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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017 Surrey

Richmond

Victoria

Sales • Lease • Management Your Richmond Specialist www.interlinkrealty.ca email: info@interlinkrealty.ca 604.271.3888

Edmonton

What’s inside:

NEWS: Mayor deals with double blow over Massey Tunnel replacement 3

n Richmond Ringette’s U-19 team pose with their gold medals in Kelowna. The team was marooned overnight on the notorious Coquihalla Highway between Hope and Merritt, due to freezing rain, en route to the event. The tournament organizers also awarded the team’s bus driver (front) a medal for getting the girls there safely. Photo submitted

Stranded team struck gold

Ringette stars win tourney despite spending night on Coquihalla ALANCAMPBELL Staff Reporter

ACAMPBELL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

M

aybe it was the camaraderie or perhaps they were simply running off adrenalin. Whatever it was, the exhausted players of the Richmond Ringette U-19 team, who spent the night stuck on a bus stranded on the Coquihalla Highway between Hope and Merritt, did what they’d never managed in seven years of competing in Kelowna — win the tournament’s gold medal. It was the end of a remarkable few days for the girls, who started out at 1 p.m. last Thursday, when they set off on the bus — along with a U-12 team — after checking with the bus company that all would be well, despite an ominous forecast of snow and freezing rain.

They managed to get beyond Hope at coach Laura Takasaki, whose husband, around 4 p.m. without incident, before Troy, also coaches the U-19 team, where the bus got stopped in its tracks about 90 their daughters, Hailey and Tayah, play. minutes later, a good 35 kilometres shy “The driver kept the bus running all of Merritt, due to freeznight to keep us warm ing rain causing dangerand we had a washous conditions on the room on board, so it The driver kept the bus infamous Coquihalla. was better than some As the evening wore running all night to keep us people’s situation. on, bad turned to “But, we always warm and we had a washworse when, at around overdo the sandwiches, midnight, DriveBC anso this time they were room on board, so it was nounced the road was all gone.” better than some people’s being closed overnight, After spending a leaving the team, and “very uncomfortable” situation. many other drivers, manight crammed on the – Laura Takasaki rooned — unable to go bus, the team got going forwards or turn around. again mid-morning and “Our driver, Don Purfinally got to Kelowna at dy, has been driving for 11 a.m. on Friday, 22 about 40 years and he said he had never hours after setting off from Richmond. seen conditions like it,” said assistant See Driver page 3

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PHOTOS: All the fun of Family Day at the cultural centre 18

SPORTS: City final rematch looms for Sharks and Wildcats 20

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

NEWSin the City

Double whammy of bad bridge news that because the bridge towers are to be built on land, there was little reason for the federal government to intervene, as the project doesn’t directly impact the n the heels of receiving a letter from river, which is federal territory. Canada’s Minister of Environment Steveston-Richmond East MP Joe Pestating that the federal government would schisolido did not return several calls by not conduct an environmental assessthe News over the past week. ment of the proposed bridge to replace One of the pre- and post-election the George Massey pledges Peschisolido Tunnel, Mayor Malcolm and the federal Liberal Brodie was hit with more government made was — albeit expected — bad The concerns raised by to strengthen the news. federal government’s Richmond about this On Thursday, Brodie environmental review stated he was disappointproject have continually process, which critics, ed yet unsurprised that including the Liberal been ignored throughout the provincial government Party in opposition, issued environmental the public consultation and claimed was watered approval for the 10-lane, down by the Conservaenvironmental assessment $3.5 billion bridge. tives, as it grants more “The concerns raised power to provinces processes. by Richmond about this and fails to account for project have continually – Malcolm Brodie broader environmenbeen ignored throughout tal impacts, such as the public consultaclimate change. tion and environmental Environmentalists assessment processes,” have condemned the bridge plan. stated Brodie. “Once again the government has One of those concerns is the removal of decided to ignore the reality of climate the tunnel, which the City of Richmond change in its infrastructure decisions,” contends will further industrialize the Frasaid Peter McCartney, Wilderness Comser River, by allowing bigger ships to pass mittee Climate Campaigner Thursday, via up and down the south arm, and increase a statement. pressure on development of farmland. “Expanding highways enables urban The Richmond News asked the provinsprawl, encourages pollution and ulticial government last year why the tunmately increases congestion. nel must be removed. As is, it sits just “Why are we starving transit while highbeneath the river bed. way expansion gets priority? Imagine how According to Geoff Freer, executive proj- far $3.5 billion would go towards more ect director of the George Massey Tunnel bus and SkyTrain service,” said McCartReplacement Project, the four-lane tunnel ney. cannot be left beneath the river because But Minister of Transportation Todd it poses a risk to dyke stability during an Stone disagrees with arguments such earthquake. as McCartney’s. Stone said the “green However, the City of Richmond is not bridge” reduces idling (a key finding of aware of any special risks to the dykes the environmental assessment) at the associated with the tunnel. existing bottleneck. The provincial environmental assessThe certificate comes with 33 condiment certificate issued Thursday calls for tions, including establishing fish habitat in the tunnel to be filled in beneath the dyke two nearby sloughs. and the four connecting tubes to be dug Brodie maintained the bridge contraup from below the river bed. dicts a regional transportation plan set That leaves a Metro Vancouver water forth by nearly all of Metro Vancouver’s line standing in the way of deeper dredgmayors, save for Delta mayor Lois Jacking for larger vessels. As well, significant son, who supports the bridge. dredging would be required at the river’s Brodie said the last remaining obstacle mouth. As such, the certificate does not to the bridge maybe a new government in assess the implications of such dredging, Victoria. as tunnel decommissioning would not The BC NDP has not stated outright that directly change the size of vessels using it will end the bridge project, if elected in the river; the certificate only addresses May. the footprint of the bridge. See Horgan page 6 Brodie said it was his understanding Graeme Wood

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

O

n Richmond News carrier Abby Spence catches some snowflakes on her tongue last week, during her delivery round with her dad and sister in West Richmond. The News is currently on the look-out for carriers on various routes across the city. Call 604-249-3132 or email distribution@richmondnews.com. Photo submitted

Driver: Given gold medal From page 1 “Our first game was supposed to be at 12:30 p.m., but the tournament committee was awesome, they shuffled things around,” said Takasaki. Takasaki said the team normally does well at the tournament, but they were surprised to win gold for the first time, especially given the less than perfect preparations. And, to top it off, the tournament committee bestowed the team’s bus driver, Purdy, with his very own gold medal, as well. “They wanted to thank him for his efforts,” added Takasaki. The team arrived back home on Monday after a “totally clear” return journey that took the requisite five hours. “One of the 12-year-old players, who hadn’t been on this journey before, said it was ‘really fast’ on the way home,” laughed Takasaki.

n The Richmond Ringette players and parents en route to Kelowna, during their arduous 22-hour road trip. Photo submitted

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Includes Soup or Salad and Tiramisu

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A3

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Offer valid until February 28, 2017 with this coupon

www.felicos.com • Full Menu On-Line


A4 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

NEWSin the City

New office construction not meeting demand Evan Duggan

Vancouver Sun

R

ichmond’s office vacancy has been on a steady decline since cresting above 20 per cent in 2012, and is now ready for fresh office developments to meet rising demand, say commercial real estate brokers and the city’s manager of economic development. As of the end of 2016, Richmond’s office vacancy rate had fallen to 9.5 per cent. That was down from 12.6 per cent in the first quarter of the year, and follows a downward trend since rising above 20-per cent vacancy in 2012, according Colliers International’s Metro Vancouver Office Report for the fourth quarter of 2016. The report said the office vacancy rate could keep falling this year, perhaps touching as low as six per cent. Over the past decade, Richmond has not added any significant office space, said Neonila Lilova, the city’s manager of economic development. She said that is set to change, albeit modestly. There are now four office development projects underway that the city is confident will reach completion, according to development applications listed on the city’s website and highlighted by Lilova. All together,

those projects will add an estimated I speak to businesses every 224,000-square-feet of office space to the day and probably within a market between now year and a half, I...could fill and the end of 2019. Only one is currently about 100,000-square-feet, under construction, and I’m not exaggerating. Lilova said. The International Trade Centre – Neonila Lilova, city at 8477 Bridgeport manager of economic Road is expected to be complete by the development middle of this year. Its 12-storey strata office component will add nearly 98,000-squarefeet of space to the market.. And at 6860 No. 3 Road, the iFortune Centre is a mixed-use tower that would include 105,000-square-feet of office space. That project is scheduled for a public hearing this month and could be complete in late 2018. Lilova says these projects, while welcomed, won’t be enough to meet a surging demand for rental office space along the No. 3 Road/Canada Line corridor.

