Tiger Magazine - Spring 2021

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SPRING 2021

2019—20 Annual Report Included


Andrea Carisse

CONTRIBUTORS

DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING

writing

photography

printing

Andrea Carisse Ed Kidd Tanya Rohrmoser Ella Floss ‘16 Meriel Bellinger-Wehner ‘21 [Kathy] Kaiyi Hu ‘22

Andrea Carisse Danny Custodio Mackenzie Fowler ‘11 Andrea Chan Eugenie Wiley Cara Lee

Battlefield Press

Mackenzie Fowler ’11 DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Tanya Rohrmoser COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Andrea Chan GRAPHIC DESIGNER & PHOTOGRAPHER

design Andrea Chan

editing Andrea Carisse Tanya Rohrmoser

Solely for valued members of the Ridley community. The information contained herein may not be published without permission.


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OUR SCHOOL

LIFE ON CAMPUS

Headmaster’s Headlines

Academics............ 20

Athletics................ 26

A Warm Welcome

Lower School Takes to the Fields

100 Per Cent Pass Rate

Players Keep Sharp

Building IB Community

Back on Track

Mayor Sendzik Comes to Class

Good Sports

The Long History of Canada’s Indigenous

Keeping Pace

Students Speak Up for Interpretation

Service.................. 28

Grade 5 Classes Welcome Prefects

Stepping Up In Service

Arts........................ 24

Home Advantage

(Un)Mask Receives Rave Reviews

AB East Walks a Mile in Her Shoes

Here Comes Santa Claus

#OrangeShirtDay

Tuning In Early

Remembrance Day Services

In the Cards

Postcards for Peace Out With the Old ‘Tis the Season for Service

The images within this issue may predate 2020 and do not reflect current COVID-19 mitigation measures. All on-campus activities have observed our strict layers of mitigation. When students are depicted without masks, they are within their designated cohorts.


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FEATURE STORIES

ALUMNI STORIES

ALUMNI ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNUAL REPORT

COVID-19 Relief Fund Results

Alumni@Work: Athletics

Class Notes

Ridleian Fund

Jim Butterfield ‘70

Contributor Article: Social Media Activism

Sam McGlone ‘97

Marriages, Births, Obituaries

Jamie Massie ‘76

Faculty and Staff Notes

Pathway to Post-Secondary Sport Spread the Word

Archives Corner: The Evolution of Ridley’s Dress Code and School Uniform

in this issue


Headmaster Kidd during the Remembrance Day services.

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HEADMASTER’S HEADLINES

I remember opening 2020 with community messages that played on the idea of ‘20/20 vision’. In reflection, I can’t discern if this was comic or tragic. Of course, no degree of clarity or acuity could have predicted how the year would unfold. Indeed, 2020 was one of those collective experiences that left one thinking that we were indeed living through an historically momentous time—an inflection point, a revolution, a paradigm shift. By December, one could hardly blame those of us who privately (or publicly) offered good riddance to the year that was—our annus horribilis? Indeed, with a vaccine on the horizon, there was much hope and anticipation for 2021. Of course, as with most things, it is not that simple. After all, the pandemic continues to rage and 2021, so far, is still a struggle. On the flip side of this coin, 2020 was not all horror. In fact, with reflection and the stoic mindset we encourage in our students, one can articulate a long list of silver linings. As business thinker Simon Sinek notes, optimism is about our ability to see the “half full” moments and valuable lessons from the recent past. Let’s not cast all of 2020 aside—after all there emerged much that is good. Certainly, looking back on Michaelmas Term, we have plenty to praise. A September return to school—all students, every day—in the midst of a pandemic is an accomplishment worth noting. As was our ability to open campus in early August to over one hundred boarding students who were required to self-isolate for 14 days following their international travel. Managing the challenging task of teaching a blend of in-person and online learning in each and every class, day in and day out, is a stressful, yet heroic task to be heralded. So too was the maintenance of our dynamic co-curricular programme and ensuring daily physical activity for all

students despite the various restrictions and health measures. Keeping campus open to boarders during school holidays–including the Winter Holiday break, when we hosted over one hundred students on campus (surely an historic first for Ridley)–is yet another example of Ridley at its best in 2020. Of course, we accomplished all of this whilst protecting and deepening our sense of community and connection with each other, and with the larger traditions of our school. Although 2020 was also defined by the explosion of so much social and political turmoil, I say we choose to reflect on the silver linings of these tumultuous moments. Rarely since the revolutionary 1960s have young people been more engaged, committed and at times inflamed by the social issues of the day. As you will read on page 34, social activism and nuanced student leadership is happening in the name of diversity, equity, inclusion, and the pursuit of that noble dream. Young Ridleians are the leaders of tomorrow; don’t let anyone tell you they are apathetic! Another silver lining worth noting is our collective resilience in the face of adversity. This issue’s Alumni@Work section features Old Ridleian athletes and their stories of strength and optimism. Although I offer our readers my warmest wishes for smoother seas ahead in 2021, let’s not entirely forget that old adage, “turbulent seas make great sailors.” From adversity, there have been new opportunities and valuable lessons learned. Ridley is already stronger and more confident, thanks to the choppy waters we’ve so recently and successfully navigated.

Terar Dum Prosim, J. Edward Kidd

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LIFE ON

campus

In a year quite unlike any other, our collective focus was on safety, wellbeing and reaching out to those in need—and our students rose to the challenge. From stellar onstage performances to finding thoughtful ways of supporting the community, time and again our Tigers have impressed us with their resilience, adaptability and maturity. Flip through to see what’s kept them busy this term—we think you’ll agree.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

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ON

parade

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Cadet Band marching at Niagara Falls for CTV’s virtual Toronto Santa Claus Parade broadcast. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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RAVE

reviews

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The fall production of (Un)Mask explored topics of identity, racism, trauma, and inclusion. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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LET IT

snow

A quiet campus covered in a fresh blanket of snow. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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UNDER

the stars

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Upper School students enjoying an outdoor screening on A-squad in early September. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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ON YOUR

mark

Ridleians were unstoppable during the annual Lower School Cross Country Run back in September. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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marching ON

Band Commanding Officer, Cadet Major Jacob Lytle '21 stands at attention outside the Chapel on Remembrance Day. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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academics Whether they’re online or on campus, our ever-curious learners are certainly keeping on top of their studies! With new technologies and plenty of ‘Teams’ building, things may have looked a little different this year, but students soon hit their stride, finding creative ways to explore, problem solve and grow.

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A Warm Welcome

100 Per Cent Pass Rate

At the start of the school year, our Prefects received a warm welcome in the Upper School Assembly, and we couldn’t be prouder of this outstanding and committed group. This year’s wellbeing theme is ‘resilience’ and these student leaders—and all our students—are embodying it day after day.

The 2019-20 year ended on a high note! For the first time since introducing IB across all grades in 2014, every single Diploma Programme candidate passed this rigorous academic programme. With the world average pass rate being 78 per cent in 2020, this achievement places Ridleans in the top minority.


Building IB Community Earlier this fall, first and second year IB Diploma students gathered in Merritt Quad to get to know their peers. Our year two Tigers were happy to share their experience with the incoming Grade 11 students, and the group enjoyed some warm treats in the crisp autumn air—hot chocolate being the perfect way to toast to a collaborative year ahead!

Mayor Sendzik Comes to Class St. Catharines mayor, Walter Sendzik virtually visited the Grades 5 and 5/6 classes in Lower School as part of the PYP unit on “Understanding Self.” Mayor Sendzik started things off with a presentation before hosting a lively Q&A session. The students received a deeper understanding of his daily roles and responsibilities—along with the challenges and most rewarding aspects of his career.

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The Long History of Canada’s Indigenous Our Upper School students wrapped up October by observing Reconciliation Week. Students participated in #OrangeShirtDay, engaged in positive discussions about reconciliation and enjoyed a thoughtful presentation by Indigenous rights activist, Michele-Elise Burnett ‘86. The impressive alumna taught a rapt audience about the Treaty of Niagara.

Students Speak Up This October, members of the Debate and Public Speaking Club participated in the International Independent Schools’ Public Speaking Contest—based out of Vancouver, B.C. and held virtually this year. Member schools from across the globe joined in the lively event, and the competition was strong. Kechun (Tony) Wu ‘23, Haelim (Jennifer) Lee ‘22 and Mahmoud Radwan ‘23 represented Ridley in excellent fashion!

Up for Interpretation The annual Lower School Interpretive Reading Competition took place this fall. The competition was strong, and the Intermediate Division (Grade 7), Senior Division (Grade 8) and EAL all streamed from Williams Hall to our Grade 7 and 8 classrooms. Outstanding performances were given by Intermediate winner, Isabella Massis ‘26; Senior winner, Sharlize Price ‘25; and EAL winner, Yating (Linda) Yu ‘26.

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Grade 5 Classes Welcome Prefects To cap off their IB ‘Leadership and Informed Citizenship’ unit, Mr. Murray and Mrs. Underwood’s Grade 5 classes invited our Prefects to present on what it takes to be a student-leader. Our young Ridleians learned about working as a team, the importance of communication and time management, what it means to be a good role model, and the value of community. We’re sure many of them are now aspiring to one day be in these Prefects’ shoes.

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arts The arts are all about inspiration and self-expression and, more than ever, our students are using creativity to tell their stories. This term has seen budding musicians, brave dramatists, and dedicated performers alike—campus continues to be filled with diversity, beauty and song!

Here Comes Santa Claus At the beginning of November, our Cadet Band jingled all the way to Niagara Falls to film a special performance for the 116th annual Toronto Santa Claus Parade; the band played “Jingle Bell Rock” while the Falls roared behind them. This longstanding Canadian tradition aired in early December on CTV and helped get us in the holiday spirit!

Tuning In Early Our Grade 2 learners were bursting with joy as they received their very first violins! Ridley’s arts programme allows students to unleash their creativity and express themselves confidently through music, art, design, and theatre. First up, our littlest Tigers learned about playing with correct posture, mental focus and the proper violin hold. We have some world-class musicians in the making!

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(Un)Mask Receives Rave Reviews The Upper School production of (Un)Mask aired November 6th and 7th, live from the Mandeville Theatre, to a wide audience online. Originally conceived as a part of R2L-Summer Playwright’s Circle, (Un)Mask grew to include dramatic work by recent graduates, Angela Daudu ‘20 and Tomiwa Femi-Johnson ‘20, and current Grade 10 students, Janae Shao ‘23, Victoria Pan ‘23 and Humzah Gilani ‘23. The play explored topics of identity, racism, trauma, and inclusion against the dreamlike/nightmarish backdrop of the pandemic. During their intense seven-week rehearsal period, cast and crew developed the text into an evocative performance which drew from individual experiences and explored how we have each been uniquely impacted in a world fighting to overcome COVID-19. This was carefully captured by the film crew who, alongside developing the projections and scenes with remote actors, crafted the narrative vision that appeared in the livestream online. After the performance, the actors reflected on their work in a talk-back—a powerful conversation where they shared their own contributions to the creative process, while acknowledging their own personal experiences with racism, isolation and trauma through the pandemic. All observed the impact the playbuilding process had on their own personal growth.

In the Cards Each year, we challenge our Lower School students to flex their creative muscles and design a Ridleythemed holiday card. For 2020, we were excited to announce two winners of the Headmaster’s Holiday Card Contest: Yue (Bella) Pan ’32 and Halle DeSilva ’30. It was too hard to choose between Halle’s snow-topped Mariott Gates and Bella’s festive Hank the Tiger!

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athletics From skills development to team-building to keeping their goals on track, our hardworking Tigers continue to keep wellbeing top of mind as they work towards strong wins and personal bests. This season, we found plenty of opportunities to cheer them on!

Lower School Takes to the Fields The 118th Annual Lower School Cross Country Race took place September 30th for Grades 4 to 8 students—albeit slightly differently than in years past! Runners raced in their classroom cohorts throughout the day, with individual and House standings recorded. Winner of the Cadeau Cup, Isadora Drynan ‘26 was this year’s fastest girl, and the fastest boy was Kiyo Steward ‘26, who won the Lt. Frank A. Read Cup. Congratulations to both and to winning House Team, Eastern Rock—winners of the Peter B. Robinson Cup!

Back on Track After suffering a brain hemorrhage last May, Prep Boys hockey player and Flint Firebirds draft pick, Jacob Cielen-Gough ‘21 is back on the ice—and the embodiment of grit and determination. The talented defenceman, who was selected by Flint in the 2019 OHL draft, admits the experience changed him, but is hoping to return to the team this season.

Photo by Bill Potrecz

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Players Keep Sharp We’re incredibly proud of our Prep Hockey players, who are working hard to maintain their edge. Both boys and girls have been taking to the Tiger Arena to hone their skills and play some rousing inter-squad games.

Keeping the Pace On November 25th, our Houses of Ridley cohorts gave it their all at the annual Upper School Cross Country Run—one of our oldest traditions! Persevering through rain and wind, racers made it to the finish line, out of breath but full of accomplishment. Top Houses this year were the girls of Gooderham East and our Dean’s House boys. Here are this year’s top place winners by division: Senior Girls: Kalyna Kit ‘21 Junior Girls: Autumn Crowe ‘23 Novice Girls: Emma Massis ‘24 Senior Boys: Adam McDonald ‘21 Junior Boys: Nathan Mandigo ‘22 Novice Boys: Loukas Massis ‘24

Good Sports November 10th, Lower School concluded the fall sports term with their Term 1 Sports Awards ceremony. The annual event is an opportunity for coaches and captains to reflect and speak on the term, sharing highlights, slideshows and videos. Though normally hosted in the Mandeville Theatre, with athletes recognized on stage with team crests and Excellence Pins, this year’s celebration was virtual. Students, teachers and coaches tuned in from various classrooms to celebrate the athletic efforts and growth of their fellow Tigers. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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service Our sense of community is strong! We’re so proud of the generous spirits of our students, who stepped up at a time when the world needs it most. From on-campus charity walks to local outreach to supporting the causes which touch us all, this term was filled with the heart and promise of citizens who will change our world.

Stepping Up in Service October’s first weekend was filled with activity on campus, as students and faculty laced up their shoes for a cause. Two charitable runs kept our feet moving: one was the Niagara Child Centre’s Superhero Run, the proceeds of which go toward providing rehabilitation and support services to children with a variety of needs. Then, runners donned pink for the CIBC Run for the Cure, organized by Carmen Elliot ‘21, with support from Mrs. Roud and Mrs. Onclin. Upper School students and faculty clocked their steps in honour of those who have faced breast cancer—especially those within our Ridley family. The on-campus run surpassed its goal by raising approximately $15,000 for cancer research, proving nothing—even a pandemic—will stop us from serving our community. 30

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Home Advantage Students marked October’s Spirit Week in Upper School, and the festivities kicked off with Olympic Day—an opportunity for students to dress as an athlete representing their home country. Across campus, good sports were striking poses with friends (COVID-safe, of course) for a chance to be featured on @keepingupwithhank Instagram account and were judged Most Spirited by the discerning Prefect team.

AB East Walks a Mile in Her Shoes This fall, students from Arthur Bishop East House walked a mile in her shoes to end violence against women and raise donations in support of Gillian’s Place, a local women’s shelter. The annual event— held virtually this year—took place on campus and students raised awareness about gender-based violence throughout the week. The week culminated in a high-heeled march. All of our Houses support local charities as part of our school-wide commitment to service and in the spirit of Terar Dum Prosim.

#OrangeShirtDay On September 30th, Lower School students marked Orange Shirt Day, an important opportunity to acknowledge the negative impact Canadian Residential schools had on Indigenous children, their families, their culture, and communities. The day was filled with activities to help students learn about this period in our nation’s history and to understand the importance of coming together in the spirit of reconciliation and hope.

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Remembrance Day Services Students donned their poppies for Remembrance Day in November, gathering to honour those who fought for our freedom. In Burgoyne House, our junior boarders created a display wall of names honouring the 163 fallen Ridleians from both world wars. Despite COVID-19 modifications, our annual Remembrance Day services in the Memorial Chapel retained their solemn and moving tone. Both services included a reading of the Roll of Honour— each of the 163 Ridleians was assigned to a student who would sit as the name was called out. It was a bright fall day, and a beautiful violin solo by Victor Kie ‘25 filled the Chapel, while sunshine spilled through the stained glass, as if to light up the memories of those who were lost. Our Honour Guard cadets were in fine form, lending their presence in a sombre and poignant display, and across campus and online, students were engaged in meaningful discussions about the past.

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‘Tis the Season for Service Service remains a central pillar of a Ridley education and students have been jumping on every opportunity to give back to the local community—and their generosity and enthusiasm for spreading cheer ahead of the holidays have been heartwarming. Our Grade 9 and 10 Tigers spent a late-November Saturday building a Salvation Army Toy Mountain. Gifts for children in need were piled high, each with a handwritten message from a Ridleian. Meanwhile, Grade 11 students participated in our fourth annual Helping Hands Project. This initiative challenges students to work together to assemble prosthetic hands, which are then sent to children in developing countries who have lost limbs to land mines. In a similar vein, students found other creative ways to support from afar. Each year, a group of Ridleians travels halfway around the world to visit the Jacaranda Foundation and School in Malawi. Due to the pandemic, the 2020 trip was cancelled, but our students participated in the highly entertaining #JerusalemChallenge. This video was stitched together featuring dancers from around the globe and shown at the Jacaranda Foundation Virtual Gala on November 15th.


Going Green Our student-led Green Tigers Club has been hard at work educating their peers on small actions they can take to help the environment. Their latest initiative has been focused on reducing the amount of waste by encouraging students to recycle or compost when possible. Prior to this new initiative, Chartwells would dispose of roughly 12 bags of garbage after lunch each day. The result: a whopping 95 per cent decrease in garbage—now reduced to a half bag of waste, seven bags of compostable material and one-and-a-half bags of recycling. Meanwhile, Lower School learners have been working hard to sort their waste into appropriate bins, while Upper School participated in Bring Your Own Bottle Day on December 11th, which encouraged students to refill reusable bottles instead of choosing single use.

Postcards for Peace This November, students safely delivered 150 Postcards for Peace to local veterans at senior homes and churches throughout the Niagara Region—just one of the ways Ridleians expressed their gratitude for the brave men and women who fought for our freedom.

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COVID-19 RELIEF FUND RESULTS $102,000

In response to the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had globally, and within our Ridley community, the COVID-19 Relief Fund was initiated to support incoming and returning students with temporary financial assistance in the 2020-21 school year. Both the Ridley College Foundation and the Ridley College Fund USA Inc. provided $125,000 for a total of $250,000 to further support this important and worthwhile fundraising initiative.

Donations to COVID-19 Relief Fund

$125,000 Ridley College Foundation CDN

$125,000 Ridley College Fund USA Inc.

