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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 2016 n MLA Linda Reid (second from right) joined in a silent protest outside of Brighouse Station on Sunday. Richmond resident Edward Liu organized the event in response to a flyer sent out last week blaming ‘the Chinese” for housing prices and ruptured neighbourhoods. Since then, a second anti-Chinese flyer is reported to be circulating. Photo by Nick Procaylo/PNG

Richmond

Victoria

Edmonton

What’s inside:

NEWS: Organic waste headed for Harvest Power to be reduced 3

New anti-Chinese flyer delivered

People calling radio station talked about feeling unsafe: Liu ALANCAMPBELL

Staff Reporter

ACAMPBELL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

A

nother flyer attacking Chinese immigrants is doing the rounds in Richmond and it’s making some residents feel unsafe, according to an anti-racism protestor. The new flyer — depicting a Caucasian family looking on in envy at a supposedly, Chinese-owned monster home and apparently distributed by Immigration Watch Canada (IWC) — was the talk of a live phone-in radio show on Monday on Chinese-language radio station AM1320. Edward Liu, who organized a silent protest outside the Brighouse Canada Line station on Sunday against another anti-Chinese flyer distributed two weeks ago in Richmond, was a guest of the station during its phone-in. During the show, Liu, a Richmond resident

and long-time immigrant from Hong Kong, said many locals calling into the station expressed fears for their safety. “Many people that were phoning in talked about feeling unsafe for themselves and their families because of the flyers in Richmond,” said Liu, who organized Sunday’s protest because he and a few friends felt they “had to do something, as we didn’t feel comfortable about the message in the (original) flyer. We wanted to show people that we are all Canadian and that we love Canada.” Liu said he urged the callers to the show not to “over-react” and that the flyers “don’t represent Richmond.” “I told them that Richmond is still a safe community to live in.” The latest flyer claims that tens of thousands of wealthy Chinese families are driving up housing costs, using healthcare and education resources in the country, paying

little or no tax into the system and that their children are getting preferential hiring treatment. No one from IWC returned calls or emails from the Richmond News before deadline. Of the suggestion that not enough new Asian immigrants are making an effort to integrate into Canadian society, Liu said such a depiction was “unfair.” “During the process of integrating, it might not be as smooth as some people want; we have different ways of doing things and seeing things and there are difficulties with integration,” he said. “Some may not have the language skills and it takes time for them to pick it up; learning a new language is not easy. About 90 per cent of the new immigrants that I know have made efforts to learn some English before coming to Canada.” See Integration page 3

BUSINESS: Richmond Chamber celebrates the best in local business 13

SPORTS: Richmond volleyball teams off to provincials this week 34

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A3

NEWSin the City

Owner chokes up over eagles house in 2004 partly because of the nest and beat out a developer in a minibidding war. “The tree hasn’t been healthy for a long time; the two trunks are cabled together. We could have taken the stress off the cabling by doing some major topping of the tree, but that would have meant the nest would be affected anyway, so there was no point. “In the last two years, major branches have broken off the tree and smashed through my window and hit my neighbour’s roof. “I’m a pretty emotional guy and I would probably be crying if I watched them take away the nest, so I had to leave the house when I knew they were coming to take it away; it was too much for me. I love my neighbourhood; I’m not tearing down or selling. But it’s a sad day for my family and the neighbourhood.” MacNab said he wasn’t sure of the developer’s intentions back in 2004 but, pointing to all the re-development in his street, said, “you just need to have a look at the place around here to see what would likely have happened.” “I’m hopeful that the eagles were able to establish a new nest somewhere close by.”

Alan Campbell

Staff Reporter acampbell@richmond-news.com

“T

his house won’t be the same without the eagles.” David MacNab was still cut up on Friday, lamenting the loss of the esteemed, bald eagles nest that used to perch proudly atop the ailing, 90-foot cottonwood tree in his backyard in The Monds in West Richmond. Looking up at where the nest sat for the last 20 years or so, MacNab — who admits to being an “emotional guy” — was fighting back tears as he told the Richmond News how much the eagles meant to him and how hard it was to hire an arborist, knowing in his heart of hearts what the tree’s prognosis was going to reveal. Worried that his Rosamond Avenue neighbours and others in the community might question his motive for condemning the tree and, therefore, the eagles nest, MacNab wanted everyone to know how difficult it was to make that call. “I was loathe to address this and, for a while, I thought to myself, ‘don’t ask the question (of the tree), and then I won’t need to hear the answer,’” said MacNab, adding that he bought the

n David MacNab says he bought his house in 2004, partly because of the eagle’s nest, which recently had to be removed from the 90-feet tree in his backyard. Photo by Alan Campbell/ Richmond News

The removal of the long-established eagle’s nest two weeks ago from the now condemned tree – set to be cut down in January – was totally necessary, according to David Hancock, a renowned eagle biologist of 55 years and founder of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation. Before finding out that an eagle expert had approved the nest’s removal, local residents were horrified when they realized the nest was gone and a tarp was erected above the nesting fork to prevent the mating eagles from returning. A subsequent inspection by City of Richmond staff — after the homeowner had applied for a tree-removal permit — confirmed the tree had “significant structural defects” and was determined as “hazardous.” MacNab praised City of Richmond staff who, he said, went out of their way to find solutions to save the tree. With the tree condemned, MacNab had to apply to the provincial Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations for a permit to have the nest removed, after the nesting season. One of MacNab’s neighbours, Steve Guthrie, has written an open letter to the Ministry and Mayor Malcolm Brodie, urging them to rescind the tree-cutting permit and review the danger it poses.

Organic waste intake to be reduced

Integration needed, not assimilation: Prof

Graeme Wood

Staff Reporter gwood@richmond-news.com

From page 1 A handful of non-Asians were among the 40-strong crowd at Sunday’s silent protest, including Richmond-East MLA Linda Reid and her family. Everyone held placards reading “We Are One Community” and waved Canadian flags. Meanwhile, Dr. Charles Quist-Adade, professor of sociology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, said it was “quite concerning and frightening” to see the flyers currently being distributed in Richmond. “I was worried, but then quite inspired by the reaction (to the flyers) by people in Richmond, especially the white people,” said Quist-Adade, who specializes in mass media, race and ethnicity and who immigrated from Ghana in 1992. “Canada has enough space and resources for everybody, for all immigrants, no matter where they’re from.” When asked about the suggestion that new immigrants in Richmond don’t integrate as much as they could, Quist-Adade did not pull any punches. “That’s what racists would say,” he said. “But immigrants in Richmond are integrating and contributing. This is just an excuse to cover up racism. “It’s saying that they should behave like white Canadians.” Integration, explained Quist-Adade, is when “everybody is contributing; assimilation is when we are all subsumed by a certain culture, in this case, it’s the dominant Euro-Canadian culture. And when immigrants do try to integrate, they are accused of not being Canadian enough.”

C

ome January, the City of Richmond will begin diverting organic waste it collects at townhouses and condos away from Harvest Power’s beleaguered waste-to-energy composting facility in east Richmond. The announcement was made Monday evening by Mayor Malcolm Brodie. The waste will go to a new, yet-to-benamed composter. The city’s move is in line with a recent recommendation by Metro Vancouver to immediately divert organic waste being sent to the Harvest Power from the North Shore Transfer Station. Both government bodies claim they are also going to review best practices of composting facilities while simultaneously demanding Harvest Power improve its facility and control its emissions within 90 days. Should it not, Metro Vancouver claims the company will be in default of its contract. The move to divert organic waste away from Harvest Power comes amidst a series of other measures

taken by the city and Metro Vancouver to mitigate Harvest’s odours. Brodie also announced that the city will be spending upwards of $150,000 to fund additional compliance, monitoring and independent research. That’s in addition to $18,800 needed to divert organic waste being collected by the city’s waste collector Sierra Waste. Aside from odours, the city appears to be looking at other matters related to the large volume of organic material Harvest Power is handling. Since August, Richmond Fire Rescue has responded to six fires found in the compost piles at the facility. On Nov. 10, the fire department issued a Notice of Violation for non-compliance, according to a report to city council by Deputy Fire Chief Kevin Gray. The city has also conducted inspections for rodent issues and has noted that Harvest Power has 200 traps to deal with an infestation. No non-compliance matters related to rodents were found. Additionally, city staff report that Metro Vancouver staff has delivered two Notices of Violation to Harvest Power since Metro Vancouver issued

the new air quality permit Sept. 30. Meanwhile, the city reported Monday it has been granted full party status in the appeals process of the Harvest Power permit, despite having joined the the process late. Senior city staff have also met with Ministry of Environment staff to request their involvement and support to enforce odour mitigation efforts. Another moving part in this issue is the matter of health. The city stated it received a letter from Vancouver Coastal Health on Friday. In it, VCH Chief Medical Officer Patricia Daly stated that while Harvest Power is creating foul odours, the emissions are “unlikely to cause health effects in addition to ones triggered by the offensive smell,” such as reports from residents of nausea and respiratory symptoms. The city is asking VCH to attend a public meeting on Dec. 8 to field health-related questions. To respond to various concerns, Harvest Power CEO Chris Kasper will be available at the meeting at the Richmond Airport Hilton, Minoru Boulevard at 7 p.m.

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A4 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

NEWSin the City

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olice have released sketches of two men suspected of taking part in a brazen, daytime heist at a jewelry store in a shopping mall. A trio of masked, hammerwielding robbers raided a jewelry store in Aberdeen Centre on Tuesday, Sept. 13 around 4 p.m. The suspects — who wore surgical masks, but appeared to be dressed as construction workers — burst into Lukfook Jewelry on the centre’s second floor armed with hammers. According to Richmond RCMP, several display cases were smashed and an undetermined amount of jewelry was taken. However, during the heist, several of the mall’s security personnel tackled the suspects and one of them managed to disarm a hammer from one of the thieves. All three managed to escape and last week,

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

NEWSin the City

Hung jury ends murder trial Keith Fraser

Vancouver Sun

A

Richmond man accused of murdering his wife is facing a new trial after there was a hung jury in the case over the weekend. The failure of the jury to reach a verdict in the case of James Jian Hua Wu came late Saturday, after 13 days of deliberations. It may have been the longest ever jury deliberation in B.C. At the trial in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, which began Sept. 20, it was alleged that Wu had used a cleaver to inflict injuries to the neck and head area of his wife, Jin Jenna Cheng. The Crown’s theory was that it was a case of extreme domestic violence and that Wu, who pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder, had intentionally killed his wife in anger after what was a difficult and frustrating period in their marriage. The May 2014 slaying happened on the second anniversary of their wedding. Court heard that after police arrived, they found the accused and the victim lying on the floor outside their seventhfloor apartment suite in the 7000-block Granville Avenue. The victim had been stabbed multiple times. Wu testified about an angry confrontation in which he had a knife and she pushed him away and he became fearful. He claimed that there was a pushing back and forth and that she also came into possession of a knife. Wu said he was fearful

for his life at that point but claimed to have no memory of subsequent events. The accused called several expert witnesses who testified that at the time of the offence, Wu’s mental functioning was impaired and he was in the middle of a “dissociative” episode. Wu claimed he did not have the intent for murder but the Crown argued that even if there was evidence of a dissociative episode, the elements of murder had been proven. The 12-member jury began deliberations on Nov. 14 and had a number of questions for the judge and the lawyers in the case before declaring that they could not reach a verdict. The case is expected to be back in court Dec. 7 to set a date for a new trial. Dan McLaughlin, a spokesman for B.C.’s criminal justice branch, said that the jury deliberations in the case “may very well be” the longest ever in the province. “Unfortunately we don’t track those types of statistics so I can’t officially confirm,” he said in an email. The longest previous case is believed to be the Greeks gang murder trial, wherein the jury took 12 days before finding five men guilty of various offences in connection with three homicides. That verdict came in November 2012. A jury in the trial of Yuan Xi William Tang, of Richmond, who was accused in the slaying of his wife, Lianjie Guo, went 11 days before finding Tang guilty of second-degree murder. That verdict was reached in November 2015.