The City of Richmond invites your input on the future vision of

Minoru Park

The planning process for the future vision of Minoru Park has started and we want to hear from you. Information boards, activities for all ages and a survey will be available at two open houses on Thursday, February 16 and Saturday, February 18, 2017. Open Houses Thursday, February 16, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Minoru Place Activity Centre, 7660 Minoru Gate Saturday, February 18, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at City Hall Atrium, 6911 No 3 Road

Open House Feb 16

She said the ITC Centre is strata, meaning that the spaces will be relatively small and would not be expandable or suitable for fast-growing tech companies, for instance. “It’s just not feasible for someone looking for 30,000 to 50,000-square-feet of space,” she said, noting that an office building with large, leasable and flexible floor plates is needed, and soon. “An institutional developer is definitely the right fit for something like that because these groups invest over a longer period of time,” she said. “I speak to businesses every day and probably within a year and a half, I probably could fill about 100,000-square-feet, and I’m not exaggerating.” Much of the city’s office space has been confined to a pair of business parks: The Crestwood, under the Knight Street Bridge; and the Airport Executive Park, Lilova said. She said neither are well-connected to transit. “You have to drive to get there,” she said, noting those tenants tend to be lowprofile tech firms and call centres. From 2007 until about three years ago, those parks were experiencing extremely high vacancies, she said. “Crestwood was at 35 per cent vacancy at some point, and the Airport Executive Park was about 25 per cent vacancy, which is substantial — well above the regional average.” In response to those numbers, developers stopped building new office space in the city, she said. But in 2009, the Canada Line opened and started to stoke commerce along No. 3 Road, she said.

Open House Feb 18 City Hall

Input received at the open houses will contribute to the development of guiding principles that will be presented to Council for approval. Once approved, the guiding principles will be used to create the concept plan options which will be presented for public feedback in the summer of 2017. Attend one or both of the drop-in style public open houses to review information boards, talk with City Park Planners, participate in activities and complete the survey. You can also visit www.LetsTalkRichmond.ca from Thursday, February 16 to Sunday, March 5, 11:59 p.m. to learn more about the process, view the open house boards and complete the survey online. For more information, contact the Parks Department at 604-244-1208 or visit www.richmond.ca/parksprojects

www.richmond.ca

n Office development in Richmond had stalled prior to completion of the Canada Line SkyTrain. Photo by Ric Ernst

pathwaysclubhouse.com

SOCCER COACHES NEEDED

Celebrating 60 years

Richmond FC is now accepting applications for volunteer coaches for the 2017/18 soccer season.

The deadline to apply is Monday February 20. Applications should be directed to admin@richmondfc.ca www.richmondfc.ca


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

A5

NEWSin the City

What makes effective consultation debated Graeme Wood

Realtor and community activist Lyn Terborg says the City of Richmond’s public consultation process is flawed and requires more opportunities for back-and-forth dialogue behen and how does the Richmond city tween citizens, city planners, outside experts council choose to conduct public conand councillors. sultation and when does it choose to push Terborg, who in 2015 formed Richmond’s new bylaws through with no open houses first ratepayers’ group in the Steveston and online forums, but only a public hearing, neighbourhood of Westwind to pressure the as required by provincial law? city to terminate land-use contracts — and The matter appears to be discretionary. thus three-storey homes — believes the most For instance, council is not moving ahead recent round of public with consultation on consultation — on house banning unlicensed setbacks (size) and short-term rentals, but green space (landscapwill conduct broad coning) — is tedious for a House massing open houses: sultations on restricting regular citizen to follow. z Cambie Community Centre house sizes on farmland. “The city is asking the Feb.16, 6 - 8 p.m. “You don’t have to go community to particiz Thompson Community Centre further than campaign pate, but we don’t seem Feb. 23, 6 - 8 p.m. contributions to see why to have the ability to Tree protection bylaw open houses: this is a queasy issue,” contribute to policy,” said z Cambie Community Centre Feb. said Coun. Carol Day, on Terborg. 27, 6-8 p.m. the matter of farm mega “These open houses z Hamilton Community Centre mansions. are static presentations; March 23, 6 - 8 p.m. Day, who has rarely a display board with a inched away from supstaff member. You can’t porting broader public possibly go into a public consultation, especially on development house and assess the technical information,” applications, did just that when she wanted said Terborg. to put a rush on restricting mega mansions She suggests more opportunities for diaon farms. logue and having third-party experts weigh “When something has been beat to death, in at such forums. As well, she would like like these homes on farmland, do we really the city to open up a comments section at need six open houses on that? I don’t see the LetsTalkRichmond.ca for people to discuss need,” said Day. ideas. Another issue is how consultation takes Terborg also argues many consultations place.

n Local realtor Lyn Terborg and community activist says more people would feel engaged with local issues, as they did last year during a debate on house sizes and Land Use Contracts, if councillors showed up at open houses and there was more opportunity to provide feedback. File photo

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

W

OPEN HOUSES

have decisions that are pre-determined by city staff. Additionally, Terborg said councillors should be present at open houses. As it stands, it is council policy they not show up to such meetings, instead relying on staff to relay residents’ comments to them, in a report to council. After the 2014 election, newly-elected Coun. Alexa Loo and Day did show up to some open houses. “They had the (guts) to go out there, but got their wrists slapped,” said Terborg. Veteran Coun. Bill McNulty said it is council policy for councillors not to show up at open houses, as expressing their opinions would influence the public. When asked why a councillor cannot just show up to an open house and listen, as Loo did in 2015 during the LUC consultations,

McNulty said it is “difficult to dispel wearing two hats” and “we have to be careful because we walk a fine line.” As for when council decides to conduct consultation, McNulty said it is discretionary. “I figured we already got lots of feedback” on illegal hotels, he said. But, “we heard some” feedback on farm mansions, “but not as widespread as you may have thought,” said McNulty. He noted the city conducts many open houses that facilitate dialogue, such as the ongoing tree protection bylaw sessions. Day said, for the most part, she now agrees with staying clear of public open houses, however, she readily admits it is difficult to walk such a fine line, as she recently visited an open house on housing. Furthermore, she openly states her opinions, even as consultation is ongoing.

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A6 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

NEWSin the City

Horgan: Supports the mayors' plan

From page 3 “I have not heard them say they are dead set against it,” said Brodie. NDP leader John Horgan told CKNW in October he supports the mayors’ transportation plan. But when pressed to answer “yes” or “no” to supporting the bridge, Horgan stated: “I’ll side with the communities every time . . . It’s not a priority for the region.” Brodie, who supports the idea of a cheaper replacement tunnel, said he also still holds out hope that there will be further dialogue between the province, Metro Vancouver and municipalities. Furthermore, if the bridge does go ahead, Brodie said it will further complicate plans to establish regional tolling (road pricing), which he supports, or even a blanket $1 bridge crossing toll, as has been proposed, to pay for transit-related projects. “The problem is with multiple jurisdictions of these bridges. You’ll have federal bridges, bridges owned by TransLink, the provincial government, cities. . . Then there are private sector partnerships. These private companies demand repayment, as well,” explained Brodie. The bridge’s tolls have yet to be announced. The bridge’s initial cost is higher than the Port Mann Bridge and traffic projections show it will see less traffic. The City of Richmond also objects to losing parkland and farmland to expand Highway 99. Furthermore, there appears to be no plan to ease congestion at the Oak Street Bridge, leading to concerns of congestion simply moving from Delta to Richmond during the morning rush hour. The city also opposes the bridge on grounds that it is a “visual blight.” As part of the project, BC Hydro will also be installing power line towers, as the existing lines will be removed with the tunnel. Couns. Alexa Loo and Ken Johnston support the bridge, with Loo noting it benefits port-related traffic and, thus, jobs.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

NEWSin the City

Some grants denied despite an excess of casino funds Graeme Wood

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

R

ichmond city council is prepared to dole out $819,894 in community and social grants this year, which would represent — at least temporarily — a two per cent decrease from last year. This despite the city holding an estimated $1 million in a reserve account for such grants. This year, the City of Richmond is allocating $586,095 to health, social and safety grants; $18,537 to child care grants; $105,508 for parks and community events grants; and $109,754 for arts and culture grants. Last year, the city relinquished about $837,000 in grants, which are funded by the city’s share of gaming revenues from River Rock Casino and Resort. While most grants went up about two per cent this year, the overall decline in funding from last year came with a significant decrease in child care grants. Last year, the city issued $69,888

n The Sharing Farm, which hosts the annual Garlic Festival, requested $30,000 but was only given $18,000. File photo

in child care grants, while this year it only handed out $18,536. Staff note another $41,000 has yet to be allocated. In total, the city did not issue about $489,000 worth of grants that were requested among the organizations (for example, the Sharing Farm Society requested $30,000 but was only allocated $18,000). Last year, the city devised a new policy that would increase the total amount of money available for social and community grants; however, instead of doling out

that extra cash (about half a million dollars), staff says it will be put in a reserve account. The same thing happened last year when staff deposited $548,669 in excess gaming funds into the “Grant Provision account.” What is to happen to the excess funds from gaming revenues has yet to be determined, and it’s unclear why requests for money are being left on the table. In January 2016, a staff report stated that “staff will be bringing forward a report with recommendations for these remaining funds later in Quarter 1.” No report came forward, however, and many groups have been left to find funds elsewhere. The Women’s Resource Centre was a focus of debate as to who should fund it. Typically, social services fall under the mandate of the provincial government, but many such organizations in Richmond report underfunding as the city, and thus their service demand, grows.

Free public March 2nd Hosted by TWU RICHMOND

Heart transformation and reconciliation with indigenous peoples: From passion to compassion March 2, 2017 at 7 P.M. Featuring:

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twu.ca/leaders-series

A7


A8 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

LETTERSto the Editor Published every Wednesday and Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group.