$352,000 Total Raised

$102,000 Raised through donations

$250,000 In matching gifts

65 Donors

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Students helped to date


B

2020–21 OPPORTUNITIES TO SUPPORT RIDLEIANS:

GOAL $30

0 K

TRANSFORMING TOMORROWS, TODAY

Scholarships & Bursaries

R

GOAL $10

0 K

Flourish Fund

HELP TURN

potential

GOAL $10

0

K

INTO

possible

Student Experience Fund

GOAL $10

0

K

The Ridleian Fund identifies projects and areas of need on campus which will have the largest impact on our students—today and into the future. Your generous gift secures Ridley’s lasting legacy and ensures we can continue to provide future generations with a worldclass education. This year, we are offering four opportunities to support our school.

Headmaster’s Fund

DONATE TODAY ridleycollege.com/give LEARN MORE development@ridleycollege.com TIGER | SPRING 2021

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alumni work @ Keeping active, playing sports and being part of a team can go a long way to becoming a healthy, well-rounded citizen. At Ridley, this is a core part of our curriculum: our students have plenty of opportunities to try something new and get better at what they love—and have fun while they do it! Some will go on to high-level competition or become professional athletes. Others will find ways to bring sport to their own communities. Still more will keep being active front and centre for a lifetime, as a way to keep both mind and body in tiptop shape. But regardless of where life takes them, the traits which sport brings out in our students—such as leadership, work ethic, sportsmanship, and resilience—stay with them long after they leave the field. And the proof is in their stories. We spoke with rower and marathon runner, Jim Butterfield ’70, who’s finding ways to give back in his home of Bermuda; Olympic triathlete, Sam McGlone ’97, now a doctor working on the frontlines of a global pandemic; and Jamie Massie ’76, whose passion for hockey has changed the city of Barrie—and, arguably, the OHL at large. For these alumni, the skills they learned—whether on the water, the track, or the ice—led to their success as both athletes and professionals. So, settle in, put on your favourite workout playlist and turn the page to read their inspiring stories.

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ATHLETICS FEATURE TIGER | SPRING 2021

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GOING THE

Distance Raised on rowing by Ridley’s best, Jim Butterfield ’70 knows how sport can inspire, support and bring people together. Now, the Bermudian businessman shares how he keeps moving forward—and is giving back to his community.

Jim Butterfield was on the soccer field when Coach Mark Gallop came up and asked if he knew how to row. “I’d only seen rowing in the movies,” Jim remembers. “I knew how to row a dingy; I knew how to row a punt—I had no idea he was talking about something that was 63-feet long. But I fell in love with it right away.” Until Mark came to Ridley, rowing hadn’t been taken all that seriously. The Englishman had arrived just two years prior and had been busy overhauling the school’s rowing programme. Having rowed at both Hampton School and Cambridge University, Mark knew exactly what a competitive rowing programme entailed. “The guys would get on a bus and go into Port Dalhousie. One group would go off and have some cigarettes and the others would row, and then they’d switch off,” Jim explains. “Then Mark came in and said, ‘The bus is being sold. If you want to row, you’ll need to buy a bicycle and you’ll need to ride down to the rowing shed and ride back. And don’t be late for dinner.’ Suddenly rowing was demanding.” As part of his vision, Mark recruited local Olympic oarsman, Neil Campbell ‘51 who, at the time, was living in nearby Vineland. “You’re a Ridley boy,” Mark entreated the athlete. “We’ve got rowing now. Would you come and coach us?” The rest, as they say, is history. Between Mark and Neil, what had once been a casual pastime soon became a big deal on campus, a challenging sport to which students aspired.

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And Jim quickly became one of them. He had come to Ridley in 1962 when he was just 12 years-old, fresh from Hamilton, Bermuda and following his older brother, George ’57. Jim’s brother, Tom, who was just slightly older than he, was sent to St. Andrew’s College—there was room for only one new Butterfield at Ridley that year, and their parents decided that Jim would benefit from having George nearby. “I wrote six letters home that first week,” Jim laughs, looking back. “It was a bit shocking and I couldn’t just jump on a train and head back to Oakville or Toronto; I was homesick.” But Jim soon settled into school, making friends and exploring the athletic opportunities he hadn’t had back home. And he was careful to heed George’s advice. “You’re from Bermuda—they’re going to want to put you in the pool,” George warned. “Don’t get in that pool! Take up ice hockey.” So, Jim tried it all, from soccer to cross country to track and field—politely passing on cricket and football—and, as his brother had suggested, hitting the ice. “I loved ice hockey,” he smiles. “We used to break into the rink at two or three o’clock in the morning and skate until the night watchman kicked us out and sent us back to bed.” But when he got to Upper School and started rowing, the sport took over. “We accomplished a lot—and would have died on our swords for Neil Campbell,” Jim remembers


alumni @ work

- Louis Riel

Jim served on Ridley’s Board of Governors for 10 years and was active in the Bermuda community, fundraising, working to connect and rally Ridleians for the alumni meeting each year and organizing accommodations for the school’s visits to Bermuda.

fondly, then the smallest of Ridley’s heavy eight at fivefoot-ten. “He was an amazing coach and mentor, an idol for most of us. He would get out of the coach boat and into the heavy eight with us; he’d train with our crew after training with his own Olympic squad, then would show up perspiring in his track suit and say, ‘Ok, let’s get started.’” Theirs was the first crew to go to Washington, D.C., the first to go to The Royal Henley. Each meet was a success—and their competitors were taking notice. Soon, Ridley became a powerful player in the high school rowing arena, their oarsmen the ones to look out for. Jim went on to win the Neil Campbell Oarsman of the Year. After Prize Day, Jim enrolled in Business Administration at Boston’s Northeastern University, a school known for its strong rowing programme. He ended up rowing in a single, due to his height, and became friends with classmate, Jim Dietz, who was the number one U.S. oarsman at the time. “He became a bit of a coach and mentor,” recounts Jim. “I would just do what he told me to do. We rowed together prior to Munich and he said, ‘Jim, I’m trying to get to the finals’—so I knew where I was going to end up.”

Jim represented Bermuda in the Men’s Single Sculls at the Munich Olympics in 1972—the only Bermudian ever to do so. That same season, he’d casually ‘popped in’ to run the Boston Marathon, showing up without any training or even a registration number. Because he was in such great shape, he ran the race in an impressive three hours, then spent the afternoon training and rowing. “When I got back to my apartment that evening, I called Ted Pilgrim, Ridley’s headmaster,” Jim shares. “He’d once told us these stories from when he’d ran the Boston Marathon and it had struck me as something that would be cool to do one day. That always stayed with me.” When Jim returned to Bermuda, its windy weather and big tides soon made it clear that it wasn’t a place to row. Recognizing he’d need to pivot, Jim sent his rowing shell back to Boston and took up cycling, hoping to qualify for the Olympics in Montreal. However, during a rather disappointing trial in North Carolina, he realized that, without a team, he didn’t have a prayer. “I was an individual in a team sport,” he shrugs. “It wasn’t going to happen.”

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It was then that Jim took up running seriously, training for marathons with his wife, Debbie—who’s an athletic powerhouse in her own right. Back when Debbie had first announced she was going to take up marathon running, they’d laughed. But, inspired by the runners she’d seen in Boston, she soon proved her doubters wrong, training every morning before work. She would go on to place fourth in the 1985 Boston Marathon and participated in the U.S. Olympic trials. Debbie has since run many impressive races and has become an inspirational figure in distance running, helping to bring women into the sport. It was 1976 when the pair moved back to Bermuda; they enjoyed road running as a couple and understood the sacrifices required to excel. An early morning or late for dinner was easily forgiven, as each pushed themselves to get their miles in for the day. However, their training was proving to push cultural boundaries as well. Bermuda is a friendly, yet conservative place, with a history of slavery and segregation of which its citizens are mindful. In the late seventies, sport was still quite segregated—soccer and cricket were for black athletes and fans, while sailing was for the white population. Road running was one of the ways this divide was bridged, and today sports in Bermuda are very much integrated. Jim and Debbie earned spots on the board of the Bermuda Track & Field Association and the Butterfields soon became synonymous with running; they were among a group that started the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Club. In the years that followed, Jim ran the Boston, Deluth, New York and London marathons, and competed at the Commonwealth Games.

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As back trouble forced him to incorporate more swimming and cycling into his routine, Jim brought triathlon to Bermuda; he was organizing races as far back as 1979. In 1981, Jim finished the Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon in seventh place. In 1999, when Jim turned 50, he cycled 100 miles a day from Irvine, California to Boston, Massachusetts to raise money for P.A.L.S., a cancer care centre in Bermuda. It took him 30 days. Seven years later, he was inducted into the Bermuda Sports Hall of Fame. That passion for sports runs in the family: his wife, daughter-in-law, and niece have all competed on the international sports stage, and Jim’s sons are both highly athletic. 38-year-old Tyler is based in Colorado and is a professional triathlete, finishing seventh and then fifth in Hawaii. Spencer, now 40, competes in triathlons in his downtime, and heliskis, wakeboards, and surfs. Since Jim’s semi-retirement in 2018, Spencer runs Butterfield & Vallis, the family’s fourth-generation food import business. The company was founded in 1918 by Jim’s grandfather, H. St. George Butterfield. For Jim, who has worked there for more than forty years, stepping back has offered him the perfect opportunity to focus on philanthropic endeavours. It seems that generosity also runs in the family—and Jim comes by it honestly. His grandfather awarded scholarships to four different schools in Bermuda as early as the 1930s. It’s clear Jim’s service and contributions mean a lot to those around him. He’s widely recognized as a generous leader in the community, who works to improve the social, economic and environmental conditions of


As I’ve gotten older, it feels good to be able to give back, to participate. I look at those Houses—Merritt House and Gooderham House—and I think about those Old Ridleians who gave to the bricks and mortar so that people like us could attend Ridley College, could create those great memories, those great friendships. his country. He was honoured by the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2015. Jim is modest when speaking about it, however. In a small place like Bermuda, he reasons, it’s easy to see where the need is, and it’s often simple to resolve—whether that means replacing the church’s appliances so they can feed those who need a little help, or rebuilding the living conditions at the Salvation Army—a project Jim completed with fellow Ridleian, Kirk Kitson ’58. Jim is also on the board of the Sloop Foundation, a cause close to his heart that sends at-risk youth out to sea for a week on board a hundred-foot ‘floating classroom.’

Speaking with this Old Ridleian, it’s clear how sport can serve one’s life in so many positive ways: breaking down barriers, bridging communities and bringing a family closer together. And, as time goes on and goals change, the athlete’s journey might shift, might even go from land to sea and back again—but that demand for excellence, that drive to meet a challenge, never does quite fade. “Our football coach, Reverend Hunt, used to say to us, ‘Keep your head up and keep your feet going,’” Jim says goodnaturedly, as we finish our conversation. It’s a beautiful sunny day in Bermuda, and he’s heading out for a bike ride around the island. “It was good advice.”

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RIGHT ON

Track

Sam McGlone ’97 has always loved a good challenge—the secret is to keep one step ahead. The retired triathlete shares her experiences at Ridley, what’s keeping her running these days, and the conversation she wishes more young athletes would have.

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These days, Sam McGlone is taking life in stride, albeit at a quick pace. The Olympic triathlete may have retired from competition, but as an emergency physician with two little ones at home, Sam has more than enough to keep her running—and, in case you were wondering, she’s still as active as ever. The San Diego-based doctor just started working at Sharp Memorial hospital, following residency at the University of California. Her husband, Brent, is an emergency physician as well, and the two have a fiveyear-old son, Cole, and a daughter, Alex, who’s three. “It’s a little hectic,” she says cheerfully, but she’s clearly enjoying every minute. “The kids are high-energy, funny, active—they’re everything you’d imagine.” They come by it honestly. Their parents met through triathlon; Brent was an elite athlete and swim coach, who, like Sam, transitioned to medicine later on. As we speak, it doesn’t take long for the elephant in the room to be addressed: Sam is working as a doctor in the midst of a global pandemic, and she is at turns empathetic and frustrated. “It wears on you,” she admits. “Everyone’s got this fatigue because it’s been going on so long—but as a health care worker I’ve seen the numbers

rise. People are coming in sicker and you know a lot of it is preventable.” She pauses. “But I’m also sensitive to the fact that people are over this and just want to see their families. They’re not ready to make those sacrifices indefinitely.” The upshot of California living, however, is that their family can be outdoors year-round, whether that means being active, taking a break, or socializing safely outside. The seasonal perks of San Diego are, admittedly, quite different from St. Catharines, where Sam and her sister, Karen ’95 grew up, right near Ridley, where they attended Upper School. “My parents always felt education was a priority, so when it came to high school, we started looking at different options,” she remembers. “Ridley immediately stood out because of the breadth of opportunity there. To have that in your own backyard and be able to go as a day student was amazing. We loved our time there.” From dabbling in music and theatre, to exploring new sports and writing for the school newspaper, Sam enjoyed the diversity she found on campus. She rode horses, was a harrier, joined the swim team, was on the First Girls hockey team for a time, and was the 1993

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Midget Girls Cross Country Run winner, earning a Tiger Tie for her athletic achievements. “When your kids are young, you think about putting them into one sport or another, but I’d encourage them to try a variety,” she offers, thinking of her own sport-loving little ones. “In your late teens and twenties, you’ll need to focus in order to get to a high level. But there’s a lot of time before that needs to happen, and you’re asking for burnout if you specialize too early.” It was Ridley’s cross-country coach, Maggie Swan who first encouraged the 14-year-old to look into triathlon. “She said it was a great way to stay in shape during summers for the track and crosscountry seasons,” Sam recalls. “So, I borrowed a wet suit and a bike and did the Grimsby Triathlon. I don’t think I did terribly well that first one, but it was challenging and a lot of fun. I decided, ‘I want to get better at this.’” In the summers that followed, Sam participated in races across Ontario, but it was her training with a team in Australia that really helped up her game. “Australia has strong teams and training programmes,” she explains, having gone for a gap year after high school,“and I took a big jump up in my level. When I came back to Canada, I made the Junior National Team, and that launched me to international competitions.” From there, she was, quite literally, off and running. Having always intended to go to medical school, Sam moved to Quebec to study kinesiology at McGill University and trained with a club while she completed her degree. When she was presented with the opportunity to make Team Canada, Sam decided to postpone med school to see where her talents could take her. She knew there was only so long she’d be able to compete in a tough endurance sport like hers, and the opportunity was too good to pass up. After graduating from McGill in 2002, she moved to the Canadian Training Centre in Victoria, B.C. It was a smart gamble which led to a successful 10-year career as a professional triathlete. Sam raced in the International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Cup Series, won the Canadian National Triathlon championship in 2004 and 2005, and represented Canada at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

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“It was the highlight of my life,” she remembers of her time in Athens, that first call to her mom back home drowned out by the cheers in the stadium. “In terms of the race itself, it was like any other: the format’s the same, the officials, the competitors—and in some ways, that was reassuring. But everything surrounding the Games was so much bigger than anything I’d ever seen. Triathlon is one of the smaller sports, so we don’t get a lot of mainstream publicity. We’re not used to the crowds. Walking into the stadium for the opening ceremonies where there were 80,000 people and media and cameras flashing was just on a different scale.” Shortly thereafter, Sam transitioned to competing in Ironman races and won gold at the 2006 World Championships—she’s the only Canadian to ever win. “Canadians have a long line of pretty incredible triathletes,” she says proudly. “Because of the size and climate of our country, we produce some impressive results. There have been some amazing women who have come before and after me.” Sam would go on to finish second at the 2007 Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii and took home the Ironman title in Arizona in 2009. And, along the way, she wrote, contributing a monthly column to Triathlete magazine where she tackled questions on training, racing and lifestyle. For Sam, it was a great way to communicate with the pre-Twitter triathlon population, in a time before social media was what it is today. Days were tough but satisfying for the young athlete, on a perpetual loop of eat-train-sleep-recover. A solid race performance was her reward. “At the time, you’re not striving for balance,” she recalls, though that’s admittedly changed over the years. “You need to have that singular focus. You might train 30 to 40 hours a week, but then there’s another 20 that’s dedicated to recovery so you can do your next session—stretching and sleeping and nutrition and massage and physical therapy and lifting weights. It’s the difference between those who do triathlon recreationally and those in the professional ranks; all those peripheral things that give you that extra edge.”


My parents always felt education was a high priority and when we started looking at options for high school, Ridley stood out because of the sheer breadth of opportunity there. To have that right in our own back yard and be able to attend as a day student was amazing.

Despite the challenging work, spending her twenties racing and in training camps was an opportunity to travel and make friends with athletes from around the world. “I was 22 when I started full time, 24 when I competed at the Olympics,” she explains. “And you may miss out on some social aspects of day-to-day life, but I never regretted it. I went to Australia and Thailand and Japan and all over Europe—and you can’t do this forever. You have to retire at some point.” The topic of retirement warrants more serious attention, Sam posits, and is part of ongoing conversations around mental health. For many athletes, the focus is on performance, their identity bound up in their sport, their confidence contingent upon their success. When the time comes to transition out, many feel aimless. “It’s hard to think there will be an end to a sports career,” she says simply. “But of course, there will be an end. Most of us retire in our thirties, which is still young. So, we have these athletes who have dedicated their lives to this one thing, becoming respected experts in their field. Suddenly they’re starting from scratch somewhere else. It’s very emotional.” Sam completed her final race, the 2012 Antwerp 70.3, just ten days before becoming a first-year med student at the University of Arizona. “I deliberately chose something allencompassing to throw myself into,” she shares. She’d always known she’d go to med school and the time it would take to complete that, in large

measure, dictated when she left competition. “Some people need more closure and time to transition, but I chose a quick turnaround so there wasn’t a lot of time to soul search and lament the loss. There was this immediate new identity that was just as exciting and full of potential.” In many ways, med school was as time consuming and competitive as triathlon ever was, and with a welllaid out path ahead of her, she was able to improve and track her gains in a similar fashion. The same grit, mental focus, and determination Sam used for competition, was now channelled into a new vocation. “I think emergency medicine tracks a lot of athletes,” she muses. “Triathletes, especially. We’re the jack of all trades: we’re never going to be the best in swimming, or biking, or running—but we’re good at doing all three. In emergency medicine, we’re not the best in any one specialty, but we know enough about everyone’s specialty to identify and treat emergencies. In some ways, it’s very comparable to the triathlon mindset.” As for the physical adjustment, the decreased physical activity was a bit of a shock. She eased herself out of the heavy, training-focused weeks and into a more sustainable lifestyle, enjoying the opportunity to explore new sports and return to others. These days, Sam goes on ski trips in the winter, paddle boards and mountain bikes and runs along the beach. Regardless of the hustle and bustle of day-to-day life, Sam and Brent make certain the other has that time to unwind and decompress. What’s clear from this Ridleian and Athlete of Distinction is her dedication to life-long personal development. Sam has always set the course, tracked a pace set by her own watch, and persevered on the uphill. These days, the path is more about balance, as she raises a young family and tends to those within her care—but that drive, that gold-standard mindset, hasn’t changed one bit.