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A6 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

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As the holidays approach and we plan gatherings, we often reflect on all of the precious relationships with family and friends that we hold dear. I’d like to introduce you to Herbert Lee. He is the managing director of LTA Holidays (Canada) Ltd. as well as a private aircraft pilot. Herbert has lived in Richmond for nearly 30 years and has watched our community change and grow. He’s a member of the Richmond Chamber of Commerce and a community volunteer board member. And he recently shared how grateful he is for the care both he and his family received. It’s a heartwarming story to share with you this season:

“As a pilot, I’ve witnessed various medical emergencies, once where a passenger needed to be rushed to Richmond Hospital, which serves Vancouver International Airport’s nearly 20 million passengers. But when my father was admitted to Richmond Hospital’s Emergency Department for a mini stroke in 2011, I realized that watching a family member suffer was much more frightening. I could see the fear my father had as he was rushed to the hospital. This was his first visit to a hospital so you can imagine his anxiety. But as soon as the staff greeted him, his nervousness melted away and he became very calm. After a few days of treatment and observation, my father was well enough to return home, and we left, grateful for such amazing health care. “In 2013, my 81-year-old mother fell and hit her head on the corner of a table. I was away on a business trip and was sick with worry when I heard that she’d been rushed to the hospital. Then—when I returned two days later—my father fell ill again and was diagnosed with kidney failure after joining my mother at Richmond Hospital. He was given only 48 hours to live. “As we struggled to accept what was happening, the doctors and nurses knew when to give us space and when to give

encouragement and comfort. My father lived in Richmond Hospital for the next 21 days, then passed Herbert Lee away shortly before Managing Director my mother was able to LTA Holidays (Canada) Ltd. leave the hospital. During that time, his nurses made him laugh and found other ways of showing compassion. They were so thoughtful that they even brought my mother over to my father’s room so she could visit him regularly. I’m sure you can imagine the deep sadness I felt at the time, but I was also incredibly grateful.

“After my father passed, one of his favourite nurses, Jill, wrote my mother a card expressing her sorrow for our loss—yet another example of the hospital staff going beyond the call of their duty. My mother still has that card to this day. “Not long after that, I returned to Richmond Hospital for a checkup of my own. My urologist found a tumour on my bladder. When I got the news, I looked around at the expert staff surrounding me, and I felt at peace. Dr. Corrie Krahn patiently explained the risks of the tumour to me and I agreed to have it removed immediately. Less than 48 hours later, I got a call from Dr. Krahn telling me that I was incredibly lucky. The tumour they’d removed was cancerous. “If my tumour hadn’t been caught, I could have developed cancer and I might not be here today. My family and I experienced amazing care from the urology, palliative, and emergency units, as well as medical imaging and surgical care. It’s only with help like yours that Richmond Hospital will be able to continue serving the growing community in such an impactful way. I hope that my story of Richmond Hospital’s compassionate and expert care for my whole family inspires you to give this season!”

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A7

NEWSin the City

Fair Trade fair in town Alan Campbell

Staff Reporter acampbell@richmond-news.com

A

very special Christmas fair takes place this Saturday at Gilmore Park United Church from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Unlike other seasonal fairs — although worthy of mention in their own right — the Kairos Fair Trade Fair displays and sells wares from artisan craftspeople from impoverished nations from around the world. Kairos, an organization made up of 10 churches and religious organizations who work together for ecological justice and human rights, is hosting the fair yet again in a bid to help sell and promote the products made by such people. One of the many vendors at this Saturday’s event will be Ten Thousand Villages, North America’s oldest and largest Fair Trade organization. “I think it’s important to show that a large, Fair Trade player recognizes its roots and Kairos was one of the first to bring Fair Trade organizations together like this,” said Ten Thousand Villages’ Granville Island store manager Roxanne Cave of the reason they continue to show up at the Kairos annual fair. “It’s really all about the selling; that’s what we’re doing, helping people to work and to receive proper wages and conditions.” As ever, Ten Thousand Villages will have its requisite array of Christmas ornaments and nativity scenes on sale on Saturday. “We are well known for our phenomenal ornaments and nativity scenes at this time of year; they’re from every corner of the world: Uganda, Vietnam, The Philippines, Burkina Faso, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Indonesia,” added Cave. “We buy directly from the artisan groups and pay a fair price for the products so families can afford to put their children into education and the children don’t need to work.” The Richmond Gogos, The Sharing

Welcoming Heather Hettiarachchi to Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP

n These Christmas ornaments, sourced from artisan manufacturers from impoverished nations, will be on sale at the Kairos Fair Trade Fair.

Heather advises employers on all aspects of labour and employment matters arising in union and non-unionized workplaces. She draws on her mediation training, human resources experience, expertise in conducting workplace investigations and her own experiences as an entrepreneur, to provide employers with proactive, efficient and timely advice that supports their business objectives. Heather also mediates workplace issues, conducts workplace investigations and provides employers with general human resources support and employee training and coaching services. Heather approaches matters from a practical and common sense perspective which enables her to design innovative, fair and equitable solutions for her clients. We hope you enjoy working with Heather as much as we do.

604.273.6411 • 208 - 4940 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC Farm, Mayan Skills, Marigold Collective, World Vision and Zambala Gifts are some of the other groups selling items. Jose Juan and Manuela Xuncax will be playing the marimbas to add to a festive atmosphere and ethnic food, as well as tea and coffee, will be on sale. The fair is being held at Gilmore United Church at 8060, No. 1 Road. Admission is free, but you can make a donation to help Kairos with its work. For more information, go online to KairosCanada.org.

City of Richmond

Notice

Notice of Intent to Dispose of Land The City of Richmond intends to sell the properties located at 7117 Lindsay Avenue & 5360 Granville Avenue, Richmond, respectively legally described as: Parcel Identifier: 023-676-191 Lot 4 Section 13 Block 4 North Range 7 West NWD Plan LMP31703 Parcel Identifier 009-606-424 Lot “G” Except: Firstly: West 75 Feet Secondly: Part on Reference Plan 12056 Section 13 Block 4 North Range 7 West NWD Plan 1343 To Grandsun Investment & Trading Inc., or its designate, for a disposition price of $3,240,000 (7117 Lindsay Road) and $2,043,000 (5360 Granville Avenue). For more information please contact: Michael Allen Manager, Property Services City of Richmond 6911 No. 3 Road Richmond, BC V6Y 2C1 Telephone: 604-276-4005 City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP welcomes Heather Hettiarachchi as external associate counsel to its litigation team. Heather has over 16 years’ experience in labour and employment matters including working for an eminent national firm as well as chairing the labour & employment group of a large Vancouver firm.

www.cbelaw.com

Welcoming Monica Dosanjh to Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP welcomes Monica Dosanjh to its litigation team. She joins Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP after working in a boutique firm specializing in family law. Monica advises clients on matters such as divorce, child and spousal support, custody and guardianship, parenting time, and division of assets. She has successfully represented clients in both the Provincial and Supreme Courts of British Columbia. She has a passion for advocating for her clients and is committed to attaining solutions that meet her clients’ needs. Monica is fluent in English and Punjabi. We hope you enjoy working with Monica as much as we do.

604.273.6411 • 208 - 4940 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC www.cbelaw.com


A8 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

LETTERSto the Editor Published every Wednesday and Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group.

200-8211AckroydRd.Richmond,B.C.V6X3K8 Call:604.270.8031Web:richmond-news.com

Editor Eve Edmonds

EDITOR@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3343

Reporters: Alan Campbell

ACAMPBELL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3342

Graeme Wood

GWOOD@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3329

Philip Raphael

PRAPHAEL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3348

Sports: Mark Booth

MBOOTH@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Director of advertising Rob Akimow

RAKIMOW@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3340

Integrated Media Consultants: Kevin Liminsang KLIMINSANG@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3337

Collin Neal

CNEAL@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3341

Garry McLellan

GMCLELLAN@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3330

Lesley Smith

LSMITH@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3349

Naomi Zhao

NZHAO@GLACIERMEDIA.CA

778.928.7533

Angela Pong

APONG@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3350

Distribution Manager Kristene Murray KMURRAY@VAN.NET

604.249.3353

Sales Administrator Joyce Ang

JANG@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3335

Veera Irani

VIRANI@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Amber Chen

ACHEN@GLACIERMEDIA.CA

Publisher Pierre Pelletier

PPELLETIER@RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

604.249.3336

Advertising Sales: 604.249.3340 advertising@richmond-news.com Delivery: 604.249.3132 distribution@richmond-news.com Classified: 604.630.3300 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact the editor at editor@richmond-news.com or call 604-249-3343. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

Let's not shy away from tough talk Dear Editor, Re: “Race: An easy, but wrong, target,” Voices, Nov. 25. The recent incident involving delivery of a flyer to a few Richmond homes has generated some good discussions. Is the incident racism? Absolutely. So should we dismiss it totally? No. As a long-time Richmond resident, I concur with the editor’s statement that “this type of bigotry does not represent Richmond. At the same time, it would be a mistake to be dismissive.” I’d like to provide my perspective as an immigrant who landed in Canada 15 years ago from Mainland China. The issue of how the Chinese community is shaping Richmond is complicated. One of the reasons is that the Chinese community is not a static, uniform, and monolithic group. Instead, the Chinese community itself is comprised of many dynamic and diverse sub-groups whose values, attitude, and interests are different from one to another. While some of those differences are subtle, others are profound. Most Chinese, including myself, are active community members — as described in another letter, “Don’t let racism divide.” I immigrated to Canada because I share Canadian values and want to pursue an engaged life in this country. However, I have also come to know, directly and indirectly, members of the Chinese com-

munity who exhibit very limited interest or willingness to participate in the local community. Rather, they encircle themselves in their own social sphere. Some immigrants don’t care to think about what their neighbours feel or to learn the official language. Services they need are available in their native language, “so why even bother?” is their attitude. When members of a community are not engaged, that community gradually becomes fragmented and neighbourhoods are diminished. Sadly, in some areas of Richmond, that is what’s happening. When people who live next door are not able (or even willing) to have a short chat, how is it possible to establish a sense of neighbourhood? This past Halloween, when my six-year-old daughter asked me why some big houses weren’t playing trick or treat, I found it hard to explain why people who live in those homes are a little bit different from the rest of us. Richmond has made headlines in recent years thanks to Chinese-only business signs, Mandarin-only strata meetings, and Chinese birth tourism. As a Richmond resident and a Chinese immigrant, I am deeply concerned about how such headlines are influencing public perception of Richmond and the Chinese community. In today’s political and social climate, any discussion around race or culture is often labeled racist. Most politicians instinctively stay

away from such discussions. But avoiding an open and constructive conversation about culture does not make racism disappear. Instead, in my opinion, it helps fuel it by driving these discussions underground, and onto anonymous forums, such as on the Internet. As Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Canadian Multiculturalism Day, multiculturalism is our strength. But multiculturalism does not preclude open and honest discussions on how we can better harness the benefits from each unique culture. In fact, such discussions would facilitate active social engagement and cross-culture pollination in our society. Communities will benefit from an enriched cultural environment and tighter social fabric. As a city with one of the largest Chinese populations in North America, Richmond could do more to spearhead positive, open dialogue to promote cross-culture interactions. Richmond city council should introduce meaningful policies to address dialogue. I also call upon the Chinese community to be active in community building. Chinese community leaders could do more to encourage its members to integrate into Canadian society. To defeat racism, we need to acknowledge that healthy discussions, that include all of us, are essential. Dongping Gu Richmond

Mayor counters cyclist’s complaints Dear Editor, Re: “Cyclist’s open letter to Mayor Brodie,” Letters, Nov. 18. I am pleased to offer comments in response to the letter from Geordie McGillivray published in the Nov. 18 edition of the Richmond News, in which the writer cites several areas of concern for cyclists in Richmond. Overall, I wish to stress that the safety of cyclists anywhere in the city is of paramount importance. Richmond wishes to extend its cycling network while protecting the cyclists.

n Westminster Highway at CN Rail Crossing (east of No. 9 Road)

The City of Richmond (city) capital project to widen Westminster Highway (Nelson Road-McMillan Way) to four lanes and provide a multi-use path on the south side triggers a federal requirement to upgrade the existing roadwayrailway crossing to provide a warning system (i.e., gates, bells and flashing lights). The city’s roadworks are on hold pending the completion of the crossing upgrade by CN Rail. The city is working with CN Rail to facilitate this work, which is expected to commence in early 2017.

n Off-Street Path on Westminster Highway (No. 6 Road-No. 8 Road) Unfortunately, the typical width of Westminster Highway in this section makes it difficult to estab-

lish an on-street bike lane in each direction. The off-street path best provides pedestrian and cycling facilities that are protected from vehicle traffic. Regarding the visibility between vehicles coming out of driveways and path users, it should be noted that the hedges and trees are on private property. When necessary, the city trims the growth in order to prevent encroachment into the right-of-way but cannot require removal. The city is examining potential options to alert both parties. Suggestions to date include adding “Cyclist Crossing” signage facing motorists coming out of the driveways; adding a white stop bar at the south edge of the path to remind motorists coming out of the driveways; and/or adding a large green painted bicycle symbol on the path in front of each driveway. Hopefully, with heightened awareness, all are better protected from tragic incident.

n River Road between No. 6 Road and the eastern end The city plans to analyze signalization of the River RoadWestminster Highway intersection to determine if a traffic signal is warranted. Yet, such signals may encourage more motorists to use River Road. More vehicular traffic could be undesirable given the roadway’s popularity with cyclists, particularly on weekends. The city also plans to analyze the entire length of this section of River Road in order to deter-

n In an earlier letter, cyclist Geordie McGillivray outlined specific intersections and roadways throughout Richmond that are particularly dangerous for cyclists. Photo by Graeme Wood/ Richmond News

mine the feasibility of establishing paved shoulders. This analysis would consider whether continuous shoulders on both sides are possible given the physical constraints of the dyke, the Fraser River on the north side and the large southside watercourse. The section of River Road with the existing 30 km/h speed limit and the installation of speed humps was established only with the support of local area residents. Extending the 30 km/h zone and installing more speed humps could be accomplished following similar verified support from the area’s residents and businesses.