200-8211AckroydRd.Richmond,B.C.V6X3K8 Call:604.270.8031Web:richmond-news.com

Editor Eve Edmonds

EDITOR@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3343

Reporters: Alan Campbell

ACAMPBELL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3342

Graeme Wood

GWOOD@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3329

Philip Raphael

PRAPHAEL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3348

Sports: Mark Booth

MBOOTH@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Director of advertising Rob Akimow

RAKIMOW@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3340

Integrated Media Consultants: Collin Neal CNEAL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3341

Garry McLellan

GMCLELLAN@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3330

Lesley Smith

LSMITH@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3349

Angela Pong

APONG@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3350

Distribution Manager Kristene Murray KMURRAY@VAN.NET

604.249.3353

Sales Administrator Joyce Ang

JANG@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

City workers applauded for keeping streets safe Dear Editor, The last couple of weeks was one for the record books. I would like to thank the City of Richmond workers who braved the snow and the cold to make our streets safe. I know they were working a lot of extra hours to get the job done. I saw trucks on the street and workers spreading salt by hand at bus stops. Well done! I think you all did a great job. Scott Stewart Richmond

It's high time for city to cap ROX money pit Dear Editor, RE: ROX sees 65 visitors a day: Oval,” News, Feb. 3. The Richmond Olympic Oval, through ROX (the oval’s Olympic museum) has created another opaque money pit for the taxpayers of Richmond. Mayor Malcolm Brodie, as chief executive officer of the municipality and the oval’s council liaison, needs to address this money pit. The amount owed to the City of Richmond by the oval is noninterest bearing with no stated repayment terms. These municipal corporations, i.e. the oval, are established with

JUDIESCHNEIDER

Veera Irani

Guest Shot

VIRANI@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

PPELLETIER@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3336

Advertising Sales: 604.249.3340 advertising@richmond-news.com Delivery: 604.249.3132 distribution@richmond-news.com Classified: 604.630.3300 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact the editor at editor@richmond-news.com or call 604-249-3343. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

the aim to provide a balance between a local government’s broad powers and corporate autonomy, while ensuring transparency and accountability owed to the electorate. After reading “ROX sees 65 visitors a day: Oval,” it appears the oval is primarily protecting the interests of itself and VROX, a private company that sells the sports simulators featured in ROX. VROX is 50 per cent owned by the oval. Interestingly, the city’s CAO, who is also the CEO of the oval, is also a director of VROX. He earns $66,000 (2015) from the oval and $302,000 (2015)

including benefits from the city. We don’t know what benefits he gets from VROX as it’s a private company. He’s among a number of city staff members who also work at the oval. This incestuous relationship between city staff and the oval could be perceived as a conflict of interest, especially when the money trail appears to end in the private companies: VROX and VRX Advanced Simulators, which are not subject to public transparency or accountability. The oval must produce the Business Plan 3.0 and other information it has been withholding from public scrutiny and queries.

This claim of “proprietary” information obfuscates matters, frustrates the taxpayers and lacks transparency and accountability to the taxpayers who foot the bill for the oval. In fact, perhaps it is time to dispose of the oval (as it is used by a small number of Richmond taxpayers), and have the taxpayers’ money redirected to other higher-use community centres, the public library and homeless shelters? Unthinkable, isn’t it! However, it would put an end to this taxpayer money pit. Donald Flintoff Richmond

Refusing to budge, despite big changes

604.249.3335

Publisher Pierre Pelletier

n Letter writer Scott Stewart thanks the city’s crews for keeping the roads safe during the recent cold snap that set records for snowfall across the Lower Manland. Photo by City of Richmond

A

s I sit in the living room of Robert and Diana Schwab’s 1970s back-split home on No. 2 Road, south of Steveston Highway, the constant stream of traffic is more of a visual disturbance than an auditory one. They have had exterior windows fitted over their original single panes, which have gone a long way toward reducing the traffic noise. That may be the only adaptation they have made to keep up with the changing circumstances around them; from the white brick fireplace to the wooden closet doors in the hall, the stylish features have all been left in their original condition. Geographically, much has changed since they moved in. “There was a ditch down there that could swallow a Greyhound bus,” says Robert, pointing across the road. In addition, the dense Westwind subdivision behind their lot didn’t exist — it was all farmland stretching from Railway Avenue eastward to their back yard. In the 1970s, the farmland was sold off

for development and they watched through their back windows as an entire stylish subdivision quickly rose up in place of their mile-long view. Now, almost 40 years later, that subdivision is getting a facelift. There were 28 demolition permits and 22 new build permits issued for houses in Westwind in 2016. If the development of the Westwind subdivision in the ‘70’s was like planting a second-growth forest, then walking through the neighbourhood today feels like a stroll through an area in the process of being selectively logged and re-planted. Tell-tale orange vinyl fencing is around the trees, rather than the homes they adorn, signaling that this house too, shall soon fall. No. 2 Road, now a main thoroughfare for getting to and from Steveston Village, wasn’t always so busy. “There wasn’t a light at the end of the road and there was very little traffic going along here,” says Robert. Like many couples who have been together most of their lives, they are quick to elaborate on each other’s points. “Before the traffic light, we had all the main traffic — like truckers and stuff — go up Railway to get into Steveston Village,”

quips Diana. But the truckers had a tight turn onto Railway and a large ditch to avoid, so No. 2 Road became the new “in-road.” No. 2 Road is built on the infamous soft, silty soil for which Richmond is known. “It’s like building it up on top of a marshmallow,” says Robert, as he discusses the frequent re-paving of the road in front of their home. This soft soil means that the Schwabs have seen many sink holes appear on the east side of the road. Several years ago, their neighbour almost lost a car in one. An extensive revision (widening of the road) is planned, utilizing the unpaved land which is prone to sink holes. Robert is concerned. “What happens when they move the road over there and then the trucks and everything [are] going over it?” he asks. The Schwabs, though, are going with the flow of their neighbourhood’s metamorphosis, and won’t be leaving their well-loved home anytime soon. They are more concerned with practical matters — getting in and out of their driveway, which is difficult enough as it is, and the noise. “That’s it — loud,” says Diana. “You can’t even talk to anybody on the street anymore.” Judie Schneider is a local, freelance writer


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

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City Board Notice

City of Richmond n A relatively new structure that has appeared at the south foot of No. 2 Road at dyke has piqued the curiosity of at least one Richmond News reader (below). Photo by Eve Edmonds/Richmond News

Is this really art? Dear Editor, Could someone please explain to me the eyesore that has recently appeared at the south end of No. 2 Road, on the river side of the new condominium complex? Initially, I thought it was part of the construction project — a large steel skip for dumping the waste, as it looks old and corroded with graffiti scratched into it. But on closer inspection, I noticed it has a phoney spine of vertebrae down the centre from which protrude some rusting metal ribs.

Some attempt at a beached whale carcass perhaps? Is this supposed to be some form of public “art,” designed to enhance the natural beauty of what is, otherwise, a very attractive waterfront? If it is, I’m afraid to say it fails miserably. Please reassure me that this is just a temporary fixture, and that we can look forward to its timely removal. Carlie Holland Steveston

Rental ban hits bottom line Dear Editor, Re: “Short-term rental ban moves forward in Richmond,” News, Feb. 7. Banning short-term rentals sounds like a group of rich persons discussing how to control the income for the low-income families in Richmond. And this makes Richmond a great city in Canada? People have listed all the reasons for the ban and have talked about how short-term rentals negatively impact neighbours, but they don’t consider the low-income people who want get a little money to help them

pay their daily expenses. Life is tough when you don’t have a job, or a good job. Some people would like to rent out a room in their home to help pay the expenses. With the Internet, this can be done more easily, but now the higher-ups plan to stop this and punish them. Does that make a fair society? It’s fine for the city to control the rich who have huge houses to rent, but why not give a path of survival for the lower-income people? Frank Wang Richmond

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February April to Environmental Sustainability Workshops Notice ofto Intent Dispose of Land Register for free classes (Statutory Right of Way) These workshops will show you ways to reduce pesticide use and create a more sustainable community. The workshops part of the City’s Right Enhanced Pesticide Management Program, The City of Richmond intendsare to grant a Statutory of Way of approximately 323.1 square Sustainability, and Waste Reduction initiatives. free; however, meters over a portion of Dyke Road legally knowThese as Lotworkshops 1 Section 1 are Block 4 North Range 4 registration is required.District Plan 46040 to Greater Vancouver Water District for $10 for the West New Westminster purposes of a line. There are twowater waysmain to register: • Online at www.richmond.ca/register For please contact:call centre from Monday to Friday, • Byinformation phoning the registration 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. at 604-276-4300 (press “2” at the prompt) Michael Allen Manager, Property Services If you register but cannot attend, please contact the registration call centre to make your City ofavailable Richmondfor other participants to attend. space Fermenting Food Saturday, February 25 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. REG# 1715988, Free, 13+yrs West Richmond Community Centre 9180 No. 1 Road Love Food, Hate Waste Saturday, March 4 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. REG# 1672338, Free, 13+yrs Thompson Community Centre 5151 Granville Avenue Edible Wilds Saturday, March 11 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. REG# 1782038, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway

Fermenting Food Saturday, April 22 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. REG# 1673688, Free, 13+yrs Cambie Community Centre 12800 Cambie Road Edible Wilds Sunday, April 23 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. REG# 1782138, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway

The Seasonal Kitchen Saturday, March 11 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. REG# 1782091, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway Housing of Mason Bees in a Garden Wednesday, March 15 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. REG# 1782438, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway

Bee Identification and NEW Conservation Saturday, April 15 2:00 - 4:30 p.m. REG# 1779639, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway

The Seasonal Kitchen Sunday, April 23 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. REG# 1782188, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway NEW

Backyard Bounty Saturday, April 8 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. REG# 1801141, Free, 13+yrs Richmond Nature Park - Kinsmen Pavilion 11851 Westminster Highway My Life with Bees NEW Wednesday, April 12 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. REG# 1829638, Free, 13+yrs Terra Nova Rural Park 2631 Westminster Highway

Preserving 1 - Fresh Storage and Easy Freezing Saturday, April 29 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. REG# 1801139, Free, 13+yrs Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre 4255 Moncton Street Preserving 2 - Drying/Dehydrating and Canning Saturday, April 29 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. REG# 1801140, Free, 13+yrs Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre 4255 Moncton Street

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca


A10 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Notice of Public Hearing

City of Richmond

Monday, February 20, 2017 – 7 p.m. Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Richmond City Hall

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139 TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Richmond will hold a Public Hearing as noted above, on the following items: 1.