Community CENTRE

“Decide early on: are you a giver or a taker?” It’s the advice that has always carried him, both as an athlete and in business. Now, hockey enthusiast, Jamie Massie ’76 shares how he has helped grow the city of Barrie—and helped raise a new generation of leaders.

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In 2015, Jamie lead a group of 75 community leaders to patriate sacred soil symbolically representing the blood of the wounded soldiers at Vimy, France. For the first time in Canadian history, soil was collected from the various battlefields and ceremoniously placed in the urn. Jamie and his family gathered soil from the spot where his own grandfather had lain bleeding so many years before.

On the ice, he may have played defence, but when it comes to his city, Jamie Massie ’76 is definitely at the centre. The businessman and long-time hockey player moved to Barrie a year after graduation from Northwood University, intrigued by an opportunity to acquire Barrie’s General Motors dealership and advance the community for which he'd grown an affection since childhood. When Jamie moved to the city in 1981, it had a population of just over 25,000 people. Today, Barrie is booming, boasting 160,000 residents and on track to reach over a quarter of a million in the next 15 years. Thanks to Jamie’s leadership, Georgian Chevrolet has prospered right along with the city and has since gone on to become one of the top five Chevrolet dealerships in Canada. Jamie still lives in Barrie with his wife, Wendy and their sons, Andrew, James, Jeffrey, and Alex. The three eldest work with their father at Georgian International, a company which grew out of the businesses Jamie took on over the years and is widely recognized as one of Simcoe County’s most influential. Today, it’s a leader in the automotive industry and a dominant real estate investor in residential and commercial land opportunities. Amongst other points of pride—including being an instrumental part of the local hospital, airport, library,

and more—Jamie helped found the Automotive Business School of Canada at Georgian College, of which Jamie sat on the Board for many years. Many of the friendships Jamie made on campus at Ridley he maintains to this day. He still works alongside good friends Ward Seymour ’74 and Dave Bunston ’76. He met Dave during childhood summers on Lake Simcoe more than 50 years ago. “We played hockey together at Ridley. Dave never passed the puck,” Jamie laughs goodnaturedly. “He always said if he passed to me, I never passed it back.” Georgian’s most recent project, a sprawling golf club in close proximity to one of their developments, was purchased in 2017 and has since undergone substantial improvements. The Braestone Club is now home to a new club house and a restaurant called ‘The KTCHN,’ a high-quality build which blends with the land from which it emerges. Its atmosphere is timeless and serene and, for Jamie, it’s more than a business; it’s a place he wants to be. Chatting with the friendly alumni this past fall, Jamie is clearly whip-smart when it comes to his business endeavours, but he’s comfortably casual about them, too, and his care for those in his community is genuine. To put it simply: business that does good, makes good sense.

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Find things to work at that enhance your life. Don’t work for the sake of a dollar; work to make your life…your life. “I left Ridley with the belief that you could be a giver or a taker in this world,” Jamie explains, quick to credit his time at the school with his service mindset. “So, we look at the bigger picture, and invest in things which improve quality of life for our family, for the people we work with, and the community at large—over the years, I’ve found that if you give to your community, the community gives right back to you.”

As it turned out, there were some fantastic players on the Colts—John Madden would go on to win three Stanley Cups—and when the team won the Sutherland Cup that first season, the new owners were motivated to do more. “We thought, Barrie’s a hockey town. We can do this,” Jamie remembers. “It had an OHL team in the 1950s, so the question was, what can we do to bring an OHL team here now?”

If you knew Jamie at Ridley, you’d remember that he’s a hockey lover through and through—he started playing when he was just four—and his passion has followedhim throughout his life. “Ridley was ideal for someone who loved sports and hockey like I did,” Jamie remembers of his time in Upper School, citing mentors like hockey coach, Keith Mawhinney, Bill Montgomery and David Mackey.

They approached City Council with the idea and found the answer was a bit tricky: Barrie would need an arena to host a team, but they’d first need a team to argue for a new arena. So, they worked with the Ontario Hockey League and the City of Barrie to accomplish both. Soon, they were researching and finding creative ways to fund a new arena.

For Jamie, the traits formed through a lifetime of hockey—qualities like leadership, sportsmanship, competition, and being a good teammate— have served him well beyond the rink. And, when the opportunity presented itself, he worked to ensure others could have that same advantage. In 1991, when he and his friends learned that the local Jr. B Colts were going to forfeit their season due to a lack of funding, the three former players were determined to help. They stepped up and paid off the team’s debts—and found themselves the new owners of Barrie’s junior hockey team. 50

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The project resulted in the Barrie Molson Centre (BMC), which was the first junior franchise in Canada to introduce private suites, a club seat programme, a restaurant at ice level, multiple entertainment venues, and a permit to sell liquor at games. “Our overarching idea was that it wouldn’t be just for hockey fans,” Jamie reasons. “This would be for the community at large, so that families could come together to support their junior team.” “The community loved it,” he says, looking back. “We sold out suites in the first 48 hours they were on sale and had 800 club seat holders in the first month. The support from the community paid for [the arena] within its first


A life-size bronze WWI bugler stands six-foot tall on a five-foot high black granite base. He faces east, calling to those who were lost on the battlefields of Europe. In 2018, on the 100th anniversary of the war’s end, Jamie and his family returned to Vimy with a delegation and placed an identical bugler facing west. This statue stands in the shadow of Walter Allward’s monument and calls to Canadians to remember their sacrifice.

ten years, and the children of Barrie grew up seeing these local idols who became more important to them than the NHL players.” Since its build, the cities of London, Kingston, Mississauga, and St. Catharines have all built arenas based off a similar model—the BMC venue has changed the OHL and CHL landscape.

had sacrificed so much in the Great War, it was an incredible honour, and he took his new responsibilities seriously. For the hundred-year anniversary of the base, he spearheaded the creation of a monument in honour of the million-and-a-half soldiers who had served Canada and trained at Borden over the century.

As time went on, many of Barrie’s players graduated to the NHL and a number now boast Stanley Cup rings. But Jamie used the sport platform to not only give kids the chance to play, but as an opportunity to teach them about service. “Inherent in our philosophy was that it would result in people giving back to their communities,” he says simply. “So, we taught our players to grow, to take on leadership roles. We believed that our responsibility wasn’t just to develop great hockey players, but to inspire amazing human beings.”

The initiative resulted in The Borden Legacy Monument, which was unveiled June 9th, 2016 by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Hon. Col. Jamie Massie. The Legacy Monument stands at the entrance to Canadian Forces Base Borden; inscribed upon it are the words, “Through these gates the sons and daughters of a grateful nation pass, serving Canada with honour, duty and courage, so all may live with freedom, democracy and justice.” It was an effort of great significance that shows what matters to Jamie most: family, history, community, and resilience.

In 2007, Jamie sold the team. He’d watched his four boys grow up at the arena and knew it was time for someone else to take over. But to this day, some of his fondest memories were from those years with the Colts. “My favourite was in 1999,” he recalls. “We’d had five NHL first round draft picks on that team, and those five players—I remember each of them—were out playing hockey with my four sons on my backyard rink”.

It’s a service-oriented mindset that has always been key to his success and it’s still fueling him decades later. For those just starting out? “Decide early to be a giver,” he advises. “Look at the bigger picture, ask how can I help move the world forward? Then run hard. Push yourself. Get out in front of your peers and be that contributor who builds your life early. You’ll find society will help push you along the rest of the way.”

Two years later his career meandered again when Canada’s Minister of Defence, Peter McKay appointed Jamie Honorary Colonel of Canadian Forces Base Borden—a role dating back 300 years in military history and intended to build a strong esprit de corps among the community and the base. For Jamie, whose grandfather

As our conversation concludes, Jamie offers one final tidbit for Ridleians—and they’re words to live by. “Find things to work at that enhance your life,” he suggests simply. “Don’t just work for the sake of a dollar—work to make your life…your life.”

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PATHWAY TO POST-SECONDARY SPORT USports - 72 NCAA - 55 Junior Hockey - 41

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A spotlight on only some of our recent graduates BASKETBALL

HOCKEY

Jaden Bediako '19

Ryan Mahshie '17

Santa Clara University NCAA DI Undeclared

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute NCAA DI Business & Management

Noah Wharton '19 University of Calgary USports Science

Malcolm Bailey '19 Colgate University NCAA DI Undeclared

Charlie Levesque '15 UMass Lowell NCAA DI Chemistry

Catherine Foulem '20 Boston University NCAA DI Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

ROWING

Shailynn Snow '19

Ashley Van Roon '17

St. Lawrence University NCAA DI N/A

University of Tennessee NCAA DI N/A

Gabrielle Cook '20 University of Tulsa NCAA DI Arts & Science

Seth Moyer '18 Yale University NCAA DI N/A

Nolan Biscaro '19 University of Pennsylvania NCAA DI N/A

Summer Rae Dobson '17 Mercyhurst University NCAA DI Sports Business Management

RUGBY

Victoria DabanovichO’Mahony '18 Ireland’s Women’s National Team Royal College of Surgeon – Medicine

SOCCER

Tatenda Mafa '20 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology NCAA DIII Biomedical Engineering

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SPREAD THE WORD Our most effective means of attracting prospective families to Ridley College continues to be WORD OF MOUTH. We’re calling on alumni to actively promote your alma mater to those who would benefit from Ridley’s exceptional educational experience. Contact development@ridleycollege.com to learn how you could become an alumni ambassador. ridleycollege.com/admissions

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1950s

CLASS NOTES WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Share a few short words with your fellow Old Ridleians about important milestones, career moves, or philanthropic endeavours. Please include your full name and the year you graduated from Ridley.

Ian Wood ’53 and his wife, Barbara would like to share that they hosted a family reunion at the Club Med in Bintan, Indonesia in January 2020. Members of the extended family arrived from Canada, the U.S., Australia, South Africa, and Hong Kong.

1960s Jamie Doolittle ’67 has been elected President of Probus Canada, a 40,000-member association which provides fellowship, friendship and fun to men and women in their retirement and semi-retirement years. Irwin Toy has been making children’s games for nearly 100 years, but after CEO, George Irwin ’69 and his wife, Brenda Elliot contracted COVID-19 in March, the Canadian company decided to expand. Wanting to ensure frontline workers had access to locally sourced PPE, the couple launched Trebor Rx—a company that produces and sells Canadian masks, respirators and face shields.

1970s Dr. James Drake ’70 has been appointed to The Order of Canada for his leadership in the field of pediatric neurosurgery and for his contributions to the treatment of complex childhood disorders.

High resolution images (300dpi, 2MB minimum) are welcome to accompany your Class Note. SEND TO: development@ridleycollege.com

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Ridleians should be proud to know that the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, led by Sir John Bell ‘71, was approved for use in the U.K. on December 30th, 2020. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has hailed this latest breakthrough as a “triumph” for British science. The Edmonton-born immunologist and geneticist has championed the development of this COVID-19 vaccine, and was the first to provide an optimistic outlook in a media interview back in November.


As the owner of Crown Verity in Brantford, seller of stainless steel barbecues, Bill Verity ’71 adapted to the impact of COVID-19 by diverting part of his operation to the sale of hand-washing stations—and the demand has kept his crew busy and provided a much-needed revenue stream. This past summer, Bill donated two of these stations to Ridley to assist our school in facilitating a safe environment. Father of Keir ’13 and Colin ’11, Dr. Fraser MacKay ‘73—a doctor in emergency and addiction medicine and co-owner of Niagara’s Segue Clinics—has recently collaborated with Community Addiction Services Niagara (CASON) and Boggio’s Pharmacy to expand services westward into Beamsville, Grimsby and Smithville. “The time and travel burden required to attend services in larger centres is the most common reason for discontinuing a programme,” he explains. Archdeacon Michael Patterson ’74 has been appointed Archdeacon of Leadership for the Niagara Diocese, on a half-time basis, as of February 1, 2020. The position will help support and inspire the current and future leaders of the Diocese of Niagara. He will remain rector of Oakville’s Church of the Incarnation on a half-time basis.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has named Michael Sabia ’72 as Canada’s next Deputy Minister of Finance, having often relied on him for policy advice throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Michael will be a central part of the government’s financial decision making as it prepares for a substantial package of stimulus measures over the next three years.

One of Bill Jackson’s ‘77 U.S. businesses sells the deep freeze equipment that have become a necessity for the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine—which requires that the vaccine be kept at extremely cold temperatures. We think it’s safe to say Bill’s team will be very busy for quite some time.

1980s In honour of Joe, Anita and their daughter, Laura Robertson ’11; Andrew McPherson ’81 and Jane Lewis ’90 hosted Home for the Holidays, a virtual sing-along inside the Memorial Chapel on December 6th. The holiday

fundraiser—in support of the TD Niagara Jazz Festival and the United Way’s Anita Project—featured festive favourites sung by musicians and choirs from near and far and included a few surprise cameos! Paul Moyer ’84 and his company, Clean Works made headlines once again, after a visit from Ontario Premier Doug Ford. The Beamsville-based company patented technology that sanitizes fruit—but discovered it disinfects personal protective equipment as well. They’ve begun sanitizing N95 masks, disposable masks and other PPE as a way to combat the spread of COVID-19. Samantha Peeris ‘85 was appointed to the bench earlier this year. Justice Peeris was called to the bar in 1994 and restricted her practice to criminal, quasi-criminal and regulatory law. She has been a sole practitioner since 2003, representing clients on a broad range of matters. From 2002 to 2016, Justice Peeris also served as an Alternate Chair of the Ontario Review Board at hearings for individuals found unfit to stand trial or not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder. Justice Peeris has volunteered as a tutor within the adult literacy programme at West Neighbourhood House since 2012. She has been assigned to the city of Toronto. Builder, Sunil Bahadoorsingh ’88 was part of a unique development plan to deliver affordable housing to the Niagara Region. His company, Penn Terra, built the Bethlehem Housing and Support Services’ new residential building in downtown St. Catharines. The new development will help provide modern, comfortable accommodations and on-site support services for residents in need. David Hunt ’88 has been named Student Success Centre Director for Calgary’s West Island College. After four years at Bishop’s College School and six at Toronto French School, he looks forward to the opportunity to coordinate and grow student support services at a CAIS school out west.

1990s Founder of Hippie Snacks, Ian Walker ’90 is looking to dominate the snack aisle. His company was recently featured at the inaugural Food Entrepreneur Expo, an interactive tasting event which showcases emerging brands and trends for retail buyers, marketers, product developers, ingredient suppliers, and founders. Hippie Snacks makes minimally processed crisps featuring almonds, avocados, or cauliflower as the star ingredient.

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CLASS NOTES CONTINUED President and CEO of Indy Eleven Professional Soccer, Greg Stremlaw ’90 has been named one of the Top 20 Most Dynamic CEOs for 2020 by The CEO Magazine. Greg is highly respected in the international sports world and is helping lead the new Eleven Park development project in Indianapolis, Indiana. Back in April, Megalomaniac winery owners, John Howard and daughter, Erin Mitchell ’90 released Much Obliged, a new wine that honours frontline workers and supports Food Banks Canada. Why not sip for yourself? Much Obliged is available online and in LCBO stores across Ontario. In a virtual ceremony held on May 28, Adam Lampman ’99 was named as one of Niagara’s 40 Under 40 for 2020.

2000s Diana Bentley ’03 and her husband, Ted Dykstra have won a Dora Mavor Moore Award, which celebrates excellence in Toronto theatre, dance and opera. The pair are the artistic directors (“Chief Engineers”) of the Coal Mine Theatre. Marjorie Prime won three Doras—including Outstanding Production—in the Independent Theatre Division. Adrian Pennechetti ’05 is a recent recipient of the 50 Faces of Lincoln for his work adding a bike pump track to Lincoln. And it looks like impressive accolades run in the family: Len, Adrian’s father—and co-founder of Cave Springs Vineyard—has been awarded the Order of Canada by the Governor General, for his key role in developing Ontario’s wine industry and for fostering tourism in the Niagara region. Bassmaker Audio, launched by Stewart Orr ’07, has been steadily growing in popularity. Ridley-branded customized stereos have now been offered to Ridleians, with part of the proceeds going back to the school. Thank you to Stewart for his generosity in donating a portion of sales back to Ridley. Heddle Shipyards, headed by Shaun Padulo ’07, has partnered with Vancouver-based shipyard Seaspan to make components for their ships. According to the provincial government, the joint agreement will bring new jobs and generate tens of millions of dollars in economic activity. Shaun is a new member of Ridley’s Finance and Human Resources Committee (FAHR).

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2010s Louis-Matheiu Belisle ’10 is entering his seventh year of professional hockey since graduating from Middlebury College in 2014. His last four seasons, he has played in France—this past year with the Bordeaux Boxers. The previous two, he was with the Amiens Gothiques, who won the French Cup both years in the top league in France. When alumni, Blake Sherk ‘11 and Ben Gigone ‘12 were in lockdown, they put their time to good use, creating a prototype of their new game, You Don’t Know Me and launching it on Kickstarter. In an age when we crave connection, the game challenges friends and family to learn more about each other and share a few laughs along the way. After a history of rowing success, earning her Master’s degree and coaching in Louisville, Kentucky, Alison Whitty ’12 will be the new rowing coach at the University of Iowa. Jeremy Hutton ’10 and Marina Radovanovic ’14 are both in the Master of Management, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship programme at Queen’s University’s Smith School of Business. They will graduate in November 2021. Riley McCourt’s ’18 on-ice career is going strong. The hockey player has just signed a two-year contract with the American Hockey League’s Toronto Marlies. Brittany Ng ’18 has been selected as Vice President of Logistics at McGill Management’s student-run International Case Competition.


MARRIAGES Mike Whittle ‘64 and his wife celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at the church in Picton where they were married on Dec 19, 1970.

FACULTY & STAFF NOTES

Dr. Keir MacKay ’13 married Rylie Leete in Michigan on May 23, 2020.

BIRTHS Sarah and G. Scott Paterson ’82 welcomed their eighth child, Pheadora Ruby-Joan Eight to the family on May 16, 2020.

Ridley’s Digital Communications Coordinator, Mackenzie Fowler ’11 and her husband, Tom Schroeter were married in a beautiful ceremony at their home in Beamsville on August 29, 2020.