n Highway 99 Northbound Off-Ramp (Rice Mill RoadSteveston Highway)

This roadway section is within the sole jurisdiction of the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, not the city. The suggestion for the off-ramp has

been forwarded to the ministry to determine if interim improvements can now be undertaken prior to the completion of the planned new bridge.

n Richmond Active Transportation Committee

Richmond’s Active Transportation Committee is an advisory committee to city council with a mandate which includes providing input and feedback to the city on infrastructure projects designed for cycling. It meets regularly to undertake various activities in co-operation with the city that encourage, educate and raise awareness of all forms of active transportation. Richmond city council and staff are pleased to work with various residents and groups to make sure that any cycling activity in the city is carried out safely and with the interests of all in mind. Malcolm D. Brodie Mayor


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

LETTERSto the Editor

A few tips for local cabbies Dear Editor, Almost daily, we see articles in the news “Uber is bad for Canada,” “Make good Money and Drive for Uber,” or protests around the world by the taxi industry. I own a successful B & B here in Richmond and hundreds of my guests arrive here by taxi from the Vancouver Airport. May I make a few suggestions to the taxi industry from my point of view as to why Uber is becoming so attractive to tourists, travellers and just plain folk going from point A to B: 1. Don’t show your immediate disappointment when you find out your customers are “only” going to somewhere in Richmond and not Whistler or Horseshoe Bay after you have sat at the airport waiting; 2. Do not give your customers the knowledge of what you had for dinner as soon as they enter your taxi due to the smell. This also applies to your choice of music; 3. Keep your taxi clean and your appearance clean; 4. Know a few English phrases when your customers get into your taxi, such as “Welcome to Canada,” instead of saying absolutely nothing the entire trip. I have met very few travellers from any country in the world that do not speak some English and if they don’t — we have an “app for that” and you can get it free. It doesn’t matter what language you speak, this app will translate it into English and back again into their language or the language you prefer. 5. Use your GPS once in awhile; 6. Get out of your taxi to retrieve luggage and preferably walk the customer to the door if the luggage is difficult to handle for

the customer, instead of dumping their stuff on the road and drive-way; 7. Drop the customer off at the right address. I have had guests call from down the block asking why I won’t answer the door. They were left at the wrong address. 8. Perhaps know a few restaurants or places of interest to go while driving in the car in case you are asked. If you are from the same country as your customers or a different culture or ethnicity, then recommend those places where you go and where you eat. Those are the places people want to hear about. 9. A tip is for a service. A tip is not for doing absolutely nothing but driving a car. 10. You provide the service and you won’t have to worry about the competition. We now refuse to use one taxi service here in Richmond, but when we switched to a different taxi service in Richmond, we found an entirely different service; they obviously knew the market and the service has been exceptional. We promote Richmond first every day. Our guests are surprised at all the things to see and do here, which means they also spend their money here, which is what we all want them to do. But we also want them to leave Richmond with great memories to tell their family and friends. The taxi industry is usually the first impression of what our city, our province or our country represents. You are all ambassadors for our city, our province and our country. Linda Cooper Richmond

Justin (Jay) Howard as Director Buildings and Programs Jay has a wealth of experience in project and program management, having spent 14 years at the City of Richmond in various roles including Community Facilities Coordinator. Jay has ‘hands-on’ knowledge of building systems and project management experience, and experience developing programs for all age groups. Jay’s extensive involvement in, and understanding of the community, will ensure our residents have many health, wellness, social and educational choices in our retirement communities. As well, he will help to ensure our residents feel very much a part of the broader community when they choose the NCL ‘Club’ lifestyle. You can reach Jay at (604) 273-1880.

Justin (Jay) Howard, Director Buildings and Programs

invites you to her annual

Christmas Open House Wednesday, ay, December 7, 2016 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM Richmond hmond East Constituency Office 130 – 8040 Garden n City Road, Richmond

RSVP to: linda.reid.mla@leg.bc.ca

Please bring b i ad donation ti of food ood ffor d dogs or cats ffor our f i d att the friends th Richmond Ri h d Animal Protection Society

A9


A10 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

LETTERSto the Editor

Letters Policy

Send your letters to Editor@Richmond-News.com. Include your name and city. The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, taste and legality. The Richmond News does not publish anonymous letters.

PROTECT YOUR HOME

or BUSINESS

Investigations (Confidential) Security Systems CCTV Cameras

Don’t tax us for your mistakes The Editor, I should like to counter the message published by another reader who was urging the City of Richmond to follow the City of Vancouver in attempting to implement an empty home tax. To start with, no municipality should attempt to apply a tax to current property owners who legally bought homes, and are currently paying city taxes based on the amount of time they choose to reside in the home. I wonder if the writer of the letter would feel that vacation homes in the Okanagan, Sun Peaks or Palm Springs should also be subject to the same tax — I should imagine not. The region has an affordable hous-

ing problem due to poor foresight by all levels of government. Fixed low interest rates, lack of policy on foreign ownership, no public housing strategy have all contributed. The City of Vancouver has caused much of their own problems with an appallingly slow and cumbersome building permit process (how many bike share spots will you have?) which has stalled several projects which would increase the housing stock. Do we want a society where home owners are told how and when they may use their legal property? I wonder how such use would be monitored. Do we have to report to city hall before

we take an extended vacation? As long as the use is legal and conforms to the property zoning, property owners should have the right to use it as they see fit. Restricting foreign ownership is the purview of any country and I believe that Canada needs to consider stricter laws in all areas: real estate, natural resources and ownership of Canadian companies. Future offshore investment in homes may need to be reviewed. But, penalizing current owners who are paying civic property taxes should not be our response to poor government planning. Kathy Marcino Richmond

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A11

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Offers available from November 23 - 30 2016. ∞ No Purchase Required. Must visit a participating Nissan Dealership in Canada to enter. The Nissan Canada Sweepstakes Celebrating Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (“Sweepstakes”) begins at 12:00:01 a.m. Eastern Time (“ET”) on Nov. 21/16, and ends at 11:59:59 p.m. ET on Nov. 30/16. Entry/Official Rules at www.nissan.ca/starwarsrogueone. Must be a legal resident of Canada who has reached the age of majority. Limit one (1) entry per person per day. One (1) Grand Prize trip, ARV: $4,235 CDN. Draw in Chicago, IL on Dec. 1/16. Odds of winning depend on the total number of Sweepstakes Entries submitted and received. Potential winner must correctly answer a mathematical Skill-Testing Question without assistance and must be able to travel Dec 14 to 17, 2016. Sponsor: Nissan Canada Inc. Void where prohibited. ©2016 Nissan Canada Inc. Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures Canada is not a Sponsor and is not responsible for the administration of this Sweepstakes. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story © 2016 & TM Lucasfilm Ltd. †Representative finance offer based on a new 2016 Sentra SR (AA00) /2016 Micra SR MT/2016 Versa Note SV MT. Selling price is $23,198/$17,588/$17,998 financed at 0%/0%/0% APR equals 84/84/84 monthly payments of $276/$209/$214monthlyforan84/84/84monthterm.$0/$0/$0downpaymentrequired.Costofborrowingis$0foratotalobligationof$23,198/$17,588/$17,998.+TotalStandardratefinanceincentivesof$5,055/$3,055/$4,250applicable,onapprovedcredit,whenfinancinganew2016SentraSRPremium/2016MicraSRAT/2016VersaNoteSMTthroughNissanCanadaFinanceInc.(“NCF”)atstandardrates.Totalincentivesconsistof:(i)$4,555/$2,555/$3,750NCFStandardRateFinanceCashthat will be deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes; and (ii) $500/$500/$500 Loyalty Conquest Cash that will be deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes. Incentives cannot be combined with lease rates, subvented lease/finance rates or with any other offers. **Loyalty/Conquest Cash(“Offer”) is available only to eligible customers who, in the 90 days preceding the date of lease/finance of an Eligible New Vehicle (defined below), have leased or financed a 2007 or newer Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Mazda or Hyundai brand vehicle (an “Existing Vehicle”) within past 90-days. Eligibility for the Offer will be determined by Nissan Canada Inc. (“NCI”) in its sole discretion. Proof of current ownership/lease/finance contract will be required. Offer is not transferrable or assignable, except to the current owner’s spouse or a co-owner/co-lease of the existing vehicle (either of whom must reside within the same household as the intended recipient of the offer). Individuals who purchased/leased a vehicle under a business name can qualify for the program provided that the new deal is not a fleet deal and that the individual can provide valid documentation that they are the registered primary owner of the business. If the eligible customer elects to lease or finance a new and previously unregistered model year 2016 Nissan brand vehicle (excluding NV, Fleet and daily rentals) (an “Eligible New Vehicle”) through Nissan Canada Finance Inc. (collectively “NCF”), then he/she will receive a specified amount of NCF Loyalty/Conquest Cash, as follows: (I) 2016 ALTIMA ($2,016); (II) 2016 MICRA/VERSA NOTE/SENTRA ($500); (III) 2016 JUKE/ROGUE ($600); (IV) 2016 PATHFINDER ($800); (V) 2016 TITAN XD ($1,000); (VI) 2017 TITAN HALF TON ($1,000). Loyalty/Conquest Dollars will be applied after taxes. Offer is combinable with other NCF incentives, but is not combinable with the Nissan Loyalty program. Offer valid on vehicles delivered between November 1-30, 2016. Models shown $24,198/$18,588/$21,348 Selling price for a new 2016 Sentra SR (AA00)/ 2016 Micra SR AT/2016 Versa Note SL. All Pricing includes Freight and PDE charges ($1,600/$1,600/$1,600) air-conditioning levy ($100), applicable fees, manufacturer’s rebate and dealer participation where applicable. License, registration, insurance and applicable taxes are extra. Offers are available on approved credit through Nissan Canada Finance for a limited time, may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers except stackable trading dollars. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. See your dealer or visit Nissan.ca/Loyalty. See your participating Nissan retailer for complete details. Certain conditions apply. ©2016 Nissan Canada Inc.


A12 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Winter Series

RICHMOND & DELTA EDITION

2

A Welcome Addition

Mayor Lois E. Jackson delivers her introductory remarks at the Grand Opening event at The Wexford on Friday, June 3rd, 2016. Right: Chef Matt with some of his creations. The Wexford has a range of on-site services and recreational programs that encourage active social and intellectual connections for seniors. These amenities, along with The Wexford’s proximity to transit and the South Delta Recreation Centre, all help to support seniors’ wellness and achieve a higher quality of life. For more information about life at a Bria community, call Rosanne Philbrook, Manager at 604 948-4477.

special gourmet menus. The program will seek accreditation by the College of Dietitians of British Columbia, through HealthLink BC. Manager Rosanne Philbrook wholeheartedly supports the program. “We are here for our residents, not the other way around. Bria’s commitment is to improve seniors’ wellness and to give them the best lifestyle conditions we can. Matt’s dining program is fully aligned with this commitment.”

The Wexford is newest independent living seniors residence in the Bria Communities family, in the heart of Tsawwassen, with 65 well-appointed, soundproofed suites, and a rooftop garden with views of Boundary Bay. 56 ST

to celebrate the families and When Mayor Lois Jackson gave residents from both The her introductory remarks at the Waterford, at Tsawwassen Grand Opening for The Wexford town centre, and The Wexford, in Tsawwassen this Summer, at Northgate. she acknowledged our beautiful Chef Matt Jackson designed new seniors’ residence as “a an amazing selection of hors d’ welcome addition to the vibrant œuvres and side dishes for this community of South Delta.” special event, from which he She said in her speech that still draws inspiration for The “Delta is fortunate to have new, Wexford’s culinary program for forward thinking developments its residents. such as the Wexford, which help Unique to The Wexford, Chef meet the housing needs of our Matt is piloting an open dining seniors population.” concept that provides our She added that The Wexford residents with flexible seatings will “help ensure Delta’s aging and non-standard meal times. population are able to remain in “We’ve discovered that our the community they call home.” residents are out and about so It’s no secret that Delta, often,” says Matt, “that they Richmond and South Surrey/ White Rock have a significant and active “The Wexford is a beautiful new seniors seniors population, residence and a welcome addition to the whose contributions community of South Delta.” to the community are — mayor lois e. jackson not only endless, but really appreciate having meal also deeply valued. options that suit their schedules “That’s why it’s so important and whims.” to recognize the value of Further, Matt plans to release creating housing opportunities a ‘Bria Cuisine’ program in early to accommodate seniors’ needs,” 2017, designed around our Mayor Jackson explained. Red Seal chef offering, Our Grand Opening event on leveraging foodie culture, June 3 was very well-attended, locally-sourced produce and and we took the opportunity

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Don’t miss our next event January 12

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FROM THE KITCHEN TO THE BOARDROOM 2.0 2.