Purpose: To create the “Town Housing (ZT81) – Williams Road” Zone and to rezone the subject properties from “Single Detached (RS1/C)” and “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Town Housing (ZT81) – Williams Road”, to permit development of 18 townhouse units with access from Williams Road. City Contact: Helen Cain, 604-276-4193, Planning and Development Division

RICHMOND ZONING BYLAW 8500, AMENDMENT BYLAW 9510 (RZ 14-678448) Location/s: 6840 and 6860 No. 3 Road and 8051 Anderson Road Applicant/s: 1004732 BC Ltd. Purpose: To create the new “City Centre High Density Mixed Use with Office (ZMU31) – Brighouse Village” zone and rezone the subject property from the “Downtown Commercial (CDT1)” zone to the new “City Centre High Density Mixed Use with Office (ZMU31) – Brighouse Village” zone, to permit development of a 18,701 m2 (201,292 sq.ft.), twelve (12) storey, mixed retail, office and residential use building. City Contact: Janet Digby, 604-247-4620, Planning and Development Division

Bylaw 9667

4.

RICHMOND ZONING BYLAW 8500, AMENDMENT BYLAW 9664 (RZ 16-734667) Location/s: 8140/8160 Lundy Road Applicant/s: Xiufeng Zhang and Shufang Zhang Purpose: To rezone the subject property from the “Two-Unit Dwellings (RD1)” zone to “Single Detached (RS2/C)” zone, to permit the property to be subdivided to create two (2) single-family lots, with vehicle access from Lundy Road. City Contact: Steven De Sousa, 604-204-8529, Planning and Development Division

RICHMOND ZONING BYLAW 8500, AMENDMENT BYLAW 9669 (RZ 16-738480) Location/s: 23100, 23120 and 23140 Westminster Highway Applicant/s: Trellis Seniors Services Ltd. Purpose: This application is to rezone the subject site from “Single Detached (RS1/F)” to “Senior’s Care Facility (ZR11) – Hamilton Village (Hamilton)” to facilitate development of a three (3) storey, 135-bed senior’s care facility. City Contact: Mark McMullen, 604-276-4173, Planning and Development Division

DP 16-741981

How to obtain further information: $ By Phone: If you have questions or concerns, please call the CITY CONTACT shown above.

5.

RICHMOND ZONING BYLAW 8500, AMENDMENT BYLAW 9667 (RZ 15-700431) Location/s: 9700, 9720 and 9800 Williams Road Applicant/s: Urban Era Builders & Developers Ltd.

(a) For the most westerly building (Building E1), increase the maximum height over a parkade structure from six (6) storeys and 25.0 m, to ten (10) storeys and 33.6 m; and (b) For the most westerly building (Building E1), increase the allowable projection of unenclosed balconies into a side yard setback abutting the Agricultural Land Reserve, from a maximum of 0.9 m to 1.8 m. City Contact: Helen Cain, 604-276-4193, Planning and Development Division

Bylaw 9669

Bylaw 9664

3.

DEVELOPMENT PERMIT DP 16-741981 Location/s: 10788 No 5 Road (also referred to as 10780 No. 5 Road and 12733 Steveston Hwy) Applicant/s: Townline Gardens Inc. Purpose: To permit the construction of one (1) 10-storey residential building and three (3) 3-storey residential buildings at 10788 No. 5 Road on a site zoned “Commercial Mixed Use (ZMU18) – The Gardens (Shellmont)”; and To vary the provisions of Richmond Zoning Bylaw 8500 to:

Bylaw 9510

2.

6.

RICHMOND ZONING BYLAW 8500, AMENDMENT BYLAW 9671 Location/s: City-wide Applicant/s: City of Richmond Purpose: To add a definition of “marihuana dispensary” and add this use to the non-permitted use and definitions (Section 3.5) of the Richmond Zoning Bylaw No. 8500 to prohibit “marihuana dispensary” in all zones. City Contact: Carli Edwards, 604-276-4136, Finance and Corporate Services

$ On the City Website: Public Hearing Agendas, including staff reports and the proposed bylaws, are available on the City Website at http://www.richmond.ca/ cityhall/council/agendas/hearings/2017.htm $ At City Hall: Copies of the proposed bylaw, supporting staff and Committee reports and other background material, are also available for inspection at the Planning and Development Division at City Hall, between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing February 10, 2017 and ending February 20, 2017, or upon the conclusion of the hearing. $ By Fax or Mail: Staff reports and the proposed bylaws may also be obtained by FAX or by standard mail, by calling 604-276-4007 between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing February 10, 2017 and ending February 20, 2017.

Notice of Public Hearing continued on next page. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

PET WEEK

COFFEE WITH...Patsy Hui

Community giving a way of life Philip Raphael Staff Reporter

praphael@richmond-news.com

R

ichmond realtor Patsy Hui didn’t need to look very far to be given an example of what role she should play in her community. Growing up as the middle child in a family of seven siblings in post Second World War Hong Kong, she was given plenty of opportunities to see first-hand that offering a helping hand was of utmost importance. “It’s me. It’s part of my life,” said Hui, who is the lead sponsor in this year’s Dancing with the Richmond Stars fundraising event for the Richmond Community Hospice Foundation. “I am always about giving back to the community. That’s because I witnessed what my parents went through after the war when everybody was poor and in need of help.” Hui, 67, said she learned that during the Chinese occupation of Hong Kong, her father would take to the streets to collect the dead and take them to the local morgue. “He wanted to play a role in any way he could,” she said, adding he also started a local benevolent society. “And my mom, she would cook up fresh meals for people in need. It was nothing elaborate, maybe a little bit of rice

and some chicken or beef. It was simple food, but it was hot and good. “My parents, they were always helping. To me, as a 10-year-old, it was fun running around helping give out blankets to people when it was cold. But even then, I could also see what they were doing was extraordinary.” So, it’s no wonder that when Hui arrived in Canada at age 19 and landed a job with the Royal Bank in Mission, one of the first things she did was get on the telephone and contact the local volunteer agencies to see how she should get involved. “That kind of thing, it was just in my blood,” she added. Hui was also imbued with a work ethic that allowed her to afford her own home by her early 20s. “I was working three jobs — the bank and two Chinese restaurants on the weekends,” she said. “It was busy, but I had that instinct telling me I should invest in real estate. Not lavishly, but enough to have a nice, comfortable home. Because, when you do that, you can go out and do a good job for other people. “It’s like if you are in good physical shape,” she added. “If you have a good, healthy body and mind, that’s when you can help others.” That’s why she still works

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out three days a week and plays ping pong and ballroom dances with her husband, Hilary, a longtime, local physician, to help stay fit. “If you want to do a job well, you have to be prepared; you have to sharpen your tools.” Hui’s association with the local hospice dates back to early fundraising efforts to get it established 11 years ago. “Hospice is a very peaceful, beautiful place,” she said. “We all have to go sometime, and it’s important to make it nice for the family and the patient. It’s something that just has to be done.” That’s why she got involved this year as the diamond level sponsor for the Dancing with the Richmond Stars event,

which on March 4 has local celebrities, and the returning champion from last year, paired with an instructor to put their best foot forward at the River Rock Show Theatre. Money is raised by sponsoring the competitors, whose bios can be seen online at RichmondHospiceAssociation.com. Hui said she is looking forward to being at the event and even taking part on the floor, just for fun. “I love life. That’s what motivates me. I am a pretty ordinary person. I don’t wear designer labels, I drive a 15-year-old car and have the same kids and husband,” she quipped. “But I am one of those people who is always positive.”

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Notice of Public Hearing

Monday, February 20, 2017 – 7 p.m. Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Richmond City Hall 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

Notice of Public Hearing continued Participating in the Public Hearing process: $ *&) 5-2"%0 #)43%8' %1 76)8 /7 4"" !)!2)31 7( /&) public. If you believe that you are affected by the proposed bylaw, you may make a presentation or submit written comments at the Public Hearing. If you are unable to attend, you may send your written comments to the City Clerk’s Office by 4 pm on the date of the Public Hearing as follows:

$ By E-mail: using the on-line form at http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/hearings/ about.htm $ By Standard Mail: 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6Y 2C1, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office $ By Fax: 604-278-5139, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office $ Public Hearing Rules: For information on public hearing rules and procedures, please consult the City website at http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/ hearings/about.htm or call the City Clerk’s Office at 604-276-4007.