On August 29, 2020 in Vancouver, Tristram Waye ’88 and his wife, Larissa Beardmore welcomed their new son, Frederick Mackenzie Waye.

OBITUARIES George Gooderham ’42 On December 13, 2020 at 95 years of age. Cameron Lee Bennet ’53 On May 29, 2020 at the age of 87. Bill Bright ’58 On June 18, 2020 at the age of 82. Tom Richardson ’58 On January 22, 2020 at 80 years of age. Russ Jones ’61 On September 15, 2020 at the age of 79. Robin Thomson ’67 On July 25, 2020 at 72 years of age. Bruce McCarthy ’67 On at 73 years of age. Frederick ‘Trent’ Hodgson ’70 On July 31, 2020 at the age of 70. Christopher Adams ’80 On November 20, 2020. Jonathan Martin ’84 Died in 2020. Lily Nazar ’01 On May 27, 2020 at the age of 38. Marcos Flegmann ’08 On December 21 at the age of 30.

Merritt North’s Head of House, Zack Jones and his wife, Taylor welcomed their firstborn, Callie Cameron Jones, on January 4, 2020. Callie shares the same birthday as her daddy. After a courageous battle with cancer, Bobbie Filion passed away this fall, leaving behind her loving children, Cassidy ’18 and Carter ’15 and devoted husband, Paul ’86. Bobbie was a Head of House, dedicated volunteer, and a caring cheerleader for hundreds of students during her 13 years of service at our school. This winter, our community lost one of its valued members: for more than four decades, Mike Cvetanovic served Ridley as the friendly soccer referee and bus driver who everyone knew and loved, taking students all over for sporting events. Mike passed away on December 19th at 73 years of age. We were saddened to learn of the passing of former faculty member, Reverend William ‘Tim’ Sharpe, who died on August 20, 2020.

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The Evolution of Ridley’s Dress Code and School Uniform By Ella Foss ’16

As Ridley moves towards a new uniform design, Archives Intern and Queen’s University Concurrent Education student, Ella Foss ’16 takes a look back on the traditions, functionality, and design trends that have inspired more than a century of our school’s dress.

S

ince the establishment of Ridley, it has been clear that uniformity was an intentional way to create a sense of community, to place all students on an even playing field, and to foster a strong sense of belonging. The first headmaster, J.O. Miller was determined that, “Ridley College from opening day would be meticulous about the students’ school dress.” In staying true to Miller’s vision, a dress code has remained a constant, while changing with the times as Ridley itself has matured. To understand how the school has arrived at the uniform’s next update, we must first revisit the trends from decades past.

1889 to 1910s During the early years, when the packing list for boarders included “knickerbockers” and “pocket handkerchiefs,” a Ridley College cap with an embellished orange Ridley crest was issued to students for weekday wearing. At this time, the remaining garments of the dress code did not include the emblem, but promoted a 60

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professional style—the boys sported suits on school days, consisting of trousers, button-up shirt, tie, and blazer. Given the church services, Sundays in the late 1800s were even more formal; the boys wore black suit jackets and black waistcoats (suit vest). Images of the First Cricket Elevens decorate our ACTAs, with Ridleians sporting white blazers which would eventually inspire the Prefect blazers of more recent times. This nod to Ridley’s British roots dates back as early as 1900 and remained through to the last year of cricket in 2001. As early as 1919, the Second Cricket Team can be seen wearing the black blazers with orange piping, which would soon become part of the Lower School uniform.


ARCHIVES CORNER 1920s

worn with navy blue or grey knee socks made the heat and outdoor play more enjoyable.

Ridley’s British independent school roots were also evident in the boys’ post-war attire. “Eton collars were the bane of the Juniors’ existence…[they] found so many excuses to avoid wearing the collar that it amounted to passive rebellion.” Due to the perceived discomfort of the garment, older students were permitted to instead don Marlborough sack coats.

In 1971, a new disciplinary code was put into place, based upon several firm beliefs: “that the individual student must be given increasing responsibility for his decisions and his actions; that the order and efficiency of the School should be maintained with a minimum of oppressive interference upon a boy’s freedom; and that good discipline does not depend necessarily upon absolute conformity, nor does it mean that a student’s cherished individualism need be sacrificed.”

1950s to 1970s Twenty years later, “blues and greys” became the number one dress, to be worn on Sundays and for Chapel. As indicated in the ACTA of the era, “This term has seen the School emerging in new blue flannel blazers with an embroidered Ridley crest on the pocket.” At the same time, the Arts Tie was introduced, with thin, widely spaced orange and white stripes on a black background, still worn today by our thespians, musicians and artists, alike.

It must be said that Ridley’s long-standing Cadet programme has had significant influence over aspects of school dress. Our traditional military uniforms have progressed from army green to navy, khakis and maple leaf red.

At this time, the regular uniform of the Lower School students included the black blazer adorned with orange piping, a white, grey, or light blue dress shirt, the Lower School tie (orange, black and sliver) and either grey or black pants. Blues and greys were worn only on Sundays, with strictly grey, black or navy blue socks. Unbelievably, at the time, every clothing item had to be labelled with the student’s name, down to the individual sock! Perhaps the most casual shift in the first half of Ridley’s existence was the introduction of summer dress, which became an alternative option for the Lower School students during the warmer months. A golf shirt and grey or navy Bermuda shorts

While older students continued to wear a plain jacket or one with small checks, some of the students displayed their individuality in loud, colourful ties. It’s no surprise then that ‘Frau Day’ has its roots in this decade, when Merritt House student, Mark Josselyn ’76 “set about to make his own ‘fashion statement.’” Back then, he would be found wearing contrasting patterns, stripes and plaid, from his tie to shirt, to his jacket, pants and even socks. The term ‘Frau’ (Josselyn’s nickname) was used to “describe anyone messy, disheveled or dirty…” The students of Merritt House North can still be found marking Frau Day each year, a nod to Josselyn’s self-described “eye-sore” look. In fall 1973, Ridley welcomed female students for the first time. The dress code, previously written for all male students, was amended to state “or equivalent” for females. There really were no clear standards outlined for the young women: what was seen as within the rules varied between faculty members. For those first Ridley women and staff members alike, it was difficult to determine what fell within the rules. It was a time unprecedented in Canadian independent schools, and Headmaster Richard Bradley’s progressive decision to go co-ed meant Ridley had to chart new territory—including with its uniform.

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Students have always worked to show their individuality through the uniform and in this liberal era some students elected to wear three-piece suits, while others pushed the limits of “trousers” by wearing corduroy pants. Summer dress was only an option for the boys.

1980s By the 1980s, the majority of Ridleians abandoned the busy and bright ties and began sporting popularized thin monochrome versions. The College’s first cohort of girls could wear pants or a skirt/ dress which went below the knee with socks or nylons, and often displayed their individuality by way of their jewelry and hairstyle. It did, however, take some time for a female uniform to be formalized. At the end of the decade, Lower School updated its first official uniform policy. The black and white kilt, white button-up Oxford shirt or turtleneck, and black sweater or vest are cited as staples for the younger Ridleians. “Change is needed everywhere one goes, and luckily at Ridley, most things simply got better [with change]” – 1988 ACTA

1990s to 2000s During the 1990s, the Upper School female students continued to push the limits of the dress code wearing babydoll dresses, Mary Janes, and small hoop earrings (studs alone being permitted previously). Headmaster Doug Campbell, among others, sought to improve the standards of the students’ daily dress and resurfaced the discussions surrounding the dress code. The fruits of those ongoing debates came to fruition in 2000 when the Upper School gained its first official classroom uniform. By the 21st century, the daily classroom dress included grey or blue trousers, the blue plaid kilt, a white button up shirt, tie, and a blue or grey pull-over sweater or vest. Blues and greys remained the number one dress. With dwindling competitors in Ontario, 2001 marked the final year of cricket at Ridley, and by 2008, the white blazer with orange piping was reassigned as the Prefect blazers­—this distinctive addition complementing the existing Prefect Tie and an homage to Ridley’s history. 62

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ARCHIVES CORNER

2010s The last year of the white Prefect blazers was 2016; a new system of recognition was adopted the following year: piping along the lapel of the of Prefect (white) and House Captain blazer (respective house colour).

Fashion Forward Along with the changing times, Ridley has experienced many positive transformations, cementing its position as one of the top independent schools in Canada—the introduction of co-education, technology, younger grades, the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme, and positive education have been among the most notable. It’s no wonder then that our student attire has remained a strong marker of our connectedness. As we can garner from the evolution of Ridley’s dress code and uniform, every once in a while a refresh is necessary. In the coming year, our alma mater is planning for another redesign that nods to our storied past but serves the current era. A Uniform Committee, made up of students, faculty and staff, has been working to restyle the look and functionality of the uniform. In speaking with key members of this group, the update is said to be inspired by Ridley’s traditions and history— and we can’t wait to see future generations of students continue to proudly sport our insignia and that telltale vibrant pop of orange.

Special thanks is owed to interviewees: Ken Hutton, Trish Loat, Geoffrey Park ’80, Zack Jones, Gary Atack, Michele-Elise Burnett ’86, Janet Lewis, Wendy Darby ’99, Lance Postma, and Hanna Kidd. TIGER | SPRING 2021

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2019–2020

ANNUAL REPORT


FROM THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Dear Ridley Community, The 2019-20 school year started off with incredible optimism and strength. We celebrated our largest enrollment ever, with 698 students representing 61 nationalities from around the globe. Our students continue to flourish under the wonderful leadership of Headmaster Kidd and our dedicated faculty and staff. Early in 2020, however, our world faced an enormous challenge with COVID-19. Since that time, we have tested our resilience and our ability to respond to changing realities. But despite the challenges, our commitment to carry on has resulted in a great many achievements. Following the government mandated closure of our school in March, Ridley was quick to pivot and ensure that remote learning was accessible, manageable and fun for Ridleians of all ages. Our students finished their year academically strong and well positioned to continue their studies in the fall. Against all odds, we reopened school for the 2020-21 year, albeit with some diminished numbers. To meet the ongoing needs of our Ridley community, our Canadian and U.S. Foundations committed $125,000 each to establish our Ridley COVID-19 Relief Fund, which resulted in another $102,000 being raised (a total now of $352,000 to date). This generosity provided 20 students thus far with tuition assistance for the 2020-21 school year, so they could continue their studies in spite of their families’ new financial circumstances. This has indeed been a trying time, but it has shown us unequivocally that Ridley and its people are leaders, are able to move forward, support one another and do so with a positive attitude. I am honoured to work alongside the Board of Governors and our faculty and staff, especially during these extraordinary times. This year has assuredly been about pulling together as a team, at all levels, and these efforts continue! I thank you for all of your support this past year—for your generous gifts of time, talent and financial treasure. Together, all of us make up this great community and I am genuinely grateful to you all, and proud of the Ridley of today. Terar Dum Prosim, David K. Carter ’88 CHAIR, BOARD OF GOVERNORS

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2019–20 SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM J. Edward Kidd

Julie A. Cameron

Andrea L. Nauf

HEADMASTER

DIRECTOR OF ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT AND ADMISSIONS

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL

Andrea K. Carisse

Bruno Petitti

James E. Steward

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING

DIRECTOR OF IT

Susan E. Hazell Shelley Huxley (incoming)

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS

Michele A. Bett

HEAD OF LOWER SCHOOL

James D. Parke CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

Margaret E. Lech ASSISTANT HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL

Scott J. McLean MANAGER OF CAMPUS SAFETY & SECURITY

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Jay W. Tredway ’96 Scott D. Walker DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES


GOVERNANCE 2019–20 BOARD OF GOVERNORS BOARD CHAIR David K. Carter ’88 SECRETARY James D. Parke, Chief Financial Officer BY INVITATION: J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

Kelvin S. Chen ’70 Timothy J. Coffin ’81 Sarah E. Eyton ’86 Joe Ferrante Brian A. Hutchings ’84 (on leave to Sept, 2020)

C. Michael Kray ’88 Scott G.A. Lampard ’88 Alison A.C. Loat ’94

Dragan Matovic Don McMurtry ’82 Maria Menechella Yanick Pagé ’84 G. Scott Paterson ’82 Ruth Todd 3 vacant seats

COMMITTEES ADVANCEMENT

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

FINANCE, AUDIT & HUMAN RESOURCES

GOVERNANCE & NOMINATION

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

Timothy J. Coffin ’81*

Joe Ferrante*

Scott G.A. Lampard ’88*

C. Michael Kray ’88*

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

VICE CHAIR

SECRETARY

James D. Parke, Chief Financial Officer

James D. Parke, Chief Financial Officer

Christopher D. Cooke ’88

James D. Parke, Chief Financial Officer

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

David K. Carter ’88*

David K. Carter ’88*

James D. Parke, Chief Financial Officer

Sarah E. Eyton ’86*

Philip D. Court ’85

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Kelvin S. Chen ’70*

Brad Ferguson ’87

Brian A. Hutchings ’84

David K. Carter ’88*

Joe Ferrante*

Jeanie Hendrie ’05

Dean Karachi ’87

Kelvin S. Chen ’70*

Geordie Hendrie ’74

D. Andrew Lind ’88

Paul S. Kundrat ’92

E. Allison Griffiths ’95

Scott G.A. Lampard ’88*

Don McMurtry ’82*

Dragan Matovic*

Jill Hopkins ’92

Alison A.C. Loat ’94*

Maria Menechella

BY INVITATION

Robin E.A. Lampard ’85

Maria Menechella*

G. Scott Paterson ’82*

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

Alison A.C. Loat ’94*

BY INVITATION:

Andrew Mitchell ’98

Scott D. Walker, Director of Facilities

Dean McCann

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

Narongsak (Tek) Thongpapanl BY INVITATION: J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

SECRETARY

David K. Carter ’88*

Sandra Ventin ’89 BY INVITATION: J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster Brenda Lockhart, Controller Andrea L. Nauf, Executive Director of Human Resources * Governor TIGER | SPRING 2021

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HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CLASS OF 2020

145

GRADUATES

MATRICULATION 2016–20 UNIVERSITY APPLICATIONS: 1051 | UNIVERSITIES: 253 ACCEPTANCE RATE: 76% | APPLICATIONS PER STUDENT: 7.2

CANADA Bishop’s University Brock University

9

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN OFFERS ACCEPTED

Carleton University Concordia University Dalhousie University Fanshawe College Humber College Huron University College King’s University College

TOP FIVE ACCEPTANCES BY #

Laurentian University McGill University McMaster University Memorial University of Newfoundland

17

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

14

QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY

Mount Allison University Niagara College Ontario College of Art & Design University Queen’s University Ryerson University Saint Mary’s University Sheridan College Institute of Technology

& Advanced Learning

St. Francis Xavier University St. Thomas University Toronto Film School at RCC Institute of Technology

9

WESTERN UNIVERSITY

8

UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

& Advanced Learning

University of Alberta University of British Columbia University of British Columbia - Okanagan Campus University of Calgary University of Guelph University of King’s College University of Lethbridge University of New Brunswick University of Ottawa University of Prince Edward Island

7

MCGILL UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO

University of Regina University of Toronto University of Victoria University of Waterloo Western University Wilfrid Laurier University York University

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USA

University of Hartford

Arizona State University

University of Miami

American Academy of Dramatic Arts

University of Notre Dame

American University

University of Pennsylvania

Babson College

University of Rochester

Boston University

University of Southern California

Brigham Young University

University of Tennessee

Brown University

University of Tulsa

California Northstate University College

University of Washington

University of Wisconsin

University of Illinois at Chicago

of Health Sciences

Canisius College

Yale University

Carnegie Mellon University Colgate University

INTERNATIONAL

Columbia University Cornell University

Amsterdam University College, Netherlands

Dartmouth College

Brunel University London, United Kingdom

Florida State University

Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland

Fordham University

IE University, Segovia, Spain

George Washington University

Imperial College London, United Kingdom

Georgia Institute of Technology

King’s College London, United Kingdom

Johns Hopkins University

Les Roches International School of Hotel

King’s College

Lehigh University

Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany

Lynn University

Neuchatel Junior College, Switzerland

Mercyhurst University

Newcastle University, United Kingdom

New York University

NYU Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Niagara University

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland

Northeastern University

The London School of Economics and

Northwestern University

Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences

The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Purdue University

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Santa Clara University

The University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Sarah Lawrence College

The University of Western Australia, Australia

Savannah College of Art and Design

Toulouse Business School Barcelona, Spain

School of Art Institute of Chicago

Universidad Anahuac, Mexico

St. Andrews University

University College Dublin, Ireland

St. Lawrence University

Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico

Stanford University

University of Bristol, United Kingdom

Syracuse University

University of Leeds, United Kingdom

The New School

University of London, United Kingdom

The University of Iowa

University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

University of California, Berkeley

University of Sussex, United Kingdom

University of California, Davis

University of the Arts London, United Kingdom

University of California, Los Angeles

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands

University of California, Santa Barbara

Waseda University, Japan

Management, Switzerland

Political Science, United Kingdom

University of Colorado at Boulder TIGER | SPRING 2021

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3394

$40K

$10K

VOLUNTEER HOURS IN SUPPORT OF RIDLEY COLLEGE

DONATION TO THE ANNUAL FUND

DONATION TO THE FAMILY GUILD SCHOLARSHIP & BURSARY FUND

THE DAVID A. MACLACHLAN VOLUNTEER AWARD The RCFG was pleased to join Headmaster Kidd in awarding Elizabeth 'Liz' Loomis-Taliano with the David A. Maclachlan Volunteer Award. For more than 10 years, Liz has truly exemplified the school motto, Terar Dum Prosim, through her commitment to leading the Decorating and Design Committee. Liz brings her talent for design to every event, including the Christmas Market, Cadet Ball, Halloween, Designer Purse Bingo, and the Ridley College Flourish conference. Both in beauty and in spirit, her work has always left an indelible signature that says, Liz was here.

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SERVING OUR COMMUNITY When it comes to supporting our community, the RCFG is Ridley’s most dedicated ally! From welcoming new families to running the Lower School book fairs; providing volunteer proctors and judges for science fairs and debates; and the various fundraising activities which have brought new initiatives to the school—such as the Recycled Uniform Programme in 2019-20—the impact of their service can be seen across campus in many important ways.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

VICE PRESIDENT Jo Hanna

EXECUTIVE BY INVITATION: COMMUNICATIONS & IT

PRESIDENT

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT

Hannah Ulrich

Charmaine Bellefleur PAST PRESIDENT

VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Fil Stabile

Jen Dunn

TREASURER

RIDLEY COLLEGE LIAISON

Gabi Guderjahn SECRETARY

Thomas Ng

Jennifer Roberge

Nancy McLeod-Elder

A NEW PATH: RCFG RESPONDS TO 2020 The pandemic may have brought the RCFG’s oncampus work to a halt—but it didn’t stop their endeavours. The executive team quickly got to work, encouraging parent members to connect via group chats and social media. General meetings were held on Zoom, and the first ever virtual AGM was heralded one of the best and most moving in modern times. International boarding and day parents came together to discuss the many emotions being experienced by graduating students. The St. Catharines Mayor spoke of the effects of COVID-19 on the city, Betty Lou Souter of the RCFG legacy, and Community Care of the effects of pandemic on our most vulnerable. Over its 96-year history, the Guild has come up against many challenges and it has, once more, rose to the occasion. Although many events were cancelled or altered due to the pandemic this year, the RCFG has worked hard to keep its traditions alive. It’s heartening to see that during this time of crisis, its legacy of support, strength and connection continues.