Ticket Price $250 | Member Price $225

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A14 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

01.12.17 RIVER ROCK THEATRE - 5:00PM AVAILABLE!

To purchase tickets please visit richmondchamber.ca or call (604) 278-2822 RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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Business Excellence Awards 2016

Community Outreach Pharmacy Program

t’s been known by other names during its existence, but the Pacific Gateway Hotel (PGH) has always prided itself on providing a relaxing home away from home for all of its guests who stop by the Sea Islandbased property that was named Large Business of the Year at the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards. The hotel underwent an extensive rebrand in late 2014 from the Delta Hotel label and is one of the only independent hotels near Vancouver International Airport. “We were absolutely thrilled to be nominated and to be named a finalist,” said general manager Eda Koot. “Winning was just the icing on the cake!” The new name and logo for the 382room hotel were a reflection of the natural landscape that surrounds the hotel, from the abundant green trees to the iconic waterfront setting of the Fraser River and the hotel’s marina. “Our team has worked so well together

- need a Nurse? - need a Pharmacist?

There was a need and we filled it with the services people wanted, so being recognised as finalists for Innovation of the Year Award means so much to our whole team. Congratulations to all the businesses honoured this year and thanks to the Richmond Chamber and event sponsors.

Our Daily Programs are suitable for simple and complex medical conditions: • Guaranteed watch and witness of medication ingestion. • In home diabetes program - insulin administration. • We assist patients with Pharmacare registration and ensure medications are covered. • Our Pharmacists provide an in-home medication management service with daily or weekly follow up covering the entire Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley Health Regions. • Providing daily assistance for patients needing blood pressure, blood glucose, and also insulin monitoring.

Pacific Gateway Hotel rebranding inspires pride I

Pharmacy makes House Calls.

Our specialty is to know our patients. We help patients understand how their medications work, and ensure that they are taken properly.

Large Business of the Year

through our recent transition to Pacific Gateway Hotel,” Koot said. “While we anticipated some of the effects of a change of this magnitude, we didn’t expect such a renewed sense of pride and energy from our team members.” It was that dynamic change and enthusiasm that Koot said were a big reason for the win. “We attribute this win to them and their efforts to make Pacific Gateway a wonderful place to work and stay,” Koot said. “We have been part of the Richmond and airport communities for 40-plus years now and look forward to many more!” Pacific Gateway Hotel combines convenience and luxurious comfort through personalized, friendly service. Affiliated with the worldrenowned Preferred Hotels & Resorts, PGH offers engaging stays and memorable moments. Their name represents location as well as purpose; they are a gateway not only for travellers but also for new ideas, relationships, and business ventures.

n Pacific Gateway Hotel general manager Eda Koot was pleased to recieve a Business Excellence Award from the Richmond Chamber of Commerce for the hotel’s extensive rebranding. The hotel has long been an iconic destination for air travellers and most long-time Richmond residents are familiar with its old Delta Hotel label. It now operates independently. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News

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Everyone at Nurse Next Door Richmond is honoured to receive this recognition as finalist for mid-sized Business of the Year.

Thanks

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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Business Excellence Awards 2016

The city’s best get their stories told

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ach year, when the call for nominations goes out for the annual Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards, current chamber chair Rob Akimow said it serves as a pleasant reminder that Richmond is a great city to do business in, and a city full of great businesses. “There are about 14,000 business that call Richmond home,” Akimow said. “And every year that means there’s an opportunity to learn about some of the wonderful stories each of them can tell about what they do.” This year, the 39th annual awards event at the River Rock Casino and Resort on Nov. 17 n Rob Akimow put the spotlight on 26 finalists across 10 categories that were selected by a panel of judges from a record number of nominations, proving that Richmond’s business sector remains one of the most vibrant anywhere in the Lower Mainland. “To be a finalist, or even just nominated for an award, is a prestigious honour,” said Akimow, adding the volume of nominations also speaks to the chamber’s increasing relevance within the business community. “The committee worked hard and did a great job mining through the record number of nominations that came in,” Akimow said. “Richmond has so many great businesses. It’s always interesting to hear the stories that come out that sometimes you take for granted. We know they are there, but every year we get a reminder of what truly amazing things take place. “It’s an honour to be able to share their stories each year.”

Hall of Fame

RCG Group celebrated as a community builder

T

ake a look around at some of the commercial and industrial buildings in Richmond and it can serve as a detailed company history for this year’s winner of the Hall of Fame award in the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards — RCG Group. Established in 1964 by Harvey Goodwyn, who was born in Vancouver and raised in Richmond, the draftsman used his knowledge of developing to multi-family homes and steel fabrication to begin defining his hometown with numerous buildings that included Brighouse Industrial Park. “We feel a very strong connection to Richmond, having been based here, but also having benefitted from the growth over the decades,” said one of Harvey’s sons, Harold Goodwyn, who started in the family business in 1990 and today is managing director of RCG Group, which manages and develops commercial property.

“My dad built a series of buildings over his career,” Goodwyn said, adding the one which remains prominent for him is the former site of Douglas (later known as Kwantlen) College on Elmbridge Way, that was developed in the early 1970s and is still in use today as a provincial court house. “Forty-five years later, the building is still very functional.” And that attribute of longevity extends to the present with a collection of properties the company plans to re-habilitate instead of redevelop in the City Centre area. “We see that as an opportunity to retain employment in the city centre to contribute in a green way,” Goodwyn said. “To be able to deliver enduring products and services that not only offer value to our clients, but have some inherent appeal, as well, is what I strive for and what motivates us.” RCG remains committed to Richmond and is headquartered on Cedarbridge Way.

n Harold Goodwyn, (second from right) accepts the Hall of Fame award on behalf of RCG Group, which has been responsible for numerous industrial, commercial and retail developments in Richmond, such as the original site of Douglas College (left). Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News


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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016 Green Business of the Year

Novex delivers on ‘green’ bottom line

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ith about 100 delivery vehicles making more than 1,500 deliveries a day, Novex Delivery Solutions has the opportunity to make a big difference to the environment in which it operates. For the past 30 years or so, it has chosen to do so on its way to becoming one of the largest local, same-day couriers in the Lower Mainland. And that has earned them the award for Green Business of the Year. “For us, it’s a verification and a pat on the back for the work that has been done here for quite a number of years,” said John Coupar, the company’s recently appointed president, who takes over from Ken Johnston, who filled that role for three decades. “While I can’t take too much credit for that, we are the first, green courier that is carbon neutral. That took a lot of work over a number of years.” Novex is the first courier of its kind to take their commitment to the earth, to the people and to the communities. They are proud to be among the 1,800 companies globally who have achieved B Corporation certified status and the only carbon neutral courier company in the Lower Mainland. “The feeling is that transportation generally is field that is pretty carbon-dependent,” Coupar said. “We’d like to be part

of the change by having a smaller carbon footprint and do better for the world and its environment. “It’s quite embedded in our company and everybody here has bought into it and is one of the reasons I joined. I could see there was a commitment to it.” And the future looks increasingly “green” for Novex as plans are underway to continue evolving its fleet from hybrid to all-electric vehicles. “We’re doing a lot of research on that right now,” Coupar said. “I was just in China last week looking at electric vehicles from a major manufacturer there. And we’re also looking at the Chevrolet Bolt, which is coming on stream in the Lower Mainland quite soon. “So, over time, there will be a change from where we are today and bigger reductions in carbon outputs.” n Top, Brett Surgenor, sales and marketing specialist at Novex Delivery Systems, accepted his company’s Green Business of the Year BEA 2016 award. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News. Left, Novex has a fleet of Richmond-based electric vehicles. Photo submitted.

Pacific Gateway Hotel is thrilled to be named as Large Business of the Year! We would like to thank our entire team for their dedication and congratulate all the outstanding organizations that were recognized in this year’s Business Excellence Awards. We look forward to continuing to welcome guests from around the world to their home away from home in Richmond.

CONVENIENT. CONNECTED. COMMUNITY. 3500 Cessna Drive, Richmond, BC (604) 278-1241 www.pacificgatewayhotel.com


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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Business Excellence Awards 2016 Association of the Year

Seafair shoots and scores at BEA 2016 ‘T

n Top, Nigel Shackles, president of Seafair Minor Hockey Association, accepts the BEA 2016 award. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News Bottom, Seafair players on a community outing. Photo submitted

here’s much more to what we do than help teach kids to put the puck in the net.” That’s how Nigel Shackles, president of the Seafair Minor Hockey Association characterized his organization which was named Association of the Year at the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards. “Even though we are a kids’ sports organization, our focus has been on a much wider role,” Shackles said. “What we try to do is provide for the next generation of volunteers and community leaders and sometimes that’s not always been about being able to put the puck in the net or win a trophy. “Those things are all cool and fun. But ultimately, we are judged on what kind of people we help to produce.” It’s something Seafair has been doing on the minor hockey side since it was registered as a not-for-profit community organization 25 years ago, and even further back to 1967 when the organization began as the Gulf of Georgia Country

Club. It started with a small rink, four sheets of curling ice and an outdoor golf driving range at the western foot of Francis Road. Given the rise of other similar groups over the years and resulting competition, Shackles said Seafair has managed to remain prominent because it has stayed true to its overall goal. “The message we have internally is that what matters most is the experience of playing minor hockey and what that brings to you as part of the community,” he said. “Seafair has been around a long time and has a lot of history in this community. And for a lot of that time we have been a small association. In the past half dozen years we have grown to become a much larger one, but we never lost sight of the fact of what we are all about.” And while Seafair has had its share of on-ice success, it’s what the group’s members take away with them after they hang up their skates that matters

The message we have internally is that what matters most is the experience of playing minor hockey and what that brings to you as part of the community – NIGEL SHACKLES

most. “I tell people that if we are judged by the number of players we produce for the NHL, Europe or anywhere else, we’re an abject failure,” Shackles said with a laugh. “The chances of doing that are not great. But we, like every kids’ sports organization, should be judged on how we are helping kids grow up, the experiences we give them and how that builds into being a bigger part of the community.”

FROM THE KITCHEN TO THE BOARDROOM 2.0 BUSINESS, ENTREPRENEURSHIP, AND COOKING WITH LOVE We are delighted to invite you to be part of the second annual From the Kitchen to the Boardroom, dining experience. On January 12, 2017 the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with the Richmond News is hosting a dining forum, centred on food, business, and entrepreneurship in the food service industry in Metro Vancouver.

01.12.17

RIVER ROCK THEATRE - 5:00PM DON’T MISS THIS EXCLUSIVE FOUR COURSE DINING EVENT WITH FOUR OF METRO VANCOUVER’S TOP CHEFS!

Ticket Price $250 | Member Price $225

LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE! To purchase tickets please visit richmondchamber.ca or call (604) 278-2822 Featuring (left to right): Chef Angus An (Maenam, Longtail Kitchen, Fat Mao Noodles), Chef David Hawksworth (Hawksworth, Nightingale, Bel Café), Chef Lucais Syme (Cinara), Chef Franck Point (Faubourg)


A18 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016 Young Entrepreneur of the Year

Flowers, shrubs beckon former business student S

ucceeding in the business world can good for me,” he said. “I was able to be very tough. work outdoors, so I wanted to know more Frank Shang knew that well after he about landscaping and enrolled at the completed a business degree in his naVancouver Training Institute where they tive China and came to Canada in 2001 have a practical horticulture program.” with his family, looking And in 2006 he began to put down roots. building up his com“School had been pany as a professional I recognized right away pretty hard, so I thought landscaping business, I should learn some othwhich provides hard that it was good for me. I er type of skilled work,” and soft landscaping said Shang, 36, who services to the private was able to work outdoors, owns MRD Landscaping and commercial sectors. so I wanted to know more Inc., the winner of the Over the years, his Young Entrepreneur of reputation in the indusabout landscaping ... the Year award. “I pick try grew so much that – Frank Shang things up pretty quickly, he and MRD became an so I decided to try some influential landscaping other things and see resource in B.C.’s Chiwhat happened.” nese community. Today, That led him to jobs he uses his knowledge in restaurants where he dealt with the and contacts to write a weekly gardening public, and later a position as a night column in a Chinese language newspashift supervisor at recycling plant where it per and act as one of seven judges in allowed him to get familiar, and certified, this year’s B.C. Landscaping Awards. with operating heavy equipment — both Shang said what he enjoys most about areas that would serve him well later in his work is being able to create a garden the landscaping trade. setting that reflects the style and perBut it was a chance meeting with an sonality of its owner by working closely acquaintance that led to a job with a with his clients to learn and interpret landscaping crew which brought things their dreams and bring that to reality in into sharp focus for Shang. a landscape design which culminates in “I recognized right away that it was living art.

n Frank Shang, owner of MRD Landscaping Inc., traded continued business studies for a job out in the fresh air as a landscaper, a decision, he said, that has helped unlock his creative side. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News

