floors with 1� spacing between planks allow cool light from kitchen beneath to penetrate. Wall addition hosts built-in lounge benches, while two community tables host additional diners sunroom & loft have glazed ceiling planes.

{ material quality } Board-formed concrete built-out wall, existing brick & wood floors, new wood canopy structure, wrought iron screen & sheers, carpet (in sunroom), smart glass

{ furniture & lighting } Lounge seating (and custom built-ins), side tables, community tables & chairs, coffee table, poufs

{ spatial adjacencies } Above kitchens & b.o.h., stair access to winter garden & beer garden

111


{ open kitchen | outdoor }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } clean, minimalistic materials characterize sanitary roomsin which food is created. Open kitchens service both interior & exterior dining areas.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 450 sq ft; 13’ ceilings

{ spatial quality } Bright, clean contemporary; simple back-of-house functional layout for cooking facilities, prep stations, cool storage, dry-store shelving, trash & receiving & washing station.

{ material quality } Sealed whitewash brick, new concrete slabs, stainless steel appliances, white corian countertops, slate shelving, dry store, metal wire shelving in cool store, white acrylic insulated paneling

{ furniture & lighting } Industrial pendants, counters for prep service, cooking appliances

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to winter garden, beer garden, reception

115


{ beer garden bar + lounge }


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } Urban garden, oasis, watering hole. The beer garden will be set within the context of an actual garden, to create an intimate environment that speaks of the beer garden tradition.

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 1275 sq ft & 13’-15’

{ spatial quality } Trees and garden will define the perimeter of the space. Guests will enter the gastropub through the beer garden, descending down a set of stairs into the garden, and then up another set to the beer platform. The canopy will be covered in hop vines.

{ material quality } Laser-cut onyx plywood, board-formed concrete, blackened steel accents, wood slats, wrought-iron screens, poured concrete floor + existing wood (in lounge).

{ furniture & lighting } Built-in lounge seating, barstools, side tables, bartop

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to reception, beer garden sunken dining

119


{ beer garden }


64


{ spatial logistics }

{ conceptual premise } An extension of the beer garden; sunken dining features builtin benches & loose tables for reconfigurable table settings. The underground firepit creates intrigue

{ sq ft & ceiling height } 1275 sq ft & 13’-18’

{ spatial quality } Open-air garden-setting in sunken dining with built-in stone benches; grassy area with landscaping for garden seating with community tables; grotto-like setting for firepit with landscaped beds.

{ material quality } New stone floors, raised stone landscaped beds & grass, existing brick walls at perimeter, wood slats for canopy salvaged from demo of 1737 structural joists.

{ furniture & lighting } outdoor lounge chairs, tables, benches, community tables

{ spatial adjacencies } Adjacent to reception entrance, Campbell & Elder Streets.

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10

16

9 3

8

11

2

N

1

13


15

14

7

floor plan { ground } 6

{ spaces }

4 5

13

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

public access walkway reception tasting room central bar + lounge brewing room root retail bottling room beer garden beer garden bar garden lounge sunken dining winter garden open kitchen bottle storage (upstairs) shipping and receiving restrooms

12

0

5

10

15

125


3

2

N


floor plan { loft } { spaces } 1

1 2 3

0

loft lounge sunroom beer garden stair access

5

10

15

127


10

9

3 4

11

N


8

7 6

floor plan { underground } 5

1

{ spaces }

2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

0

fermentation hops + malt cold store lagering cellar chilling cabinet- kegs cold store-kegs office lab bottle storage & wash restrooms utilities underground firepit (garden)

5

10

15

129


transverse section

131


longitudinal section

133


taproom elevation

135


entrances elevation

137


image index { page }

{ source }

8-9

<http://www.cincinnatibrewerytours.com/images/moerlein1.jpg>

10

http://www.pearedcreation.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Herancourt-600x377.jpg

12

http://rackphoto.com/pp/special-projects/lagering-cellars-kauffman/

14

http://www.historyhappenshere.org/node/6866

16

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=cincinnati+brewery+tunnel&FORM=HDRSC2#view=detail&i d=CE4A79709D8FE2C2EDD6DAF012E938D64F4398C3&selectedIndex=3

16

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=cincinnati+brewery+tunnel&FORM=HDRSC2#view=detail&i d=FDF17D18BA150D32ACBEFFB8219AA2C411CF424A&selectedIndex=2

22

http://us.paulaner.com/our-specials/the-world-of-paulaner-as-a-wallpaper

26 28 “

http://www.stockpicturesforeveryone.com/2012_07_01_archive.html <http://www.canstockphoto.it/pancetta-parmesan-e-arugula-11819364.html> <http://www.thevictoria.net/images/gallery/06-Freshly-baked-bread.jpg>

<http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=organic+vegetables&qs=IM&form=QBIR&pq=organic+veg e&sc=8-12&sp=1&sk=#view=detail&id=1108A06210784708DD9D2F29B11240DCB0BDA270&selectedIn dex=139>

<http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=gourmet+organic+foods+herbs+spices+3&qs=n&form=Q BIR&pq=gourmet+organic+foods+herbs+spices+3&sc=0-31&sp=-1&sk=#view=detail&id=431ACCC9 9F2242AFEF8D3B7AC1456326790AADDB&selectedIndex=384>


{ page }

{ source }

28

<http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=most-healthy-russian-food-bilberries&qs=n&for m=QBIR&pq=most-healthy-russian-food-bilberries&sc=0-31&sp=1&sk=#view=detail&id=B692C987E35826B1510906062EE28558ADC68E48&selectedInd ex=0>

<http://www.rawfoodsandiego.com/2010_09_01_archive.html> “

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=roots&qs=n&form=QBIR&pq=roots&sc=8-2&sp=1&sk=#view=detail&id=59D48E265527B9CB81848881752CA7C3C173C5F2&selectedIndex=4

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megan rieger root brewery| independent brewery + gardens senior capstone project interior design class of 2013 college of design, architecture, art + planning university of cincinnati 585.305.8330 megrieger.design@gmail.com


ROOT independent brewery & gardens