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

$ ,"" 1-2!%11%781 +%"" (73! 643/ 7( /&) 3)073. 7( /&) hearing. Once the Public Hearing has concluded, no further information or submissions can be considered by Council. It should be noted that the rezoned property may be used for any or all of the uses permitted in the “new” zone. David Weber Director, City Clerk’s Office


A12 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

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home. See the \ames, feel the warmth, and ]nd out how ef]cient today’s models can be. It’s a one-stop shopping experience, said Craig McClean, president of The Fireplace Warehouse. “We wanted to give our customers the convenience of being able to see as many ]replaces all in one place as possible so they can compare them,” said McClean, who runs the business with his wife, Donna, and general managerDerek Egerton. “And with a subcontractor on hand who is an experienced installer, customers can get everything from choosing the right ]replace for them and See Locally page 13

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Locally designed and manufactured From page 12 arranging to get it properly installed, all in one visit. “We do the whole process, including installation and getting the required permits.” Having so many models in one place is a big help for customers, not just because of the convenience, but for comparison shopping. “We’ve set up the showroom with all the ]replaces installed along one big wall so customers can stand back and compare the different sizes and \ames very easily,” added McClean. Helping customers make that important selection is general manager Egerton who has a

wealth of knowledge and experience in gas ]replaces that has been built up over 20 years of manufacturing and installing ]replaces. “Looking at a wall of ]replaces you’ve got the 45-, 55- and 65-inch ]replaces all side by side, you really get a feel for the difference in size,” Egerton said. “It’s just a much better way to showcase our ]replaces.” The Fireplace Warehouse carries lines from Savannah Heating Products — which are manufactured in Richmond — Napoleon Quality Fireplaces, Mendota, Amantii and Majestic. In addition to the gas

]replaces, the showroom also has more than a dozen electric ]replaces on display. As for how ef]cient today’s gas ]replaces can be, Egerton said technological changes have steadily increased how much heat they provide. But there are also ]replaces meant to be more for decoration, which becomes important in smaller settings that do not require them to deliver large volumes of heat. Customers can also get a preview by visiting online at TheFireplaceWarehouse.ca. To see the showroom in person, drop by The Fireplace Warehouse at 115–12320 Vulcan Way.

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A14 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

VOICESOn Wine

Wine fest requires strategy ERICHANSON Sips Happen

I

f you want to get the best bang for your buck at this week’s Vancouver International Wine Festival, it’s the Festival Tasting Room. Simply put, it is overwhelming featuring 180 wineries pouring more than 700 wines! You don’t have the time or stamina to taste even an ounce of each wine being served. One strategy would be to go online and see which countries and wineries are coming. Then spend one tasting session trying your favourites. At the second tasting session be adventurous and discover countries and wineries you don’t know much about. That’s the marvelous thing about wine; you continually learn new things if you get out of your rut. Another strategy would be to try sparkling wines and whites on the first night, reds on the second, and then try some dessert wines as well as anything else that tickles your fancy on the third. If you want to be patriotic, celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday and focus on Canadian wines. First, sample some of the B.C. wines from 60 wineries just begging to offer you a taste of their cellar. For the second day, try the wines of Ontario with Chardonnay, Riesling, and Pinot Noir from the three main regions: Niagara, Prince Edward County, and Lake Erie. And then discover wines from six Nova Scotia wineries. Besides tables with individual wineries, there are five Regional Tasting Stations where you taste wines from multiple wineries

in a particular country or region. At the B.C. Regional Tasting Station, you will explore the diversity that makes our wines so unique. There will be eight flights of wines, each flight having three wines to taste. For example, at the Pinot Noir flight, you might taste this varietal from Vancouver Island, the Similkameen, and the Okanagan. Other red flights include Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Bordeaux blends. You will be able to compare Chardonnays, Rieslings, Pinot Gris, and aromatic varietals at the white flights. At the New Zealand Tasting Station, savour the sub-regions of Marlborough and Otago with exciting Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir. Meanwhile at Spain’s Station let the passionate and original Spanish reds such as Tempranillo and Monastrell and tantalizing whites such as Albarino and Viura take you to the land of wine and tapas. And if that’s not enough, be the first in your neighbourhood to try a dozen Nova Scotia wines from the Tidal Bay Appellation. Experience the passionate, artisan winemakers and the classic Nova Scotia style with lively, fresh green fruit, dynamic acidity and characteristic minerality. Maybe there will be samples of East Coast lobster and garlic butter. Finally, if you love Aussie wines, you will be in wine heaven with the Australia Station and its Shiraz, Semillon, and other fair dinkum delights from the land of Oz. Tickets to the Tasting Room are available for Thursday evening Feb. 16, Friday evening Feb. 17, and Saturday afternoon Feb. 18. For more, visit online at VanWineFest.ca. Eric Hanson is a local wine expert and retired Richmond teacher

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

COMMUNITYin Focus

Rose’s Angels show they care Alan Campbell

Staff Reporter acampbell@richmond-news.com

A

bout 1,000 “care packages” are now doing the rounds for the less fortunate in Richmond, thanks to the memory of a lady called Rose. “She was a Holocaust survivor and was the most giving person I ever knew; I wanted to do something with her legacy in mind,” said the late Rose Lewin’s granddaughter, Courtney Cohen, who, along with fellow Richmondite Lynne Fader, set up “Rose’s Angels” four years aago. On S Sunday, aat the R Richm mond JJewish D Day S School on N No. 5 and B Blundell ro roads, the p pair were jo joined by around 60 volunteers who helped organize and bag 1,000 of the care packages, containing a new pair of gloves, toque, socks, non-perishable foods and hygiene care items.

A15

New library hours A

s of Feb. 17, the hours of operation at the Cambie, Ironwood and Steveston branches of the Richmond Public Library will be restored to their original times. Beginning this Friday, the Cambie and Steveston branches will be open Monday – Friday from 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. and the Ironwood branch will be open from 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Brighouse branch hours remain unaffected. Restoring the hours at the branches was identified as a priority for both the library and the City of Richmond in 2017, after the hours were cut by the city in 2016.

n Courtney Cohen (above) with some of the 1,000 care packages collected as part of the Rose’s Angels event, which was named after Cohen’s grandmother (left) Rose Lewin, seen with Courtney in 2012. Photo (above) by Lianne Cohen Photography

On Tuesday, Cohen — who carries out the Rose’s Angels outreach as part of the non-profit Richmond-based Kehila Society, which offers outreach programs within the Richmond Jewish community for children, youth, adults and seniors — started distribution of the packages to the Jewish Food Bank, Chimo Outreach, Richmond Family Place and Turning Point Recovery, amongst others. “It all starts in September and spend

a lot of time looking for volunteers and donations,” said Cohen, who sits on many non-profit boards due to her grandmother’s inspiration. Cohen said the number of individuals wanting to volunteer their time and “give back to those living in our community is positively overwhelming. “Each care package is put together with love and care by community volunteers and is curated especially for the organization it is going to.”

n Artist Victoria Oginski was on hand for the recent unveiling of her 12 mural panels depicting Steveston in the early 1900s, when tall ships used to moor along the waterfront. Photo submitted

Open Forum Vancouver Coastal Health Board of Directors Open Board Forum Richmond Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:00 to 8:00 pm

WHAT'SOn n Thursday

The Steveston Folk Guild presents Just Duets on Feb. 16 at the Britannia Shipyards (5180 Westwater Drive). Just Duets is a roots-country and folk music pair — Andrea Smith and Dave Lidstone — who perform a selection of traditional and songwriter material from Canada and elsewhere. Tickets are $10 at the door and show time is 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 604-238-8050. What should Minoru Park look like in the near future? Have your say at the Minoru Park Vision Plan Open House on Feb. 16, from 5 – 8 p.m. at the Minoru Place Activity Centre (Seniors Centre) at 7660 Minoru Gate. Informa-

tion boards will be on display and a survey will be available to the community at two open houses — one Feb. 16 and another set for Feb. 18. Information gathered will contribute to the development of guiding principles that will be presented to city council for approval.

n Saturday

Get acquainted and practice clear communication at the Richmond Cuddle Party on Feb. 18 from 6 - 9 p.m. with a certified CP facilitator who guides participants socialization (no cellphones) and/or cuddles at their own pace. To RSVP, go online to MeetUp. com/CuddlePartyKarins or register at KarinCuddleParty. Eventbrite.ca.

Discover Garry Point Park and West Dyke in Steveston during the Feb. 18 Walk Richmond event from 10 – 11 a.m. Loop around the park and continue along the West Dyke trail while taking in the spectacular views of the Gulf Islands and Coastal Mountains. Meeting spot: Garry Point Concession stand (12011 7th Avenue). For more information, call the Richmond Fitness and Wellness Association at 604238-8004.

n Upcoming

Richmond Public Library is pleased to offer a Spanish Café on Feb. 22 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., which provides an opportunity for Spanish-speaking members

to get together and discuss topics of particular interest to the Spanish community. The café runs the last Wednesday of each month at Brighouse Branch. Registration is required. Each month, a different topic will be discussed in Spanish. For more information go online to YourLibrary.ca. The City of Richmond is hosting monthly information sessions until March to give a brief overview of the city’s Tree Protection Bylaw and the criteria staff use to assess trees. The next one is set for Feb. 23 from 6 – 8 p.m. at the Cambie Community Centre (12800 Cambie Road). Visit online at Richmond.ca for more information.

The Board of Vancouver Coastal Health invites you to meet with members of the Board and Senior Leadership of Vancouver Coastal Health. Join us to hear about health services in your community and engage in discussion with the Board through a question and answer session.

Date: Time: Where:

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:00 to 8:00 pm Richmond Hospital Auditorium - Ground Level 7000 Westminster Highway Richmond, BC

Please join us for this opportunity to connect with the VCH Board and Senior Leadership. Everyone is welcome. For details and the agenda, visit www.vch.ca or call 604-875-4719 for more information.