Congratulations 2016 Business Excellence Award Finalists and Winners

Herbaland Naturals Inc. Canada’s #1 Gummy Vitamins Manufacturer www.herbaland.ca


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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Business Excellence Awards 2016 Workplace of the Year

Family ties earn Gilmore Gardens recognition A

t Glimore Gardens, Richmond’s first Gardens Seniors Community. independent living residence for seniors, Management and staff are empowered the philosophy is plain and simple. Their to work as a team, to constantly improve, 130 or so residents are not considered cusand to take pride in providing outstanding tomers — they are family. customer service. The result is residents That’s one of the reasons its general manwho are heard, supported and, most of all, ager, Elizabeth Ho, believes her organization fulfilled. was named the Workplace of the Year in Recognition plays a big role in incentivthe Richmond Chamber of Commerce 2016 izing work at Gilmore Gardens. Fair wage Business Excellence Awards. increases are delivered across the team. “I think part of it is that For all staff, the greatest we’re really not selling a incentive is knowing they product. We are very much have touched a resident and a personal, one-on-one helped them have a great relationship-building organiday; through a simple hello, The people who work zation,” she said. “And what a smile or a hug. here really care about makes us the workplace of “We’re thrilled and very the year is that the people excited and honoured to be our residents. who work here really care recognized this way, particu– ELIZABETH HO about our residents, who are larly in Richmond amongst our customers, but we feel such a huge diverse group are our family, too. So, that of businesses and industry feeling of family and support segments,” Ho said. for each other really extends “For us, Gilmore Gardens to the team of workers.” has had a great reputation in the community Gilmore Gardens was opened in May 1999 as a wonderful place to live,” she added. on land which that was initially the parking “And we’re just really proud that the recoglot for Gilmore Park United Church. nition has extended to such a great place to When rebuilding the church, an opportuwork. For us, the award really brings home nity to accommodate the well-being of local the fact that this is a place that we want to seniors was identified. And along with Verve come to every day. It’s not considered someSenior Living, CanBrit developers, and priwhere we have to go. vate investors, built and established Gilmore “We are truly family here.”

n Above, Gilmore Gardens resident Maxine Howarth looks on as Bob Wardley, centre, building manager at Gilmore Gardens, plays piano with fellow resident Jim Gray. Photo By Graame Wood/Richmond News. Left, Upon accepting the award for Workplace of the Year, Elizabeth Ho, general manager at Gilmore Gardens, spoke about the dedication her employees have to the seniors living in their care. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News.

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A20 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016

n The best and brightest in Richmond’s business community were celebrated at the 39th annual Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards on Nov. 17 at the River Rock Casino Resort. Photos by Rob Newell/Special to the News

Being the best for our members and employees is our greatest award.

BUSINESS

EXCELLENCE

AWARDS

Outstanding Workplace of the Year Finalist

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

Business Excellence Awards 2016

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A22 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016 New Business of the Year

Outlet mall draws crowds, business to Sea Island W

ho doesn’t love a deal — especially when it comes to some designer clothing and some of life’s finer goods. Those behind the McArthurGlen Designer Outlet Vancouver Airport on Sea Island certainly identified a large community of shoppers, judging by the success the mall has experienced since it opened in the summer of 2015 to crowds that have helped it earn the distinction as this year’s New Business of the Year. “We’re incredibly humbled and excited to have received this prestigious recognition from the Richmond Chamber of Commerce,” said Ally Day, the mall’s marketing manager. “We were welcomed with open arms when we first opened our doors last July and have been thankful for all the support we’ve received so far.” The mall, with its distinctive streetscape that blends European charm with local identities, continues to set records in visits and sales after starting with more than 60 stores covering

240,000-square-feet of retail space. “There has been a massive demand for an outlet centre in the Lower Mainland,” Day said. “As the only true outlet centre in the Lower Mainland, McArthurGlen achieves just that, as well as providing a great day-out destination for both shoppers and the general public with more than 55 brands and wide range of food and beverage options.” One of the highlights from the first year or so included hosting Vancouver’s largest outdoor yoga exercise fundraiser that benefited Red Cross Canada during Canada Day. “One of McArthurGlen’s mandates since the opening has been its dedication to engaging the community of Sea Island and Richmond,” Day said. “With various family-friendly activities like annual holiday kick-off events, as well as the event on Canada Day, the centre has become one of the top hubs for community events in the City of Richmond.” And the future looks bigger for the

n Robert Thurlow (above), general manager of McArthurGlen Designer Outlet Vancouver Airport, accepted the award for his mall which has exceeded the firm’s projections for customers visits and sales in its first year of operation. Design of the outdoor mall (left) features a blend of European and local, B.C. scenes. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News

mall, with expansion plans on the horizon as it is set to welcome its fivemillionth visitor by the year-end. A total six to eight new store openings

are upcoming and an additional expansion phase in the next two years will add another 200,000-square-feet and up to 50 more stores and 400 new jobs.

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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Business Excellence Awards 2016 Innovation of the Year

Closing the loop on a valuable stream of waste C

n Peter Holgate, founder and CEO of Ronin8 Technologies Ltd., is hoping to mine a waste stream of precious metals from discarded electronics using the power of sound. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News

enturies ago, there were exclamations of untapped riches that “There’s gold in them there hills.” In the 21st century, that clarion call has changed to finding gold, along with an assortment of other precious metals and valuable glass and plastic, in a rapidly growing waste stream from discarded electronic devices that previously ended up in a landfill or were incinerated. Richmond’s Ronin8 Technologies Ltd., winner of the Innovation of the Year award, is working on bringing that new wave of resource separation and recovery to reality by using sound waves emanating from a sonic generator to break down the materials from cellphones and computers. It is estimated that electronic waste is growing at approximately 15 per cent annually, making it the world’s fastest growing waste stream. And despite current efforts to recover those materials, less than 15 per cent is recycled through formal channels. Using Ronin8’s technology,

which was originally employed by another company to remediate toxic soils, 100 per of the glass, plastic and an assortment of precious metals can be recovered and sent back through the supply chain. “The award, for us, is validation, that we are building something meaningful,” said Peter Holgate, Ronin8’s founder and CEO. “When an innovation is recognized by your community and peers, that’s really the test of determining if you are on track to do something.” Currently, Ronin8 is still in the development and testing stages at its southeast Richmond facility. “The zoning there, unfortunately, doesn’t allow us to do anything other than development and training work. So, our next full-scale facility that we are looking to build in 2017, we’re still trying to find a location,” Holgate said, adding plans are to take Ronin8 public next year. “That will be done so we can raise the money needed to start building local plants,” he

When an innovation is recognized by your community and peers, that’s really the test of determining if you are on track to do something. – Peter Holgate

said. And that is expected to increase the company’s attraction to industry. “We are having a phenomenal pull,” Holgate said. “We’re not having to push ourselves, industry is pulling us and our dilemma is that we cannot work fast enough. There aren’t enough hours in the day to deliver on the needs within this world. “There’s a vacuum that’s sucking our technology into it.”

This Floats Our Boats! “Steveston Harbour Authority is honoured to have been awarded the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Leadership of the Year Award. We are humbled by this recognition among such a wonderful group of businesses and thank the Chamber and greater Richmond community. As Canada’s largest commercial fishing harbour, serving the commercial fishing fleet is focal for our team as we work to be good corporate citizens in many ways. We’re approachable and believe in sharing policies, methodologies and successes with other organizations so that these successes can be repeated elsewhere to the benefit of all.

Congratulations to all nominees, finalists, and winners of the 2016 Business Excellence Awards. 'Landscape Industry Certified' Program lead MRD to be one of the successful Businesses. As a Multi Award-Winning Company, we would like to say thank you to our clients BCLNA, Fairchild TV, FM96.1 and WESTCA! Your support has made me a stronger person and I will forever be grateful. Frank Shang CLT

12740 Trites Road, Richmond, BC Office: 604.272.5539 Fax: 604.271.6142 www.stevestonharbour.com

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MRD LANDSCAPING INC. • 604-961-7737


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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016 Leadership of the Year

Steveston Harbour charts course in leadership L

eadership comes in many forms and when it comes to displaying that in Richmond, the Steveston Harbour Authority (SHA) charts the course in both the business world and the community it serves. For that, it is this year’s Leadership of the Year award winner. Since it was established, the SHA — a private, non-profit organization that runs Steveston Harbour, Canada’s largest commercial fishing harbour — has developed policies and procedures that have spread through our involvement in the Harbour Authority Association of British Columbia to become standard models for most of the 54 harbours along the B.C. coast. It has also helped pioneer in B.C. a fishing net recycling program that has helped change attitudes in the treatment of old and disused nets, transforming them from an environmental problem to a recyclable solution. “Steveston Harbour Authority is honoured to have been awarded the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Leadership of the Year Award,” said SHA general manager Bob Baziuk. “Steveston Harbour is a pivotal part of the community of Steveston and Richmond as a whole and, as such, we have always striven to act as a good corporate citizen in a variety of ways — something we have inherently built into our business model.”

Baziuk added that the harbour authority has also believed that it’s important to share its policies, methodologies and successes with other organizations so that these successes can be repeated elsewhere to the benefit of all. “We are humbled by this prestigious distinction by the Richmond Chamber of Commerce and the greater Richmond community and wish to extend our sincere thanks to the chamber and to all of the other businesses in Richmond that are doing such amazing work,” he said.

n Above, Janet Rios of the Steveston Harbour Authority accepts the chamber’s award. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News. Right, Joel Baziuk inspects fishing nets to be recycled. File photo

Congratulations to the winners of the 2016 Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards. To contact our Richmond Business Centre, email Barbara Tinson, Business Centre Manager at barbara.tinson@bdc.ca. Or call 1-888-INFO-BDC.

bdc.ca


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A25

Business Excellence Awards 2016 Small Business of the Year

You can’t trash a business that plans well

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rowth can sometimes be the hardest thing for an up and coming business to manage properly. But for this year’s winner of the Small Business of the Year award, 505-Junk, it was well anticipated and became a strength they hope to build on with some significant future expansion plans, said Barry Hartman, who founded the junk removal and recycling firm with business partner Scott Foran in 2012. “To be honest, our success has been a mixture of a number of things,” Hartman said, adding ensuring their systems prepared them well for an anticipated increase in business was key. “When we did that, it allowed us to more than double our growth, which we’re on pace to do this year,” he said. “And the only reason we were able to do that was the fact we had a lot of the infrastructure in place. And that enabled us to hire some really great people and together we’ve been able to grow the company.” For the first five years, Hartman and Foran worked on a business they believed was primed to grow, using their unique system that has customers pay for the service based on the weight of what is being removed. Plus, there was the commitment to reuse or recycle as much of the waste as possible. “This was the first year we could actually focus on the growth and bring in new clients

and people to our team,” Hartman said, adding the customer call centre added two new positions to handle the rising numbers of clients. Currently, 505-Junk employs 14 people. “We’ve come a long way since it was just Scott and I,” Hartman said. “But we actually projected the growth — it didn’t happen by surprise. But at the same time, it didn’t automatically happen. It took a lot a lot of hard work to hit our revenue targets and hire the people that would fit our culture and our team.” With a good foundation in place, 505-Junk plans on expanding into Victoria next spring. And Ontario is firmly in their sights. “In business, someone coined the term BHAG, which stands for big, hairy, audacious goal. That’s us, looking five years out,” Hartman said, adding Toronto, with its large population base, is the plan for 2018. “There’s a massive market in Toronto,” Hartman said, “and they are just starting to adapt this concept that diversion and recycling is a good thing. Vancouver is so on with that already, but we think we can help keep a lot of stuff out of the landfill in Toronto, as well.” And a little further down the road, expansion to the U.S. market is on the books. “We’ve got our eyes on Seattle, which is just a few hours drive away from Vancouver and is a logical step,” Hartman said.

n Above, Barry Hartman, co-founder of junk removal and recycling firm 505-Junk. Hartman founded the company with business partner Scott Foran. Photo by Rob Newell/Special to the News.

to all of the nominees, finalists and winners of the 39th Annual Business Excellence Awards. BUSINESS

EXCELLENCE

AWARDS

Richmond Youth Honour Choir presents…

HOLIDAY HARMONIES Artistic Director and Conductor - Heidi Epp Prelude Conductor - Sylvia Tam Assistant to Artistic Director – Molly Bushell Accompanists - Barbara Chow and Melissa Huen

Featuring our own talented choristers! Join us for a family friendly evening to get you ready for the Christmas Season!

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HONOURED TO HAVE BEEN AMONG THE FINALISTS FOR ASSOCIATION OF THE YEAR!