A COMMITMENT TO THE RCFG LEGACY After taking the initiative in 2018-19 to modernize the RCFG through a strategic planning process, the executive team continued to serve a second year in their respective positions. This additional time enabled the RCFG to put positive strategies into action and fortified the organization as a whole. Their ongoing commitment strengthened parent and community relations, improved the quality of programmes and modernized via social media—efforts which will strengthen its core for years to come. CONTINUED SUCCESS ON CAMPUS AND IN THE COMMUNITY ‘Community’ being the theme for 2019-20, the RCFG continued to raise funds to support Ridley’s Annual Fund Campaign through events such as Designer Purse Bingo and the Christmas Market. Additionally, the Guild expanded outreach throughout the Niagara Region, supporting both the Paper Bag Ball and the Christmas Shoebox Initiative—important initiatives which support those most vulnerable in our local neighbourhoods.

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STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS AND CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES

2020

2019

Total

Total

$

$

REVENUE 30,946,911

30,826,202

Financial support

5,784,113

4,093,611

Fees

3,382,620

3,087,147

Summer Programmes

1,390,946

1,182,799

Store and book sales

746,117

826,957

Facility rentals

501,070

618,013

Interest income

536,344

502,428

Other

171,607

276,586

Busing

134,858

173,545

43,594,586

41,587,288

Teaching, Athletics, Activities

15,021,272

14,727,731

Maintenance Of Properties and Equipment

3,884,481

3,882,119

Board and Care of Students

3,315,140

3,832,387

Tuition

TOTAL REVENUE

EXPENSES

Financial Aid

3,609,229

3,578,215

General and Administration

3,218,163

2,684,151

Information Technology

1,561,574

1,352,480

Admissions and Marketing

1,299,911

1,315,076

Development

1,075,878

1,191,123

Summer Programme

1,080,610

1,065,581

Store and Book Sale Costs

682,548

743,652

Facility Rental Costs

331,377

343,818

Communications

344,865

363,219

Ancillary Operations

240,736

-

Busing Costs

234,017

257,893

Amortization Of Capital Assets

2,512,245

2,326,417

38,412,046

37,663,862

5,182,540

3,923,426

Fund Balances, Beginning of Year

23,951,106

21,199,486

Pension Remeasurements

(457,113)

(1,171,806)

28,676,533

23,951,106

TOTAL EXPENSES EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUE OVER EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR

FUND BALANCES, END OF YEAR

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YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2020

Sources of Revenue June 30, 2020

Tuition & Fees 79% Financial Support 13% Summer Programme 3% Miscellaneous 2% Hank’s Sales 2% Facility Rentals 1%

Teaching, Athletics & Activities 39% Facilities 10% Board & Care of Students 9% Financial Assistance 9% Admissions, Development, Comm 7%

Expenditures June 30, 2020

General & Administration 8% Amortization of Capital Assets 7% Information Technology 4% Summer Programme 3% Hank’s Sales 2% Rentals 1% Miscellaneous 1%

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CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET

AS AT JUNE 30, 2020 2020

2019

Total

Total

$

$

21,571,327

20,247,270

7,491,964

6,802,886

Deferred Financial Assistance & Prepaid Expenses

256,484

540,719

Inventories

324,841

272,178

29,644,616

27,863,053

3,165,903

1,681,041

31,897,061

31,754,603

64,707,580

61,298,697

2,644,525

3,208,309

ASSETS Current Assets Cash & Short Term Investments Receivables

Construction in Progress Capital assets

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities Prepaid Fees and Refundable Deposits

Pension and Post-Retirement Obligations

29,585,433

30,537,276

32,229,958

33,745,585

3,801,089

3,602,006

36,031,047

37,347,591

(2,577,632)

(3,692,520)

FUND BALANCES Operating - Unrestricted Capital Assets - Restricted

31,897,061

31,754,603

Expansion - Restricted

(7,969,248)

(7,740,892)

690,022

613,775

6,636,330

3,016,140

28,676,533

23,951,106

64,707,580

61,298,697

Specified Donation - Restricted Expansion 2 - Restricted

RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION TRUSTEES R. Michael H. Stevens ’77 CHAIR Gregory B. Souter ’85 SECRETARY/TREASURER

John R. Anderson ’65

BY INVITATION:

Robert D. Evans ’77

David K. Carter ’88

Sean P. Gallaway ’87

Susan E. Hazell

John P. Hynes ’96

J. Edward Kidd

Duncan M. McGregor ’84

James D. Parke

W. Darcy McKeough ’51 Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 William O. Wallace ’77 74

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RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION ASSETS - $CAD

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2020

35000000

30,185,667

30,639,510

2019

2020

28,417,250

30000000 26,380,632 24,188,162 25000000

23,570,049

22,746,511

20000000

15000000

10000000

5000000

0 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

GRANT RECEIVED WAS EXPENDED ON THE FOLLOWING

DURING 2019–20

Scholarship & Bursaries 67.3%

Total Received $1,082,060

TOTAL RECEIVED

$1,082,060

Academic Funds 10.4% Unrestricted 7.9% Facility Maintenance 6.6% Athletics & Activities 4.8% Prizes 2.0% Professional Development 1.0%

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RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC. ASSETS - $USD

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2020

8,000,000 7,132,298 6,647,594 7,000,000

6,915,548

6,592,914 6,238,230

6,256,828

6,260,063

2014

2015

2016

6,000,000

5,000,000

4,000,000

3,000,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

US FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

2017

2018

2019

2020

GRANT RECEIVED WAS EXPENDED ON THE FOLLOWING DURING 2019–20

Timothy J. Coffin ‘81 PRESIDENT Britt R. Franklin Call ‘08 VICE PRESIDENT Robert McD. Wilson ’81 SECRETARY Alexander C. O. Hansen ‘87 TREASURER Michele-Elise Burnett ‘86

Total Received $778,000

Bruce L. Carrow ‘74 John K. S. Cleary ‘84 William S. Cleary ’81 Peter B. Coffin ‘78 Brian A. Iggulden ’67 Michelle M. Mandeville ‘95

Capital Campaign 52%

James C. Rogers ‘81

Scholarships & Bursaries 43%

Andrew McD. Wilson ‘90

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Restricted Donations 5%


SCHOLARSHIPS & BURSARIES

$ 3,609,229 TOTAL TUITION ASSISTANCE

$ 576,500

$ 2,731,713

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS AWARDED

BURSARIES AWARDED

106

90

RECIPIENTS

RECIPIENTS

TIGER | SPRING 2021

77


RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION ENDOWED FUNDS AS OF JUNE 30, 2020

BURSARY & SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 125 Renaissance Bursary Fund

$

430,868

Class of 1971 Bursary

42,599

Alberta Ridley College Scholarship Centennial Endowment Fund

Class of 1972 Bursary

54,357

63,396

Class of 1974 Bursary

86,845

Katharine Alexander and Kitty Miller Scholarship Fund

27,024

Class of 1975 Bursary

52,465

628,168

Class of 1976 Bursary

47,866

Anderson Memorial Scholarship Fund

59,672

Class of 1977 Bursary

10,989

J. J. Arnold Maritimes Scholarship

21,129

Class of 1978 Mark Preece Memorial Bursary

42,931

Bahamas Scholarship Fund

16,903

Class of 1979 Robert Malone Memorial Bursary

53,884

Banville Winnipeg Scholarship Fund

55,698

Class of 1980 Bursary

30,024

L. Clarke Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund

94,967

Class of 1982 Bursary

30,788

Bermuda Ridley College Scholarship Endowment Fund; including David B. Wadson Memorial Scholarship 183,898

Class of 1985 Bursary

74,259

Class of 1988 Bursary

45,908

Class of 1989 Bursary

41,750

Class of 2005 Bursary

37,403 38,300

Alumni Scholarship

Andre Buller ‘54 Scholarship Fund

306,518

Bullied Award Scholarship

43,379

Dorothy Burgoyne Doolittle & Henry B. Burgoyne ‘67 Memorial Bursary

30,287

Nat Caters Bursary Fund

Burn Memorial Fund

42,739

Richard R.P. Court ‘50 Innovation Fdn Bursary

105,242

34,730

Stephen R. Court ‘89 Memorial Scholarship

894,291

Isobel Burton Memorial Scholarship Fund Carley Family Bursary

158,116

Crawford, Smith & Swallow Bursary

36,330

Carthy Foundation Centennial Bursary Funds;

272,649

John B & Terence Cronyn Bursary

68,248

Harry J. Daniel Scholarship

67,010

Michael R. Davies ‘78 Memorial Scholarship

14,225

• Bruce H. Mitchell ‘64 Bursary • G.Mark Curry ‘62 Bursary

2,186,469 409,033

Nan and Laddie Cassels Scholarship Fund

31,320

L. Robert S. deLangley ‘48 Scholarship

25,440

Tony Cassels Award

27,334

Desmarais Family Bursary

96,670

Charlton Family Scholarship

45,954

Class of 1938 Bursary

31,725

Richard James Dickinson B.A. L.L.B. Scholarship Fund NEW 2016/2017

24,576

Class of 1939 Samuel G. Heaman Bursary

91,463

Evelyn Dobson Memorial Scholarship

24,250

Class of 1940 Bursary

24,706

Class of 1942/Class of 1957 - Matheson Bursary

102,487

Class of 1945 Bursary

43,292

Class of 1947 Bursary

56,664

Class of 1951 Bursary

66,278

Class of 1953 Bursary

45,579

Class of 1954 Bursary

720,997

Class of 1955 Bursary

46,524

Class of 1957 - Matheson Bursary (see class of 1942) Class of 1959 Bursary

206 69,471

Andrew A. Dodge ‘24 Bursary

162,921

John S. Drake ‘35 Bursary

56,717

Margaret A. Drake Bursary

56,531

George D. Enos Jr. ‘41 Bursary

21,304

Robert Evans ‘77 Bursary

94,414

Eyton Family Scholarship

57,164

Faculty and Staff Bursary

107,863

Female Prep Hockey Bursary/Scholarship

43,954

Roderick Ferguson ‘87 Memorial Bursary

117,431

Harry E. Foster Memorial Scholarship

98,010

Alex Friesen Memorial Bursary

49,393

Donna Gauley-McCarthy Memorial Bursary

28,598 249,845

Class of 1961 Karen Chaplin Memorial Bursary

149,714

Class of 1962 Michael Ross Mandeville Memorial Bursary

144,037

Gooderham Family Memorial Scholarships

Class of 1963 Bursary

60,600

Peter S. Gooderham ‘44 Bursary Fund

102,521

Class of 1964 Bursary

42,674

Kendra A. Watts - Gransden ‘84 Bursary

104,443

Class of 1965 Bursary

41,867

John Grant Memorial Scholarship

71,235

Class of 1966 Bursary

63,994

Griffith-Hamilton Scholarship Fund

38,609

Class of 1967 Bursary

73,790

John and Cosie Guest Memorial Bursary

52,479

Hamilton Stone Memorial Scholarship

62,504 189,277

Class of 1968 Douglas Utting Memorial Bursary

983,964

Class of 1969 Bursary

59,387

George M. Hendrie ‘49 Bursary

Class of 1970 Bursary

31,026

Nicholas D. Holmes Bursary

78

flourishing

67,232


(cont.) $ Donald and Nancy Hunt Scholarship

51,284

Dr. John Ormsby Miller Scholarship

Robert L. Hunter ‘33 Memorial Scholarship

39,484

James B. Milligan Character Scholarship

Brian ‘67 & Rosemary Iggulden Bursary

61,192

Newfoundland Ridley College Scholarship Endowment Fund

74,203 39,903 30,071

Mac ‘46 and Elinor Irwin Fund

284,844

Kenmore Construction Company Limited Scholarship

22,794

Allan V. Orr Family Bursary

Rupert & Judy Lane Bursary

55,821

B. B. Osler ‘21 Scholarship

Leonard Foundation Scholarship and Reuben Wells Leonard Memorial Awards Fund

91,234

Ernest Gregory Powell Memorial Scholarship

683,342

Ridley College Family Guild Bursary

523,100

Kenyon Lett Scholarship

27,523

Ridley College Family Guild Scholarship

149,047

Lewis Family Bursary

63,232

Robertson Family Bursary and Scholarship Fund

239,892

Donald H Lie ‘52 Bursary

1,144,363

658,508

667,193

W.H. Lind ‘33 Family Bursary Fund

61,540

Alan Maclachlan Memorial Scholarship

89,549

Graham M. MacLachlan Memorial Scholarship Peter Maclachlan Memorial Fund E.W. ‘Peter’ Mandeville ‘38 Bursary Fund Brian Martin Fund Anthony V. Mason ‘42 Memorial Scholarship Janet L. Matthews Memorial Scholarship Fund Kelly Matthews Award John L.C. McCarthy ‘32 Memorial Scholarship Alex McIntosh Memorial/Beaver Foods Scholarship R. S. McLaughlin Foundation Bursary Donald S. McMurtry ‘82 Bursary

199,840 82,803 360,008 1,884 51,739 115,745

Scandrett Family Bursary

141,717

The Robert M. Schmon Memorial/Quebec and Ontario Paper Company Scholarship School Scholarship Fund - World War I Memorial

52,194

Sears Family Bursary

46,920

Stanley Family Scholarship

27,536

Strasenburgh Bursary

61,075

Stevens Family Bursary

95,956

Leonard Sutcliffe Memorial Scholarship

38,918

202,425

Albert W. Taylor Fund

203,817

Graham Taylor ‘71 Bursary & Scholarship Fund

85,594 921,650 98,006

240,212

82,791 132,000

James Gordon Thompson ‘44 Bursary

157,627

The G.O. Watson Bursary

131,217

William Wallace Family Bursary Fund

20,000

Women of Ridley Bursary Fund

TOTAL BURSARY & SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

2,883

20,481,631

TIGER | SPRING 2021

79


PRIZE ENDOWMENT FUNDS

$

ACADEMIC & SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT PRIZES

$

Dr. J. A. Arnell ‘34 Science Prize

7,198

Robert L. Hunter Prize

Judge Benson Memorial Prize for Diligence

3,689

The Adam Hutt Memorial Award

Margaret M. Bentley & Eleanor M. Wakeman-Long Memorial History Prize

1,881

Gerald Blake Memorial Prize

John Hastings Kerr Memorial Prize

2,954 44,105 869

2,042

Rosemary Reid Iggulden House Zealous Achievement – Gooderham East

3,029

Boreal Laboratories Prize

1,507

Elizabeth Bae Kurusi ‘07 Gr. 11 Drama Prize

1,809

E. M. Boyd Memorial Prize

880

W. B. Leach Memorial

2,042

The Richard A. Bradley Trophy

700

Robert J. Malyk Scholarship

8,887

W.T. Bright ‘58 Prize

1,031

M.R. Mandeville Prize

2,954

Colin G Brzezicki English Prize

1,178

The J. Herbert Mason Medal

6,156

Bullied Award

Kelly Matthews Memorial Prize

2,954

Dorothy Burgoyne Award

3,463

Dr. M. A. McElligott Art Prize

1,080

Isobel Burton Memorial Prize

1,476

T. R. Merritt ‘44 Fund

4,008

101

Dr. W. H. Merritt Prize

1,291

Nan Cassels Award Fund

643

C.E. Miller Prize for Creative Writing

Chapel Service Prize – A.E. Mix Memorial

950

Michelle A. Morrissey Intermediate ‘Always Artistic’ Award 1,049

E.H.M. Burn Memorial Prize

734

Chapel Reading Prize – Brian J. Maher ‘83 Memorial Prize 950

James Nesbitt Award for Excellence in Dance

Dr. J. W. Chapman Memorial Prize

The Kenneth Albert Nordheimer Prize for IB History

The Frederick C. Clarkson ‘62 – Latin Prize The Sgt Herbert Charles Clitheroe Prize for Art Stephen R. Court ‘89 Memorial Prize – Successful Participation

2,035 937 2,250 2,954

The Scott Paterson ‘82 Stock Market Challenge Anthony M. Partington ‘65 History Prize

268 883 23,001 940 937

Ernest Gregory Powell Memorial Prize

1,476

Daniel H.T. Oh ‘09 Prize for Gr. 8 Math

937

Stephen R. Court ‘89 Shield

734

Sean S.T. Oh ‘07 Prize for Gr. 10 Math

937

Stephen R. Court ‘89 Art Prize

734

Plener Perseverance Prize

Class of 1939 Dr. J. R. Hamilton Memorial – Science Award Terence Cronyn ‘20 Prize H. J. Daniel Prize David Dodge ‘61 IB Award

24,860 474 3,314 28,837

Endeavour Award

1,031

Feagan-Davies Memorial Award

4,066

Evelyn Dobson Memorial Prize Keith Dorrington Science Award

734 25,767

The John S. Drake ‘35 Memorial Prize

3,772

Dunkley Prize for Senior Music

1,944

Family Guild Zealous Achievement - Merritt South

4,121

Fischer Family Lower School Valedictorian Award

3,477

The Hanna Flandrak Memorial Prize

5,152

The Dr. Ellen Smoor Foster Award

1,010

The J.Z. Given Senior Art Prize

26,539

The Grace Family Prize for Wellroundedness

10,253

Herald B. Greening ‘51 Memorial Music Awards

4,885

S. O. Greening ‘26 Prize

3,856

O. Michael G. Hamilton Prize for AP Calculus

4,569

Mrs. Ada F. Harris Memorial Prize

2,042

Headmaster’s Zealous Achievement Award

3,785

Frank Hollinrake ‘57 Memorial Prize for Science

1,274

House Zealous Achievement – Arthur Bishop East

2,159

J.David Mackey/Anthony P. Sherman Arthur Bishop West House Zealous Achievement

5,226

80

flourishing

1,084

E. Osborne and George C. Powell Prize

734

Price Memorial Prize

624

Dr. Alan & Mrs. Jean Rice Memorial Award – Mathematics 1,031 Dr. Alan & Mrs. Jean Rice Memorial Prize

4,596

C.N.D. Rosmarin Prize

4,026

Klaus Peter Schoenefeld Memorial Prize – Art

423

Gerald S Shantz Prize for Poetry

940

A.J. Silver Leadership Award

3,761

Julian Street Memorial Prize

1,080

Charlotte Francis Norah Thomas Prize

208

W.G. Trethewey Memorial Prize

446

Tricolour Award

2,359

Akshay Shetty ‘04 Valedictorian Prize

3,729

F. Kenneth Venables History Prize – Grade 8

850

Virginia Vickers Essay Award

950

H.G. Williams Prize for Public Speaking

2,008

Harold A. Wilson ‘30 Memorial Prize

4,341

E. A. Woolley ‘80 Music Prize

1,987

SUBTOTAL ACADEMIC & SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT PRIZES

358,955


ACTIVITY PRIZES

$

Ruth E. Brown Acta Editor’s Award

1,313

Gwyn Morris Librarian Award

Colin G. Brzezicki Prize for Thought Provoking Writing

1,199

Richard Naylor ‘79 Drama Prize

1,373

H. ‘Tony’ Cassels Tuesday Night Trophy

1,476

Newman-Rigby Band Trophy Prizes

2,006

Hume Cronyn ‘31 Trophy for Outstanding Performance

1,160

Prefect Prize

1,206 1,767

Terence Cronyn ‘20 Prize for Best News Story

950

998

Matthew A. Davis ‘94 Memorial Prize

5,036

Don and Karen Rickers International Student Leadership Award

James Filby Memorial Prize

1,031

Ridley College Family Guild Junior Public Speaking Prize

867

Harry “Red” Foster Prize for Social Service

2,010

Ridley College Family Guild Public Speaking (M.S. Jr.)