A16 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

COMMUNITYin Focus

Filipinos stage charity gig n One of the bands performing at the fundraising concert will be Jim’s Underground. Photo submitted

We have so many beautiful new things arriving for spring: Exquisite gifts, collectible items, toys, travel accessories, writing instruments, cookware, stationery, greeting cards, bath products and much more. Great gift ideas for everyone, including yourself! Buchan’s Kerrisdale Stationery (Richmond location) has unique items that will bring a smile to your face

Timeless memories...Forever cherished... Keepsakes of the heart NEW! Loyalty Stamp Card! Spend $25 to earn one stamp, with 10 stamps RECEIVE 20% OFF NEXT PURCHASE. #350 9100 Blundell Rd. Garden City Shopping Centre 604-270-9619 | www.buchanst.com

Terra Nova Nature School Registration Information 2017-2018 School Year (by lottery)

Parent Information Night

Wednesday, February 22, 5:30–6:30 p.m. at Thompson Community Centre (no registration required) Meet the teachers and learn about the unique Nature School experience and the new lottery-based registration process.

IMPORTANT DATES Lottery form pick up: Monday, February 27-Friday, March 17 at Thompson Community Centre Terra Nova Nature School Trial Day at Terra Nova Rural Park: Registration opens Wednesday, February 22, 7:00 p.m. Register for one session only:

Community Association

www.richmond.ca

• Friday March 3, 2:00-4:00 p.m. (barcode #1870138) • Saturday, March 4, 9:30-11:30 a.m. (barcode #1870139) 3 ways to register for above: • Online: www.richmond.ca/register • Registration Call Centre: 604-276-4300 • In person: during facility hours

Lottery submission deadline: Saturday, March 18, 6:00 p.m. in person at Thompson Community Centre Lottery draw: Tuesday, March 28, 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Thompson Community Centre (attendance mandatory) For more information about Terra Nova Nature School: 604-238-8437 www.terranovanatureschool.com

Thompson Community Centre 5151 Granville Avenue 604-238-8422

O

n Saturday, March 4, you’ll have an opportunity to show off your air guitar skills at a fundraising concert in support of Richmond Cares, Richmond Gives (RCRG), a local charity that acts as a hub for volunteering and giving. Dubbed “Band2Gether4RCRG,” the event in Richmond was organized by a group of Filipino volunteers from across the Lower Mainland. Acts scheduled to perform include Jim’s Underground, Five for the Road, BC AkaFellas and the Our Lady of Good Counsel Family Choir. “It’s been amazing to watch this concert come together,” said Ed Gavsie, president and CEO of RCRG. “The organizing committee — they call themselves CanadianFilipinosforRCRG — is made up entirely of volunteers.

GET HOOKED ON THE SOCKEYES!

“I can’t tell you how many hours they’ve spent booking performers, securing sponsors and selling tickets, but it’s a lot, and they’ve done it all to support the community.” Vancouver-Kensington MLA Mable Elmore will make a special guest appearance, joining the bands on stage for a performance. Mayor Malcolm Brodie will be in attendance, as well. In addition to the performances, the event will feature an art exhibition by Dimasalang III International Artist Group. The artists will also be donating paintings for a raffle, proceeds from which will go to RCRG. Band2Gether4RCRG will be held at Fraserview Church, from 8 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $15 each, and can be purchased on Eventbrite.ca (search Band2Gether) or by calling 604-279-7020.

RICHMOND SOCKEYES

Playoff Schedule with the Grandview Steelers Time

Venue

Game 1

Feb. 15

7:15 pm

BWC

Game 2

Feb. 16

7:00 pm

Minoru Arena

Game 3

Feb. 19

4:00 pm

BWC

Game 4

Feb. 20

7:30 pm

Minoru Arena

Game 5

Feb. 22

7:15 pm

BWC (if needed)

Game 6

Feb. 23

7:00 pm

Minoru Arena (if needed)

Game 7

Feb. 26

4:00 pm

BWC (if needed)

MINORU ARENA Kids (6-12)

3

$

Students

$

6

Seniors

$

6

Adults

$

10


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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

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A18 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

THEPULSE WE’VE GOT OUR FINGERS ON IT FAMILY DAY FUN

n Kids of all ages celebrated the B.C. Family Day holiday at the Richmond Children’s Arts Festival in and around the Richmond Cultural Centre on Monday with a variety of events, including a huge cupcake flag to mark the city’s first, official party to mark Canada’s 150th anniversary. There were also plenty of activities and a performance by CircusWest’s talented youngsters. Photos by Gord Goble/Special to the News

Submit Your Pictures

To Editor@RichmondNews.com with The Pulse in the subject line. For more photo galleries, visit Richmond-News.com

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

SPORTS Beyond the Scores

Got Sports?

Contact Mark at mbooth@richmond-news.com or 604-998-3615

City champs McMath take aim at Crehan Cup Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

F

rom an overwhelming favourite one week to a somewhat unknown contender the next. That’s the playoff journey for the McMath Wildcats senior girls basketball team. The Wildcats captured their fourth consecutive Richmond title — capping another unbeaten run with a 69-47 victory over the Cambie Crusaders. They did it with a line-up that features not one returning starter and a whopping 10 players eligible to be back next season. Now, the Steveston school will attempt to defend its Crehan Cup Lower Mainland AAA championship and get to the provincial tournament for a third straight year. It’s a scenario that seemed improbable back at the start of the season until Grade 11 Abby Zawada established herself as one of the top scoring guards in the province and a supporting cast that has got better each week. “I think there are six teams that have a legitimate chance at making provincials and we are in that mix,” said McMath co-coach Chris Kennedy. “The thing is we could end up first or we could end up sixth. “We are really relying on Abby shooting the ball well. When she does that, we are tough to beat. If she is having a bit of an off night then all of a sudden we are in a ball

■ After winning their fourth consecutive Richmond Senior girls title, Martha Melaku and the McMath Wildcats will try to qualify for the provincial “AAA” tourney.

game.” That’s why other scoring threats are vital as the Wildcats move forward. Martha Melaku, Mahara Gibson-Zeinoun and Liz Kennedy have all shown they are capable. Zawada poured in 25 points to lead the way Wednesday, then collected her Richmond League MVP

award. However, Gibson-Zeinoun chipped in with 19 and Melaku added 12 as McMath erased an early 9-5 deficit with a 22-point run to take control. “We need that secondary scoring,” continued Kennedy. “If Abby is getting half our points then we are probably not winning those games.

We also need other girls scoring so Abby gets better looks too.” The Wildcats earned No. 4 seed for the Crehan Cup and were slated to face No. 5 Lord Byng in the quarter-finals last night. North Shore schools Carson Graham and Argyle, along with Churchill and New West also should also be in the mix. “It’s going to be interesting because every game from now on is going to be tough. We are not going to be leading by 25 and rolling five (players) in and out. “A lot of people will have not seen us before our quarter-final game. Everyone knows Abby is going to shoot the ball but, like we showed tonight, we are a bit more than that,” added Kennedy. Richmond individual player awards included: MVP: Abby Zawada (McMath) First Team All-Stars: Martha Melaku (McMath), Mahara GibsonZeinoun (McMath), Ramvir Dhaliwal (Cambie), Kirsten Abo (McNair), Maggie Campbell (Steveston-London). Second Team All-Stars: Liz Kennedy (McMath), Daljit Aujla (Cambie), Eclipse Malixi (Steveston-London), Colette Mofakham (McNair), Amanda Kuo (Palmer). Third Team All-Stars: Komalpreet Nahal (Cambie), Sparky Huang (Palmer), Bianca Kozica (MacNeill), Mikaela Cadorette (McRoberts), Sophia De La Torre (Richmond).

Sockeyes and Steelers renew PJHL playoff rivalry Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

I

t took nearly beyond the Pacific Junior Hockey League regular season for the Richmond Sockeyes to finally learn they would be facing the Grandview Steelers in the opening round of the playoffs for the fourth consecutive year. The Tom Shaw Conference rivals open their best-of-seven quarter-final series at the Burnaby Winter Club tonight and the teams are at Minoru Arena for game two Thursday (7 p.m.). The Sockeyes (22-13-3-5) have been in “waitand-see” mode for the last two weeks — locked into third place — while Grandview (28-9-2-5) and

the Delta Ice Hawks (31-12-0-1) battled it out for top spot. A pair of winter storms over the last 10 days wiped out a number of games and spilled the regular season over into Monday. The Ice Hawks finally clinched first place with a make-up game win in Mission on Sunday night, while the Sockeyes didn’t even play their final road game against Aldergrove which was also postponed but had no impact on the final standings. Little separated the top three teams in the conference for much of the 44-game campaign. A Steelers’ overtime win was the only difference in six regular season meetings (3-2-1) with Richmond.

A19

Sockeyes head coach Judd Lambert has used the stretch run to get his team into playoff mode. “We were trying to find some cohesion and something to build on over these last three of four games,” said Lambert. “We’ve been locked into third and it was up to Grandview and Delta to figure out who we were going to play. “Delta is probably a little bit better up front and Grandview is a bit better defensively. “There are not any surprises which there never are at this time of year.” The Steelers took out the Sockeyes in six games last season and in seven back in 2015. Game three of the series goes Sunday in Burnaby (4 p.m.) and the teams are back at it Monday (7:30 p.m.) in Richmond for game four.