A26 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

Business Excellence Awards 2016 Mid-sized Business of the Year

Awards follow the sweet rise of success

A

fter chalking up two category wins in the Richmond Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards (BEA) since 2011, Richmond’s Herbaland Naturals Inc. is the picture of evolution. Five years ago, the manufacturer and exporter of gummy vitamins and gummy supplements was presented with the BEA for New Business of the Year. Last week, the company, which has grown in leaps and bounds in that time, was the recipient of the Mid-sized Business of the Year. And in between, in 2014, the company was one of the finalists competing for the Best International Trade Award in the annual Small Business BC Awards Contest. “It’s truly our honour to be nominated and awarded by Richmond Chamber of Commerce,” said Musharaf Syed, Herbaland’s CEO. “In 2011 we received the new business of the year award, in the last five years, we have grown from eight people to more than 50. The company keeps on growing. Now we are the only gummy vitamins manufacturer and exporter to more than 26 countries around the world.” This time around at the BEA, the company was also named as a finalist in the Workplace of the Year category. The amount of recognition the business has received for its efforts just makes you wonder in what category the Herbaland name will pop up in the future with another

nomination. “We will keep doing our best to maintain the best working environment,” Syed said. “And in the next few years, we have another business expansion plan and we will definitely stay and grow in Richmond.” Herbaland began with gummy vitamin products for both children and adults. Capsules and tablets have been the traditional supplement delivery form, however, consumers, increasingly seeking nutritious health products that are also delicious and convenient, have flocked to the products.

Seafair Minor Hockey has been a sports tradition in the Richmond community for many years. Since the early 1960’s, Seafair has been a leader in developing some of the most talented hockey players and outstanding citizens in Richmond. We couldn’t have made it this far without the tireless support of our parent volunteers, coaches, directors & staff.

n Above, Herbalands Naturals co-founder Musharaf Syed and sales manager John Bentley. Left, the Herbalands lab. Photos by CandyIndustry.com


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

BusinessReport Business R I C H M O N D

C H A M B E R

O F

C O M M E R C E

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

M O N T H L Y

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N E W S L E T T E R

SUITE 202 - SOUTH TOWER, 5811 COONEY, RICHMOND. BC. V6X 3M1 | T. 604.278.2822 | F. 604.278.2972 | richmondchamber.ca

Canada’s strategy: ‘Keep calm and climate on’ Katrina Marsh

Canadian Chamber of Commerce

T

he [ght against climate change had what we in the biz like to call “momentum.” Countries agreed to limit rising temperatures in the UN’s 2015 Paris Agreement. Two other deals were struck to check emissions in the aviation sector and away from HFCs — a potent greenhouse gas. The world was on a roll! This undoubtedly pleased Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who champions action on climate change both at home and abroad. But political climates can change even faster than global ones and some cold winds are blowing on Canada now. President-elect Donald Trump

will transform the U.S. from a driver of international momentum on climate to a roadblock. He will pull out of the Paris Agreement, and in the meantime will ignore commitments made under the UN’s “gentlemen’s agreement” style of lawmaking. The U.S.’s domestic climate policy depends on regulation, much of it administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The President-elect has stated that he will seek to weaken or remove its powers to regulate emissions from power plants, the oil and gas industry and vehicles. So far, Trudeau’s response has been to keep calm and carry on, with no announcements to change direction. He will need to consider how best to react to the threats and opportu-

nities (both exist) inherent in this American change of heart. Canada’s oil and gas sector will bene[t from the resurrection of the Keystone XL pipeline. However, if the U.S. reneges on a plan to jointly cut emissions from the industry, Canada’s competitiveness could suffer if we don’t pull back, as well. The loss of the Clean Power Plan, which would move the U.S. power grid off coal, would be a blow to Canada’s hydroelectricity producers. They were set to triple exports as demand for clean electricity grew. The case for federal carbon pricing, the centre of the prime minister’s strategy, has changed less than you might think. The unexpected arrival of President-elect Trump does not change the fact the U.S. was never going to

It remains to be seen how a change in U.S. politics will affect efforts to curb impacts on the environment. Photo submitted

impose a carbon price. Still, provinces accounting for 80 per cent of Canada’s GDP are moving forward with a price on carbon. Canada needs a plan to ensure that uncoordinated policies do not erode competitiveness. Alignment with the U.S. was

The Richmond Chamber of Commerce • Published Monthly

The Richmond Chamber of Commerce has been “Proudly serving our community since 1925.” In partnership with local media the Chamber produces the Business Report once per month. The statements and views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. The publication’s intent is to keep Chamber members, and prospective members, informed on important information, events, and educational items. The Richmond Chamber of Commerce is located at Suite 202 - North Tower - 5811 Cooney Road, Richmond, BC, V6X 3M1. For more information and to reserve tickets for the events, please call 604-278-2811, email rcc@richmondchamber.ca, or see us online at: richmondchamber.ca .

Canada’s best chance to avoid any economic fallout from strong climate policies. Avoiding the worst case scenario of shifting emissions and investment out of Canada will mean keeping as close an eye on the climate policy as on the global one.

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A30 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

COMMUNITYin Focus

Out, damn'd gender! Out, I say Roles reversed in high school production of MacBeth Philip Raphael

Staff Reporter praphael@richmond-news.com

A

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gender role reversal in a play performed around Christmas time? No, this is not a pantomime. But the suggestion drew a laugh from Jean Kosar, drama teacher at Steveston-London secondary who was busy preparing her students for their production of MacBeth, which takes to the school’s stage Nov. 30 and runs until Dec. 2. The difference from the Bard’s original is that the tale features a gender fluid set of characters, with actors switching roles as Grade 12s Chevonne Thompson plays the beleaguered Scottish king, while William Watt takes a turn at Lady MacBeth. “If you think of Lady MacBeth’s character, she leaves the traditional role of the supportive and kind mate,” said Kosar, adding there was a production of Romeo and Juliet last summer in Toronto where the roles were also fluid. “I think it’s kind of a trend. Plus, we have a number of girls in Grade 12 who are about to graduate, so I thought it would be interesting to do it this way.” And when Kosar started to delve into lines in the play, many lent themselves to the switch. “‘If then you were a man, but now you would be so much more the man. I could play the woman with mine eyes, but I refuse to do so,’” she said, reciting some lines. “And of course, there’s that iconic one, ‘Unsex me here. And fill me from the crown

n Wiiliam Watt (left) plays Lady MacBeth to Chevonne Thompson’s MacBeth in StevestonLondon’s gender fluid production. Photo by Philip Raphael/Richmond News

to the toe top-full of direst cruelty.’ I think it really lends itself to a look of the gender switch.” So, how did the students take to the changes? “They are very flexible, modern teenagers,” Kosar said. “They’ve embraced it.” The only hiccup was the staging of swordfights that male students tend to readily choreograph themselves. “Boys seem to have a natural affinity for that,” Kosar said. Tickets at the door are $5 for students, $7 for adults.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A31

ADVERTISING FEATURE

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Keeping ourselves informed about healthy lifestyle choices and options are now easier than ever.

Five surprising fertility facts you need to know if you are trying to conceive By Dr. Niamh Tallon

I

t seems like conceiving a baby should be the easiest thing in the world but studies show that infertility rates are on the rise in Canada. Currently, 15 per cent of couples will not conceive in a year of trying and that number increases to more than 50 per cent if the woman is over the age of 39. Often both the husband and the wife have fertility issues that prevent them from conceiving. Approximately 40 per cent of the time infertility is caused by female factors, 40 per cent of the time by male factors, and 20 per cent of the time by a combination of both. The good news is that recent advances in fertility treatment and prenatal testing have significantly improved the chances of conceiving and having a healthy baby, even for women who are over 40 and/or have had multiple miscarriages. Knowing these five fertility facts could increase your odds of getting pregnant:

➊ 40 is not the new 30 when it comes to your eggs. Despite the number of celebrities that seem to conceive with ease in their 40s and even, in the case of Janet Jackson, at 50, your chances of getting pregnant over 40 with your own eggs are very slim. Most of the 40-plus celebrities touting baby bumps have used donor eggs (eggs from a younger woman) in order to get pregnant with IVF. Fertility peaks in the mid-20s and drops off sharply after 37. A healthy woman at age 30 has about a 20 per cent chance per month of conceiving. By the time she reaches 40, her chances drop to about 5 per cent per month. ➋ Don’t wait to freeze your eggs. Many women who are feeling their biological clock ticking but not yet ready to have a baby, are thinking of freezing their eggs with a new technology called continued on next page


A32 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016 Healthier You

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

FALL 2016

vitrification. This is a flash freezing process that allows women to preserve their eggs for future use. But you may be waiting too long. Doctors recommend women freeze their eggs before age 38, with optimal years between 32 and 36. ➌ Are you missing your fertile window? If you rely on taking your basal body temperature (BBT) to determine the best time to have intercourse, you may be too late. The rise in your BBT occurs after you have ovulated. The sperm will live in the body for approximately 3 days but the egg only lives for 24-48 hours, so it is important to have intercourse before you ovulate rather than after. The easiest way to find out if you are ovulating is to use an Ovulation Predictor Kit (OPK), where you pee on a stick and it measures a surge in the luteinizing hormone (LH) in your urine. Ovulation predictor kits are useful because they tell you when you are about

to ovulate, so you can have intercourse before you ovulate. The 12 to 36 hours from the time you test positive for ovulation, carries the highest likelihood for becoming pregnant. ➍ Are you a fertile weight? A healthy BMI (Body Mass Index) is 18.5 - 24.9. Just losing 5 to 10 pound if you are overweight (or gaining a few pounds if you are underweight) can significantly increase your chances of getting pregnant. Weight is just as important for men. The National Institutes of Health found that overweight men are 20 per cent more likely to be infertile than men with a low to normal BMI, while obese men were 36 per cent more likely to be infertile. Fat can affect fertility hormones and, in men, can lead to reduced sperm movement and increased sperm DNA fragmentation.

➎ Be proactive. Talk to your doctor if you are under the age of 35 and have been trying to get pregnant for 12 months or more, or if you are over 35 and have been trying to conceive for six months or more. The chances of fertility treatment being successful become progressively less with advancing age. Remember for the majority of couples who have difficulty conceiving most will go on to have a baby. In BC, your consultations with a fertility specialist as well as the initial investigations for infertility and some surgical treatments are covered by MSP. Dr. Tallon is a fertility specialist at Olive Fertility Centre and a Clinical Assistant Professor at UBC. She works as part of a team of healthcare providers at the Women’s Reproductive Health Program, BCWH, dealing with early pregnancy .

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Healthier You

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

A33

FALL 2016

Sleepless in Vancouver?

UBC HOSPITAL SLEEP DISORDERS PROGRAM IS EXPANDING SLEEP AND HEALTH CONDITIONS Poor sleep or sleep deprivation can weaken the body’s immune system, leaving people susceptible to infection, impaired quality of life and mental health issues. Many sleep disorders can be traced to lifestyle such as poor sleep hygiene, shift work and jet lag, but some sleep disorders, like sleep apnea and narcolepsy, require accurate diagnosis and treatment. That’s where the UBC Hospital Sleep Disorders Program comes in. The UBC Hospital Sleep Disorders Program is a specialized multi-disciplinary team comprised of psychiatrists, respirologists, a neurologist, sleep technologists, as well as coordinators and administrative support staff. The program was established in 1981 and is about to undergo its largest expansion in 35 years. The new expanded sleep disorders clinic and lab will grow from six to nine beds and the dual-purpose space will be better equipped to operate 24/7. The expansion is scheduled for completion in the spring of 2017. It was made possible through donations to the VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation. EXCITING TIMES FOR SLEEP AND SLEEP RESEARCH The new space will be innovatively designed. According to Tracey Taulu,

Operations Director UBC Hospital, the expanded program has the ability to shift from a hospital clinic during the day to a warm and non-clinical atmosphere as a sleep lab during the night. The space will also be fully upgraded in soundproofing and ventilation which will allow for a better overall sleep-study environment for the clients. Inquiring minds want to know, is it possible to catch up on sleep? Many of us will look to the yearly time change to catch up on our sleep. But our body clocks are far too complex to be so easily reset. Dr. Fleetham says we operate on a 24-hour clock. Any change in the body’s routine can cause fatigue and sleepiness. We know increased fatigue is often a factor in motor vehicle accidents and workplace accidents. According to Dr. Fleetham, the three ingredients of a long, healthy life are diet, exercise and sleep. “We tend to focus on diet and exercise, but ignore sleep, which is a mistake, given that 40 per cent of Canadians will suffer from some form of a sleep disorder in their lifetime,” he says.