734

The Mackenzie S. Fowler ‘11 Trophy

1,105

R.J. Rumble ‘42 Trophy

898

Lt. Col. S.G. Heaman ‘39 Prize

1,031

S.F.D. Sampson Memorial Rose Bowl Band Prize

950

The Captain F.A. Hollinrake ‘57 Memorial Bowl

1,144

Stephen L. Souter ‘81 Memorial Tech Prize

7,804

Tiger Tribune Prizes

1,052

A. Stoddard Jones Prize Fund

12,934

The Hon. Mr. Justice A. Courtney Kingstone (1892) Memorial Prize

10,647

UK Branch Prize for Dramatic Monologue

Lt. Col. A.C. Iggulden Memorial Shield

963

Lt. Col A.C. Iggulden Trophy

101

Kennedy Family Dance Spirit Trophy

1,031

Tony Kwok Memorial Public Speaking Prize

1,178

John K.H. Mason ‘39 Public Speaking

1,611

SUBTOTAL ACTIVITY PRIZES

921

66,499 TIGER | SPRING 2021

81


ATHLETIC PRIZES Athena Award for Girls Rugby The Bartlett Trophy – Girls Hockey Becken-Whitty Trophy Colin G. Brezicki Girls Hockey

$ 1,049 714 1,751

958

Brian Martin Coaches Award

2,209

J.P. Matheson Trophy

3,286

The W.C. Montgomery Award

1,188

Browne Family Rugby Cup

1,144

The Mentone Cup

1,237

Bunston Hockey Trophy

1,031

Michael J. Moulden ‘70 Coaches Award

1,001

Bulldog Trophy – 1st Team Squash

665

Mann Family Trophy MVP 1st Girls Tennis

937

Ohio Ironman Award for Hockey

Bulldog Trophy – U/16 Squash

937

Old Boys Trophy – Soccer

Gary Burroughs ‘64 Trophy - Football

382

Karen Oude-Reimerink Award – Gymnastics

A.J. Corolis Award

1,142

822 1,957 950

Paton Trophy

1,104

The Kristine Corolis Trophy

994

Penney Squash Trophy

1,065

Coy-De Vellis Trophy

734

A.C ‘Sandy’ Peters Squash Award

1,260

Nan Cassels 1914 Steeplechase Trophy – Sr. Girls Cross Country Neil Campbell ‘51 Trophy – Rowing

The Rob Poe Award 937 1,131

104

Peter B. Robinson ‘71 Cross Country Award

1,031

Michael A. Scott Trophy

1,049

Barry Cromarty ‘63 Trophy

867

Seymour Award Fund

Ingrid Cronin Field Hockey Prize

761

Caroline L. Sherk ‘12 Field Hockey Award – Top Defender

1,199

David ‘83 & Andrea Shemilt Trophy – 2nd Team Swimming

1,220

Captain Terence Cronyn ‘20 Trophy – Novice Oarsperson Scott Daniel ‘83 Trophy Crossingham Field Hockey Award (Wendy Darby) The William Dick Award Carl F. Dorland Trophy Faes Trophy for Soccer Greenshields Harriers Award (Most Improved)

1,820 950 2,541 937 1,281 734 1,059

71,289

W.H. Somerville ‘75 Trophy

950

H.A. Staples Trophy

101

Henry James Taylor Trophy Fund

677

R.P. Tidy ‘38 Award

987

S.D. Vaughan Tier II Girls Hockey – MVP Award

917 450

Jill Hopkins ‘92 Trophy

629

Michael J. Johnson ‘05 Award – MVP Golf

937

Crossingham Cup – 1st Field Hockey Rookie of the Year Trophy

The Hal Gould ‘69 Football Colours Endowment

734

Dr. Adam Wright Memorial Prize

992

Captain Terence Cronyn ‘20 Trophy – Novice Oarsperson 984

The Dr. Angela M. Zuliani ‘88 Memorial Trophy

1,310

The Simon Hall Award

N.A. Ronald Award for Determination – Jr. Girls; Volleyball

3,260

Dr. Bryan A. Henry ‘91 Track Prize

1,388 803

Jose Huerta ‘00 Rugby Trophy

1,187

Rod Jack ’80 Memorial Prize

1,080

The Kindellan Cup – Girls Rugby Trophy

1,044

Judy Lane Volleyball Trophy

1,031

P.E. Lewis Cup

1,265

C.J. Loat ‘62 Award MVP U/15 Soccer

SUBTOTAL ATHLETIC PRIZES

TOTAL PRIZE ENDOWMENTS

82

flourishing

950

139,100

564,554


RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS

$

ACADEMIC FUNDS

$

Sam Anderson’45 Chair for History & Modern Languages Class of 1956 Academic Tie Fund Terence Cronyn ‘20 Chair in English and Drama MGI – Crawford ‘56 & Eve Gordon Speaker Series Endowment Fund

Frank Hollinrake ‘57 Memorial Fund for Science 414,365 5,160 434,209 170,481

Curriculum on Ethics & Morals

10,330

J. M. Gould Fund – Visiting Scholars

87,394

Dr. J. R. Hamilton Chair in Mathematics and Science

15,210

Lett Family Endowment for Information Technology 1,166,167 Donald S. McMurtry ‘82 Environmental Fund

197,568

Siebens Business Lecture Series Fund

105,203

Technology Endowment Fund

124,189

448,640

SUBTOTAL ACADEMIC FUNDS

3,178,916

ACTIVITY FUNDS

$

W. E. N. Bell Memorial Games Fund

100,877

The Laine Family Fund

18,350

Butterfield Global Services Fund

128,766

Nitsopoulos Athletic Fund

Carthy Centennial Cadet Fund

159,451

Public Speaking/Debating Endowment Fund

7,950 501,195

Class of 2003 Fund for Arts & Athletics

19,760

Residential Life Program

Class of 2004 Fund for Arts & Athletics

12,386

Hugh A. Slater ‘44 Athletic Endowment Fund

163,573

127,855

Ian Wood ‘53 International Summer Program

115,404

Peter David James Jacobs Athletic Fund

14,369

Derek Zavitz ‘97 Memorial Fund for Athletics

21,316

Kingstone Family Physical Literacy Wellbeing Fund

68,582

Green Tiger Endowment Fund

SUBTOTAL ACTIVITY FUNDS

5,747

1,465,581

TIGER | SPRING 2021

83


RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS (cont.) $ DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

$

The Headmaster’s Discretionary Fund

28,020

C. C. Hopper Operating Fund – Bursar’s Discretionary

21,518

SUBTOTAL DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

49,538

LIBRARY FUNDS

$

Anderson Book Fund

4,046

G. D. Enos Jr. ‘41 Library Fund

3,014

Glassco Book Fund

19,932

SUBTOTAL LIBRARY FUNDS 26,992 FACILITY/MAINTENANCE FUNDS

$

Ron Angleman Endowment Fund

87,611

Ridley College Memorial Chapel Endowment Fund

181,406

Class of 1944 Maintenance Fund

70,466

Walker Maintenance Fund

238,307

Fitness Studio Endowment Fund

167,032

F. W. Hillock Maintenance Fund

22,937

D. C. MacLachlan ‘45 Memorial Auty Cricket Library /Archives Fund

88,903

Mandeville Grove Endowment

4,245

Mandeville Maintenance Fund

1,005,090

McKeough Maintenance Fund

139,071

SUBTOTAL FACILITY/MAINTENANCE FUNDS 2,005,068 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS

$

Class of 1953 Headmaster’s Fund

44,942

Faculty Professional Development Fund

97,922

Neil Campbell ‘51 Fund

117,426

SUBTOTAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS 260,290

TOTAL RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS 84

flourishing

6,986,385


UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT FUNDS

$

G. W. Gooderham Memorial Fund

295,773

Donald C. ‘44 & Frances M. McFarlane Memorial Fund 203,904

H. S. Gooderham Fund

736,050

Charles A. Thompson ‘28 Fund

R. S. Leach Memorial Fund J. E. McConnell ‘31 and Malcolm H. McConnell ‘63 Family Fund

20,437

Unrestricted Funds

88,883 452,059

611,965

TOTAL UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT FUNDS

2,409,071

IN TRUST FUNDS

$

Class of 2010 Graditude Fund

536

Class of 2017 Graditude Fund

54

Class of 2011 Graditude Fund

2,568

Class of 2018 Graditude Fund

38

Class of 2012 Graditude Fund

167

Class of 2019 Graditude Fund

565

Class of 2013 Graditude Fund

1,824

TOTAL IN TRUST FUNDS

5,752

GRAND TOTAL CAPITAL

30,447,393

TIGER | WINTER SPRING 2021 2020 85


gifts by ALUMNI AS OF JUNE 30, 2020. 1930–1939 A.C. Gordon Jarvis ’39

1940–1949 Julian W. Atwater ‘49 John A. Boyd ‘46 Frank W. Convery ‘43 † Leland R. S. deLangley ‘48 David V. Geary ‘45 Harry D. L. Hill ‘47 Richard M. Ivey ‘43 † Edwin M. Mills ‘48 Frederick L. Moffat ‘45 Allan C. Ruddle ‘46 Hugh L. Smith ‘44 Allen D. Taylor ‘46 John S. Walton ‘49 H. Donald Williams ‘48

1950–1959 Dave H. Armstrong ‘59 George D. B. Butterfield ‘57 George A. Calder ‘53 David H. Cook ‘55 William H. Cowen ‘54 David J. F. Creighton ‘59 William A. B. Davis ‘55 J. Edward T. Dillane ‘55 G. Leiter Doolittle ‘53 David L. Dusing ‘54 Paul Elgie ‘54 † Charles O. Fairbank ‘59 John D. Falkenhagen ‘58 Keith L. Falkner ‘59 David C. Finlay ‘59 Terence M. Guest ‘59 Richard O. W. Haeberlin ‘53 Bruce A. Hall ‘59 Douglas J. Hay ‘52 Anthony B. Jerauld ‘59 Thomas B. Jones, Jr. ‘54 Robert C. Kinnear ‘59 Robert W. Korthals ‘50 Kenneth J. Lampman ‘54 Robert F. Lee ‘58 Douglas R. Leggat ‘54 David K. Lett ‘59 Michael C. H. Locke ‘56 Richard C. Malone ‘59 Robert O. Matthews ‘56 Wilmot L. Matthews ‘54 J. Gordon Maw ‘54 W. Darcy McKeough ‘51 John G. Moffat ‘52 Paul Montgomery ‘54 Richard R. Perdue ‘59 Richard B. Perren ‘59 John A. Pollock ‘55 Kenneth P. Powell ‘58 Timothy H. E. Reid ‘54 86

flourishing

Gordon D. Rice ‘54 John N. M. Seccombe ‘59 Edward M. Sellers ‘59 Edwin R. Shepherd ‘54 Robert D. Sheppard ‘53 J. Christopher Snyder ‘59 Jeremy F. G. Sturgeon ‘58 Jonathan P. Swinchatt ‘54 Peter F. E. Swinchatt ‘51 Matthew A. Terborg ‘53 Eric R. Van der Sar ‘59 Norris W. Walker ‘52 Ernest L. Wilson ‘57 Harry A. Woggon ‘51 Ian Wood ‘53 James K. Wood ‘57 David L. Woods ‘58 Roger C. Young ‘59

1960–1969 John R. Anderson ‘65 Paul R. Bannock ‘67 Brian W. Barr ‘61 James H. Belton ‘60 Thomas G. Belton ‘61 David C. Bewley ‘61 Donald E. Bradford ‘67 James H. Burrows ‘62 Michael R. Carson ‘64 R. Gordon Chaplin ‘61 Peter T. Christensen ‘61 Chris Collingwood ‘66 Richard A. Coy ‘60 Mark Curry ‘62 David A. Dodge ‘61 John C. Drummond ‘67 J. Michael M. Durnan ‘61 John H. Fisher ‘61 Richard A. Gano ‘64 Ian Gibson ‘63 D. Harold W. Gould ‘69 Timothy K. Griffin ‘68 C. M. Victor Harding ‘66 Karl R. Hartwick ‘66 Paul A. Head ‘68 Christopher H. Hebb ‘60 Robert C. Howard ‘63 Brian A. Iggulden ‘67 Richard W. Ivey ‘68 Daniel O. Jarvis ‘68 Russell E. Jones ‘61 † William N. Kinnear ‘63 Steven D. Latner ‘69 Philip B. Lind ‘61 Christopher J. Loat ‘62 Ian B. Maclennan ‘68 Ronald N. Mannix ‘66 Donald L. Matthews ‘60 Ian N. McKinnon ‘63 Donald G. McLean ‘63 Bruce H. Mitchell ‘64 R. Duncan Moran ‘62

David R. Morgan ‘65 David L. Muir ‘61 Paul J. Muller ‘63 Moore Newell III ‘68 Fred M. Partington ‘67 Andrew Paton ‘64 Christopher W. Paton ‘65 John M. Proctor ‘68 Terence H. Rapsey ‘66 Ian K. Reid ‘63 George C. Reifel ‘69 Michael A. Rice ‘61 Timothy H. Rigby ‘60 John H. Sandham ‘66 James E. Savory ‘66 Terence P. Scandrett ‘61 Arthur A. Schmon ‘67 Richard D. Spurling ‘65 John O. Stubbs ‘62 Donald A. B. Turner ‘61 Allan J. Tyson ‘65 Ian K. Upjohn ‘69 Jonathan C. Vick ‘61 Robert B. Waind ‘63 Robert A. Walker ‘61 Andrew O. Watson ‘65 David G. Whiting ‘61 David S. Willmot ‘68 Harold A. Wilson ‘67 David P. Worts ‘66

E. James Kingstone ‘75 Donald R. Lawson ‘75 Geoffrey W. Lind ‘71 Jon E. Love ‘73 Philip A. Macdonald ‘79 Robert B. Macdonald ‘79 William H. ( Willie ) Mayor, Jr. ‘73 Gordon R. McBride ‘74 Ian R. McClelland ‘70 Michael J. Moulden ‘70 Timothy S. Pfohl ‘76 Timothy A. Powell ‘74 Anthony W. Pylypuk ‘71 Robert J. Pyne ‘76 Robert J. B. Rumble ‘75 Grant R. Skelly ‘78 Paul M. Slemon ‘72 Robert W. Sterne ‘73 Thomas A. C. Stevens ‘79 William G. Stewart ‘75 Robert S. Stratton ‘71 Paul W. Szczucinski ‘72 Andrew Tymoszewicz ‘76 James D. Walker ‘77 William O. Wallace ‘77 William G. Watt ‘70 J. W. Timothy Witzel ‘76 John A. Wright ‘73 George R. H. Wyatt ‘73 J. Christopher Young ‘78

1970–1979

1980–1989

Nestor Luis G. Aristiguieta Frias ‘77 Gary D. Atack ‘73 Michael D. Baker ‘78 Peter R. Bennett ‘72 Tom G. Brownlee ‘77 Peter F. H. Burn ‘71 John M. Burnes ‘74 James B. Butterfield ‘70 Bruce L. Carrow ‘74 Kelvin S. M. Chen ‘70 Peter B. Coffin ‘78 Michel G. Debiche ‘79 Robert D. Evans ‘77 Thomson D. Fischer ‘77 William A. Folland ‘73 Derek D. Fraser ‘79 Ian M. Fraser ‘72 James E. Gibson ‘75 Timothy M. Gould ‘74 David S. Grant ‘72 George C. Hendrie ‘74 Robert S. L. Ho ‘77 C. Leigh Hogg ‘71 J. Anthony D. Hooper ‘72 John M. Hopmans ‘77 Douglas E. Hunt ‘70 William T. Hutton ‘76 Paul G. Iggulden ‘72 William B. Irwin ‘72 David A. Jarvis ‘70

Sarah A. ( Morrison ) Barpoulis ‘83 Leighan S. ( Leggat ) Basadur ‘83 Jeffrey R. C. Bell ‘88 Anu Bhalla ‘86 Geoffrey B. Biddell ‘80 Thomas W. Bright ‘81 Marko R. Bukovec ‘85 Michele-Elise C. Burnett ‘86 David K. Carter ‘88 John K. S. Cleary ‘84 William S. Cleary ‘81 Timothy J. Coffin ‘81 Christopher D. Cooke ‘88 Paula Copland-Sherk ‘85 Suzanne W. Court ‘86 John G. Crawford ‘84 Derek J. Dunkley ‘87 Ian K. Duquemin ‘82 Hugh D. Evans ‘87 Sarah E. Eyton ‘86 Nancy E. Ferriman ‘88 Sean P. Gallaway ‘87 Glen R. Gill ‘88 John S. F. Greenwood ‘81 Alexander C. O. Hansen ‘87 Stephen E. Hunt ‘82 Charlene J. (Ebert) Hutton ‘83 Michael D. Jones ‘85 Dean Karachi ‘87 Grant Kedwell ‘86