Sports Shorts SCOREBOARD High School Basketball Richmond Championships

Senior Boys

Quarter-Finals McNair 81 Richmond High 74 McMath 93 Boyd 75 Steveston-London 88 Palmer 71 Cambie 86 MacNeill 60 Semi-Finals Steveston-London 99 Cambie 77 McMath 78 McNair 77 Third Place Game McNair 99 Cambie 45 Championship Game Steveston-London 94 McMath 87

Senior Girls

Quarter-Finals McMath 76 Rmd High 27 Palmer 69 Steveston-London 68 Cambie 51 McRoberts 23 MacNeill 58 McNair 56 Third Place Game MacNeill 49 Palmer 46 Championship Game McMath 69 Cambie 47

Junior Boys

Quarter-Finals Cambie 52 McRoberts 40 Richmond High 71 Burnett 70 MacNeill 66 Boyd 39 Steveston-London 57 MacNair 49 Semi-Finals Rmd High 53 Steveston-Lond 42 Cambie 55 MacNeill 49 Third Place Game Steveston-London 46 MacNeill 42 Championship Game Richmond High 70 Cambie 67

Junior Girls

Semi-Finals McMath 44 MacNeill 16 Boyd 46 Rmd Christian 14 Third Place Game Rmd Christian 46 MacNeill 20

Championship Game McMath 42 Boyd 39

PACIFIC JUNIOR HOCKEY

Tom Shaw Conference W L T OTL Pts Delta 31 12 0 1 63 Grandview 28 9 2 5 63 Richmond 22 14 3 5 52 North Van 17 22 1 2 39 Port Moody 15 27 0 1 31 Harold Brittain Conference Aldergrove 36 7 0 Abbotsford 25 14 0 R. Meadows 22 18 2 Mission City 18 22 0 Surrey 0 41 0

0 4 2 4 3

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A20 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017 SPORTS

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

City final rematch looms for Sharks & Wildcats Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

T

hat breeze coming from McNair Secondary on Thursday night was probably the collective sigh of relief from opposing coaches knowing Fardaws Aimaq had played his final game in the Richmond Senior Boys Basketball League. The 6-foot-10 Grade 12 standout put on one final show in front of a capacity crowd with 44 points and 25 rebounds in leading the Steveston-London Sharks to their second straight city title in a 94-87 win over the McMath Wildcats. In an era where true post players in the Richmond League are as rare finding an empty parking spot at Costco on Saturdays, Aimaq has been a difference maker the past two seasons. He is not only putting up huge offensive numbers but disrupting teams’ strategies as well. The Wildcats actually have a decent inside game but opted to fire up a steady barrage of threepointers instead of attacking Aimaq, who collected city MVP honours in the post-game awards presentation. It worked for a a while as McMath trailed 39-37 at the half before its perimeter game eventually cooled off. The Sharks just kept feeding Aimaq for high percentage looks and the lead was up to 16 points by the midway mark of the fourth quarter. A late Wildcats’ flurry cut the margin to five points in the final

minute but they would get no closer. “They were just hitting their shots at the end and it’s just so hard to stop Fardaws,” said McMath head coach Tony Wong-Hen. “He is such a big man. What can you do? He was not only solid tonight but didn’t do anything outside of himself either.” The Wildcats did earn the No. 1 Richmond seed for the Lower Mainland “AAA” Championships thanks to their regular season win over the Sharks but it proved to be only worth home floor advantage. The tournament’s fourth seed is expected to clash again with the No. 5 Sharks on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. At stake is a berth into next week’s semi-finals as the 12-team event shifts to the Richmond Olympic Oval. The Sharks are still trying to find the consistency that resulted in last year’s outstanding run to the Lower Mainland title and provincial championship game, even with another city title in their back pocket. Head coach Mike Stoneburgh knows it’s going to take more than Aimaq producing 40-plus points per game. “I will take half the game of our performance tonight,” said Stoneburgh, “but if we play like the other half, we are going to lose. Last year we went into the Lower Mainlands unbeaten in Richmond and won the final by 30. We had the confidence and knew we were the No. 1 team. This year we are going to get a tougher draw and we have lost to teams like STM, Byng and McMath.

“We have the talent, if the kids can come together. That’s the point I’m going to be hammering home these next couple of days.” The Wildcats are also well aware what they are up against at the Mainland tourney. They needed a last second basket from Mason to squeak past the McNair Marlins in the city semi-finals. The Marlins earned the Mainland No. 6 seed and are poised to meet No. 3 Byrne Creek for the second straight year in the quarter-finals. The No. 8 Colts will take on No. 1 St. Thomas More should they win their home game against No. 9 Gladstone. “You know what I am really happy about is all the Richmond teams to be honest,” added Wong-Hen. “The parity is awesome right now.” Here is a rundown of the Richmond League individual award winners: MVP: Fardaws Aimaq (StevestonLondon). First Team All-Stars: Jordin Kojima (McMath), Bryce Mason (McMath), Zak Hassen (Cambie), Talvinder Jagde (McNair), Fardaws Aimaq (StevestonLondon). Second Team All-Stars: Ryan Yeung (McMath), Ahmed Mohamud (Steveston-London), Kevin Dhillon (Cambie), Phillip Gundic (Richmond High), Josh Ignacio (MacNeill). Third Team All-Stars: Daniel Chen (Steveston-London), Nathan Schroeder (McNair), Daniel Afanasivevksy (Richmond High), Pavel Prasad (Hugh Boyd), Sorosh Sidiqi (Palmer).

Land Act: Notice of Intention to Apply For a Disposition of Crown Land Take Notice that Van-Air Marina Hotel Ltd. from North Vancouver, BC, has applied to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Operations (MFLNRO), Surrey for a Commercial tenure to operate a marina situated on Provincial Crown land located at 3500 Cessna Drive, Richmond, BC, V7B 1C7. The Land File Number for this application is file # 2411838. Comments concerning this application should be directed to the Senior Land Officer at 200-104248 153rd Street, Surrey, BC V3R 1E1. Comments will be received by the Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resources Operations until (March 19, 2017). Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations may not consider comments received after this date. Please visit the Applications and Reasons for Decision Database website at www.arfd.gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/index.jsp for more information. Be advised that any response to this advertisement will be considered part of the public record. For information, contact information Access Operations at the Ministry of Technology, Innovation and Citizens Services In Victoria at: www.gov.bc.ca/citz/iao/.

■ McMath Wildcats Bryce Mason and Steveston-London Sharks Ahmed Mohamud battle for the rebound during last week’s Richmond Senior Boys Basketball League championship game. The Sharks defended their title with a 94-87 win. The teams are expected to meet again tonight in the Lower Mainland playoffs.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

A21

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MOSKALUK, Dewayne Barry It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Dewayne on January 4, 2017. Dewayne was born on December 4, 1952 in Lethbridge, Alberta to parents Lloyd and Margaret. He is survived by his daughters Andrea Belisario (David) and Laura Kravtsov; 3 grandchildren Alysa, Ethan and Natalie Belisario; father Lloyd; brothers and sisters Bryan (Brenda), Beverly, Valerie, Donna Lockhart (Jeff); Larry McIntyre (Debbie), Kevin McIntyre (Giselle), Judy McIntyre & Richard McIntyre (Shinobu); many nieces and nephews and friends. Dewayne spent most of his working career (19842017) with Pacific Industrial Scale in Richmond where he was an electronic scale technician. He loved the outdoors, especially the Harrison Lake and Hope areas. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle with his brother Howard who passed away in 2015. A celebration of his life will be held on Saturday, February 18, 2017 from 1:00 - 4:00 pm at Mayfair Lakes Golf Club in Richmond. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Heart & Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice.

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs & tributes at:

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Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment.

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ORTON, Eva Edna

December 26, 1923 - February 2, 2017 It is with great sadness that we say good-bye to Eva Orton (Guest) at the age of 93 years old. She passed away peacefully at Fraserview Care Home in Richmond, B.C. with family at her side. She is predeceased by her husband Arthur, her son Ron and her son-in-law Robert D’Aoust, as well as 8 siblings. She is survived by her loving family, daughters Glenna and Susan (David), grandchildren Kimberlee (Joey), Jennifer (Kevin), Megan (Topher), Christopher (Jordan), Joey and Sarah and great grandchildren Hunter, Connery, Brody and Willow. She is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews and one sister-in-law.

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TRUTH IN EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

OBITUARIES

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REMEMBRANCES IN MEMORIAM

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER

Phone Hours: Mon to Fri 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Office Hours: 9 am to 5 pm

Eva was born in Saskatchewan and was the youngest of 9 children. Art and Eva moved to B.C. in 1957 with their two eldest children Ron and Glenna. Their youngest daughter Susan was born the following year in Richmond, B.C. Eva was always active in Seniors at her church and women’s groups. Eva was very family oriented, the best grandma and was blessed to be here for the birth of her 4 great grandchildren. The family would like to thank the amazing staff of Fraserview Care home for the care, love and friendship they gave our Mom. Mom will always be remembered for her quiet and gentle strength, her sense of humour and of course her delicious baking. Service to be held February 18, 2017 @ 10:30 a.m. with refreshments following at Richmond Funeral Home, 8420 Cambie Road, Richmond, B.C. In lieu of flowers please make a contribution to your favorite charity.

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CANADA BENEFIT GROUP Attention British Columbia residents: Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-5112250 or www.canada benefit.ca/free-assessment

To advertise in the Classifeds call

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May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of Despair

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GENERAL EMPLOYMENT F/T Dishwasher. $12/hr plus tips. Exp. an asset.