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A34 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

SPORTSBeyond the Scores

Top ranked Panthers end Trojans’ title hopes Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

T

ry as they might, the Hugh Boyd Trojans simply weren’t going to find a crack in the armour of the Vernon Panthers. The West Richmond school saw its outstanding football season conclude last Saturday at B.C. Place Stadium in a 21-7 semi-final loss to the province’s No. 1 ranked “AA” team. The Panthers become the first school from the Interior to reach the championship game in 21 years. The Trojans fell behind 14-0 early but showed the grit and determination that has carried them all season to still be within a touchdown late in the third quarter. That’s when Vernon finally got some breathing room on a 15-yard interception returned for a converted touchdown by defensive back Bradley Hladik. One last Boyd attempt at a comeback was snuffed out in the end zone when quarterback Tyler Moxin’s intended pass to Robbie Conroy bounced off his helmet and into the hands of Hladik again. The 6-foot-2 Hladik, combined with his older brother

Ben (6-foot-4), hindered Boyd’s passing game all aftetrnoon. “That’s a good defence. We had some mismatch problems for sure. Smaller guys running around out there trying to get open,” said Boyd head coach Bill Haddow. “They are pretty solid all away across the board. I thought we could run the ball better than we did but they were tougher inside than we thought. “Football comes down to big plays and there’s usually two or three in every game. Honestly, I can’t think of one we made today. It was tough sledding out there.” The Panthers looked like they might run the Trojans out of the stadium by scoring on their first two possessions, including an outstanding catch and run by Ben Hladik. However, Boyd recovered from the tough start and began to battle back, culminating with Moxin scoring on a third down sneak with 5:25 left in the opening half. They had a chance to pull even before the intermission but Moxin’s pass into the end zone, on a fourth and four gamble from the Vernon 14-yard-line with nine seconds left, fell incomplete. The Trojans then spent much of the third quarter

■ Hugh Boyd Trojans quarterback Tyler Moxin attracted plenty of attention from the Vernon Panthers during Saturday’s provincial ‘AA’ semi-final game at B.C. Place Stadium. The Trojans saw their impressive season end in a 21-7 loss. Photo by Mark Booth

hemmed in their own end after taking the second half kickoff and getting stuffed on fourth and one from their own 31-yard-line. The defence held firm, highlighted by back-to-back blocked field goals, but subsequent

poor field position led to Bradley Hladik’s pick six. “You need to make some plays and take some chances,” added Haddow of the fourth down gambles. “We knew it was going to be tough getting in that (scor-

ing) position often. “If we score there it’s 14-14 going into halftime. “You have to put trust in our guys like we have all year and that’s what we we did (on the fourth and one). We kept thinking if we only

could get a crease we could maybe break a long one. “We were a little understaffed today again with our bench but the kids played their guts out. We asked some kids to do a lot out there.”

Richmond volleyball teams head to provincials this week Mark Booth

Sports Editor mbooth@richmond-news.com

M

cNair Marlins are off to Kelowna this week to participate in the B.C. ‘AAA’ Girls Volleyball Championships for the first time in recent memory. The Marlins secured a spot in the 16-team tournament by finishing third at the Lower Mainland “AAA” playoffs, behind respective Vancouver private schools Crofton House and Little Flower Academy. Power play pool begins Thursday with the Marlins in a group that includes Prince George, Caledonia and Mark Isfeld. They will be looking to earn the 13th seed when the round of 16 begins Friday morning. Playoffs and consolation play will continue until Saturday afternoon. Meanwhile, they have been a fixture in the top 10 rankings all season, now the McRoberts Strikers will attempt to take it a step further and be a medal contender at the B.C. “AA” Boys Volleyball Championships, starting Wednesday at the Langley Events Centre.

The Strikers captured their third Lower Mainland title in four years thanks to an unbeaten run on their home court — defeating Richmond High, Magee and Charles Tupper. The feat was worth another banner and plaque but did little to improve their status in what is considered the most competitive tier in the province this season. McRoberts is seeded ninth for the 16-team tournament, meaning getting past the first round of the playoffs is no certainly. The Fraser Valley zone features the top four seeds at the championships including No. 1 Langley Christian. Still, the Strikers are a veteran team with plenty of tournament experience. “It’s going to be a dogfight, predicted head coach Daniel Wong. “The Valley is very strong but we can compete with all the top teams. It depends who is sharp and on. We lost in two straight to (No. 3) MEI but both games were 25-23 and could have gone either way. It comes down to who is going to be hot at provincials.” The Strikers already had the Lower Mainland banner wrapped up when they closed out the tournament against Tupper. They promptly won the opening two sets and had

three match points they couldn’t convert. Tupper eventually won the third game and also took the next one before McRoberts finally prevailed in five. Wong just patiently watched his players deal with the adversity, hoping it will help them in the long run. “The whole season we knew the kids had the skill level to succeed and go far. We are really trying to work on their mental game and build their character a little more,” he said. “So when they get into those situations where there is a little bit of pressure, we sit back and let them take over. We want them to learn from the experience. “We especially want the seniors to step up and take ownership of the team. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.” Grade 12 power-hitting standout Jeff Lam was named Lower Mainland MVP. The Strikers will be joined by Richmond High in Langley next week after the Colts secured the other provincial berth. They are seeded 15th. Richmond Christian’s senior girls team are also in Kelowna this week for the B.C. “A” Championships.

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

16th Annual

SPORTS

Red hot Devils stay perfect

I

t’s unfolding into a special season for the Richmond Devils as they take a perfect record into December. The Devils are off to their best start in franchise history — making it 10 straight wins out of the gate in the South Coast Women’s Hockey League with a dominant 5-0 home ice triumph over the Island Surge last Saturday at the Richmond Ice Centre. Lindsay DiPietro led the way with a four point night, including a pair of goals. The former Wayne State University standout and Ottawa native has been a key off-season addition to the Devils’ scoring attack with 12 points in eight games. Marisa Chau, Jaya Gill and Kelsey McIntyre had the other goals as Richmond

scored four times in the second period and cruised the rest of the way. Winning goaltender Reggin Eraut had to make just 10 saves for the shutout while her counterpart Melinda Choy faced a whopping 66 shots. Eraut and 18-year-old rookie Harmony Sander have shared the crease load. Each have 5-0 records with five shutouts as the Devils have surrendered only six goals all season. They have an excellent chance to make it 11 straight wins when the Fraser Valley Jets visit the RIC’s Igloo Rink on Saturday at 7:15 p.m. Richmond will then play its final game before the holiday break on Dec. 10 against defending provincial champion South Fraser TNT in North Delta.

A35

Presented by the Rotary Club of Richmond Sunset

Come celebrate the Holiday Season with family and friends. Come celebrate Rotary International’s year of Serving Humanity.

Free as tm Chriscerts Con

Funds raised this year will be used to support Rotary’s International and Richmond Community Programs.

November 26 (Sat)

12:30 pm–Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony Performance: 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm – Tom Lee Music Group 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm – Tom Lee Music Group

December 03 (Sat)

Performance: 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm – Richmond Music School 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm – Quality Piano

December 10 (Sat)

No io pt

P.P. Magdalen R. Leung Phone: 604-214-8833 Email: magrleung@gmail.com Event Sponsor

Gold Sponsor CANADA’S LARGEST COMMUNITY BUILDER

Supporting Partner

Find out more at metrovancouver.org/nonroaddiesel or call 604-451-6655.

Let’s figure out the

LOWEST PRICE OF THE YEAR

3 DAYS ONLY

Stock up on these holiday favourites and be ready for guests and gatherings this season.

YOUR CHOICE

9

Shrimp Ring OR Oriental Party Pak

99

16 20 0, r3 be m , BC m ce ond De ichm 30 p to d, R 2: 16 Roa - 1 m 20 o.3 6, 11 N 0 a r 2 all, 69 1:0 1 H n

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You can also apply for a refund of 80% of fees paid over the last 3 years, if you permanently retire a Tier 0 or 1 engine from Metro Vancouver.

ty Ci

For christmas tree sponsorship/donations please contact:

Registration fees can be significantly reduced by installing an approved Emission Reduction Measure (ERM).

be

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d

Re

Performance:

1:00 pm to 2:00 pm – Richmond Delta Youth Orchestra 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm – Emmanuel Children’s Chorus

Baby Grand Piano sponsored by Tom Lee Music

Reduce your Metro Vancouver Non-Road Diesel Registration Fees?

ve

on m

Visit metrovancouver.org and search “Bylaw 1161 Amendments”

December 17 (Sat)

P

You’re invited to an online meeting on December 1st at 11am.

ch Ri

We want to hear from you. Contact DieselBylaw@metrovancouver.org before February 17, 2017.

Music Department

VI

Proposed amendments are being considered for the Non-Road Diesel Engine Emission Regulation

Performance: 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm – BC Registered Music Teachers’ Association (Richmond Branch) 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm – McNair Secondary School

Oriental Party Pak 48-58 PIECES 800 g

A party platter that’s sure to wow your guests.

save $ 4

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

2

3

4

Chicken Strips 27-33 PIECES save $9 99 1.36 kg/3 lb

11

Shrimp Ring

449

ALL PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY, DEC.2 TO THURSDAY, DEC.8, 2016 UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

Limit of 3 per customer.

Prices of products that feature the MAX special logo are exclusive to registered M&M MAX customers. Simply present your MAX card, or sign up for a FREE MAX membership in store or online, to take advantage of these MAX discounts.

RICHMOND

7020 Francis Road 604-204-0707

Francis Rd. No.3 Rd.

save $ 6

Thai Sweett and Spicy picy Dipping Sauce auce 350 mL

Gilbert Rd.

42-48 PIECES 454 g

Our Pacific white shrimp, cooked, peeled, deveined and tail on. Sauce included.


A36 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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COMMUNITY

CANADA BENEFIT GROUP Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-511-2250 or www.canadabenefit.ca/ free-assessment

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12+<1 %5F?:C7F?5G (0I, &4 F?$G? *5"G6$GI 1-?E> 9H1D, '4" ;5F!GC.?C47A E$G35F?> .=$7?> .G675> 055; $7; F.$!5 .=$7?F, %4G@C7) 46?;44GF # ;4C7) F4:5 E5$3I =C/?C7), %$)5 81H,2-BEG, '"23%(43"/(' .#8-$*!6*10,.#1&)+7-5

Now Hiring FLAG PERSONS & LANE CLOSURE TECHS .

• Must have reliable vehicle • Must be certified • Union Wages from $18.44 per hr & Benefits

.

VALLEY TRAFFIC SYSTEMS Apply in person 9770-199A St, Langley Fax or Email resume: 604-513-3661 jobapplication@valleytraffic.ca

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SANDMAN INNS Rural BC recruiting management couples, both full-time and parttime roles available. Ask us about our great employee perks and accommodation. Send resumes to jobs@sandman.ca FARM LABOURERS req’d for seasonal work. Duties: Sorting and packaging of fruit, some heavy lifting req’d. Preference for those with previous exp. in a farm setting. Min. 40hr/wk,

$10.85/hr. Fax 604-244-0588

or Email to canwestfarms@yahoo.ca

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SEMINARS / EDUCATION

If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the: Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711 Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email: inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

3/, 4,0%,#$ #' "**'%.-(1 !,#-%,),(# 2'%+$/'& "4(5,%3) -,$ ', 1&21422 #,&) )3'4)303.' +27.* !37). 76,&' '-3 )3'4)303.' +27..4./ +),53((* *(55 +< #13(75$ 6>;16!81-82" &755?=,0'7/.#:4+<:9<+0)=%+3

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RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY,NOVEMBER 30, 2016

Christmas Corner SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH corner of No. 3 Rd & Steveston Hwy

CHRISTMAS FAIR

Sat. Dec 3rd. 9 - 12:30 Home Baking, Quilting, Poinsettias, Crafts, Pickles & Jams, Silent Auction, Junque Muffins & coffee served

! $).$# *)"&'% , !

+%.&!-)" (+&$

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR

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Sat. Dec. 3rd 10am - 4pm

,B3: (;))72"-$+ '2-?7! %$@4 0:1/>5:/,83> # *<)4 93

Kensington Community Centre

)&3 %"6-0' ! 6**%1' *, ,$+4 ,"6$-*$' ,/+2' ,*( #*$ ! #*$( 05-05%/5 "6*20.

(2;$.-$@ (A+.A2$+ (7@.27

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5175 Dumfries St. Vancouver (Near 37th & Knight St) 604-718-6201

St. Anne’s Anglican Church Christmas Bake Sale

Cookies, Bars, Bread, Pies And much more!