Ellen Kolbert-Cornelissen ‘84 C. Michael Kray ‘88 Robin E.A. Lampard ‘85 Scott G.A. Lampard ‘88 & Amanda S. Lampard ‘88 Thomas P. Marian ‘81 Robert B. Mason ‘82 Donald H. McDonald ‘80 W. Stewart McKeough ‘85 Malcolm A. McRae ‘84 Anne M. Mitchell ‘85 William H. Morrison ‘86 Joey D. Palov ‘88 Geoffrey R. Park ‘80 G. Scott Paterson ‘82 M. Samantha G. Peeris ‘85 Steven L. Rotenberg ‘86 Hugh J. M. Silk ‘87 Gregory B. Souter ‘85 Graham B. Stanley ‘85 Thomas N. Urban ‘84 William G. Urban ‘86 Christopher D. Wilson ‘80 Robert M. Wilson ‘81 Kai-Yen Wong ‘88

1990–1999 Jennifer L. Birmingham ‘93 Susan C. ( MacDonnell ) Calder ‘92 Andrea K. Charlton ‘92 Thomas P. Clarkson ‘99 Wendy E. ( Crossingham ) Darby ‘99 Michael R. Drake ‘99 Esther S. ( Copland ) Hagerman ‘96 Leah K. Hamilton ‘99 Steven Latner ‘69 H. Jane Lewis ‘90 Alison A. C. Loat ‘94 Christopher J. E. Loat ‘97 Mark A. McGaw ‘97 Anne C. S. McIntosh ‘92 Nicola J. McLaughlin ‘98 Kristin (Micaleff) Botros ‘90 Christa L. Moulden ‘98 Perry Nitsopoulos ‘95 Claudia A. M. (Haegele) PhilipszJones ‘96 Matthew J. Picken ‘93 Matthew P. W. Rogers ‘99 Bryan J. Rose ‘96 Derek M. Surka ‘90 Jay W. Tredway ‘96 Andrew M. Wilson ‘90 Victor C. H. Woo ‘98

2000–2019 Mohamed A. M. Abdelreheim ‘20 Oluwaseyitodun A. Akinyelure ‘20 Mowa O. Alabi ‘20 Kenneth O. Anaebonam, Jr. ‘20 Nestor L. Aristiguieta Frias ‘20 Vega Armstrong ‘20 Simon E. H. Bailey ‘20 Karlina K. ( Gravitis ) Bear ‘04 Coleman R. J. Bennett ‘20 Alexander X. Bento ‘20 Marco A. Bento ‘20 Artem Beshevli ‘20 Alexandre L. Blanchard ‘20 Davide Bonifacio Proietto ‘20 Noah J. Booker ‘20 Ben N. Carter ‘20 Xihexiang Chen ‘20 Maximilian P. Chu ‘20 Brooklyn M. Clark ‘20 Evan R. V. Clarke ‘05 Lauren J. Clarke ‘20 Seth L. Clohosey ‘05 Elizabeth K. Consky ‘06 Gabrielle G. Cook ‘20 Katherine Culligan ‘20 Angela T. Daudu ‘20 Adin D. V. De Wit ‘20 Debbie Y. Deng ‘20 Celeste N. Doucet ‘07 Charlotte F. Drennan ‘20 Tomiwa K. Femi-Johnson ‘20 Igal Flegmann ‘13 Catherine E. Foulem ‘20 Mackenzie S. Fowler ‘11 Feifan Gao ‘20 Ren Xiang Gao ‘20 Hailey G. Gill ‘20 Andreas Gomez ‘20 Dylan B. Graff ‘20 Abygail K. Grexton ‘20 Francesca Guarducci ‘20 Chongyuan Guo ‘19 Christopher J. Hayward ‘20 Tanya Henderson ‘20 Emily V. Herbert ‘20 Rylee J. Hlusiak ‘20 Matthew D. Hopkins ‘20 Sarah C. Howard ‘20 Yi H. Huang ‘20 William M. Kelso ‘20 Jesse K. Kennedy ‘20 Alina Khasanova ‘20 Chak Ying Ko ‘20 Sean-Alexandre Kohler ‘20 Katarzyna K. Kubrak ‘20 Anna E. Kuku ‘20 Owen A. Leach ‘20 Marcie A. Lewis ‘03 Eva Yun Li ‘11 Muzhi Li ‘20 Alexandra M. Little ‘03

Ziying Liu ‘20 Brynne C. Lund ‘20 Joshua C. Maloney ‘20 Nathan J. Martin ‘05 Gerardo Martinez Lastra Aviles ‘14 Alisa Martsynkevich ‘20 Rozhina Mazhar ‘20 Somsinodima O. Mba-Uzoukwu ‘20 Hallie A. McClelland ‘20 Eamonn J. X. McCloskey ‘20 Emmanuel McIntosh ‘05 Cormac B. McMahon ‘20 Hannah G. McMaster ‘20 Riley McMaster ‘20 Olivia F. Melnyk ‘20 Sean A. Moir ‘03 Shawn A. Moulden ‘01 Sydney R. Mouttet ‘20 Jiaru Ni ‘20 Atinuke S. Oduwole ‘20 Nelly C. Okwuwolu ‘20 Ruby E. Orim ‘20 Sharon U. Orkeh ‘20 Joshua M. Ostaszewicz ‘20 Ruitong Ou ‘20 Avery A. Penner ‘20 Emma P. Penner ‘20 Jamie V. Pritchard ‘20 Jia J. Qi ‘20 Abhimanyu S. Rai ‘20 Olivia M. Reynolds ‘20 Kaoru Ri ‘20 Victor A. Robles Bernal ‘20 Samuel D. Rodriguez Gonzalez ‘20 Abby M. Russell ‘20 Nikolas E. W. Schramm ‘20 Rodrigo Serrano Cendejas ‘20 Mona Shivafard ‘20 Maya Sirhan ‘20 Courtney M. Smith ‘06 Oscar O. J. Sodian ‘20 Robert B. Stewart ‘20 Kennedy C. Stock ‘20 Aleksandr Sugrobov ‘20 Guanbo Sun ‘20 Isabella J. Taliano ‘20 Tianmu Tang ‘20 Veronica Tawiah ‘20 Anna-Sophie Thiele ‘20 Manuella K. Tona ‘20 Grace Tylee ‘20 Lucie M. Urban ‘20 Mario A. Vera ‘20 Mia L. Waddell ‘20 Yaxian Wang ‘20 Zixin Wang ‘20 Huiyu Wei ‘20 Xavier R. West ‘20 Alexander M. Wilson ‘00 Rachel E. Wing ‘20 Amelia C. T. Winterbottom ‘20 Temiloluwa M. Wright ‘20 Zhixin Wu ‘20

Yucheng Xiao ‘20 Yicheng Yin ‘20 Shulan Zeng ‘20 Guangyu Zhang ‘20 Xinyi Zheng ‘20 Elliott Ziolkowski ‘16 Isabella G. Ziolkowski ‘19

TIGER | SPRING 2021

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Michelle Scrivener

Class of ‘94

gifts by COMPANIES & CHARITABLE FOUNDATION Albert & Temmy Latner Family Foundation Anthony Broski Medicine Professional Corp. Baron Roofing & Siding Ltd. Belden Ben’s Roofing Benevity Community Impact Fund (Anonymous) Beutel, Goodman & Company Ltd. Canadian Tire Retail Store - Louth Street Canadian Tire Store #175 Carrick Holdings Inc. Carthy Foundation Chrisholm Machinery Solutions CM Harding Foundation Compass Group Canada Cook Wealth Management Court Holdings Limited Courtyard by Marriott Credit Bureau Services Canada Desveaux Developments Inc. Dietrich Law Firm P.C. EcoClean Canada Estate of Richard M. Ivey Fidelity Investments Canada ULC Fluidesign Composites Inc.

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flourishing

Foyston, Gordon & Payne Inc. Franklin Templeton Investments Corp. Government of Canada Highway Clearing & Guardrail Hope Charitable Foundation Integrated Wealth Advisory Inc. Ivest Properties Ltd. John Deere JOIBOI Inc. Judy and Wilmot Matthews Foundation Kanazwa Adventures Maserati/ Alfa Romeo Of London Meyers Fruit Farm Ltd. Mountainview Homes Niagara Community Foundation Niagara North AAA Zone Hockey Association Niagara Protective Coatings Ontario Panelization P. Ephrat Medicine Professional Corp. P. I. Incentives Limited R. Todd Professional Corp. Raymond James Canada Foundation Relamping Services Canada Ltd. Ridley College Family Guild Ridley College Fund USA, Inc.

Ridley Graduate Boat Club Royal LePage State Realty Simply Beautiful Events Decor Simply White Interiors Skyway Lawn Equipment Sullivan Mahoney LLP T. Litzen Sports TD Bank - Branch 2516 The Baird Foundation The Brock Rowing Club The Charitable Gift Funds Canada Foundation The Community Foundation of Oakville The G. Scott Paterson Foundation The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation The UK Online Giving Foundation The Weathertop Foundation Toronto Foundation - Capital United Way of Greater Toronto Vancouver Foundation Vlahos Dentistry Professional Corp Waind Management & Consulting Wallace Chevrolet


PLANNED gifts AS OF JUNE 30, 2020. INCLUDING BEQUESTS TO RIDLEY COLLEGE, THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION AND THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC. Peter R. ‘72 & Heather Bennett Georgina H. Black ‘85 & William D. Watson Henry M. ‘Mac’ Borden ‘64 Richard A. Bradley † John N. Bragg ‘39 † Diane Brezicki Tom G. ‘77 & Cheryl Brownlee Marko R. Bukovec ‘85 Donald M. ‘72 & Margaret Burton John C. Cairns ‘42 Robert E. Campbell ‘55 Hilary D. Caters ‘89 R. Gordon ‘61 & Celia Chaplin Arthur D. Charlton ‘49 John Cleave ‘51 † Donald W. Coons ‘82 Harry J. Daniel † G. Leiter ‘53 & Ricky Doolittle Carl F. Dorland † James I. Elliot ‘58 † & Elizabeth Larmond-Elliot Bruce W. & Karen Etherington Denis R. † & Janet Evans Jane Feagan † Ian M. Fraser ‘72 & Janine Schweitzer Crawford ‘56 † & Eve Gordon Timothy K. ‘68 & Darka Griffin Richard C. ‘74 & Cindy Hazell George C. ‘74 & Janet Hendrie Stephen N. ‘49 † & Betty Hooper William T. ‘76 & Joanne Hutton Brian A. ‘67 & Rosemary Iggulden Richard M. Ivey ‘43 † Jeffrey K. M. Jakobsen ‘91 Frederick N. C. III ‘53 † & Ellie Jerauld Robert C. ‘59 & Laureen Kinnear Joan H. Larkin ‘76 † Elizabeth Larmond-Elliot & James I. Elliot ‘58 † Donald H. Lie ‘52 † John M. Lind ‘54 †

Brian H. ‘71 & Carol Love William ‘66 & Betsy Marler James A. ‘94 & Carolyn McCabe W. Darcy ‘51 & Joyce McKeough John H. Milnes ‘31 † Bruce H. Mitchell ‘64 C. Paul Montgomery ‘54 Christa L. Moulden ‘98 Michael J. ‘70 & Karen Moulden Shawn A. ‘01 & Kristen Moulden Donald W. Naylor † Robert J. Pyne ‘76 Joan R. Randall Timothy G. T. Reid ‘78 Michael A. ‘61 & Margaret Rice Joseph C. † & Anita E. Robertson † D. S. ‘Bill’ ‘47 & Ann Rudd John C. Rudd ‘80 John H. ‘66 & Darlene Sandham James H. H. Scandrett ‘39 † Terence P. Scandrett ‘61 William H. ‘58 & Carole Sears Geoffrey M. Seymour ‘69 † A. Jon D. B. Silver Hugh A. Slater ‘44 † Joan Stevens Graham E. ‘71 † & Elizabeth Taylor Maggie M. Verity ‘06 William H. ‘71 & Katie Verity A. Ross Webster ‘60 Andrew & Annette Whiteley David Michael Whittle ‘64 H. Donald ‘48 & Monica Williams David S. ‘68 & Susan Willmot Michael L. ‘60 & Gwyne Willmot Ian ‘53 & Barbara Wood George R. H. Wyatt ‘73 Adam H. Zimmerman ‘44 †

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Photo taken August 2019

gifts by CURRENT AND FORMER FACULTY AND STAFF Brian Amyote Justin Baird Melissa Barone Jodi Battle Kimberly A. Becken Karlee Bell Michael J. & Michele A. Bett Matthew Bowie Christine E. Boyko Jane M. Bradley Catherine Burke Jenna Cameron Julie Cameron Andrea Carisse Linda Chang Andrea K. Charlton ‘92 Rhonda Corris-Collee Ruth E. Court Heather Cousins Saralyn Covent Richard A. ‘60 & Mary Ann Coy Tracy Crowe-Morey Danny Custodio Michael Cvetanovic David & Wendy E. (Crossingham) ‘99 Darby Clifton Dean Paul S. DeVellis Celeste N. Doucet ‘07 Peter & Jessica Doyle Jeffrey Drummond Lisa Dumont Derek J. Dunkley ‘87 & Wendy S. Q. Pak Sue Easton Ijeoma Eze-Ashimole Ellen M. Foster Mackenzie S. Fowler ‘11 Tricia Franklin Derek D. Fraser ‘79 Wayne Fraser & Eleanor Johnston Michael Grant Simon J. Hall Susan ( Oades ) Hazell Angie Hicks Brianne Hickson

Andrew Hitchcox Erin Howard Nancy Hunt Stephen E. Hunt ‘82 Ken & Charlene J. (Ebert) ‘83 Hutton Shelley Huxley Brian A. ‘67 & Rosemary Iggulden Stacey Iggulden Tobin Ireland & Taylor York-Ireland Zachary R. Jones Vinitha Kahandaliyanage Sara Karklins J. Edward & Hanna Kidd E. James Kingstone ‘75 Anne E. Kubu Peggy Lampard Andrew D. Leach Margaret E. Lech Aaron Lee Janet M. Lewis Marcie A. Lewis ‘03 Kory Lippert Alexandra M. Little ‘03 Christopher J. ‘62 & Patricia Loat Robert Lockey Brenda Lockhart Alexandra Lucenti Sylvie Luo Lachlan Macintosh Sandra J. Magee Katherine Marrone Spencer Martin R. Gerardo Martinez Adam Masterton Scott McLean Andrew & Erin McNiven James B. Milligan Kirk M. Mitchell & Kathy E. Anderson Kyle Moccia Louise Montreuil Betty Morgan Michael J. Moulden ‘70 Andrea Nauf Duane Nickerson Paul & Kim O’Rourke

Kristy Onclin Karen P. Oude-Reimerink Barbara V. Papp Geoffrey R. ‘80 & Stephanie Park James & Valerie Parke Anna Parkhomenko Karen Pavlakovich Sarah Peterson R. Brent Pfab Lance & Kim Postma Marilyn G. Prociuk Michael A. Rice ‘61 Jennifer Roberge Lara A. Rootes Bryan J. Rose ‘96 Jessica Roud Lori Schultz Dereck Schwandt Rachael A. M. Scott Robert Sergnese W.L. ‘Tim’ Sharpe † A. Jon D. B. Silver Benjamin Smith Courtney M. Smith ‘06 E. Anne Snowden Marina Spalla Annick C. Stark Derek Stephenson Teresa Stevens James Steward Sarah M. Thompson Suzanne Tisi Jay W. ‘96 & Donna M. Tredway Lorraine Upham Rory Vandenbrink Jesse Vasquez Scott K. Vernon Virginia R. Vickers Blake Walker Scott Walker Amanda Wark Andrew Whiteley David C. & Sarah C. Whitty Loretta Whitty Eugenie Wiley † denotes deceased

90

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gifts by CURRENT AND PAST PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS & FRIENDS Brian Amyote & Tanya MacAusland Amyote John R. ‘65 & Kathy Anderson Nestor Luis G. Aristiguieta Frias ‘77 & Mariantonia Aristiguieta Aaron Asp & Renee Smith Bob & Leighan S. ( Leggat ) ‘83 Basadur Howard E. & Mary Bell James and Elizabeth Bennett Peter R. ‘72 & Heather Bennett Michael J. & Michele A. Bett David V. & Phyllis J. Bloom Sean & Joan Booth T. Larry & Joan Bourk Dale & Jane M. Bradley Tony P. and Laurel F. Broski William R. Brunt, Jr. Marko R. Bukovec ‘85 C. Glenn and Heidi Burgess Michele-Elise C. Burnett ‘86 Julie Cameron Brian & Freedom Chan R. Gordon ‘61 & Celia Chaplin Sunyoung Choi Graeme S. Clark Cameron Clayton & Linda Chang Timothy J. ‘81 & Amy Coffin Brian G. Collins & Amanda Demers Charles & Aimee B. Cook Winston Cook Chris Cookson Adrian and Mary Coote Suzanne W. Court ‘86 Ruth E. Court Nancy Court William H. ‘54 & Ione Cowen Conrad Cowherd & Henny Didriksen-Cowherd Richard A. ‘60 & Mary Ann Coy Norma Y. Croxon Cort M. Day Shawn De Laat Paul S. & Alexandra DeVellis Elizabeth A. Douglas John C. ‘67 & Hilda Drummond Derek J. Dunkley ‘87 & Wendy S. Q. Pak Madeleine Duquemin Chris Dyck & Nicole Reid Ingrid Efstathiou Shane & Barbara Elliott Pinhas & Sigalit Ephrat Bruce W. & Karen Etherington Robert D. ‘77 & Nancy Evans Joseph N. & Cathy Ferrante Barbara Fraser Sean P. ‘87 & Shannon Gallaway Shunjun Gao & Chunhong Zhou A. Elliot Gardiner David & Kim Giles D. Harold W. ‘69 Jason Gould & Sarah E. Eyton ‘86 Susan Graham