Is Hiring FLAG PERSONS & LANE CLOSURE TECHS

• Must have reliable vehicle • Must be Certified • $19.98 per hour for TCP $25.58 per hour for LCT • Full union benefits, including Medical. DINAMAC HOLDINGS LTD Apply in Person 9770 - 199A St, Langley or Email resume: resumes@ dinamacholdings.ca

classifieds. richmond-news.com

Wage dependant on exp. Call Marino 604-277-5626 / 604-649-5119

OFFICE / CLERICAL

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Is Seeking FLAG PERSONS & LANE CLOSURE TECHS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711 Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email: inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

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Richmond Funeral Home Reception and Cremation Centre 604-273-3748

COMMUNITY

If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the:

• Must have reliable vehicle • Must be certified • $18.21 per hour for TCP $22.89 per hour for LCT • Full union benefits, including Medical. VALLEY TRAFFIC SYSTEMS Apply in Person 9770-199A St, Langley or Email resume: jobapplication@valleytraffic.ca

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A22 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM BUSINESS SERVICES

EDUCATION

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get the online training you need from an employer trusted program.Visit:CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-athome career today!

FINANCIAL SERVICES

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HOME SERVICES CLEANING

EXCAVATING

EUROPEAN DETAILED Service Cleaning www.puma-cleaning.ca Sophia 604-805-3376 .

ELECTRICAL YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call. Lic#89402. Fast same day service. Insured. Guar’d. We love small jobs. 604-568-1899

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#1 Backhoes & Excavators Trenchless Waterlines Bobcats & Dump Truck & All Material Deliveries

Drainage, Video Inspection, Landscaping, Stump/Rock/Cement/Oil Tank & Demos, Paving, Pool/Dirt Removal, Paver Stones, Jackhammer, Water/Sewer, Line/Sumps, Slinger Avail, Concrete Cutting, Hand Excavating, Basements Made Dry Claudio’s Backhoe Service

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GUTTERS GUTTER CLEANING ROOF CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING POWER WASHING 30 yrs experience WCB/Liability insured

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GET BACK ON TRACK Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We lend! If you own your own home you qualify! Pioneer AcceptanceCorp. BBB mem. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com 604-987-1420

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

RENTALS

SUITES FOR RENT Available Now. 3 BR suite ground floor of house, Accessible to amenities Cozy, clean, 1500sf 1.5 baths, w/d. N/s, no pet. $1700 excl utils. 604-721-3022

AUTOMOTIVE

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

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ADVERTISING POLICIES

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All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes will be made in the next available issue. The Richmond News will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

FOR SALE - MISC 2 SIDE-BY-SIDE burial plots in the Garden of the Last Supper. At Valley View Memorial Gardens in Surrey. 604-599-8400. HARDY TREE, Shrub and berry seedlings delivered. Order online at www.treetime.ca or call 1-866-8733846. New growth guaranteed. SAWMILLS from only $4,397 Make money & save money with your own band mill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT

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BUSINESS SERVICES

BUSINESS FOR SALE ARMSTRONG HOTEL & Saloon - Armstrong, BC. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, April 26 in Edmonton. 16 guest rooms, saloon & restaurant. Jerry Hodge: 780-706-6652; Realtor: Tom Moran (PREC) Re/Max Dawson Creek Realty; rbauction.com/realestate.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES FREE FREE Vending Machines & Countertop Profit Centers. Can Earn $100,000.00 + Per Yr. Retire in just 3 Years. Prime Locations Provided. Plus Raise Money for Breast Cancer Research. Full Details Call Now 1-866-668-6629 Web Siite www.vendingforhope.com

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CASH FOR ALL! Serving the Delta area since 1986

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BOATS

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

HOME SERVICES

CALL THE EXPERTS RUBBISH REMOVAL

KITCHEN / BATHS

HANDYPERSON

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TREE SERVICES

Pruning, Hedge Trimming Tree & Stump Removal 60 ft Bucket Trucks 604-787-5915 604-291-7778 www.treeworksonline.ca 10% discount with this ad

and I’m a Nice Guy!

Mike Favel • 604-341-2681

@

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CHURCH

Insured / WCB

• Residential / Commercial • Complete • Rotary / Reel Cutting • Trimming

Fertilizing Programs • Hedge

• Edging

Trimming / Pruning

• Aeration / Power Raking • Pressure Washing

604-908-3596

DIRECTORY

Fujian Evangelical Church welcomes you to Sunday Worship Services • English Services: 9:00 & 10:45 a.m. • Mandarin Service: 9:00 a.m. • Minnanese Service: 10:45 a.m. 12200 Blundell Road, Richmond, B.C., V6W 1B3 Phone 604-273-2757 • www.fujianevangelical.org

APOSTOLIC PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

11960 Montego St. (corner No. 5 Road), Richmond, BC (604) 520-0660 aslagayan@hotmail.com

(J.D. MURDOCH HALL)

Family-Oriented Fellowship, Everyone Welcome Sunday Service 1:30-3:30 pm, Fellowship Follows. 8151 Bennett Road, Richmond • (604) 277-9157 Pastor Ed Arquines • Cell (604) 644-9364

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH

In Tagalog & English

Come and visit us

..where you are always welcome

LIVING TRUTH BAPTIST CHURCH

8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.ca Rev. Maggie Watts-Hammond, Min. of Word, Sacrament & Pastoral Care Rev. Yoko Kihara – Min. of Christian Development & Outreach Worship and Children’s Program Sundays 10:30 am

3720 Broadway Street, Richmond BC We are a multicultural Christian Faith Community Join us in our Worship Service.....2:00 p.m. Sunday School and Fellowship Follows Pastor: Joe De Guzman.....778-997-5673

St. Alban

ST. ANNE’S ANGLICAN CHURCH- STEVESTON

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 10:00 School am Services at 8:30 and 10:00 amand • Sunday 10:00 am Rev. John Firmston Sunday School 10:00 am 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

Our multicultural community welcomes you to worship 4071 Francis Road, Richmond BC Sunday 8:30 am Eucharist, 10:00 am Family Eucharist with Church School Wednesday 10:00 am Eucharist with Bible Study at 11:00 am The Reverend Brian Vickers, Rector www.stannessteveston.ca • 604-277-9626

Worship Service: Sundays 2:00 – 4:00 pm Senior Pastor - Abe Lagayan

Richmond United Church 8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622 Come for 10am Sunday Worship and Children’s Sunday School and after-service coffee and fellowship.

Rev. Dr. Warren McKinnon

Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church

STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH

3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.) Please join10am us at Worship 10am Sunday, 2015School Please join us for ServiceJuly and19, Sunday with Rev. Brenda Miller School for Worship Service and Sunday Rev. Brenda Miller 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

To advertise in the Church Directory, please call 604-249-3335.


A24 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

LANGLEY FARM MARKET PRODUCE

B.C. GALA APPLES

CAULIFLOWER

Product of B.C. ($1.74KG)

79¢

Product of CALIFORNIA (2LB

BEEF FLAT IRON

15.38KG.........................................

2

59¢

lb.

lb.

DELI

GROCERY EAT WHOLESOME ORGANIC

4

$ 99

6

/lb.

$ 99

450g ................................................

Product of MEXICO ($1.30KG)

$ 29

z

ARCTIC SURF CLAMS

ZUCCHINI

Product of S. AFRICA ($5.04KG)

MEAT 10.98KG..........................................

lb.

RED SEEDLESS GRAPES

BAG)

ea.

PORK BELLY

59¢

lb.

CLEMENTINE MANDARIN

3

Product of MEXICO ($1.30KG)

89¢

lb.

$ 99

ROMA TOMATOES

Product of U.S.A. ($1.96KG)

CHICK PEAS / RED KIDNEY 4 BEANS MIX $ 398ml ..................................................

EAT WHOLESOME ORGANIC /lb.

SAUERKRAUT

900ml ...........................................2 for

EAT WHOLESOME ORGANIC

6

$ 99

STRAINED TOMATOES ea.

680ml ..................................................

FRYEBE

1

OVEN ROASTED TURKEY

29

ea.

7

$ 00

1

$ 99

ea.

2

$ 09

100g .............................................. ...

FRYEBE

1

CERVELAT SALAMI

$ 88

CREAMY HAVARTI

$ 49

100g ...................................................

100g ...................................................

1

BAKERY BUTTER ROLL 350g ...................

1

$ 90

MADEIRA LOAF ea.

440g ....................

3

$ 00

ea.

APPLE STREUSEL PIE $ 99 550g .................

2

ea.

MANGO SWISS ROLL $ 600g .....................

499

ea.

Valid Wednesday, February 15th - Sunday, February 19th, 2017 while quantities last.

For Freshness and Quality you can count on!

WE ARE HIRING!

STORE HOURS:

for the following positions: • Meat Cutter • Produce Stocker • Cashier • Grocery Stocker

RICHMOND

Unit 640, Lansdowne Centre 5300 #3 Road, Richmond

604-232-1188

LFM LANGLEY FARM MARKET

For fresh and quality foods

MON, TUES, SAT 8:30 AM - 6 PM WED, THURS, FRI 8:30 AM - 9 PM SUN & HOLIDAY 9 AM - 6 PM

Your Choice. Our Honour. Our Effort. Our Award. Thank you to all our valued customers for your ongoing support

For freshness & quality you can count on!


Richmond News February 15 2017