FOR SALE - MISC SAWMILLS from only $4,397 Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT

FOR SALE - MISC HARDY TREE, Shrub and berry seedlings delivered. Order online at www.treetime.ca or call 1-866-8733846. New growth guaranteed. STEEL BUILDING Sale... “Really Big Sale-Extra Winter Discount on Now!” 20X19$5,145 25X27 $5,997 28X27 $6,773 30X31 $8,110 35X33 $11,376 40X43 $13,978. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 www.pioneersteel.ca

CLEANING EUROPEAN DETAILED Service Cleaning www.puma-cleaning.ca Sophia 604-805-3376

DRAINAGE DRAIN Tiles, Sewer, Water,

Video Inspection, Jack Hammering, Hand Excavating, Concrete Cutting, Rootering, WET BSMT MADE DRY

604.782.4322

!; *9'(%5 *&'*$7 !*/, ' 13#(&$//) -3. + -*. #'($$'$%&'!)"( "**0# 3%2

GET BACK ON TRACK Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We lend! If you own your own home you qualify! Pioneer AcceptanceCorp. BBB mem. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com 604-987-1420

MORTGAGES OWNER WANTS $70,000 on first mortgage on 3 million dollar Richmond property. Please email: samb7377@gmail.com or call 604-278-4001

AUTOMOTIVE

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

I:; J=K?LL;K J=K?L =?K F IKH=9 K;NMG?8

*+$' (#! +%% ")'&*%)$

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DELTA SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL

Call 604-649-1627 www.deltascrap.ca

HOME SERVICES

APPLIANCE REPAIRS

TJ’s

REFRIGERATION & Appliance Services 25+ yrs experience Government Certified

Pomeranianæ-Pekinese1/4 6 fem/1 m. Black/orange/white Dewormed. Raised in family envir. $700. 604-464-9485

Paver stones, Hedges driveways/patios, ponds & walls, returfing, demos, yard/perimeter drainage, jack hammering. Old pools filled in, concrete cutting.

604.782.4322

@

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(604) 946-3038

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@

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MOVING #661/8#".7 51-034 GGGE5??,CD5-4B1,HBCA-+E+,1 )0"!

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SUDOKU

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call. Lic#89402. Fast same day service. Insured. Guar’d. We love small jobs. 604-568-1899

EXCAVATING

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#1 Backhoes & Excavators Trenchless Waterlines Bobcats & Dump Truck & All Material Deliveries

Drainage, Video Inspection, Landscaping, Stump/Rock/Cement/Oil Tank & Demos, Paving, Pool/Dirt Removal, Paver Stones, Jackhammer, Water/Sewer, Line/Sumps, Slinger Avail, Concrete Cutting, Hand Excavating, Basements Made Dry Claudio’s Backhoe Service

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

604-341-4446

FLOORING

"!%&$!#' (0;7817+!79 #+9 &+62879: *-- 61.7 /)"65 %-7#67 !#-- 3)8 '$(( 7641,#47: (#53&#53#)5# 1$0-6/1*'+%6'2/1*!4,"2.-6/,

GUTTERS GUTTER CLEANING ROOF CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING POWER WASHING 30 yrs experience WCB/Liability insured

Simon 604-230-0627

HANDYPERSON

ACROSS

Serving the Delta area since 1986

ALL SMALL BREED PUPS Local, Non-Shedding and Vet Checked. 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com

Greenworx Redevelopment Inc.

$$ LOW RATES $$ Lic’d. We LOVE small jobs! Fast. Efficient. Bonded. 24/7 30 yrs exp. 604-617-1774

+0=> #83:2 1 "84)

CASH FOR ALL!

PETS

LANDSCAPING

ELECTRICAL

Promote your Craft Fairs, Christmas Events and Services

We are offering a 25% discount on Christmas Corner ads Until December 21st

HOME SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

GET BACK ON TRACK Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We lend! If you own your own home you qualify! Pioneer AcceptanceCorp. BBB mem. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com 604-987-1420

MARKETPLACE

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ANTIQUES

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Handcrafted Items! Added room, more vendors! FREE Admission & Parking!

Saturday, December 3 10:00 am -2:00 pm 4071 Francis Rd. Richmond Delicious homemade holiday treats

BUSINESS SERVICES

A37

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DOWN

1. Civil Rights group 2. Early Slavic society 3. Mammals that lack incisors and canines 4. Blasphemy 5. Israeli city 6. Put this in your hair 7. Black tropical American cuckoo 8. Month in the Islamic calendar 9. Begets 10. Court game 11. Painkiller 12. New Zealand parrot

30. Withered 31. “Gymnopedies” composer 33. Plate glasses 37. Muscial artist __ DeBarge 38. Before 39. Arrange in steps of size 41. Electron cloud model 42. Morning 43. Leonard __, famed Swiss mathematician 44. Capital city of Buenos Aires province 46. Snouts 49. Of I 50. Swiss river

51. Perplexes 55. Made angry 58. Precious stone 59. Type of envelope 60. One who believes in reason and knowledge 64. Monitors brain activity (abbr.) 65. Get _ ___ of 66. Actress Zellweger 67. Spinal muscular atrophy (abbr.) 68. “Inferno” author 69. Puts together in time 70. Silvery-white metal

dcg bafih 19. Egg cells 21. Another name for Thor 24. About pontiff 25. The academic world 26. Raise 27. Civil rights city in Alabama 31. Encompasses 32. Helmet 34. Nostrils 35. Lovable Spielberg alien 36. Divides 40. Ruthenium 41. Preceding all others in time

45. Past participle of lie 47. Fastener 48. Overindulged 52. Ancient lyric poem 53. Ardent supporter 54. Iranian village and Islamic pilgrim attire 56. A fragrant resin obtained from tropical trees 57. Semitic fertility god 59. Millisecond 60. Cool! 61. “Take on Me” singers 62. ESPN sportscaster Bob 63. Accommodating place


A38 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

HOME SERVICES

CALL THE EXPERTS RUBBISH REMOVAL

RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT

MOVING 1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING Across the street, across the world Real Professionals. Reas. Rates. Best in every way! 604-721-4555

Complete Reno’s Roof to basement, Kitchen, Framing, Plumbing etc. 15 yrs exp, Insured ~No Job too Small~ Gary 604-897-3614

ABE MOVING & Delivery & Rubbish Removal $30/HR per Person• 24/7. 604-999-6020

PAINTING/ WALLPAPER

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PATIOS

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*"+)/ '.!& "(#$-+%,!"#

1 %=;; "+E:A/+ $=5> #+82:9; 6 ';+95C?0 9B *))2E-93;+ #9B+D 1 (22>+- *002A5B8+5BD 1 "98+C&97 "+E:A/+ 1 @4 <9E- (A5 !E=/> 1 #+DA-+5BA9; 6 '288+E/A9; $# ("03 !1) 02),"+. +#"$#%&! "# "$%% . *',) (--+

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Bath, Kitchen, Basement & More Grade A+, Licensed & Insured RenoRite.com, 604-365-7271

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classifieds.richmond-news.com • classifieds.richmond-news.com

• Edging

604-908-3596

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes will be made in the next available issue. The Richmond News will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

Family-Oriented Fellowship, Everyone Welcome Sunday Service 1:30-3:30 pm, Fellowship Follows.

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DIRECTORY

(J.D. MURDOCH HALL)

8151 Bennett Road, Richmond • (604) 277-9157 Pastor Ed Arquines • Cell (604) 644-9364

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ADVERTISING POLICIES

APOSTOLIC PENTECOSTAL CHURCH In Tagalog & English

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH 8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.ca Rev. Maggie Watts-Hammond, Min. of Word, Sacrament & Pastoral Care Rev. Yoko Kihara – Min. of Christian Development & Outreach Worship and Children’s Program Sundays 10:30 am

St. Alban

Trimming / Pruning

• Aeration / Power Raking • Pressure Washing

JACK’S RUBBISH REMOVAL Household Junk Specialist! Fast, Friendly & cheap. Call 604-266-4444

CHURCH

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 10:00 School am Services at 8:30 and 10:00 amand • Sunday 10:00 am Rev. John Firmston Sunday School 10:00 am 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

Fertilizing Programs • Hedge

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RUBBISH REMOVAL

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FRASERVIEW RENO’S

CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH

www.cccc-richmondbc.com COME AND JOIN US IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION!

Worship Service.....12:20 p.m. Sunday School.....2:00 p.m. 8151 Bennett Road, Richmond • 604-271-6491

LIVING TRUTH BAPTIST CHURCH 3720 Broadway Street, Richmond BC We are a multicultural Christian Faith Community Join us in our Worship Service.....2:00 p.m. Sunday School and Fellowship Follows Pastor: Joe De Guzman.....778-997-5673

ST. ANNE’S ANGLICAN CHURCH- STEVESTON

Our multicultural community welcomes you to worship 4071 Francis Road, Richmond BC Sunday 8:30 am Eucharist, 10:00 am Family Eucharist with Church School Wednesday 10:00 am Eucharist with Bible Study at 11:00 am The Reverend Brian Vickers, Rector www.stannessteveston.ca • 604-277-9626

STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH

3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.) Please join10am us at Worship 10am Sunday, 2015School Please join us for ServiceJuly and19, Sunday with Service Rev. Brenda Miller School for Worship and Sunday 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

Broadmoor Baptist Church A safe place to connect with God and fellow travellers on your spiritual journey 8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC

Fujian Evangelical Church welcomes you to Sunday Worship Services • English Services: 9:00 & 10:45 a.m. • Mandarin Service: 9:00 a.m. • Minnanese Service: 10:45 a.m. 12200 Blundell Road, Richmond, B.C., V6W 1B3 Phone 604-273-2757 • www.fujianevangelical.org

Dec 2nd at 7:00pm: Christmas Tales Coffeehouse This is a FREE community event. All are welcome. Come hear the Christmas Story like you’ve never heard before! Dec 18th at 8:00pm Longest Night Service For those living with loss, loneliness, pain and grief, there is a place for you. Singing, prayer, and the lighting of candles are optional. Dec 24th at 6:30pm Christmas Eve Service Come and celebrate the gift of our Saviour, Jesus Christ. Dec 25th at 10:30am Christmas Day Service Come and celebrate the gift of our Saviour, Jesus Christ Please plan to come early on Christmas Eve as parking and seating are limited. Pastor AI Grochowski - Senior Pastor Phone: 604-277-8012 Website: www.bbchurch.ca Sunday Morning Worship Service at 10:30am Sonshine Discoveryland for kids up to Grade 6.

Richmond United Church 8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622 Come for 10am Sunday Worship and Children’s Sunday School and after-service coffee and fellowship.

Rev. Dr. Warren McKinnon Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church

To advertise in the Church Directory, please call 604-249-3335.


RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

SANTA CLAUS

PARADE SUNDAY DECEMBER 4 NEW TIME FOR 2016 12:00PM NOON

Burrard Station

Start

Granville Station

Georgia Howe

Alberni

Robson

8:00AM-10:00AM BREAKFAST WITH SANTA

Vancouver City Centre Station

at Fairmont Hotel Vancouver, 900 W Georgia St, Vancouver

Christmas Square

Haro

Finish

Reservations 604.647.0517 Smithe

10:00AM-12:00PM COAST CAPITAL SAVINGS CHRISTMAS SQUARE

Barclay

Granville

Hornby

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Bute

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at 800 Block Robson (Howe & Hornby), Vancouver

Family entertainment, gingerbread decorating, face painting and so much more

12:00PM ROGERS SANTA CLAUS PARADE Starts at Georgia and Broughton Ends at Howe and Smithe Downtown Vancouver

A39


A40 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

RICHMOND-NEWS.COM

WEEKLY SPECIAL Nov 30 – Dec 4, 2016 Grande Harvest Jasmine Rice 15lbs

Fresh Pork Side Ribs (2Pcs Up)

Frozen Headed White Shrimps

新鮮靚西排 (二塊以上)

冰鮮有頭白蝦

Baby Pak Choy Miu 白菜苗

大豐收茉莉香米

7 ea

99

Honey Citron Tea 1kg 韓國蜂蜜柚子茶

5 ea 99

2

1 ea

99

Fresh Digital Muscles 新鮮金錢腱

5

88

lb

99

lb

Hey Song Sarsaparilla 330ml

1 ea

2 FOR

黑松沙士

黃油曲奇餅干

29

¢

99

1 ea

新鮮有骨豬上肉

2

3 lb

海威鳥頭魚

Fresh Carrots 新鮮紅蘿蔔

福字米粉

¢

99ea

新鮮有骨五花腩

3

99

AA-1 Galunggong 450g

AA-1 鯖魚

好牌冷凍木薯粉

2 FOR

1

2 ea 49

99

Searay China Yellow Croaker

lb

Fresh Chinese Yam 新鮮淮山

海威中國黃花魚

黃金香蕉

3

2 ea

Buenas Grated Cassava 454g

lb

2 FOR

Golden Me Bihon 454g

19

49

Searay Grey Mullet

1 lb

日昇炸豆腐

09

Fresh Pork Picnic (Bone in)

99

Sunrise Fried Tofu 300g Fresh Pork Belly (Bone-in)

日昇鮮板豆腐

Golden Saba Bananas 454g

99

lb

Royal Castle Butter Cookies 125g

Chuang’s Soft Flour CakeSunrise Premium Assorted Flavours 230g Medium Firm Tofu 350g 莊家沙琪瑪 – 各口味

6

99

39

3 lb

1 lb 69

99

Blue Jay Sweet Orange (88’s)

Sugar Mandarins

Mini Cucumbers

¢

¢

1 lb

中國砂糖桔

日本青瓜

小藍鳥橙

¢

69 lb

79 lb

99 lb

OPEN DAILY 8:30AM - 7:30PM 8108 PARK ROAD • TEL. 604.278.8309 WHILE QUANTITIES LAST

49

Richmond News November 30 2016  
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