Timothy K. ‘68 & Darka Griffin John & Linda Grubic Costanza Guarducci Daphne Hamlin Gregory N. & Jo Hanna Indrasiri I. & Jaya Hapangama I. Perera George C. ‘74 & Janet Hendrie C. Leigh ‘71 & Dinah Hogg Ken & Charlene J. (Ebert) Hutton ‘83 Anthony & Elizabeth Idigbe Brian A. ‘67 & Rosemary Iggulden Paul G. Iggulden ‘72 Tobin Ireland & Taylor York-Ireland Richard W. Ivey ‘68 Oi Sook Jung & Ki Seak Yoo Christopher & Vinitha Kahandaliyanage Dean Karachi ‘87 J. Edward & Hanna Kidd Margaret Kingstone Robert Korthals and Janet Charlton Dean & Lee-Ann Kraus Peter K. S. & Viola Lam Peggy Lampard Andrew D. Leach & Nicky Adamou-Leach Douglas R. ‘54 & Maryella Leggat Justin Leidwanger & Elizabeth Greene Suzanne (Pagé) Lévesque Jamie Lewin Janet M. Lewis Yan Li & Dengke Pan Kenian Lin & Xiaorui Pan Geoffrey W. ‘71 & Jane Lind H. A. Patrick Little Jigang Liu & Huiqi Yan Ying Liu & Qing Yang Yang Christopher J. ‘62 & Patricia Loat Peter S. & Sandra L. Lochead Fabien C. Loranger & Diane E. Martin Suzanne Luey Sylvie Luo & Won-Hi Han Thomas Lynam & Kimberly A. Becken Philip A. ‘79 & Robin E. Macdonald Robert B. Macdonald ‘79 & Heather Morris James & Jill MacPhail Kenneth L. MacRitchie Sandra J. Magee Ralph & Diane Maloney Spencer Martin & Beth Douglas Robert B. ‘82 & Denise Mason Elizabeth Mason W. Darcy ‘51 & Joyce McKeough William & Margaret G. McLeod Patrick & Marleen McMaster Malcolm A. ‘84 & Barbara A. McRae James B. & Ann Milligan Bruce H. ‘64 & Vladka Mitchell Kirk M. Mitchell & Kathy E. Anderson Frederick L. ‘45 & Molly Moffat John Morey and Tracy Crowe-Morey John H. & Les Anne Morrison William H. ‘86 & Karen Morrison Michael J. ‘70 & Karen Moulden

Susan Musselman John C. & Brenda Newell Dale Nicholson Perry ‘95 & Elaine Nitsopoulos Adam & Kristy Onclin Paul & Kim O’Rourke Geoffrey R. ‘80 & Stephanie Park Joseph E. Patchett G. Scott Paterson ‘82 Liqun Pei & Vivian Yihui Huang Abdul H. & Nicole Pirani Lance & Kim Postma William Prestia & Laura Menechella Rodrigo Quintana & Malusa De la Vina Mohammed Radwan & Omnia Sherif Brad A. Ralph & Charmaine M. Bellefleur Donna Ralph Terence H. ‘66 & Denyse Rapsey Alex Reyes & Katherine Richardson Michael A. ‘61 & Margaret Rice Timothy H. ‘60 & Gini Rigby John C. & Lara A. Rootes Dan & Jessica Roud Mary Ryan Terence P. ‘61 & Angela Scandrett Arthur A. Schmon ‘67 & Lucy Bocchino Rachael A. M. Scott George D. & Lorrie L. Searle Ryan & Nicoletta Serravalle Alexander Siplyarsky & Anna Parkhomenko David Skok & Alison A. C. Loat ‘94 Steven Smyth & Teresa Stevens E. Anne Snowden Patrick Steier & Maria Menechella Carsten & Bettina Stelzer Margaret Stephenson Robert W. ‘73 & Sandra Sterne Robert S. ‘71 & Martha Stratton Jihui Su & Xiaofeng Xu Jo Ann Sweeney Clifford Tattersall Elizabeth Taylor Jerome D. Jr. & Nancy J. Taylor William & Ruth Todd Karen Tortorella Jay W. ‘96 & Donna M. Tredway Axel & Hannah R. Ulrich Scott K. & Alissa Vernon Norris W. Walker ‘52 William O. ‘77 & Valerie Wallace John S. Walton ‘49 Ping Wang Fred Wanklyn & Jennifer Rowsell Todd M. & Amanda Wark Dennis A. Webb & Helen K. Bryk-Webb Rod R. & Jamie L. West Mark S. Wharton & Leona Roache-Wharton Andrew & Annette Whiteley David C. & Sarah C. Whitty Lloyd A. Wiggins

TIGER | SPRING 2021

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Michelle Scrivener

gifts by CURRENT AND PAST PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS & FRIENDS (cont.) David S. ‘68 & Susan Willmot Jim Winterbottom & Sarah M. Thompson J. W. Timothy ‘76 & Lauri Witzel Kenneth Wong & Elissa Tsoi Marcy Wydman

92

flourishing

Huiming Yan & Minghui Liu Song Ye & Dejun Gao Yoshikazu & Patricia Yonemushi J. Christopher ‘78 & Dorrez Young Lu Zhang & Lijun Gao

Thomas & Tiffany Zhou Liang Zhou & Wei Cui Zhongyuan Zhu & Jufang Chen Michael & Rosa Ziolkowski


OUR

alumni

6,790*

ACTIVE ALUMNI

2,195

4,595

WOMEN

4,127

CANADIANS

429

CARIBBEAN

MEN

1,862

INTERNATIONAL

109

UNITED KINGDOM

801

AMERICANS

640 ASIA

246

EUROPE

11,417 LIVING ALUMNI

*Alumni for whom we have valid contact information TIGER | SPRING 2021

93


CUMULATIVE GIVING* AS OF JUNE 30, 2020 TO RIDLEY COLLEGE, THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION AND THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC. * electronic records maintained by the Development Office beginning in 1986.

DIAMOND $1,000,000+ Samuel I.A. Anderson ‘45 † Frederick K. Ashbaugh † Christopher Carter ‘68 Clarence J. Chandran J. Douglas ‘53 † & Nancy Court Suzanne W. Court ‘86 Patrick F. Lett ‘67 † Hubert T. Mandeville ‘40 † Ronald N. Mannix ‘66 Frederick P. Mannix ‘60 W. Darcy McKeough ‘51 The R. Samuel McLaughlin Foundation Bruce H. Mitchell ‘64 G. Scott Paterson ‘82 Ridley College Foundation Ridley College Family Guild Ridley College Fund USA, Inc. Stewart D. Siebens ‘64 In Honour of John M. Stevens ‘42 and Robert W. Stevens ‘44 Norris W. Walker ‘52

PLATINUM $250,000–$999,999 Anonymous James B. Butterfield ‘70 George D.B. Butterfield ‘57 Chartwells Peter B. Coffin ‘78 Conam Charitable Foundation Philip D. Court ‘85 Michael C. Court ‘82 John B. Cronyn ‘39 † G. Mark Curry ‘62 Dorothy & Ridley Doolittle † John C. Drake ‘65 Estate of Donald Lie ‘52 Estate of Marjory E.J. Cain Estate of Geoffrey M. Seymour ‘69 Estate of John Lind ‘54 Estate of Andre Buller ‘54 Estate of Joe & Anita Robertson Robert D. Evans ‘77 Hugh D. Evans ‘87 H. Stephen Gooderham ‘41 † Peter S. Gooderham ‘44 † D. Harold W. Gould ‘69 Timothy K. Griffin ‘68 S. MacDonald ‘Mac’ ‘46 † & Ellie Irwin † Richard M. Ivey ‘43 † Richard W. Ivey ‘68 Fabien C. Loranger & Diane E. Martin E.W. Mandeville, Jr. ‘38 † Leighton W. McCarthy ‘62 James E. McConnell ‘31 †

94

flourishing

Gilbert E. McElheny † Donald S. McMurtry ‘82 Michael & Kelly Meighen John H. Milnes ‘31 † John B. Mitchell ‘71 Yanick Pagé ‘84 Robert J. Pyne ‘76 Ridley Graduate Boat Club Terence P. Scandrett ‘61 William H. Sears ‘58 Hugh A. Slater ‘44 † R. Michael H. Stevens ‘77 John W. Stevens ‘74 James G. Thompson ‘44 Robert † & Joan Utting John G. Walker ‘58 † The Weathertop Foundation Luke A. Weinstein ‘72 David S. Willmot ‘68

GOLD $100,000–$250,000 B. Wallace Anderson ‘49 John R. Anderson ‘65 Anonymous Brian W. Barr ‘61 Real & Anne Bergevin Georgina H. Black ‘85 Henry B. Burgoyne ‘67 † Burgoyne Holdings Inc. Centrinity R. Gordon Chaplin ‘61 Harry J. Daniel † André & France C. Desmarais David A. Dodge ‘61 Estate of Dorothy M. Cooke Estate of Joan H. Larkin ‘76 Estate Of Graham M. MacLachlan ‘33 Estate of J. Ronald Angleman Estate of Richard M. Ivey Bruce & Karen Etherington Denis † & Janet Evans J.D. Peter Franks ‘42† Crawford Gordon ‘56 † Bryan & Angela Gransden James D. Greenshields ‘76 Richard C. Hazell ‘74 George C. Hendrie ‘74 George M. Hendrie ‘49 † Brian A. ‘67 & Rosemary Iggulden Jeffrey K.M. Jakobsen ‘91 Daniel O. Jarvis ‘68 Dean Karachi ‘87 J. Edward & Hanna Kidd Steven D. Latner ‘69 Suzanne Lévesque Philip B. Lind ‘61 Chenzhong Luo & Hongyue Wang John M. Lind ‘54 †

Wilmot L. Matthews ‘54 Donald S. McFarlane ‘76 † Michael J. Moulden ‘70 William Prestia & Laura Menechella Robert W. Stevens Q.C. ‘44 † Joseph C. † & Anita E. Robertson † Michael J. Sabia ‘72 & Hilary Pearson Ward H.M. Seymour ‘74 W. Carter Siebens ‘82 Graham B. Stanley ‘85 Patrick Steier & Maria Menechella Joan Stevens John M. Stevens ‘42 † Elizabeth Taylor Thomas & Mary Urban Vancouver Foundation William O. Wallace ‘77 Michael L. Willmot ‘60 F. Ian Wood ‘53 George R.H. Wyatt ‘73 Zhongyuan Zhu & Jufang Chen Adam H. Zimmerman ‘44 †

SILVER $50,000–$99,999 Edward † & Ana Abady Anonymous James & Elizabeth Bennett Edward J. Berkhout ‘76 McLean Budden William J. Burke ‘77 John S. Burns ‘60 † Alexander J. Carley ‘53 † Denise Chan James D. Chaplin ‘51 † Richard R.G. Chaplin ‘78 † Richard R.P. Court ‘50 † Allan & Lynn Day Leigh Ann Epperson Estate of Allan Bond Jr. ‘46 Estate of Alexander Carley Estate of Donald W. Naylor Fernando Estrada & Nadine D. Karachi ‘87 Ian M. Fraser ‘72 W. Palmer Goetz ‘18 † John H. Gooderham ‘57 † Anthony R. & Helen M. Graham Arthur ‘19 & Joan Harrison † Harry C. Hatch ‘67 Frederick N.C. Jerauld III ‘53 † Ingle International Inc. Robert J.A. Irwin, Jr. ‘46 † William B. Irwin ‘72 Anthony B. Jerauld ‘59 Peggy Kingstone The Kohler Family Mei Kou H.S. Henry Lee ‘79 Douglas R. Leggat ‘54


Janet M. Lewis Kenian Lin & Xiaorui Pan Lind Family Foundation Walter H. ‘Jed’ ‘33 & Susan Lind † Geoffrey W. Lind ‘71 Robert B. Macdonald ‘79 Philip A. Macdonald ‘79 Pasquale Marra Tony ‘42 † & Judy Mason Donald L. Matthews ‘60 Donald C. McFarlane ‘44 † Cosmo & Gina Menechella Microsoft Corporation A. Hoadley † & Ruthie Mitchell Paul A.G. Morabito ‘82 Eleanor Osler Anthony M. Partington ‘65 Frederick M. Partington ‘67 Joan R. Randall Michael A. Rice ‘61 Ridley College Women’s Guild Toronto Branch Bryan J. Rose ‘96 Geoffrey M. Seymour ‘69 † J. Griffin Strasenburgh ‘66 † F. Gregory Thompson ‘68 Charles A. Thompson ‘28 † Charles F.S. Tidy ‘36 † William & Ruth Todd William G. Urban ‘86 William H. Verity ‘71 John S. Walton ‘49 Yingchun Wang & Dongmei Qiu Robert C. Watson ‘63 Donald G. & Ivy Willmot † Victor C.H. Woo ‘98

BRONZE $25,000–$49,999 Linda M.E. Alexanian ‘85 David ‘88 & Katherine ‘88 Anderson Anonymous Gregory J. Aziz ‘68 Brian R. Babcock Allan Bond ‘46 † Henry M. ‘Mac’ Borden ‘64 Joseph C. Botticelli ‘97 William A. Bryden ‘43 † Marko R. Bukovec ‘85 Kenneth C. Bunston † Michael K. Bunston ‘79 J. David Bunston ‘76 Gary F. Burroughs ‘64 Donald M. Burton ‘72 Huntley H. Bush John C. Cairns ‘42 Giles B. Campbell John W. Carlisle ‘44 † David K. Carter ‘88 Hilary D. Caters ‘89 Kelvin S. Chen ‘70

Peter T. Christensen ‘61 Timothy J. Coffin ‘81 Christopher Collingwood ‘66 Steven S. Copp ‘84 John K. Coutts † Crawford, Smith & Swallow D. Bruce Croxon ‘79 Larry G. Culver ‘66 & Eva Riis-Culver Jad & Lola Damouni Frederick W. Derry † Mary Drope † Doris M. Drummond † E. Peter Elwood ‘66 Estate of John H. Milnes Estate of George Gooderham Estate of Donna Gauley-McCarthy Estate of Edward B. Magee Jr. Mark Evans ‘81 Charles O. Fairbank ‘59 Roderick & Margaret Ferguson Tony & Cindy Fischer Macquorn R. Forrester ‘51 † Birchall Family Foundation David Friedman Chi Chuen Fung & Yee Hung Chan Shunjun Gao & Chunhong Zhou Peter D.H. Greenwood ‘78 Corinne Hansen † Stig-Ove ‘59 † & Marja-Liisa Hansen C.M. Victor Harding ‘66 Sandra Henderson Frank W. Hillock † Juan A. Hinestrosa ‘80 Thomas E. ‘45 † & Ruth Hodgins Holt Renfrew Steven ‘49 & Betty Hooper G. Peter Horne ‘51 Robert C. Howard ‘63 William T. Hutton ‘76 Paul G. Iggulden ‘72 George M. Irwin ‘69 Babatunde & Kehinde Ismail David & Joanne Jones John P. Kennedy ‘74 Stewart E. Kingstone † Robert C. Kinnear ‘59 The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation Lorenzo Kling ‘85 Rudolf & Rosario Kling C. Michael Kray ‘88 Roy E. Laine Martin C. Lam ‘76 Robin E.A. Lampard ‘85 Scott G.A. ‘88 & Amanda S. Lampard ‘88 Gary Last & Cori Simms Margaret E. Lech Kwing-Tong & Tinna Li Donald H. Lie ‘52 † Christopher J. ‘62 & Patricia M. Loat Brian H. Love ‘71 Fraser ‘73 & Karen MacKay

James & Jill L. MacPhail Richard C. Malone ‘59 Michael L. ‘41 † & Myrna Mandeville Thomas P. Marian ‘81 Robert B. ‘82 & Denise Mason Dragan & Lisa Matovic Robert O. Matthews ‘56 David R. McBride ‘51 Dean & Susan McCann John L.C. ‘32 † & Ruth McCarthy John A. McLeish ‘66 MDS Capital Corp. Robert & Nancy Meehan Katharine M.O. Miller ‘21 † Edwin M. Mills ‘48 David R. Morgan ‘65 Christa L. Moulden ‘98 Shawn A. ‘01 & Kristen Moulden Peter Naylon Niagara/Baie-Comeau Community Foundation Niagara Airbus Inc. George S. Niblett ‘50 Harry P. Oakes Allan & Pauline Orr † Glyn W. Osler ‘48 † Paul & Mary Oster David & Tracy Overbeeke Matthew J. Picken ‘93 John A. Pollock ‘55 Thomas E. Richardson ‘58 Robert Schmon ‘70 Edward M. Sellers ‘59 Peter H. Sims ‘51 † Neil & Patricia Smith Philip R.L. Somerville ‘65 Gregory B. Souter ‘85 John F. Storm ‘53 Robert S. ‘71 Stratton William N. Sun ‘09 James R. Swayze ‘82 & Petra Kern-Swayze ‘83 Peter F.E. Swinchatt ‘51 Michael & Ira Tatham Graham E. Taylor ‘71 † Donald & Connie Tigert Thomas N. Urban ‘84 Nora Walker Paul H.C. Wang ‘75 Yongzhong Wang & Zhongqi Zhou Andrew & Annette Whiteley Douglas S. Wilson Harold A. Wilson ‘67 J.W. Timothy Witzel ‘76

† denotes deceased

TIGER | SPRING 2021

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gifts IN HONOUR OR IN MEMORY OF IN MEMORY OF SAMUEL ANDERSON ‘45 Kenneth L. MacRitchie IN MEMORY OF NICK BADOVINAC ‘61 Jonathan C. Vick ‘61 IN MEMORY OF ANDREW BELTON ‘66 James H. ‘60 & Louise Belton IN MEMORY OF W. PAUL ELGIE ‘54 C. Paul Montgomery ‘54 IN MEMORY OF LAURENCE HAMLIN ‘89 Dave H. Armstrong ‘59 David J. F. Creighton ‘59 David C. Finlay ‘59 Daphne Hamlin David K. Lett ‘59 Edward M. Sellers ‘59 Eric R. Van der Sar ‘59 IN MEMORY OF CORINNE HANSON Barbara Fraser

IN MEMORY OF DONALD HUNT Nancy Hunt Stephen E. Hunt ‘82 & Carolyn Kennedy IN MEMORY OF RICHARD M. IVEY Q.C. ‘43 W. Darcy ‘51 & Joyce McKeough IN MEMORY OF PAUL LEWIS AND E. JANE MORRIS Steven L. Rotenberg ‘86 IN MEMORY OF DONALD S. MCFARLANE ‘76 Graeme S. Clark Susan Musselman IN MEMORY OF GLYN W. OSLER ‘48 A. Elliot Gardiner IN MEMORY OF EDSON, PETER ‘53, PORTER ‘43 & RODERICK PFOHL Timothy S. ‘76 & Margret Pfohl

IN HONOUR OF SOPHIA ‘28 & SYDNEY ‘24 REID Chris Dyck and Nicole Reid IN MEMORY OF PETER ROGERS ‘63 William N. Kinnear ‘63 IN MEMORY OF GEOFFREY M. SEYMOUR ‘69 Michael J. ‘70 & Karen Moulden IN MEMORY OF REVEREND GERALD S. SHANTZ Hugh J. M. Silk ‘87 IN MEMORY OF CHRISTOPHER D. SHARPE ‘86 Tim † & Elizabeth Sharpe IN MEMORY OF JONATHON YOUNG AND JOHN WALKER James D. ‘77 & Fiona Walker IN HONOUR OF SONGYI WANG ‘23 Ping Wang

† denotes deceased

96

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